News

ASWM has been a valuable source for wetland-related news for over 10 years. It publishes the monthly "Wetland Breaking News," which is widely read as a national publication. News items are also posted under major topic categories, for example, climate change, Gulf oil spill, state wetland program news and job postings. These can be found in the drop-down menu below "News," or select a news topic from the list below, then select a news article to read. In Wetland Breaking Newsaddition to publishing WBN, the Association also offers original content with announcements, legal analysis, quirky wetland stories and more on its weekly blog, The Compleat Wetlander.

By Tristan Scott  – Flathead Beacon  – November 17, 2014

With renewed plans to expand coal-mining operations in southeastern British Columbia’s Elk River drainage, located upstream from one of Montana’s world-class transboundary watersheds, researchers and government agencies are intensifying scrutiny on environmental hazards spanning the border. The concerns center on increasing amounts of coal waste byproducts leaching into the heavily mined Elk River and its many tributaries, which drain into two bodies of water shared by B.C. and Montana – Lake Koocanusa and the Kootenai River – both of which are showing increased levels of mining contaminants like selenium in the muscle tissue of fish species. For full story, click here.

By Ashley Parker – The New York – Times November 18, 2014

Senate Democrats, by a single vote, stopped legislation that would have approved construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, one of the most fractious and expensive battles of the Obama presidency. The vote represented a victory for the environmental movement, but the fight had taken on larger dimensions as a proxy war between Republicans, who argued that the project was vital for job creation, and President Obama, who had delayed a decision on building it. For full story, click here.

By Marty Schladen – Alamogordo News – November 15, 2014

People who live in the Rio Grande Basin will have to take dramatic steps if they hope to have a future that involves more than just dust. Experts say population in the region has swelled during unusually wet years, leading to growth and creating habits that tree rings and other scientific data indicate we shouldn't expect in the future. Stream flows measured at the Otowi Gauge on the Upper Rio Grande were well above historical norms between 1980 and 2000, when El Paso's and Albuquerque's populations grew 42 percent and 38 percent, respectively. Add climate change — which an overwhelming majority of those who study it say is happening — and you have a future that might not be very promising for cities such as El Paso, Juárez, Las Cruces and Albuquerque. For full story, click here.


ASWM is keeping an eye on the development of the 2012 Farm Bill. On this page you can find updates on the Farm Bill as well as agricultural news in the context of wetlands and related issues. For Farm Bill 2012 resources on the web, click here.


Read news from each state by clicking on the states in the map above or the list of states below.

In addition to the job postings below, ASWM has compiled a list of links to water resources and/or wetland-related job postings.  Click here.  To submit a wetland-related job announcement to the ASWM site, send the job title, a brief description, a link to the full description, closing date, relevant contact info and website to sharon@aswm.org