Allan Savory – Revitalization News – August 1, 2015

Regenerating the health and productivity of our soils is critical for ensuring the Earth’s climate remains conducive to not only human life but other species as well. Moreover, we need to take direct action so that we have enough water and food to sustain a growing population of people. Livestock, properly managed, have a critical role to play in achieving these goals. For full article, click here.

By Rina Marie Doctor – Tech Times – July 30, 2015

A new study found that Washington D.C. may drop by approximately six or more inches in the next 100 years as researchers discovered that the land under the Chesapeake Bay is sinking slowly. The falling of this land may contribute significantly to the problems of sea level rise and all the more increase the possibility of flooding, which is a growing problem of the country due to global warming and subsequent ice melting. Adding all these circumstances may hasten the hazards faced by infrastructures, roads, wildlife refugees, monuments and military installations. For full story, click here. July 28, 2015

Changing storm dynamics are causing a greater risk of flooding than they were 50 years ago, particularly on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts, putting nearly 40 percent of the US population in harm’s way, according to a new study from a Florida university. In the study, Florida researchers used records of rainfall, sea levels and hurricanes for more than 30 American cities along the Atlantic, Gulf and Pacific coasts to assess the relationship between heavy rainfall on land and abnormal rises in water levels occurring during a storm or storm surge. For full story, click here.

By Jordan Fabian – The Hill – August 3, 2015 – Video

President Obama on Monday rolled out a historic rule that imposes the first-ever federal limits on greenhouse gas pollution from power plants. An emotional Obama argued climate change already affects the “reality we’re living with every day,” adding that it would be “shameful” if the U.S. waited any longer to address its causes. “We only get one home. We only get one planet. There is no plan B,” he said at the White House. “I don’t want my grandkids to not be able to swim in Hawaii, or not to be able to climb a mountain and see a glacier, because we didn’t do something about it.” The rule is the cornerstone of Obama’s climate agenda, and administration officials have called it a crucial step to build momentum toward an international climate agreement in Paris this December. For full story and to view video, click here.



By Katherine Bagley – nside Climate News – July 15, 2015

The Texas flooding in May that pulled houses off foundations and swamped city streets provided a glimpse of what scientists have long warned could be its new norm because of global warming. But it did nothing to sway the state's politicians, who have done next to nothing to adjust to a climate that is already bringing more damaging extreme weather. For full story, click here.

By Joby Warrick – The Washington Post  – July 23, 2015

Even after years of talk about a “war on coal,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell startled some of his constituents in March when he urged open rebellion against a White House proposal for cutting pollution from coal-fired power plants. The Obama administration’s Clean Power Plan is “extremely burdensome and costly,” the Kentucky Republican said in letters advising all 50 states to boycott the rule when it goes into effect this summer. For full story, click here.

By Jessica Dinapoli – Reuters – July 15, 2015

The U.S. Department of Agriculture named several Puerto Rico municipalities natural disaster areas on Wednesday, giving them access to emergency loans to make up for losses of crops and livestock as a result of the recent drought. The drought is another blow to Puerto Rico as it struggles to restructure $72 billion in debt. The USDA declared municipalities located southeast of the capital, San Juan, as disaster area. It also named other areas, including some of the island's suburbs, as disaster areas. For full story, click here.

ScienceDaily – July 14, 2015

If it seems like you're pulling more bass than trout out of Ontario's lakes this summer, you probably are. Blame it on the ripple effect of climate change and warming temperatures. Birds migrate earlier, flowers bloom faster, and fish move to newly warmed waters putting local species at risk. To mitigate the trend and support conservation efforts, scientists at the University of Toronto (U of T) are sharing a way to predict which plants or animals may be vulnerable to the arrival of a new species. For full story, click here.

NOAA – July 16, 2015

In 2014, the most essential indicators of Earth’s changing climate continued to reflect trends of a warming planet, with several  markers such as rising land and ocean temperature, sea levels and greenhouse gases ─ setting new records.  These key findings and others can be found in the State of the Climate in 2014 report released online today by the American Meteorological Society (AMS). For full story, click here.