Wetland Breaking News: July 2015

                   
   
IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES &
PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

 

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Wetland Breaking New: July 2015

All photos by
Jeanne Christie, ASWM

     

EDITOR'S NOTE

Integration

“Integration” seems to be the word du jour - and for good reason. As we collect news stories every month for Wetland Breaking News and as we participate in discussions among ourselves and with other organizations, I am constantly reminded of how complex our relationship with water is. Trying to select new stories that deal with wetlands requires looking outside of wetland management at all the other ways in which the earth moves water as well as the many ways in which humans use and rely on water. Water interconnects every system in nature in both direct and indirect ways. And we have developed many different programs and agencies to manage all of these activities. But are we working together as a team?

I spent last Sunday with my family at the Tall Ships event in Portland, Maine. El Galeon, the Spanish Armada ship was by far the coolest one of them all. It is a replica of a 16th-17th century galleon and was set-up as a museum of sorts, with information everywhere about how the sailors operated the massive ship and what all the old instrumentation, knobs and pullies do. The sheer magnitude of the amount of teamwork that was involved in operating a ship of that size is impressive. Pulling up two 2,200 pound anchors alone must have been a feat, not to mention operating a ship with more than 150 occupants including seamen, soldiers, traders, servants, families and other passengers. I can guarantee not all of them shared professional, academic, political or personal interests, but when it came to getting across the ocean, they learned to get along, share their talents and make it work. In other words, they “integrated” their efforts to make for a successful journey.

This is not unlike where we are today in our efforts to integrate programs to better manage our natural resources. As you’ll see from our headlines, we are facing many challenges – everything from political fights over the Clean Water Rule to lawsuits between cities and farmers, climate change impacts, and declining fresh water reserves, to name a few. But there are also many examples of integration and collaboration to address these challenges, such as the Local Foods, Local Places Program which is supported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC), the Delta Regional Authority (DRA), and the White House Rural Council to help communities create walkable, healthy, economically vibrant neighborhoods through the development of local food systems. Stories about the “dead zone” in the Chesapeake Bay show us how our current large-scale agricultural practices are negatively impacting wetlands so local food systems may offer solutions, but it will take collaboration and program integration to reach our goals.

Efforts like this prove that we can find ways to better leverage our diverse areas of expertise through discovering efficiencies from program integration and collaboration to successfully sail the mighty seas of wetlands management.

Best regards,

Marla J. Stelk, Editor
Wetland Breaking News

 

     
                   

Wetland Breaking News - July 2015

EDITOR'S CHOICE

GOP subpoenas Obama regulatory officials on water rule

By Timothy Cama – The Hill – July 14, 2015
House Republicans moved Tuesday to force the Obama administration to disclose certain documents related to the development of the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) major water jurisdiction rule. The House Oversight Committee sent a subpoena on the rule to the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA), which is responsible for reviewing all major federal regulations before they are issued. Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) alleged in his subpoena that OIRA and its chief, Howard Shelanski, are illegally withholding from Congress documents that lawmakers have requested since a March hearing. For full story, click here.

Business groups sue over Obama water rule

By Devin Henry – The Hill – July 13, 2015
The Obama administration continues to be flooded with lawsuits over its new water regulations.
The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, National Federation of Independent Businesses (NFIB) and other groups announced a lawsuit Monday against the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) "Waters of the United States" rule. They are the latest industry groups challenging the rule, which looks to define which water bodies the government has the ability to regulate. In a statement announcing their lawsuit, NFIB contended that the rule covers water bodies that go beyond what the EPA is legally allowed to regulate under the Clean Water Act. For full story, click here.

Local Foods, Local Places Technical Assistance

EPA – July 8, 2015
Local Foods, Local Places helps communities create walkable, healthy, economically vibrant neighborhoods through the development of local food systems. The program is supported by EPA, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC), the Delta Regional Authority (DRA), and the White House Rural Council. Communities are invited to apply for technical assistance through a new round of Local Foods, Local Places. For more information, click here. Application deadline is September 15, 2015.

Court upholds EPA in putting Chesapeake Bay on 'pollution diet'

By Timothy B. Wheerler – The Baltimore Sun – July 6, 2015
A federal appeals court upheld Monday the Environmental Protection Agency's authority to order pollution reductions by Maryland and all the other states that drain into the Chesapeake Bay. In a 60-page ruling, the U.S. 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals in Philadelphia brushed aside challenges from agricultural and home building groups to the "pollution diet" that EPA imposed for the bay in 2010. For full blog post, click here.

Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Settlement Reached

By Kevin McGill and Rebecca Santana – U.S. News – July 2, 2015
BP and five Gulf states announced a record $18.7 billion settlement Thursday that resolves years of legal fighting over the environmental and economic damage done by the energy giant's oil spill in 2010. The settlement will likely mark the end of major litigation against BP, following the biggest offshore oil spill in U.S. history. When the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded in April 2010, it killed 11 people and spread miles of black oil across the Gulf Coast before the underwater well was capped a few months later. For full story, click here.

States sue to block Obama's water rule

By Timothy Cama – The Hill – June 29, 2015
Eighteen states sued the Obama administration Monday to stop a new regulation asserting federal authority over minor waterways like streams and wetlands. The rule from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is one of the most controversial regulations from the Obama administration, redefining how the EPA enforces the water pollution protections of the Clean Water Act. The states got together in three separate groups to file lawsuits in different federal courts, based in Bismarck, N.D.; Columbus, Ohio; and Houston. For full story, click here.

Climate change turning sacred land against Navajo

By Henry Gass – The Christian Science Monitor – June 19, 2015
The land of the Navajo Nation is sacred to its people, bordered by four mountains that are central to the tribe’s identity and beliefs. But this land has been turning increasingly hostile as the regional climate has changed. While California has been in a much-publicized state of drought for more than four years, Navajo Nation has been enduring drought conditions since 1996. For full story, click here.

FWS Provides $5.7 Million in Grants to Help Conserve Monarch Butterflies and Other At-Risk Species in 11 States

Contact: Christina Meister – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – June 1, 2015
The monarch butterfly, Topeka shiner and gopher tortoise are among the imperiled species that will benefit from $5.7 million in grants to 11 states through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Competitive State Wildlife Grants program. The grants focus on large-scale conservation projects to conserve and recover species of greatest conservation need and their habitats. They will be matched by more than $2.9 million in non-federal funds from states and their partners. In addition to offering funds to these 11 states, the Service is also awarding two grants totaling $605,771 to the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, to be distributed to several western states and their partners for cooperative conservation projects. For full news release, click here.

Farmers and Cities Play the Water Pollution Blame Game

By Daniel C. Vock – Governing.com – June 2015
The source of the drinking water that’s processed by the city’s utility, which serves half a million people, routinely has dangerous levels of nitrate, a colorless, odorless and tasteless form of nitrogen. In extreme cases, nitrate-rich water can be fatally toxic for babies, depriving them of oxygen. So for the past several years, Des Moines has been spending hundreds of thousands of dollars annually to filter nitrate from the Raccoon River, where it gets its drinking water. The situation has grown so dire that the utility says it will soon need to build a new facility to comply with federal pollution laws, at a cost of somewhere between $76 million and $184 million. For full story, click here.

ASWM Members’ Wetland Webinar: Using Beaver as a Wetland Restoration Tool – July 29, 2015

ASWM’s Members’ Wetland Webinar: Using Beaver as a Wetland Restoration Tool: Restoration Lessons Learned and an Introduction to the Beaver Restoration Assessment Tool (BRAT) will be held on Wednesday, July 29, 2015 at 3:00 p.m. Eastern. Presented by Joe Wheaton, Associate Professor and Ecogeomorphology & Topographic Analysis Lab Director at Utah State University. This webinar will be open to both members and nonmembers. For more information, click here. To register, click here.

ASWM’s Wetland Restoration Webinar: Stream/Wet Meadow Restoration – September 8, 2015

Wetland Restoration Webinar: Stream/Wet Meadow Restoration will be held on September 8, 2015 at 3:00 p.m. Eastern. Presenter: Will Harmon, Stream Mechanics, Inc. For more information, click here.

Wetland Mapping Consortium (WMC): Part 2- “The Florida Wetlands Integrity Dataset: Analysis of nonrenewable energy data and construction of graph-theoretic networks to quantify landscape integrity” – September 16, 2015

Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Part 2 - “The Florida Wetlands Integrity Dataset: Analysis of nonrenewable energy data and construction of graph-theoretic networks to quantify landscape integrity” will be held on Wednesday, September 16, 2015 from 3:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. EDT. Presented by John Humphreys and Amir Mahjoor, Florida Department of Environmental Protection. For more information and to register, click here.

 

Wetland Breaking News - July 2015

NATIONAL NEWS

Wildfires in Canada And Alaska Drive Thousands From Homes

By Nathan Rott – npr – July 11, 2015
"Extreme." "Unprecedented." "Historic." Those are just a few of the words being used to describe the start of this year's fire season in North America. The wildfires are centered in the northwest of the continent, but their consequences are far-reaching. Thick smoke has blanketed parts of Wisconsin and North Dakota. It's triggered air alerts in Minnesota and Montana and muddied skies as far south as Tennessee and Colorado. For full story, click here.

House Pulls Interior Appropriations Bill

Ocean Leadership: Ocean Policy & Legislation – July 10, 2015
The House of Representatives pulled the Interior-EPA FY16 funding bill over a controversial amendment that would have stripped a provision barring the Confederate flag from being displayed in cemeteries and sold in stores operated by the National Park Service. The bill, H.R. 2822, provides approximately $30.17 billion in discretionary budget authority for FY 2016, which is $246 million (0.8%) below FY 2015 levels and $2.038 billion below the President’s request. The bill provides $7.4 billion in funding for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), a cut of $750 million below the FY 2015 enacted level and $1.2 billion below the President’s request. For full story, click here.

Seabird population down 70 per cent around the world, say UBC researchers

By Tiffany Crawford – The Vancouver Sun – July 9, 2015
Researchers at the University of B.C. say the world’s monitored seabird populations have dropped 70 per cent since the 1950s. Michelle Paleczny, a UBC master’s student and researcher with the Sea Around Us project, says the drop indicates that marine ecosystems are not doing well. Paleczny and co-authors of the study, published in PLOS ONE, a journal published by the Public Library of Science, compiled information on more than 500 seabird populations from around the world, representing 19 per cent of the global seabird population. They found overall populations had declined by 69.6 per cent, equivalent to a loss of about 230 million birds in 60 years, according to a UBC news release. For full story, click here.

NOAA, partners predict severe harmful algal bloom for Lake Erie

NOAA – July 9, 2015
NOAA and its research partners, using an ensemble modeling approach, predict that the 2015 western Lake Erie harmful algal bloom season will be among the most severe in recent years and could become the second most severe behind the record-setting 2011 bloom. The effects of the cyanobacterial blooms include a higher cost for cities and local governments to treat their drinking water, as well as risk to swimmers in high concentration areas, and a nuisance to boaters when blooms form. These effects will vary in locations and severity with winds, and will peak in September. For full story, click here.

BP could get billions in tax breaks on oil spill settlement

By Jennifer Larino – NOLA.com - The Times-Picayume – July 8, 2015
Last Thursday (July 2), states attorneys general in Louisiana and four other Gulf Coast states celebrated an $18.7 billion settlement with BP over claims from the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill. A report from the U.S. Public Interest Research Group says the true value of the deal could be far lower after BP files its taxes. Federal tax law prevents companies from deducting penalties paid for breaking the law from their corporate taxes. But damage payments -- such as money paid for coastal restoration -- can be treated as a business expense. For full story, click here.

EPA and Navajo Nation EPA Enter Historic Agreements to Halt Water Pollution

Contact: Soledad Calvino – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – July 7, 2015
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Navajo Nation EPA announced a pair of settlements with the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority to bring its wastewater treatment facility in Window Rock into compliance both with the Federal Clean Water Act and the Navajo Nation Clean Water Act. For full story, click here.

Why Budget Forecasts Should Include the Next Big Disaster

By Charles Rath – Government Executive – July 7, 2015
The White House made a bold move last week to minimize the economic burden of climate change. Specifically, the Office of Management and Budget is asking federal agencies via the revised Circular A-11 to “consider climate preparedness and resiliency objectives as part of their FY17 budget requests for construction and maintenance of federal facilities.” This new guidance represents a fiscally astute move on behalf of the administration. Regardless of your beliefs on climate change, the frequency and magnitude of disasters is increasing both nationally and globally. The glaciers are melting, the seas are rising and chronic drought is becoming a way of life for many parts of the country. For full story, click here.

The Great Plains' looming water crisis

By Alan Bjerga – Bloomberg.com – July 2, 2015
Farming in the northeast corner of Colorado used to be simple: plant corn and watch it grow, irrigated by the massive Ogallala aquifer. Today the sprinklers at Marvin Pletcher’s farm in Yuma County, about 120 miles from Denver, put out half as much water as a decade ago, and he keeps them low to the ground to prevent evaporation. Half of Pletcher’s 1,300 acres are planted with wheat, sorghum, sunflowers, and pinto beans—crops that are less thirsty than corn, but also less profitable. “I have four wells in operation. In 10 years I’ll be lucky if I have one,” says the fourth-generation farmer. “We’re all drinking from the same bowl of water here, and when it’s gone, it’s gone.” For full story, click here.

Below-average 'dead zone' predicted for Chesapeake Bay in 2015

PHYS.org – June 23, 2015 – Video
A University of Michigan researcher and his colleagues are forecasting a slightly below-average but still significant "dead zone" this summer in the Chesapeake Bay, the nation's largest estuary. The 2015 Chesapeake Bay forecast calls for an oxygen-depleted, or hypoxic, region of 1.37 cubic miles, about 10 percent below the long-term average. The forecast was released today by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which sponsors the work. Farmland runoff containing fertilizers and livestock waste is the main source of the nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients that cause the annual Chesapeake Bay hypoxic region, which is also known as a dead zone. For full story and to view video, click here.

USDA Seeks Partner Proposals to Protect and Restore Critical Wetlands

Contact: Sylvia Rainford – USDA – June 22, 2015
Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced the availability of $17.5 million in financial and technical assistance to help eligible conservation partners voluntarily protect, restore and enhance critical wetlands on private and tribal agricultural lands. "USDA has leveraged partnerships to accomplish a great deal on America's wetlands over the past two decades, Vilsack said. "This year's funding will help strengthen these partnerships and achieve greater wetland acreage throughout the nation." For full news release, click here.

Fracking and water: Quantity, not just quality, a concern

By Kathiann M. Kowalski – Midwest Energy News – June 17, 2015
Even in a water-rich state like Ohio, growing water use for fracking could strain water reserves, according to new research from the FracTracker Alliance, a non-profit organization that compiles data, maps and analyses about the impacts of the oil and gas industry. For full story, click here.

EPA National Water Program Releases 2015 Workplan

EPA – June 2015
EPA's National Water Program 2012 Strategy: Response to Climate Change sets out long-term goals and specific actions that are EPA's contributions to national efforts to prepare for, and build resilience to, the impacts of a changing climate on water resources. The 2012 Strategy is organized around five long-term programmatic vision areas: protecting water infrastructure; coastal and ocean waters; watersheds; and, water quality. The EPA National Water Program looks forward to working with state, tribal, and local governments, as well as other partners to implement actions that address climate change challenges in these areas. For more information, click here. For the 2015 Workplan, click here.

 

Wetland Breaking News - July 2015STATE NEWS

AK: Extremely high coastal erosion in northern Alaska

Environmental News Network – July 2, 2015
In a new study published today, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey found that the remote northern Alaska coast has some of the highest shoreline erosion rates in the world. Analyzing over half a century of shoreline change data, scientists found the pattern is extremely variable with most of the coast retreating at rates of more than 1 meter a year. For full story, click here.

CA: Most of California's fracking waste left in unlined pits, study finds

By David R. Baker – SF Gate – July 9, 2015
More than half of the wastewater from fracked oil wells in California is disposed of in open, unlined pits and could contaminate groundwater, according to a state-mandated study of hydraulic fracturing issued Thursday. The California Council on Science and Technology study presents a cautious assessment of fracking in the state. And it’s not likely to defuse the political fight over fracking, with both the oil industry and its opponents on Thursday claiming vindication in its findings. For full story, click here.

CA: Debate about using glyphosate to control plants in Marin heats up

By Peter Seidman – Pacific Sun – June 24, 2015
A recent report from an international health organization has bolstered the argument that a commonly used herbicide should be dropped from use on Marin public lands, say opponents of relying on chemicals to control non-native vegetation. The debate about whether the county and the county’s largest water district should use the herbicide glyphosate to control plants that easily overrun native vegetation in parks and open space has lasted for decades. For full story, click here.

CA: Key Corte Madera marshland acquisition all but assured

By Nels Johnson – Marinij.com – June 10, 2015
Funding that all but assures the acquisition of a key 5-acre bayland parcel flanked by public marshland along the Corte Madera shoreline was approved this week by county supervisors. The county board approved a $100,000 grant sought by the Marin Audubon Society, providing enough money to complete a $1.1 million acquisition if a $400,000 grant is approved as expected by the State Coastal Conservancy later this month. The society and Marin Baylands Advocates already had raised $575,000 for a deal officials said has been in the works for 20 years. For full story, click here.

FL: Hunt for oil in Big Cypress back in play

By Jenny Staletovich – Miami Herald – June 17, 2015
A Texas oil company hoping to hunt for crude in the Big Cypress National Preserve has applied for a permit for a seismic survey of 110 square miles of wilderness. On Wednesday, the National Park Service posted a plan from Burnett Oil that proposes using massive “thumper” trucks to send vibrations deep into the earth to detect oil and gas. The park service is seeking public comment on the request through July 17 and will use responses in crafting a study on the environmental impacts of the operation. For full story, click here.

FL: In Tampa Bay, rare environmental win measured in seagrass

By Letitia Stein – Reuters – June 9, 2015
When Tampa Bay was grappling with repeated fish kills and murky waters two decades ago, the scientists who set out to restore its health by bringing back once-bountiful underwater grasses were doubtful it could be done in their lifetimes. Yet that mission has now been accomplished. New data show Tampa Bay's seagrasses at levels not seen since the 1950s, before urban development exploded along Florida's west coast and nitrogen pollution of its waters soared. For full story, click here.

GA: Georgia justices rule buffers not required for freshwater marshes

By Walter C. Jones – Jacksonville.com – June 15, 2015
The Georgia Supreme Court ruled Monday 6-1 that state law does not require a buffer against development around freshwater marshes, swamps and other bodies of water where the flow is not sufficient to wash away plants — so called “wrested vegetation.” The decision overturns an earlier ruling by the Georgia Court of Appeals and supports a controversial interpretation by the Environmental Protection Division. Monday’s decision doesn’t actually change EPD practices. Since 1989, the EPD hasn’t imposed no-building zones around freshwater marshes because the wording of state law says 25-foot buffers are to be measured from “wrested vegetation.” Where the water flow isn’t fast enough to uproot plants, there can’t be a buffer, the agency argues. For full story, click here.

GA: Business-Heavy Committee Rejects Wetland Protections

By John Huie – Flogpole.com – June 3, 2015
A citizens committee appointed to consider stricter protections for local wetlands has given a thumbs-down to such proposals and won't meet again. The committee—heavy with local businesspeople—was appointed by Mayor Nancy Denson under pressure from county commissioners, who would like to strengthen local buffer protections. State law requires 25-foot undisturbed buffers to protect streams and ponds from pollution by rainwater runoff (since such waters eventually reach drinking water sources). Athens-Clarke county's rules already extend those protections to 75 feet for most streams, but not for ponds or wetlands—which some commissioners would like to include, despite the citizens committee's recent thumbs-down. For full story, click here.

ID: 'Wetlands' launched to help Hayden

By David Cole – CDA Press – May 30, 2015
Unfortunately for landowners and lovers of Hayden Lake, it has no outlet streams. Pollutants concentrate as water evaporates. The primary pollutant of concern to many is phosphorus, and high levels of it yield algae blooms that can be toxic. It also fertilizes invasive aquatic plants like Eurasian milfoil. For full story, click here.

LA: St. Bernard accepts about $9.3 million settlement with BP

By Benjamin Alexander-Bloch – Nola.com-The Times-Picayune – July 7, 2015
St. Bernard Parish agreed Tuesday evening (July 7) to accept a $9.3 million settlement from BP for the parish's economic losses stemming from the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The Parish Council passed the resolution approving the $9,326,805.85 settlement after a private, closed-door meeting. It would be its portion of as much as $1 billion that BP is setting aside for more than 400 local governments. For full story, click here.

ME: Grants Now Available for Wetland Projects in Maine

Environmental Protection – July 7, 2015
The State of Maine Department of Environmental Protection is now accepting applications and proposals for wetland improvements and restoration. The projects should include ideas for dealing with climate change and floods, as well as ways to help improve wildlife habitats. As of July 6, 2015, eligible parties are encouraged to apply for grant monies for wetland projects. For full story, click here. Proposals due by August 17, 2015.

MD: Top leaders at Maryland DNR leaving agency

By Rona Kobell – Bay Journal – May 29, 2015
Four top leaders at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources were let go Friday, sending a combined 98 years of fisheries, land conservation and communications experience out the doors of the Tawes building, the department’s headquarters in Annapolis. For full story, click here.

MI: NWF Heralds New Michigan Report as Major Step Forward to Protect Communities, Wildlife, Great Lakes from Risky Oil Pipelines

By Jordan Lubetkin – National Wildlife Federation – July 14, 2015
The National Wildlife Federation is heralding a new report by the State of Michigan as a major step forward in the effort to protect the Great Lakes, fish, wildlife, and communities from another major oil spill like the one near Kalamazoo, Mich., in 2010 that dumped more than 800,000 gallons of oil into the Kalamazoo River—the largest inland oil disaster in U.S. history. For full story, click here.

MN: Minnesota's loons could benefit from BP Gulf payout

By Josephine Marcotty – Star Tribune – July 7, 2015
Minnesota’s beloved loons may get a piece of the $18.7 billion Gulf oil spill settlement announced last week — perhaps as much as $39 million over the next 15 years. Minnesota and Wisconsin would be the only states outside the Gulf Coast region to share in the payout, largely because scientists here have proved that the birds migrate every year to the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico, and that, since the disastrous spill in 2010, many have returned contaminated with carcinogens and other toxins that they pass onto their eggs. For full story, click here.

MN: Lead fishing tackle ingested by fish is killing loons and other birds

By Samantha Stark – WDAZ.com – June 21, 2015
Lead’s widespread use has resulted in worldwide environmental contamination, human exposure and significant public health problems. Lead is an extremely toxic element that, over the years, has been removed from water pipes, gasoline, paint and other sources due to extensive health issues in humans, animals and the environment. Yet toxic lead is still entering the food chain through widespread use of lead fishing tackle. Thousands of cranes, ducks, swans, loons, geese and other waterfowl ingest lead fishing tackle that was lost in lakes and rivers each year, often resulting in deadly consequences. For full story, click here.

NY: Next phase in Buffalo River recovery kicks off with habitat restoration and shoreline improvements

Great Lakes Commission – July 13, 2015
As the 10-year effort to remove toxic sediment from the Buffalo River nears completion this summer, the focus now shifts to shoreline access and habitat restoration along this once-dead river. After nearly five years of planning and design work, construction is beginning at RiverBend and seven other locations along the Buffalo River that are essential for removing the river from the federal list of Great Lakes Areas of Concern by 2016. For full story, click here.

NY: New York State First to Ban Fracking

Environment News Service – June 30, 2015
A statewide ban on high-volume hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, was made official across New York State on Monday, nearly a year after communities won the right to ban oil and gas development locally. This action concluded New York Department of Environmental Conservation’s comprehensive, seven-year review and officially prohibits fracking anywhere in the state. Joe Martens, head of the Department of Environmental Conservation, DEC, said in a statement, “After years of exhaustive research and examination of the science and facts, prohibiting high-volume hydraulic fracturing is the only reasonable alternative.” “High-volume hydraulic fracturing poses significant adverse impacts to land, air, water, natural resources and potential significant public health impacts that cannot be adequately mitigated,” Martens said. For full story, click here.

OH: Maumee Bay wetland-restoration project hailed as 'victory'

By Tom Henry – The Blade – May 27, 2015
The completion of a $1.8 million wetland-restoration project on the edge of Maumee Bay State Park is a time “we really celebrate victory and results,” U.S. Rep. Marcy Kaptur (D., Toledo) said today at the site’s dedication ceremony. She made her remarks while flanked by a crowd of nearly 60 local officials and employees on the wetland’s south side, with a group on egrets congregating on the north side. Miss Kaptur said she was pleased by the local partnership that came together over the years to move the project forward. The wetland was conceived and designed years ago. But it wasn’t made a reality until two grants were issued in recent years by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, a basin-wide program that President Obama began shortly after taking office in 2009. It has offered millions of new federal dollars for shovel-ready restoration work along Great Lakes shorelines. For full story, click here.

OR: Oregon issues clam eating limit due to high arsenic levels

By Tracy Loew – Statesman Journal – July 13, 2015
Oregon health officials on Monday issued a consumption advisory for softshell clams dug along the state's entire coast because they contain high levels of arsenic. The Statesman Journal reported on the problem last week, after the Oregon Health Authority notified coastal health and government officials, but told them to keep mum. Several refused, saying the public deserved to know right away. "The fact we're being asked to sit on information that's a matter of a public health advisory – I didn't really feel comfortable doing that," Newport City Councilor David Allen said. The advisory recommends removing the skin from the siphon, or neck, of softshell clams before eating them, because that's where most of the arsenic is concentrated. For full article, click here.

PA: Fracking operator faces record $8.9M fine for alleged water contamination

By Wallace McKelvey – Pennlive.com – The Patriot-News – June 16, 2015
Pennsylvania regulators plan to levy a record fine against a shale gas operator that reportedly failed to correct a well that leaked methane into nearby water supplies. Range Resources, the Texas-based company that drilled the first Marcellus Shale well in 2004, faces an $8.9 million civil penalty stemming from a leaking gas well in Lycoming County. It follows a pair of multi-million-dollar fines against drilling companies last year. For full story, click here.

PA: Feds: Pennsylvania 'substantially off track' in Chesapeake Bay cleanup efforts

By Ad Crable – Lancaster Online – June 15, 2015
Pennsylvania is “substantially off track” in meeting its goals to reduce agriculture-based nitrogen and dirt polluting the Chesapeake Bay, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says. The federal agency is warning it may have to step in and levy tougher measures on sewage-treatment plants and large farms in the Susquehanna basin. The poor performance is being acknowledged by Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection officials under a new administration in Gov. Tom Wolf. For the full story, click here.

TN: Work completed on roadside wetland in Smokies

y Morgan Simmons – Knoxville News Sentinel – June 3, 2015
Crews have restored a small but ecologically important wetland to its natural state in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Located at the southwest end of the Foothills Parkway in Blount County, the lower reaches of Chilogatee Branch had been degraded for decades by unrestricted cattle grazing and rechanneling that turned the meandering stream into a roadside ditch. The National Park Service acquired the property in the mid-1960s and kept the land under an agricultural lease that allowed farming to continue. In 2008 the lease was modified so that farming could continue on a portion of the land while the bulk of the property could be restored to its former state as a wetland. For full story, click here.

TX: Border Wetland Uses Treated Wastewater As Congress Considers Wetland Funding

By Lorne Matalon – Fronteras Desk – May 26, 2015
A man-made wetland is now under construction on the Rio Grande, the first on the Texas-Mexico border. And this new wetland will be the first on the Rio Grande to use treated wastewater to restore habitat. This comes as Congress is considering a bipartisan bill to extend funding for the construction of wetlands.The Rio Grande has lost huge swaths of bird and wildlife habitat because water has been diverted for farming and human consumption and the population of the Southwest has grown exponentially. The new man-made wetland leverages geography and a blend of private and federal funding. For full story, click here.

VT: Report shows no progress on Lake Champlain cleanup

By Sarah Olsen – VTDigger.org – July 5, 2015
The recently released 2015 State of the Lake and Ecosystem Indicators Report shows Lake Champlain’s water quality continues to be a “cause for concern.” The report released last week at a Grand Isle news conference, finds that phosphorus levels in the lake since 1990 have continued to increase and, while small improvements have been made, they have yet to make a significant impact on the overall status of the lake. For full story, click here.

VA: Virginia, Coal Country for Centuries, Now Embraces Carbon Regulations

By Katherine Bagley – Inside Climate News – June 16, 2015
Nestled on the eastern edge of Appalachian coal country, with a 267-year history of mining its reserves, Virginia seems an unlikely candidate to become one of the country's biggest success stories in adapting to the Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Power Plan. But when the agency finalizes its rules this summer, Virginia will not be among the states fighting for it to be overturned. Instead, it is already well on its way to complying. The state has been moving away from coal-fired electricity for the past decade, and the effects of climate change—particularly along the Atlantic coast—already has its attention. For full story, click here.

WA: $16 million to help relieve drought hardships statewide

Contact: Dan Partridge – Washington Department of Ecology – July 13, 2015
Drought relief money is now available across the state as hardships from water shortages really begin to mount for farms and fish. With a $16 million appropriation from the Legislature, the Washington Department of Ecology is accepting grant applications for public projects to help relieve hardships arising from the drought. These funds can be used over the next two years to help protect public health and safety from effects of the drought, and reduce economic or environmental impacts from water shortages. For full story, click here.

WA: Wetland targeted for detention pond rallies activists

By Alison Morrow – King 5 – July 6, 2015 – Video
From the outside, a field of trees and brush across the street from Paine Field looks like many around Snohomish County. Inside, however, the brush clears to a wetland floor. A sign notifies people that it's a mitigation site, preserved to protect fish and wildlife. "They have the most value for water quality treatment, for flood attenuation, wild life habitat," said Bill Lider. Bill Lider works with Sno-King Watershed Council. He and others worry all of that could change if Paine Field moves forward with planned development. They want to use the Category II wetland for storm water runoff, but their own code says wetlands like that "shall not be used" for detention of storm water runoff unless certain criteria are met, which critics Like Lider claim have been ignored. Especially, they note, concerns about high levels of standing water. For full story and to view video, click here.

WV: Freedom, DEP reach $2.5 million deal on spill site cleanup

By Ken Ward, Jr. – WV Gazette.com – June 16, 2015
A deal that sets aside $2.5 million for cleanup of the Freedom Industries site was announced Tuesday. The demolition of the chemical tanks at the site took place last year. State regulators have reached a deal with bankrupt Freedom Industries that will set aside $2.5 million for the cleanup of the site of the January 2014 chemical spill that contaminated drinking water supplies for hundreds of thousands of people in Charleston and surrounding communities. Lawyers for Freedom disclosed the deal Tuesday in a filing in U.S. Bankruptcy Court, in a move that they hope paves the way for eventual approval of a liquidation plan that would resolve Freedom’s bankruptcy proceeding. For full story, click here.

WI: Waukesha's Bid to Divert Great Lakes Water Unnecessary Finds New Analysis

Contact Kristy Meyer – Ohio Environmental Council – July 9, 2015
A new, independent analysis released today shows that Waukesha, Wisconsin can provide clean drinking water to its residents without diverting water from Lake Michigan. An alternative plan developed by two engineering firms would solve the city’s water problem and cost Waukesha taxpayers tens of millions of dollars less than the current proposal to divert water from Lake Michigan. The alternative plan comes to light at a critical time as the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources is considering a precedent-setting water diversion application under the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact, which could make Waukesha the first city straddling the Great Lakes’ borders to obtain Great Lakes water. For full press release, click here.

WI: Rule Change Reduces Barriers to Restoring Wetlands on Working Farms

Contact: Erin O’Brien – Wisconsin Wetlands Association – July 1, 2015
A small change to Wisconsin’s property tax assessment law (Tax 18) has created a big opportunity for wetland restoration and other agricultural conservation practices. The changes recognize the importance of wetlands in agricultural landscapes and open the door for broader discussions about the benefits of restoring and actively managing wetlands on working farms. For full story, click here.

WI: Wisconsin Wetlands Association releases new County Wetland Fact Sheets

Wisconsin Wetlands Association
To promote wetland understanding and engagement, WWA has developed a series of County Wetland Fact Sheets. The goals of the project are to promote the availability of new wetland data sets; to encourage communities to consider how changes to the wetland landscape may have contributed to local water resource management problems; to help communities identify opportunities to restore wetlands to improve watershed health. Each fact sheet contains maps and tables showing current and potentially restorable wetlands in the county, as well as maps to illustrate changes in historic wetland land cover at the county and sub-watershed (HUC 12) scales. Information on how to obtain wetland spatial data, and tips for how it can be used in local planning and policy development, are also included. For more information and to download factsheets, click here.

Wetland Breaking News: July 2015WETLAND SCIENCE

Oilsands reclamation a failure, says ecologist

By the Calgary Eyeopener – CBC News – July 17, 2015
The energy industry touts its ability to reclaim lands as a selling point in the PR battle over strip mining in the oilsands, but ecologist Kevin Timoney argues the wetlands companies leave behind are defective and destructive. Timoney looked at an area approximately 100 kilometres long and 50 kilometres wide in northeast Alberta near Fort McMurray and discovered significant issues with reclaimed land. Reclamation is required by law in Alberta for mining operations. His primary concerns for these sites are the reduced numbers of native plants and the increased levels of non-native weeds when compared to natural wetlands; the reduced biomass when compared to natural wetlands; the homogeneity of the reclaimed wetlands spread over the landscape; and the elevated concentrations of contaminants and salts in the soil. For full story, click here.

International report confirms: 2014 was Earth’s warmest year on record

NOAA – July 16, 2015
In 2014, the most essential indicators of Earth’s changing climate continued to reflect trends of a warming planet, with several markers such as rising land and ocean temperature, sea levels and greenhouse gases ─ setting new records. These key findings and others can be found in the State of the Climate in 2014 report released online today by the American Meteorological Society (AMS). For full story, click here.

Ecologists predict impact of climate change on vulnerable

ScienceDaily – July 14, 2015
If it seems like you're pulling more bass than trout out of Ontario's lakes this summer, you probably are. Blame it on the ripple effect of climate change and warming temperatures. Birds migrate earlier, flowers bloom faster, and fish move to newly warmed waters putting local species at risk. To mitigate the trend and support conservation efforts, scientists at the University of Toronto (U of T) are sharing a way to predict which plants or animals may be vulnerable to the arrival of a new species. For full story, click here.

UW Researcher Discovers Groundwater Modeling Breakthrough 84 Years in the Making

By Gabriel Popkin – University of Wyoming – July 1, 2015
A University of Wyoming professor has made a discovery that answers a nearly 100-year-old question about water movement, with implications for agriculture, hydrology, climate science and other fields. After decades of effort, Fred Ogden, UW’s Cline Chair of Engineering, Environment and Natural Resources in the Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering and Haub School of Environment and Natural Resources, and a team of collaborators published their findings in the journal Water Resources Research this spring. The paper, titled “A new general 1-D vadose zone flow solution method,” presents an equation to replace a difficult and unreliable formula that’s stymied hydrologic modelers since 1931. For full story, click here.

Global warming may cause sex changes in lizards

By Rachel Feltman – The Washington Post – July 1, 2015
According to new research, climate change may leave some lizards in a gender lurch. The Australian bearded dragon's sex is determined by both its chromosomes and the environment its egg is incubated in, so warmer temperatures could be skewing wild populations to have more females. For full story, click here.

EPA: Supreme Court ruling won’t stop climate rules

By Timothy Cama - The Hill – June 30, 2015
The Supreme Court’s decision against a key Obama administration air pollution rule is not stopping regulators from moving forward on the government’s most ambitious climate change rule. Janet McCabe, head of the air pollution office at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), characterized the Monday ruling in Michigan v. EPA as “very narrow,” and said it does not affect any other air or climate regulations. For full story, click here.

The hunt for the world's missing carbon

By Gabriel Popkin – Nature.com – June 30, 2015
In a forest just west of Chesapeake Bay, Geoffrey Parker wraps a tape measure around a young tulip tree. He jots the reading down in a field notebook, marks the tree with blue chalk and moves on to the next trunk. Parker spends about 10 seconds on each tree. Wrap, measure, record. Since 1987, he and others have logged more than 300,000 tree measurements at their plots in the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) near Edgewater, Maryland. This 1,070-hectare site is filled with tulip trees, oaks, beeches and other mostly deciduous trees. Some stout specimens have stood here for centuries. Others are just a decade old, sprouting from land that was recently logged. To keep tabs on the growth, the researchers measure their trees every three to five years. All that patient record-keeping can help to answer two major questions about climate change: how much carbon dioxide pollution are forests mopping up, and will their capacity shrink over time? For full story, click here.

EPA Releases Report: "Climate Change in the United States: Benefits of Global Action"

EPA – June 29, 2015 – Video
A new EPA report, Climate Change in the United States: Benefits of Global Action, estimates the physical and monetary benefits to the U.S. of reducing global greenhouse gas emissions. This report summarizes results from the Climate Change Impacts and Risks Analysis (CIRA) project, a peer-reviewed study comparing impacts in a future with significant global action on climate change to a future in which current greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise. For more information, to download report, and to view video, click here.

Earth Entering 6th Great Mass Extinction

Sci-News.com – June 22, 2015
There is agreement among researchers that extinction rates have reached levels unparalleled since the last ‘great extinction’ 66 million years ago when the dinosaurs perished. However, some scientists have challenged the theory, believing earlier estimates rested on assumptions that overestimated the crisis. The new study, led by Dr Gerardo Ceballos from the Universidad Autónoma de México, shows that even with extremely conservative estimates, vertebrate species are disappearing up to 114 times faster than the normal rate between mass extinctions. For full story, click here.

Extreme Weather in a Changing Climate: Asking the Right Questions

By Laura Snider – University Corporation for Atmospheric Research – June 22, 2015
When a deadly heat wave lingers for an especially long time; when a hurricane makes landfall with particular ferocity; or when droughts, winter storms or cold snaps break records, the public is increasingly interested in knowing if human-induced climate change played a role. Attributing individual extreme weather events to a warming climate is difficult work. Even so, scientists have been making an effort in recent years to determine when a connection can be detected. For full story, click here.

There's a giant, toxic algae bloom stretching from Southern California to Alaska

By Deena Shanker – QUARTZ – June 19, 2015
A toxic algae bloom off the US West Coast that began earlier this year has grown into the biggest and most severe the region has seen in more than a decade. The bloom and its toxins have thus far been reported from the coast of Santa Barbara, California, all the way up to Alaska, Raphael Kudela, a professor of ocean sciences at University of California Santa Cruz tells Quartz. “For comparison, the other really large event occurred in 1998, and occurred from approximately San Diego to Washington state.” For full story, click here.

Earth's largest groundwater aquifers are past 'sustainability tipping points'

By Andrew Freedman – Mashable – June 16, 2015
Humanity is rapidly depleting a third of the world's largest groundwater aquifers, with the top three most stressed groundwater basins in the political hotspots of the Middle East, the border region between India and Pakistan, and the Murzuk-Djado Basin in northern Africa. Making matters worse, researchers say in a pair of new studies, we don't know how much water is left in these massive aquifers — which water resources scientists often refer to as Earth's water savings accounts. For full story, click here.

New study shows Arctic Ocean rapidly becoming more corrosive to marine species

Contact: Monica Allen – NOAA – June 15, 2015
New research by NOAA, University of Alaska, and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the journal Oceanography shows that surface waters of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas could reach levels of acidity that threaten the ability of animals to build and maintain their shells by 2030, with the Bering Sea reaching this level of acidity by 2044. For full story, click here.

Current Climate Pledges Won't Prevent Dangerous Warming, Agency Says

By John H. Cushman, Jr. – Inside Climate News – June 15, 2015
Pledges made so far by Europe, the United States and China to cut greenhouse gas emissions aren't enough to keep global warming within safe limits, according to a new report by the International Energy Agency. But the agency also said that if nations increase their efforts, there is just enough time to change direction with existing technology and without economic penalty. For full story, click here.

Wetlands continue to reduce nitrates: Study

Iowa Farmer Today – May 27, 2015
Wetlands created 20 years ago between tile-drained agricultural fields and the Embarras River in Illinois were recently revisited for a new two-year University of Illinois research project. Results show an overall 62 percent nitrate removal rate and little emission of nitrous oxide, a potent greenhouse gas. For full story, click here.

 

Wetland Breaking News: July 2015RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONS

Drainage of Prairie Pothole Wetlands Can Increase Flooding and Degrade Ecosystems

U.S. Geological Survey – July 15, 2015
The drainage of small wetlands can decrease wildlife habitat and may contribute to flooding in the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR), according to a recent U.S. Geological Survey study. USGS scientists analyzed data on 141 large PPR wetlands in North Dakota from the 1930s through 2010, and found that they have increased significantly in size. Most of the increases in surface water were due to drainage of smaller wetlands, likely for more efficient agricultural production. This drainage moves surface water into fewer wetlands, making them larger and degrading their abilities to reduce regional flooding and provide productive habitat for animals. Small wetlands in the PPR are economically and environmentally important because they help recharge local and regional groundwater. They also provide habitat for 50 to 80 percent of North American ducks. “While the loss of small wetlands has its own effect on the ecosystem, consolidation of their water into larger wetlands can fundamentally change valuable ecosystems in the PPR,” said Michael Anteau, a USGS scientist and an author of the paper. “Our findings are relevant to policy makers and managers making wetland conservation decisions.” The study is published in the journal Ecosphere. For full news release, click here.

National Report on Living Shorelines Institutional Barriers Released

Restore America's Estuaries – June 18, 2015
Restore America’s Estuaries has released a new report, “Living Shorelines: From Barriers to Opportunities,” which provides a national assessment of institutional barriers that are preventing broader use of living shorelines and provides clear recommendations and strategies to move forward. Living shorelines are a suite of techniques that offer property owners the opportunity to protect and restore their shoreline using more naturally-occurring systems like salt marsh and oyster reefs while also providing benefits to bays and estuaries. To read more, click here. To download report, click here.

Economic and Community Benefits from Stream Barrier Removal Projects in Massachusetts: Report & Summary

Massachusetts Department of Fish and Game – March 2015
Dams and culverts exist in abundance across the State of Massachusetts. Many of these structures are in poor condition, having outlived their intended design life. Although removing stream barriers may require considerable up-front costs, these stream restoration efforts may also mitigate flood risks, improve ecosystem function, and relieve long-term financial burdens. Qualitative information on the consequences of dam removal and culvert improvements (i.e., stream barrier removals) is relatively available; however few detailed analyses have attempted to evaluate the socioeconomic impacts of these projects. For more information, click here. To download report, click here.

Restoration of Forests, Grasslands, and Wetlands Damaged by Off-Highway Vehicles

By Ellen Eubanks and Thomas Biebighauser – Forest Service – September 2014
The purpose of this guide is to provide information on recognizing damage caused by Off-Highway Vehicles (OHV) to ecosystems. It also provides information on how to restore ecosystems. In this guide damage is defined as the long-term and “acute and obvious changes in an ecosystem” (SER 2004). The desired condition of restoration is the return of a self-sustaining ecosystem. This guide was written to be instructional for all readers especially for those associated with trail design, layout, maintenance, and restoration. This includes technicians, recreation planners, landscape architects, engineers, site managers, and resource managers. This guide is divided into three chapters, six appendixes, and a glossary. For information on how to obtain a copy please visit Wetland Restoration and Training.

Disaster Resilience: A National Imperative

By Committee on Increasing National Resilience to Hazards and Disasters; Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy; Policy and Global Affairs; The National Academies – 2012
No person or place is immune from disasters or disaster-related losses. Infectious disease outbreaks, acts of terrorism, social unrest, or financial disasters in addition to natural hazards can all lead to large-scale consequences for the nation and its communities. Communities and the nation thus face difficult fiscal, social, cultural, and environmental choices about the best ways to ensure basic security and quality of life against hazards, deliberate attacks, and disasters. Beyond the unquantifiable costs of injury and loss of life from disasters, statistics for 2011 alone indicate economic damages from natural disasters in the United States exceeded $55 billion, with 14 events costing more than a billion dollars in damages each. For more information, click here.

 

Wetland Breaking News: July 2015

POTPOURRI

Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar Recording June 19, 2015

Riverine/Riparian Wetland Restoration – Richard Weber, NRCS Wetland Team, CNTSC and Larry Urban, Montana Department of Transportation. For more information and to view recording, click here.

Special Topics Webinar Recording June 17, 2015

Clean Water Rule – Roy Gardner, Professor of Law and Director, Institute for Biodiversity Law and Policy and Kim Diana Connolly, Professor, Director of Clinical Legal Education, Vice Dean for Legal Skills, SUNY Buffalo Law School
For more information and to view recording, click here.

Sage grouse flies into U.S. species protection crossfire

By Ayesha Rascoe – Planet Ark – July 14, 2015
A wildlife protection fight over a quirky ground-dwelling bird highlights how two U.S. environmental groups have increasingly dominated the process of species protection, sparking a backlash from pro-business Republicans. A Reuters review of hundreds of federal records over a 10-year period shows how the non-profit groups have had success by inundating Washington with petitions for new protected-species listings and lawsuits designed to compel regulators to respond. Many of the new listings achieved by the Center for Biological Diversity (CBD) and WildEarth Guardians have been for relatively obscure species, such as snails and fish with compact habitats. For full story, click here.

Flood Maps Can Get Much Sharper With A Little Supercomputing Oomph

By Joe Palca – npr – June 30, 2015
A small company in California is hoping to make a big splash by providing detailed flood maps to homeowners and insurance companies. And to do that, the company is using one of the fastest supercomputers in the world. The company is called Katrisk, based in Berkeley, Calif. Hydrologist and computer modeler Dag Lohmann is one of the company's founders. He says the flood maps the Federal Emergency Management Agency already produces will tell you how prone a particular area is to flooding. But FEMA's maps don't tell you everything you might want to know about what might happen in a flood, Lohmann says. For full story, click here.

What's Really Warming the World?

By Eric Roston and Blacki Migliozzi – Bloomberg – June 24, 2015
Skeptics of manmade climate change offer various natural causes to explain why the earth has warmed 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit since 1880. But can these account for the planet’s rising temperature? For full story, click here.

Waters of the U.S. Revisions - What you Need to Know

Great Ecology – June 23, 2015
The final rule of the Clean Water Act’s definition of the Waters of the U.S. (WOTUS) was issued on May 27, 2015. Initially proposed last year, the changes will go into effect shortly. Project managers and landowners need to understand how the revised ruling will affect their projects. For full blog post, click here.

Reflections on a field course

By R.K. Booth – Among the Stately Trees – June 19, 2015
The Pymatuning wetlanders demonstrated their knowledge of wetland ecosystems this morning on the final exam. The end of this course is always a bit bittersweet for me. Teaching a field course like this is intense, high-energy, all-consuming, and by the end…. exhausting. However, without a doubt the experience has once again been the highlight of my professional activities for the year. Each time I teach this class, I get to learn something new about wetland ecosystems and sharpen my natural history and plant identification skills. I have the opportunity to get to know a bunch of interesting students, much better than I would in a typical classroom setting. And it is extremely satisfying to share my knowledge and passion for natural ecosystems with a group of interested students. The Pymatuning Laboratory of Ecology is an ideal place to do this. For full blog post, click here.

The California Spill and the Continuance of Harmful Oil Operations

By Brittany Michelson – Environmental News Network – June 2, 2015
Plains All American Pipeline, the company responsible for the May 19th Refugio oil spill rakes in billions of dollars (over 43 billion in 2014) while birds, fish, and marine mammals drenched in oil have washed up on the shores of Santa Barbara County. In the initial few days investigators reported that 9.5 miles of ocean and 8.7 miles of coastline had been affected, but oil shifts with trade winds, and signs of oil damage have shown up further south, in the Malibu region. For full blog post, click here.

Expedition Launched to Save Africa’s Largest Wetland

By Alexandra Fuller – National Geographic – May 27, 2015
A multinational team of, scientists, filmmakers, and journalists arrived in a remote corner of Angola last week to begin an unprecedented, 1,000-mile-long expedition supported by the National Geographic Society. For full story, click here.

Who's Afraid of the Big Bad EPA?

By Katherine Bagley – Inside Climate News – February 26, 2015
The Environmental Protection Agency has been accused of everything from running this country to waging an economy-destroying war on coal. But it turns out the GOP’s prime target isn’t that big after all. The agency’s budget represents an almost invisible slice of the federal pie—less than a quarter of a percent of Obama’s proposed $4 trillion budget for the 2016 fiscal year. If approved, the EPA’s budget next year would be 16.5 percent smaller than it was in 2010. In a budget hearing Wednesday grilling Gina McCarthy, EPA’s administrator, Rep. Ed Whitfield (R-Ky.) said the Obama EPA “has embarked on an expansive and expensive global warming regulatory agenda” that is bad for the country. For full story, click here.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

   

WEBINARS

   

MEETINGS

   

TRAINING

     
                   
WEBINARS          
                   
JULY 2015                  
                   
July 29, 2015
3:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m. EDT
      ASWM's Members' webinar: Using Beaver as a Wetland Restoration Tool: Restoration Lessons Learned and an Introduction to the Beaver Restoration Assessment Tool (BRAT). This webinar will be open to both members and nonmembers.
         
                   
July 30, 2015
1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m. EDT
      Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM) presents the second Planning Information Exchange (PIE) webinar: Climate Change Adaptation & Resilience          
                   
AUGUST 2015                  
                   
August 18, 2015
1:00 p.m. EDT
      AWRA webinar: Water Security in 2015: Case Studies from the Nile River Basin          
                   
August 20, 2015
2:00 p.m. EDT
      Forester University Webinar: Simplifying Stormwater Detention Design with Precast Concrete & Hydrologic Modeling          
                   
SEPTEMBER 2015                  
                   
September 8, 2015
3:00 p.m. EDT
      ASWM’s Wetland Restoration Webinar: Stream/Wet Meadow Restoration          
                   
September 10, 2015
1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m. EDT
      Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, the EBM Tools Network, OpenChannels.org, and MPA News: Maps and Datasets for Blue Carbon Habitats          
                   
September 15, 2015
1:00 p.m. EDT
      American Water Resources Association webinar: Unique Program to Drive Water Quality in the Delaware River Watershed          
                   
September 16, 2015
3:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. EDT
      Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Part 2 - “The Florida Wetlands Integrity Dataset: Analysis of nonrenewable energy data and construction of graph-theoretic networks to quantify landscape integrity”
         
                   
September 16, 2015
1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m. EDT
      Center for Watershed Protection webcast: What to Do About Trashy Watersheds          
                   
September 24, 2015
2:00 p.m. EDT
      Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM) webinar: Developing & Implementing Dam Removal Projects          
                   
OCTOBER 2015                  
                   
October 6, 2015
1:00 p.m. ET
      AWRA webinar: History of Water Quality Monitoring and Assessment in the United States          
                   
October 6, 2015       EPA's Green Infrastructure Program 2015 Webcast Series: Winter Weather O&M for Green. More information will be available in late September here.          
                   
NOVEMBER 2015                  
                   
November 12, 2015
1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m. ET
      National Park Service Ocean Parks Centennial          
                   
November 18, 2015
1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m. ET
      Center for Watershed Protection webcast: Checking in on Post-Construction Stormwater Management          
                   
DECEMBER 2015                  
                   
December 8, 2015       EPA's Green Infrastructure Program 2015 Webcast Series: Ahead of the Curve – Implementing Green Infrastructure in Rural and Growing Communities. Information will be available here in late November.          
                   
MEETINGS        
                   
JULY 2015                  
                   
July 26-29, 2015
Greensboro, North Carolina
      70th Annual Soil and Water Conservation Society (SWCS) Conference          
                   
July 27-31, 2015
Boulder, Colorado
      National Center for Atmospheric Research Second Annual Graduate Workshop: Environmental Data Analytics          
                   
July 27-August 2, 2015
Nagoya Japan
     

XIX INQUA Congress Quaternary Perspectives on Climate Change, Natural Hazards and Civilization

         
                   
AUGUST 2015                  
                   
August 2-5, 2015
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
      21st International Conference on Environmental Indicators          
                   
August 2-6, 2015
Austin, Texas
      StormCon, the North American Surface Water Quality Conference and Expo          
                   
August 5, 2015
Huntingdon, PA

      Mid-Atlantic Invasive Plant Council 2015 Conference: Advances in Invasive Plant Science: Applying research outcomes to management and restoration at the species, community, and landscape levels
         
                   
August 5-7, 2015
Reston, Virginia
      American Society of Civil Engineers Watershed Management Symposium          
                   
August 6-8, 2015
Shenandoah University
Winchester, Virginia
      2015 Mid-Atlantic Volunteer Monitoring Conference: Bridging the Water Quality Data Gap          
                   
August 9-14, 2015
Baltimore, Maryland
     

Ecological Society of America: Ecological Science at the Frontier: Celebrating ESA's Centennial

         
                   
August 19-20, 2015
Lewisberry, Pennsylvania
      The Wetland Restoration and Training: Wetland Restoration Workshop. The agenda and registration information will be available at a later date.          
                   
August 20-21, 2015
Gulfport, Mississippi
      Mississippi Urban Forest Council: Urban Forestry and Green Infrastructure Conference          
                   
August 23-27, 2015
Manchester, England
      Society of Ecological Restoration 6th World Conference on Ecological Restoration: Towards Resilient Ecosystems: Restoring the Urban, the Rural and the Wild          
                   
August 23-28, 2015
La Crosse, Wisconsin
     

4th Biennial Symposium of the International Society for River Science

         
                   
August 23-28, 2015
Stockholm, Sweden
      Stockholm International Water Institute: 2015 World Water Week          
                   
August 24-25, 2015
Stockholm, Sweden
      Climate Resolve: California Climate Change Symposium: Using Climate Science to Plan for a Resilient Future
         
                   
August 26-28, 2015
San Francisco, California
      U.S. Water Alliance: One Water Leadership Summit          
                   
SEPTEMBER 2015                  
                   
September 8-11, 2015
Rancho Mirage, California
      2015 Floodplain Management Annual Conference in conjunction with ASFPM Arid Regions Conference          
                   
September 8-11, 2015
Karnataka, INDIA
      The Sixth Student Conference on Conservation Science - Bengaluru 2015          
                   
September 13-18, 2015
York, UK
      WETPOL 2015 - 6th International Symposium: Wetland Pollutant Dynamics and Control Annual Conference          
                   
September 14-15 and
September 16-17, 2015
Seymour, Indiana
      Wetland Restoration and Training: Wetland Restoration Workshop          
                   
September 15-17, 2015
Lincoln, Nebraska
      USDA and EPA are cosponsoring a National Workshop on Water Quality Markets. Registration deadline is August 14, 2015.          
                   
September 16-18, 2015
Washington, DC
      Transportation Research Board: International Conference on Transportation System Resilience to Climate Change and Extreme Weather Events          
                   
September 17-18, 2015
Oakland, California
     

San Francisco Estuary Partnership: State of the San Francisco Estuary Conference 12th Edition

         
                   
September 23-25, 2015 Baltimore, Maryland      

Resource Institute, Inc.: Mid-Atlantic Stream Restoration Conference

         
                   
September 25-26, 2015
Lake Ariel, Pennsylvania
      Lacawac Ecology Conference (LEC) annual fall conference of Lacawac Sanctuary and Field Station          
                   
September 25-27, 2015
Shepherdstown, West Virginia
      Moving the Needle Toward a Restored Bay Watershed: 10th annual Chesapeake Watershed Forum.          
                   
September 26-30, 2015
Chicago, Illinois
      Water Environment Federation Technical Exhibition and Conference          
                   
September 28-29, 2015
Chicago, Illinois
      2015 Great Lakes Commission Annual Meeting          
                   
September 28-October 4, 2015 Kelowna and Vernon, BC       British Columbia Wildlife Federation's Wetlands Education Program: Communities Conserving Wetlands.          
                   
September 29-October 1, 2015
Chicago, Illinois
      Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: 11th Annual Great Lakes Restoration Conference          
                   
OCTOBER 2015                  
                   
October 6-8, 2015
Olympia, Washington
      Pacific Northwest Chapter of the Society of Wetland Scientists Conference: From a Watershed Perspective: Integrating Science into Policy. Abstracts due by August 1, 2015.          
                   
October 7-9, 2015
New York, New York
      6th annual Student Conference on Conservation Science          
                   
October 7-11, 2015
University of Oklahoma
Norman, Oklahoma
      Society of Environmental Journalists: Weather, Water, Energy: News in Every Neighborhood          
                   
October 14-15, 2015
Villanova, Pennsylvania
      Villanova Urban Stormwater Partnership: 9th Stormwater Management Symposium          
                   
October 21-23, 2015
Tustin, Michigan
      Huron River Watershed Council: 2015 Michigan Aquatic Restoration Conference          
                   
October 28-31, 2015
San Diego, California
      California Invasive Plant Council: 24th Annual Cal-IPC Symposium. Abstracts due by June 15, 2015.          
                   
October 28-30, 2015
Acme, Michigan
      Michigan Department of Environmental Quality: 9th Biennial State of Lake Michigan and 15th Annual Great Lakes Beach Association Joint Conference. Call for abstracts deadline is June 15, 2015.          
                   
NOVEMBER 2015                  
                   
November 3-5, 2015
Little Rock, Arkansas
      Natural Areas Association: 2015 Natural Areas Conference          
                   
November 4-5, 2015
Coeur d’Alene, Idaho
      Sixth Annual Northwest Climate Conference
         
                   
November 6-8, 2015
Manhattan, Kansas
      13th Annual Ecological Genomics Symposium          
                   
November 8-12, 2015
Portland, Oregon
      Coastal Estuarine Research Federation Conference: Grand Challenges in Coastal & Estuarine Science; Securing Our Future          
                   
November 12-13, 2015
Cambridge, Massachusetts
      Association of Climate Change Officers will hold the 2015 Rising Seas Summit          
                   
November 16-18, 2015
Greater Portland, Maine
      Think Blue Maine Partner Maine Stormwater Conference. Abstract deadline is Friday, March 27, 2015.          
                   
November 16-19, 2015
Denver, Colorado
      AWRA's 50th Annual Water Resources Conference
Special session proposals due by May 15, 2015.
         
                   
November 16-19, 2015
Tampa, Florida
      National Working Waterfront Network: National Working Waterfronts & Waterways Symposium
         
                   
November 17-20, 2015
Saratoga Springs, New York
      North American Lake Management Society 35th International Symposium: North American Lakes: Embracing their History, Ensuring Their Future          
                   
DECEMBER 2015                  
                   
December 14-18, 2015
San Francisco, California
      American Geophysical Union (AGU): 2015 AGU Fall Meeting          
                   
TRAINING        
                   
JULY 2015                  
                   
July 26-August 1, 2015
Steuben, Maine
      Eagle Hill Institute Natural History Science Seminar: Field Botany and Plant Ecology of the Eastern Maine Coast          
                   

July 27-31, 2015
Logan, Utah

      Utah State University course: Sediment Transport in Stream Assessment and Design          
                   

July 28-29, 2015
Tully, New York

      Wetland Restoration Techniques Practicum at SUNY-ESF. Undergraduate and Graduate Level, 1-Credit. . For more information, contact banewman@esf.edu; go here or go directly here.          
July 28-30, 2015
Portage, Wisconsin
      Wetland Training Institute will hold a course: Problematic Wetland Delineation Seminar          
                   
July 31, 2015-August 6, 2015
Cable, Wisconsin
      3 Sigma Institute in affiliation with Northland College and the USFS is offering a course on Assessment of Wetland Food Web Support – Patterns in Primary and Secondary Production          
                   
AUGUST 2015                  
                   
August 3, 2015
St. Michaels, Maryland
      Environmental Concern Course: WOW! The Wonders of Wetlands. This course will also be held on July 13, August 4, and December 9, 2015. More information is available here.          
                   
August 3-12, 2015
Ashland, Wisconsin
      3 Sigma Institute Course: Introduction to Environmental Modeling: Linking Social and Natural Sciences          
                   
August 3-November 1, 2015       The Swamp School online and field training program: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator          
                   
August 6, 2015
St. Michaels, Maryland
      Environmental Concern Course: POW! The Planning of Wetlands. This course will also be held on December 11, 2015.          
                   
August 6-7, 2015
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training course: Hydrophytic Vegetation (Piedmont)          
                   
August 9-15, 2015
Steuben, Maine
      Eagle Hill Institute Natural History Science Course: Botany at the Landscape Scale          
                   
August 9-15, 2015
Steuben, Maine
      Eagle Hill Institute Natural History Science Seminar: Lakes and Rivers Understanding Their Ecology and Water Quality          
                   
August 10-13, 2015
Mahwah, New Jersey
      Managing Floodplain Development Through the National Flood Insurance Program          
                   
August 10-14, 2015
Moss Landing, California
      5-day General CRAM Training with riverine and depressional wetland field examples. For more information, click here. This course will also be held on July 13-17, 2015 in Sacramento, California.          
                   
August 10-14, 2015
Front Royal, Virginia
      The Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Conservation for Development Professionals: Strategies for implementing biodiversity action plans for the private sector          
                   
August 17-20, 2015
St. Michaels, Maryland
      Environmental Concern Professional Course: Grasses, Sedges and Rushes          
                   
August 17-21, 2015
Truckee, California
      UC Berkeley course: Geomorphic and Ecological Fundamentals for River and Stream Restoration          
                   
August 18-21, 2015
Hays, Kansas
      The Wetlands Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification          
                   
August 18-21, 2015
Evanston, Illinois
      Aarcher Institute of Environmental Training course: The Original Environmental Compliance Bootcamp™. For other dates and locations, click here.          
                   
August 24-25, 2015
Arlington, Washington
      The Wetlands Training Institute, Inc. Course: Advanced Hydric Soils          
                   
August 27-28, 2015
Denver, Colorado
      Urban Watershed Research Institute Course: FIRM Map Revisions - Technical & Administrative Aspects - 2015          
                   
August 28-29, 2015
Denver, Colorado
      Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. course: Wetland Permitting Training          
                   
SEPTEMBER 2015                  
                   
September 10-11, 2015
Charleston, South Carolina
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes          
                   
September 10-11, 2015
South, Millville, New Jersey
      Rutgers University Course: Vegetation Identification for Wetland Delineation: South          
                   
September 11-18, 2015
Logan Lake, British Columbia
      British Columbia Institute of Technology Wetland Restoration Course. Email Doug_Ransome@bcit.ca for more information.          
                   
September 14-18, 2015
Covington, Louisiana
      The Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Basic Wetland Delineation course. For other dates and locations, click here.          
                   
September 14-19, 2015
Whitefish, Montana
      Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation with Emphasis on Soils and Hydrology          
                   
September 17-18, 2015
San Diego, California
      The Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: on Riparian Habitat Restoration in the Arid Southwest          
                   
September 17-18, 2015
Denver, Colorado
      Urban Watersheds Research Institute Course: Stormwater Planning & Design Using SWMM - 2015          
                   
September 21-25, 2015
St. Michaels, Maryland
      Environmental Concern Course: Basic Wetland Delineation Professional Course          
                   
September 23-25, 2015
Hays, Kansas
      The Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Woody Plants (Trees, Shrubs, and Vines) Identification          
                   
September 28-29, 2015
Bordentown, New Jersey
      Rutgers University Course: Wetland Construction: Planning and Functional Design          
                   
September 28-October 2, 2015
Portage, Wisconsin
      The Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation          
                   
OCTOBER 2015                  
                   
October 5-9, 2015
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training will hold a course on Basic Wetland Delineation
         
                   
October 8-9, 2015
Tuckerton, New Jersey
      Rutgers University Course: Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants          
                   
October 17, 2015
St. Michaels, Maryland
      Environmental Concern Course: Project WET 2.0 Register by November 18, 2015.          
                   
October 20-21, 2015
Richmond, Virginia
      The Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum          
                   
October 20-23, 2015
Basking Ridge, New Jersey
      Rutgers University course: Methodology for Delineating Wetlands. Instructors: Ralph Tiner and Mallory N. Gilbert          
                   
October 21, 2015
Basking Ridge, New Jersey
      Rutgers University course: Introduction to Wetland Identification. Instructor: Ralph Tiner          
                   
October 23, 2015
Denver, Colorado
      Urban Watersheds Research Institute Course: Overview of WQ Regulations and Compliance - 2015          
                   
October 26, 2015
New Brunswick, New Jersey
      Rutgers University Course: Understanding Advanced Stormwater Management Techniques          
                   
NOVEMBER 2015                  
                   
November 2-3, 2015
Atlanta Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species          
                   
November 12-13, 2015
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Advanced Hydric Soils and Hydrology (Piedmont)          
                   
DECEMBER 2015                  
                   
December 3-4, 2015
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan course: Problem and Atypical Wetland Delineation (Piedmont)          
                   
December 3-4, 2015
Denver, Colorado
      Urban Watersheds Research Institute Course: Floodplain Hydraulics Using HEC RAS - 2015          
                   
December 7-11, 2015
Front Royal, Virginia
      The Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Statistical Downscaling of Global Climate Models in SDSM 5.2          
                   
December 8, 2015
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Endangered Species Act Overview. This course will also be held on July 21, 2015 in Atlanta, Georgia.          
                   
December 9, 2015
St. Michaels, Maryland
      Environmental Concern course: WOW! The Wonders of Wetlands. This course will also be held on July 13, August 3, and August 4, 2015.          
                   
December 11, 2015
St. Michaels, Maryland
      Environmental Concern course: POW! The Planning of Wetlands. This course will also be held on August 6, 2015.          
                   
SPECIAL EVENTS 2015                  
                   
November 28, 2015       The Wetlands Institute: Wetland Wonderland          
                   

For more wetland events, meetings, conferences, and courses nationwide, visit the ASWM calendar.


JOBS

Wetland Breaking News - July 2015


INDEX

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • GOP subpoenas Obama regulatory officials on water rule
  • Business groups sue over Obama water rule
  • Local Foods, Local Places Technical Assistance
  • Court upholds EPA in putting Chesapeake Bay on 'pollution diet'
  • Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Settlement Reached
  • States sue to block Obama's water rule
  • Climate change turning sacred land against Navajo
  • FWS Provides $5.7 Million in Grants to Help Conserve Monarch Butterflies and Other At-Risk Species in 11 States
  • Farmers and Cities Play the Water Pollution Blame Game
  • ASWM Members’ Wetland Webinar: Using Beaver as a Wetland Restoration Tool – July 29, 2015
  • ASWM’s Wetland Restoration Webinar: Stream/Wet Meadow Restoration – September 8, 2015
  • Wetland Mapping Consortium (WMC): Part 2- “The Florida Wetlands Integrity Dataset: Analysis of nonrenewable energy data and construction of graph-theoretic networks to quantify landscape integrity” – September 16, 2015

NATIONAL NEWS

  • Wildfires in Canada And Alaska Drive Thousands From Homes
  • House Pulls Interior Appropriations Bill
  • Seabird population down 70 per cent around the world, say UBC researchers
  • NOAA, partners predict severe harmful algal bloom for Lake Erie
  • BP could get billions in tax breaks on oil spill settlement
  • EPA and Navajo Nation EPA Enter Historic Agreements to Halt Water Pollution
  • Why Budget Forecasts Should Include the Next Big Disaster
  • The Great Plains' looming water crisis
  • Below-average 'dead zone' predicted for Chesapeake Bay in 2015
  • USDA Seeks Partner Proposals to Protect and Restore Critical Wetlands
  • Fracking and water: Quantity, not just quality, a concern
  • EPA National Water Program Releases 2015 Workplan

STATE NEWS

  • AK: Extremely high coastal erosion in northern Alaska
  • CA: Most of California's fracking waste left in unlined pits, study finds
  • CA: Debate about using glyphosate to control plants in Marin heats up
  • CA: Key Corte Madera marshland acquisition all but assured
  • FL: Hunt for oil in Big Cypress back in play
  • FL: In Tampa Bay, rare environmental win measured in seagrass
  • GA: Georgia justices rule buffers not required for freshwater marshes
  • GA: Business-Heavy Committee Rejects Wetland Protections
  • ID: 'Wetlands' launched to help Hayden
  • LA: St. Bernard accepts about $9.3 million settlement with BP
  • ME: Grants Now Available for Wetland Projects in Main
  • MD: Top leaders at Maryland DNR leaving agency
  • MI: NWF Heralds New Michigan Report as Major Step Forward to Protect Communities, Wildlife, Great Lakes from Risky Oil Pipelines
  • MN: Minnesota's loons could benefit from BP Gulf payout
  • MN: Lead fishing tackle ingested by fish is killing loons and other birds
  • NY: Next phase in Buffalo River recovery kicks off with habitat restoration and shoreline improvements New York State First to Ban Fracking
  • OH: Maumee Bay wetland-restoration project hailed as 'victory'
  • OR: Oregon issues clam eating limit due to high arsenic levels
  • PA: Fracking operator faces record $8.9M fine for alleged water contamination
  • PA: Feds: Pennsylvania 'substantially off track' in Chesapeake Bay cleanup efforts
  • TN: Work completed on roadside wetland in Smokies
  • TX: Border Wetland Uses Treated Wastewater As Congress Considers Wetland Funding
  • VT: Report shows no progress on Lake Champlain cleanup
  • VA: Virginia, Coal Country for Centuries, Now Embraces Carbon Regulations
  • WA: $16 million to help relieve drought hardships statewide
  • WA: Wetland targeted for detention pond rallies activists
  • WV: Freedom, DEP reach $2.5 million deal on spill site cleanup
  • WI: Waukesha's Bid to Divert Great Lakes Water Unnecessary Finds New Analysis
  • WI: Rule Change Reduces Barriers to Restoring Wetlands on Working Farms
  • WI: Wisconsin Wetlands Association releases new County Wetland Fact Sheets

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • Oilsands reclamation a failure, says ecologist
  • International report confirms: 2014 was Earth’s warmest year on record
  • Ecologists predict impact of climate change on vulnerable
  • UW Researcher Discovers Groundwater Modeling Breakthrough 84 Years in the Making
  • Global warming may cause sex changes in lizards
  • EPA: Supreme Court ruling won’t stop climate rules
  • The hunt for the world's missing carbon
  • EPA Releases Report: "Climate Change in the United States: Benefits of Global Action"
  • Earth Entering 6th Great Mass Extinction
  • Extreme Weather in a Changing Climate: Asking the Right Questions
  • There's a giant, toxic algae bloom stretching from Southern California to Alaska
  • Earth's largest groundwater aquifers are past 'sustainability tipping points'
  • New study shows Arctic Ocean rapidly becoming more corrosive to marine species
  • Current Climate Pledges Won't Prevent Dangerous Warming, Agency Says
  • Wetlands continue to reduce nitrates: Study

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • Drainage of Prairie Pothole Wetlands Can Increase Flooding and Degrade Ecosystems
  • National Report on Living Shorelines Institutional Barriers Release
  • Economic and Community Benefits from Stream Barrier Removal Projects in Massachusetts: Report & Summary
  • Restoration of Forests, Grasslands, and Wetlands Damaged by Off-Highway Vehicles
  • Disaster Resilience: A National Imperative

POTPOURRI

  • Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar Recording - June 19, 2015
  • Special Topics Webinar Recording - June 17, 2015
  • Sage grouse flies into U.S. species protection crossfire
  • Flood Maps Can Get Much Sharper With A Little Supercomputing Oomph
  • What's Really Warming the World?
  • Waters of the U.S. Revisions - What you Need to Know
  • Reflections on a field course
  • The California Spill and the Continuance of Harmful Oil Operations
  • Expedition Launched to Save Africa's Largest Wetland
  • Who's Afraid of the Big Bad EPA?

WEBINARS, MEETINGS, TRAINING

Webinars

  • ASWM's Members' webinar: Using Beaver as a Wetland Restoration Tool: Restoration Lessons Learned and an Introduction to the Beaver Restoration Assessment Tool (BRAT)
  • Climate Change Adaptation & Resilience
  • AWRA webinar: Water Security in 2015: Case Studies from the Nile River Basin
  • Simplifying Stormwater Detention Design with Precast Concrete & Hydrologic Modeling
  • ASWM’s Wetland Restoration Webinar: Stream/Wet Meadow Restoration
  • Maps and Datasets for Blue Carbon Habitats
  • American Water Resources Association webinar: Unique Program to Drive Water Quality in the Delaware River Watershed
  • Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Part 2 - “The Florida Wetlands Integrity Dataset: Analysis of nonrenewable energy data and construction of graph-theoretic networks to quantify landscape integrity”
  • Center for Watershed Protection webcast: What to Do About Trashy Watersheds
  • Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM) webinar: Developing & Implementing Dam Removal Projects
  • AWRA webinar: History of Water Quality Monitoring and Assessment in the United States
  • EPA's Green Infrastructure Program 2015 Webcast Series: Winter Weather O&M for Green
  • National Park Service Ocean Parks Centennial
  • Center for Watershed Protection webcast: Checking in on Post-Construction Stormwater Management
  • EPA's Green Infrastructure Program 2015 Webcast Series: Ahead of the Curve – Implementing Green Infrastructure in Rural and Growing Communities

Meetings

  • 70th Annual Soil and Water Conservation Society (SWCS) Conference
  • National Center for Atmospheric Research Second Annual Graduate Workshop: Environmental Data Analytics
  • Quaternary Perspectives on Climate Change, Natural Hazards and Civilization
  • 21st International Conference on Environmental Indicators
  • StormCon, the North American Surface Water Quality Conference and Expo
  • Advances in Invasive Plant Science: Applying research outcomes to management and restoration at the species, community, and landscape levels
  • American Society of Civil Engineers Watershed Management Symposium
  • 2015 Mid-Atlantic Volunteer Monitoring Conference: Bridging the Water Quality Data Gap
  • Ecological Society of America: Ecological Science at the Frontier: Celebrating ESA's Centennial
  • Wetland Restoration and Training: Wetland Restoration Workshop
  • Mississippi Urban Forest Council: Urban Forestry and Green Infrastructure Conference
  • Towards Resilient Ecosystems: Restoring the Urban, the Rual and the Wild
  • 4th Biennial Symposium of the International Society for River Science
  • Stockholm International Water Institute: 2015 World Water Week
  • Climate Resolve: California Climate Change Symposium: Using Climate Science to Plan for a Resilient Future
  • U.S. Water Alliance: One Water Leadership Summit
  • 2015 Floodplain Management Annual Conference
  • The Sixth Student Conference on Conservation Science - Bengaluru 2015
  • WETPOL 2015 - 6th International Symposium: Wetland Pollutant Dynamics and Control Annual Conference
  • Wetland Restoration and Training: Wetland Restoration Workshop
  • USDA and EPA are cosponsoring a National Workshop on Water Quality Markets
  • Transportation Research Board: International Conference on Transportation System Resilience to Climate Change and Extreme Weather Events
  • San Francisco Estuary Partnership: State of the San Francisco Estuary Conference 12th Edition
  • Resource Institute, Inc.: Mid-Atlantic Stream Restoration Conference
  • Lacawac Ecology Conference
  • Moving the Needle Toward a Restored Bay Watershed
  • Water Environment Federation Technical Exhibition and Conference
  • 2015 Great Lakes Commission Annual Meeting
  • British Columbia Wildlife Federation's Wetlands Education Program: Communities Conserving Wetlands
  • Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: 11th Annual Great Lakes Restoration Conference
  • From a Watershed Perspective: Integrating Science into Policy
  • 6th annual Student Conference on Conservation Science
  • Society of Environmental Journalists: Weather, Water, Energy: News in Every Neighborhood
  • Villanova Urban Stormwater Partnership: 9th Stormwater Management Symposium
  • Huron River Watershed Council: 2015 Michigan Aquatic Restoration Conference
  • California Invasive Plant Council: 24th Annual Cal-IPC Symposium
  • 9th Biennial State of Lake Michigan and 15th Annual Great Lakes Beach Association Joint Conference
  • Natural Areas Association: 2015 Natural Areas Conference
  • Sixth Annual Northwest Climate Conference
  • 13th Annual Ecological Genomics Symposium
  • Coastal Estuarine Research Federation Conference: Grand Challenges in Coastal & Estuarine Science; Securing Our Future
  • Association of Climate Change Officers will hold the 2015 Rising Seas Summit
  • Think Blue Maine Partner Maine Stormwater Conference
  • AWRA's 50th Annual Water Resources Conference
  • National Working Waterfront Network: National Working Waterfronts & Waterways Symposium
  • North American Lakes: Embracing their History, Ensuring Their Future
  • American Geophysical Union (AGU): 2015 AGU Fall Meeting

Training

  • Field Botany and Plant Ecology of the Eastern Maine Coast
  • Sediment Transport in Stream Assessment and Design
  • Wetland Restoration Techniques Practicum at SUNY-ESF
  • Problematic Wetland Delineation Seminar
  • Assessment of Wetland Food Web Support – Patterns in Primary and Secondary Production
  • WOW! The Wonders of Wetlands
  • Introduction to Environmental Modeling: Linking Social and Natural Sciences
  • Certified Hydric Soils Investigator
  • POW! The Planning of Wetlands
  • Hydrophytic Vegetation (Piedmont)
  • Botany at the Landscape Scale
  • Lakes and Rivers Understanding Their Ecology and Water Quality
  • Managing Floodplain Development Through the National Flood Insurance Program
  • 5-day General CRAM Training with riverine and depressional wetland field examples
  • Conservation for Development Professionals: Strategies for implementing biodiversity action plans for the private sector
    Grasses, Sedges and Rushes
  • Geomorphic and Ecological Fundamentals for River and Stream Restoration
  • The Wetlands Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification
  • The Original Environmental Compliance Bootcamp™
  • Advanced Hydric Soils
  • FIRM Map Revisions - Technical & Administrative Aspects - 2015
  • Wetland Permitting Training
  • Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
  • Vegetation Identification for Wetland Delineation: South
  • British Columbia Institute of Technology Wetland Restoration Course
  • Basic Wetland Delineation course
  • Wetland Delineation with Emphasis on Soils and Hydrology
  • Riparian Habitat Restoration in the Arid Southwest
  • Stormwater Planning & Design Using SWMM - 2015
  • Basic Wetland Delineation Professional Course
  • Woody Plants (Trees, Shrubs, and Vines) Identification
  • Planning and Functional Design
  • Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants
  • Environmental Concern Course: Project WET 2.0
  • Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Methodology for Delineating Wetlands
  • Introduction to Wetland Identification
  • Overview of WQ Regulations and Compliance - 2015
  • Understanding Advanced Stormwater Management Techniques
  • Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
  • Advanced Hydric Soils and Hydrology (Piedmont)
  • Problem and Atypical Wetland Delineation (Piedmont)
  • Floodplain Hydraulics Using HEC RAS - 2015
  • Statistical Downscaling of Global Climate Models in SDSM 5.2
  • Endangered Species Act Overview
  • WOW! The Wonders of Wetlands
  • POW! The Planning of Wetlands

SPECIAL EVENTS

  • The Wetlands Institute: Wetland Wonderland

 

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Wetland Breaking News

The Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News (WBN) is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those working in water resources and Wetland Breaking News July 2015related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published for over fifteen years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.

The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to news@aswm.org.

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled and Edited by Marla Stelk, Editor; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors. Executive Director: Jeanne Christie. Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399 Fax: 207-892-3089

All photos by Jeanne Christie, ASWM

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