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All photos by
Jeanne Christie, ASWM

     

Wetland Breaking News - November 2016Dear Fellow Wetlanders,

It’s been a strange month here at the Association of State Wetland Managers (ASWM). Halloween has come and gone, but mysterious sightings of some sort of strange wetland creature have been flooding our phone lines. We thought perhaps it was some bizarre flock of wild turkeys that were trying to avoid the Thanksgiving dinner table. But now that Thanksgiving has passed, and sightings continue to roll in, we think it must be something else…. If you have been following our posts on Facebook, you have seen some interesting video footage that has been taken from these various sightings. Although the prospects of what exactly the intentions of this strange wetland creature may be are a bit terrifying, ASWM is committed to protecting all wetland creatures, large and small. We hope you’ll support us in our efforts by generously donating to ASWM on Giving Tuesday (video footage posted here as well).

The news may contain troubling stories from here and abroad these days, but new opportunities exist within every new challenge. In this month’s Editor’s Choice section of Wetland Breaking News, I have highlighted stories about new opportunities and accomplishments. Nationally, federal funding continues to support critical efforts, e.g., the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service is now accepting applications for its Conservation Stewardship Program. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is awarding $1.3 million to revitalize America’s Urban Waters and the National Oceanic Administrative Administration recently awarded $44 million for climate research to improve community resilience. We also celebrated 40 years of the Conservation and Recovery Act in October.

And if you look at the State News section, you’ll find some inspiring stories of new initiatives such as the new California law that recognizes meadows and streams as green infrastructure which makes them eligible for public works funding. In Maryland, a 15-acre tract of land was just donated to the state to expand the Great Cypress Swamp. And in Virginia, farmers are finding that cleaning waterways can help bolster their bottom line. In our Wetland Science News section, you can find a story about how carbon emissions were flat for the third straight year. And new resources and publications continue to be developed to improve scientific knowledge, practice, policy and regulation.

Best regards,

Marla J. Stelk
Editor
Wetland Breaking News

     
                   

Wetland Breaking News - November 2016

Giving Tuesday Fun with ASWM!

 

   


ASWM’S Members’ Wetland Webinar: Innovations in State Buffer Management – November 30, 2016

The Association of State Wetland Managers Members’ Wetland Webinar Innovations in State Buffer Management will be held on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 at 3:00 p.m. Presented by Kimberly Roth, Environmental Analyst, New England Pollution Control Commission; Trish Garrigan, Healthy Watersheds and Green Infrastructure Coordinator, EPA New England; Tom Gile, Buffers and Soil Erosion Program Coordinator, Minnesota Bureau of Water and Soil Resources; Danny Bennett, Wildlife Biologist, West Virginia Department of Natural Resources. For more information, click here.

Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar: Comprehensive Local Planning and Programs: Charlotte-Mecklenburg’s Approach – December 6, 2016

In cooperation with the Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA), the
Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM) presents this quarter’s NFFA webinar: Comprehensive Local Planning and Programs: Charlotte-Mecklenburg’s Approach . This webinar will be held on December 6, 2016 at 3:00 p.m.ET and presented by Tim Trautman, PE, CFM, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Services, Engineering & Mitigation Program Manager. For more information, click here.

Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar – Maps of Potential Wetland Extent for Selected Streams in Indiana – December 21, 2016

Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Maps of Potential Wetland Extent for Selected Streams in Indiana will be held on Wednesday, December 21, 2016 at 3:00 p.m. ET and presented by Kathleen Fowler, U.S. Geological Survey. For more information and to register, click here.

   



SMU GeoSpatial Services staff, students to inventory Minnesota wetlands

Winona Post– November 23, 2016
Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota has signed an $880,000 agreement with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources to help inventory wetlands in the state’s Northwest region. This is the largest single project awarded to the university’s GeoSpatial Services (GSS), a project center that integrates professional services and academic apprenticeships in the areas of natural resource assessment, geographic analysis, and digital mapping. The two-year wetland project, which began in October, involves professional GSS staff working with Saint Mary’s undergraduate and graduate students interested in the fields of geographic information science and environmental science. Saint Mary’s students under professional supervision will be generating the majority of the data for updating the Northwest Minnesota National Wetlands Inventory. For full story, click here.

During Sandy, Wetlands Averted US $625-Million in Damages

By Jackie Snow – Hakai Magazine – November 16, 2016
In 2012, tropical cyclone Sandy made landfall in the United States’ northeastern coast, killing scores and causing extensive damage. The storm went on to become the second costliest cyclone in US history, after Hurricane Katrina. But as new research shows, it could have been much worse. Confirming their long-argued role as natural defenses, scientists calculated that coastal wetlands prevented as much as US $625-million in property damage during the storm. Overall, Sandy caused an estimated $50-billion in flood damages. Storm surge causes much of the damage during a tropical cyclone, but wetlands helped absorb some of the wave energy and rising water. For full article, click here.

USDA Announces Applications Available for Conservation Stewardship Program

USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service – November 10, 2016
Starting in November, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) will accept and process applications for enrollment in the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP), the nation’s largest conservation program. Applications will be made available in local service centers. For more information, click here.

Celebrating 40 Years of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

By Mathy Stanislaus – EPA Connect – October 21, 2016
Forty years ago, our nation looked much different than it does today. There were few protections in place to safeguard people and our environment from the mismanagement of solid and hazardous waste…and it showed. On October 21, 1976, President Ford signed the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) into law. And from that day, EPA and countless others have worked to protect the health of communities by promoting resource conservation and implementing safe waste management practices to ensure a cleaner environment for future generations. For full blog post, click here.

EPA Awarding $1.3 Million to Revitalize America’s Urban Waters and Surrounding Communities

Contact: Tricia Lynn – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – October 11, 2016
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is awarding $1.3 million to 22 organizations in 18 states to help protect and restore urban waters and to support community revitalization and other local priorities. “Often underserved communities in our nation’s cities face disproportionate impacts from pollution, and too often they lack the resources to do something about it,” said Joel Beauvais, EPA Deputy Assistant Administrator for Water. “EPA provides support to empower these communities to improve the quality of their waterways and to help reconnect people and businesses with the water they depend on.” For full news release, click here.

NOAA awards $44 million for climate research to improve community resilience

NOAA – October 3, 2016
NOAA’s Climate Program Office (CPO) has awarded $44.34 million for 73 new projects designed to help advance the understanding, modeling, and prediction of Earth’s climate system and to foster effective decision making. The projects, ranging from observing systems in the tropical Pacific Ocean to on-the-ground community-based research institutions, will be conducted by NOAA, universities, and other agency and research institutions. Some anticipated outcomes include more accurate forecasts, early warning hazards of drought, more robust decision support services, enhanced community and drought preparedness, and improved ability to respond and adapt to climate-related public health impacts. For full story, click here.

2017 National Wetlands Awards – Deadline for Nominations is December 21st

Environmental Law Institute
The National Wetlands Awards are presented annually to individuals who have excelled in wetlands protection, restoration, and education. Through coverage in the National Wetlands Newsletter, coordinated media outreach, and an awards ceremony on Capitol Hill, awardees receive national recognition and attention for their outstanding efforts. The program is administered by the Environmental Law Institute and supported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Forest Service, Natural Resources Conservation Service, NOAA Fisheries, and the Federal Highway Administration. ELI coordinates the awards program, while their federal agency supporters provide financial support, serve on the selection committee, and/or participate in the ceremony. For more information, click here. Deadline for nominations has been extended to December 21, 2016. For nomination guidelines, click here.

Funding Opportunity: Five Star & Urban Waters Restoration Grants

National Fish and Wildlife Foundation
The Five Star and Urban Waters Restoration Program seeks to develop nation-wide-community stewardship of local natural resources, preserving these resources for future generations and enhancing habitat for local wildlife. Projects seek to address water quality issues in priority watersheds, such as erosion due to unstable streambanks, pollution from stormwater runoff, and degraded shorelines caused by development. For more information, click here. Proposals due by January 31, 2017 by 11:59 p.m. ET.




Clean Water Rule: WOTUS ‘ultimately doomed.’ What happens next?

By Tiffany Stecker – E&E Publishing, Inc. – November 16, 2016
The Obama administration's controversial Clean Water Act jurisdiction rule was already on life support before the election. Dozens of lawsuits and a nationwide stay halted U.S. EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers' plans to implement the new standards on the ground. At the same time, congressional opponents and industry groups continued to paint the rule as invasive, hastily written and illegal. With Donald Trump's promise to pull the plug on the measure, it's only a matter time before it dies, say observers. "I think this rule is ultimately doomed," Vermont Law School professor Pat Parenteau said in an email. For full story, click here.

Republicans seek quick repeal of latest Obama administration regulations

By Erin Kelly – USA Today – November 15, 2016
Congressional Republicans are poised to act quickly next year to repeal tens of billions of dollars in environmental regulations and other federal rules issued by the Obama administration during its final seven months in power. As soon as Donald Trump won the presidential election last week, GOP lawmakers began scrambling to research the approximately 180 regulations that have been finalized since mid-May and may be eligible for repeal under a rarely used law called the Congressional Review Act. Republicans can undo any of those regulations they don't like if they act fast after Trump is sworn into office Jan. 20. For full story, click here.

Dakota pipeline protesters win temporary victory with promise for more review

By William Yardley – Los Angeles Times – November 14, 2016
Invoking the historic mistreatment of Native Americans, the Obama administration said Monday it will continue to withhold a final permit for completion of the controversial Dakota Access pipeline while it conducts further analysis of concerns that the project will damage sacred tribal sites and water supplies. Developers of the 1,170-mile pipeline say it would provide a vital and safe means of transporting as much as 500,000 barrels of crude oil daily from the Bakken region of North Dakota to an existing pipeline in Illinois. But the pipeline has stirred national controversy and become a rallying point among Native Americans across the country because it would cross a major waterway just a half-mile north of the Standing Rock Sioux Indian reservation. For full story, click here.

Crow Creek tribe sues U.S. government for $200 million

By Seth Tupper – Rapid City Journal – November 13, 2016
About 270 river-miles downstream from the Dakota Access pipeline protest camp, a South Dakota Native American tribe is quietly fighting for $200 million in compensation over alleged water-rights violations.
The Crow Creek Sioux Tribe, which resides on a reservation on the eastern banks of the Missouri River in central South Dakota north of Chamberlain, is locked in a legal showdown with the federal government in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims. For full story, click here.

'The Pantanal is national heritage': Protecting the world's largest wetlands

The Guardian – November 12, 2016
Inside a small aircraft, decorated with a polka-dot jaguar design, Ângelo Rabelo checks data on a small laptop computer. “We’re approaching a river spring!” he shouts over the plane’s noisy engine. Below, the Paraguay River in Brazil’s Mato Grosso state snakes between clusters of vibrant green forest and extensive patches of farmland. The plane flies over a large, barren-looking stretch of light brown land where soy is being grown. A small buffer zone of trees separates the crops from the river, in which lies a pulsating spring. Rabelo is the head of local NGO Instituto Homem Pantaneiro, which works to conserve the Pantanal region by monitoring waterways and promoting sustainable practices with the local population. The Paraguay river “is like the main artery feeding the veins of the Pantanal’s body – if this artery gets blocked, the whole body breaks down”, he says. For full story, click here.

Donald Trump's US election win stuns scientists

By Jeff Tollefson, Lauren Morello, and Sara Reardon – Nature – November 9, 2016
Republican businessman and reality-television star Donald Trump will be the United States’ next president. Although science played only a bit part in this year’s dramatic, hard-fought campaign, many researchers expressed fear and disbelief as Trump defeated former secretary of state Hillary Clinton on 8 November. “Trump will be the first anti-science president we have ever had,” says Michael Lubell, director of public affairs for the American Physical Society in Washington DC. “The consequences are going to be very, very severe.” For full story, click here.

Revived 'compact' could be court's answer to Georgia-Florida water war

By Dan Chapman – The Atlanta Journal-Constitution – November 4, 2016
Fifteen years ago, scientists from Georgia, Florida and Alabama played volleyball in order to build trust and let off steam after grueling days spent analyzing water-sharing scenarios involving the Chattahoochee, Flint and Apalachicola rivers. One day the games stopped. Negotiations among their bosses to create a three-state commission, or “compact,” to regulate the flow of the waters from North Georgia to the Gulf of Mexico had broken down. But the push for a tri-state compact never really died. And Ralph Lancaster Jr., appointed by the U.S. Supreme Court to resolve the latest water war legal battle, resurrected talk of a compact three times this week during trial. Once, he asked a witness whether an earlier attempt to create a regional water board was “a good thing”. For full article, click here.

USDA Begins National Project to Quantify Effects of Ag Conservation

KTIC Radio – November 3, 2016
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) is contacting 16,300 farmers and ranchers now through March to take part in a national survey that will more accurately measure the environmental benefits associated with implementation and installation of conservation practices on agricultural land. The results of the National Resources Inventory Conservation Effects Assessment Project (NRI-CEAP) survey will help further develop the science-based solutions for managing the agricultural landscape to improve environmental quality. For full story, click here.

Plan unveiled to protect U.S. sagebrush

By Keith Ridler – The Associated Press – The Argus Observer – November 2, 2016
Federal officials on Monday released an ambitious wildfire-fighting and restoration plan to protect a wide swath of sagebrush country in much of the West that supports cattle ranching and is home to an imperiled bird. The 139-page plan is a how-to guide that follows Interior Secretary Sally Jewell’s five-page secretarial order in early 2015 calling for a “science-based” approach to safeguard the greater sage grouse bird while contending with fires that have been especially destructive in the Great Basin. The Interior Department plan also identifies knowledge gaps as scientists try to find the best approach to restore and protect some 500,000 square miles of sagebrush steppe. For full article, click here.

Which states have most land in CRP?

By David Murray – Great Falls Tribune – November 1, 2016
On Oct. 28, the U.S. Department of Agriculture released details of the nearly $1.7 billion in Conservation Reserve Program payments made to more than half of a million U.S. property owners in 2016. “We have seen record demand to participate in this important program,” Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack in a Oct. 28 news release. “Despite the current enrollment limit of 24 million acres, USDA is committed to continuing our important partnerships with farmers, ranchers, state and local governments and sportsmen to maintain the environmental benefits provided by the Conservation Reserve Program.” For full story, click here.

Climate Change Is Already Forcing Americans to Move

By Christopher Flavelle – Bloomberg – October 31, 2016
Loraine Helber runs the public housing authority in Punta Gorda, Florida, a city of 18,000 just north of Fort Myers at the mouth of the Peace River. In March, she hopes to celebrate a milestone: the opening of new apartments for the elderly, replacing about 80 units destroyed by the hurricane. But the storm that destroyed the original public housing wasn't Hurricane Matthew; it was Hurricane Charley, 12 years ago. Neither the insurance company nor the federal government provided enough money to rebuild what was lost. Construction could proceed only once Bank of America, through a subsidiary, invested in the new building to get a tax write-off. For full article, click here.

Oregon standoff defendants found not guilty in 'unbelievable, truly astonishing' verdict

By Maxine Bernstein – Oregon Live – October 27, 2016
A jury Thursday delivered a stunning across-the-board acquittal to the leaders and participants in the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge occupation and a remarkable blow to the federal government as it tries to tamp down a national movement led by a Nevada family to open public lands to ranchers, miners and loggers. The verdicts finding Ammon Bundy, older brother Ryan Bundy and five others not guilty of a federal conspiracy drew elation from defense attorneys who spent five weeks arguing that the armed takeover amounted to a time-honored tradition of First Amendment protest and civil disobedience. For full story, click here.

EPA Releases the EJ 2020 Action Agenda, the Agency’s Environmental Justice Strategic Plan for 2016-2020

Contact: Tricia Lynn – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – October 27, 2016
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today released the Environmental Justice 2020 Action Agenda (EJ 2020), the Agency’s environmental justice strategic plan for 2016 to 2020. EJ 2020 will further integrate environmental justice considerations in all of the Agency’s programs, strengthen EPA’s collaboration with partners, and demonstrate progress on significant national challenges facing minority and low-income communities. For full news release, click here.

Great Lakes Commission to help accelerate adoption of green infrastructure across the Great Lakes

Great Lakes Commission – October 26, 2016
The Great Lakes Commission (GLC) will lead two projects to spark the adoption of green infrastructure across the Great Lakes region. With support from the Fred A. and Barbara M. Erb Family Foundation, the GLC is working with Lawrence Technological University through the Great Lakes Stormwater Technology Transfer project to advance adoption of stormwater management best practices and technologies across all sectors in the basin. An advisory group comprised of stormwater and green infrastructure experts met for the first time Thursday, Sept. 29 in Ann Arbor to launch the effort. For full article, click here.

U.S. EPA approves Pala Band of Mission Indians authority to develop water quality standards

Contact: Margot Perez-Sullivan – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – October 24, 2016
Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced the approval of the Pala Band of Mission Indians’ application for “Treatment in a similar manner as a State” under the federal Clean Water Act. Tomás Torres, EPA’s Water Division Director for the Pacific Southwest, presented the signed Certificate of Achievement to Tribal Water Resources Specialist Heidi Brow in a ceremony at the Regional Tribal Operations Committee meeting in San Francisco. For full news release, click here.

A bold new vision for restoring America’s most polluted river

By Kara Holsopple – The Allegheny Front – October 21, 2016
In many ways, the Ohio River is an unsung resource for the region it serves. The Ohio’s near-thousand-mile course flows through Pennsylvania and five other states before emptying into the Mississippi. It’s a source of drinking water for more than five million people. But its long legacy as a “working river” has also made it the most polluted in the country. Today, many cities and towns along the Ohio are rethinking their relationship to the river—and weighing how a large-scale restoration effort could be critical to the region’s future. For full story, click here.

Coastal crisis, conflicting ideas: How a complex restoration plan found success

By Natalie Peyronnin – Environmental Defense Fund – October 20, 2016
Delta systems such as coastal Louisiana are beautiful and unique intersections of communities, ecosystems and industry. But the wide variety of interests in these areas can also lead to discord as we plan for the future of our often-vulnerable coastal regions. For full blog post, click here.

Does the Agua Caliente tribe have rights to groundwater?

By Ian James – The Desert Sun – October 20, 2016 – Video
Lawyers for the Coachella Valley’s largest water districts and the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians presented their arguments to a federal appeals court in a water rights case that could set a precedent for tribes across the country. The case hinges on the question of whether the Agua Caliente tribe holds a federally granted “reserved right” to groundwater beneath its reservation in Palm Springs and surrounding areas. Lawyers for the Coachella Valley Water District and the Desert Water Agency urged the three-judge panel of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals to overturn a 2015 decision in which a judge sided with the tribe. If the water districts lose their appeal, a court would eventually determine how much groundwater the tribe is entitled to, and Agua Caliente leaders would gain greater influence in decisions about how the desert aquifer is managed. For full story and to view video, click here.

Dakota Access: Regulators regret tribe 'didn't come to the table' sooner

By Ellen M. Gilmer – E&E Publishing, LLC – October 18, 2016
North Dakota regulators did not see this coming. Forty-five miles from the massive demonstration formed to protest the Dakota Access pipeline, Brian Kalk sits in his Capitol office and recalls hours and hours of pipeline hearings with no hint of the fervent resistance that would eventually follow. "I don't think anyone thought it would turn into what we have now," he said, referring to the thousands of tribal members and environmentalists who have cycled through the anti-pipeline camp south of here, plus the hundreds who have engaged in work site protests, sometimes with violent results. For full story, click here.

Landscape architect Thomas Woltz is coming to a park near you.

By Diana Budds – Environmental Health News – October 17, 2016
On the west side of Manhattan, an armada of cranes and construction workers is building the city’s largest 21st-century development. A 28-acre, $25 billion megaproject by Related Companies, Hudson Yards will include six skyscrapers, 17 million square feet of commercial and residential space, a performing arts center, and a hotel. The project’s scale is impressive, as is its location spanning one of the busiest railways in New York City—an industrial site filled with train cars and a tangle of tracks and tunnels. But when it’s completed in 2025, people won’t see any of that heavy infrastructure. For full article, click here.

Data Show Farmers Must Do More to Protect the Environment, Public Health

By Craig Cox - AgMag – October 13, 2016
Across the nation, Americans are seeing the price of farm pollution firsthand in contaminated drinking water, toxic algal blooms and pesticide-laden foods. Agriculture is largely exempt from regulation under key environmental laws, so the protection of public health and natural resources largely depends on so-called voluntary programs that pay farmers and farmland owners to take steps to curb polluted runoff from their operations. For full article, click here.

Coalition Launched to Scale up Conservation Finance

Michelle Mendlewicz – Conservation Finance Network – September 28, 2016
The current conservation finance gap is estimated to be $200-300 billion per year. As public and philanthropic investments in conservation are in decline, private investment has the potential to bridge it. That was the key message conveyed by the Coalition for Private Investment in Conservation (CPIC) launched at the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) 2016 World Conservation Congress on Sept. 2, in Honolulu, Hawaii. For full story, click here.

Trump taps climate-change skeptic to oversee EPA transition

By Brady Dennis – The Washington Post – November 11, 2016 – Video
President-elect Donald Trump has made no secret of his disdain for the Environmental Protection Agency, saying the regulations it has put out under President Obama are “a disgrace.” He has vowed to roll back Obama’s signature effort to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, known as the Clean Power Plan, and to scrap a litany of other “unnecessary” rules, especially those imposed on the oil, gas and coal sectors. The man planning how a Trump administration can obliterate Obama’s environmental legacy is Myron Ebell, a Washington fixture who has long been a cheerful warrior against what he sees as an alarmist, overzealous environmental movement that has used global warming as a pretext for expanding government. For full story and to view video, click here.


AL: Alabama’s ‘Worst Drought In Memory’ Is About To Get Even Worse

By Dominique Mosbergen – The Huffington Post – October 28, 2016
Alabama farmer George Robertson has experienced some bad droughts over the years, but the 74-year-old has seen nothing like this. But for all his years in the farming business, Robertson, who served on his district’s Soil and Water Conservation Committee for more than 40 years, said he’s never seen a drought quite so bad. For full story, click here.

CA: Feds say 25% of California is drought-free, but state experts are still cautious

By Matt Stevens – Los Angeles Times – November 3, 2016
A rainy October in Northern California has lifted about a quarter of the state out of drought conditions, the U.S. Drought Monitor reported Thursday. It’s the rosiest picture released by federal officials since the spring of 2013, when about 64% of the state was considered to be in “moderate drought” — or worse. The rains so far this fall have given some weather watchers reason for optimism as California braces for a potential sixth year of drought. For full story, click here.

CA: San Francisco Bay Joint Venture just launched a new video shorts campaign

San Francisco Bay Joint Venture - November 2016
The SF Bay Joint Venture has released the first in an upcoming series of video shorts that seek to show in 1 minute or less, how and where wetland restoration efforts by partners of the Joint Venture are working throughout the nine Bay Area Counties. You are invited to watch and share! It is available here, on Vimeo, and on Youtube. They also offer a publishing guide on their website for anyone who wants to spread the good news through their social media outlets.

CA: Toxins from freshwater algae found in San Francisco Bay shellfish

By Tim Stephens – University of California Santa Cruz – October 26, 2016
Scientists have detected high levels of a toxin produced by freshwater algae in mussels from San Francisco Bay. Although shellfish harvested from California's coastal waters are monitored for toxins produced by marine algae, they are not routinely tested for this freshwater toxin, called microcystin. The toxin, which causes liver damage, is produced by a type of cyanobacteria (also known as blue-green algae) that thrives in warm, nutrient-rich water conditions. It has been found in many lakes and rivers in California, including the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, which flow into the San Francisco Bay Delta, and in several Bay Area lakes. For full story, click here.

CA: New California Law Recognizes Meadows, Streams As "Green Infrastructure", Eligible For Public Works Funding

By Kelli Barrett – Ecosystem Marketplace – October 20, 2016
The US state of California has spent the better part of the last hundred years cobbling together a massive network of pipes, pumps, and aqueducts that today suck water from remote rivers in angry parts of distant states up over high mountains down through dry valleys and into the Southern part of the state. It’s a technological and engineering wonder – one the Romans would envy – but it’s only as good as the forests and catchments that mop up that water and filter it for human consumption, and those ecosystems are increasingly under pressure. For full story, click here.

FL: Florida Votes to Release Millions of Zika-Fighting Mosquitos

By Marley Walker – WIRED – November 10, 2016
Zika’s fate was on the ballot. A Florida Keys county elected to have British biotech company Oxitec release millions of genetically modified mosquitoes to combat the virus. Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are some of the world’s deadliest animals: Carriers of yellow fever, dengue, chikungunya, and, now, Zika, a disease that causes severe birth defects like microcephaly in the fetuses of women infected with the virus. In August, the Food and Drug Administration approved a field trial to test the modified mosquitoes’ ability to cull populations of Zika-carrying bugs. But the trial needed voter approval to proceed. On Tuesday, the constituents of Monroe County, encompassing the Florida Keys and a southwestern chip on the state’s mainland, gave it the go-ahead. For full story, click here.

FL: Pasco official: $14M wetland project will help environment

By Leah Masuda – Bay News 9 – October 25, 2016
The Tampa Bay region will get a boost in its water supply from a $14 million project in Pasco County that leaders say will have a positive impact on the environment.

  • Pasco teamed with Southwest Florida Water Management District
  • Together they constructed 237 acres of wetlands\
  • Scientists say project will improve environment, drinking water

4G Ranch sits in between two regional well fields that produce 30 million gallons a day of drinking water for Pasco, Pinellas and Hillsborough counties. “Thirty million gallons a day withdrawn from this area has a detrimental impact. It reduces the superficial water table in this area," said Jeff Harris, an environmental biologist for Pasco County Utilities. "That causes some environmental degradation to the wetlands and lakes and things of that nature that are drying up." For full story, click here.

IA: Wetland credited with reducing flood's crest

By Orlan Love – The Gazette – October 28, 2016
The 6,100-acre Big Marsh wetland complex north of here helped reduce the crest of last month’s Cedar River flood, speakers at the Cedar River Watershed Coalition’s fall meeting said Friday. Efforts to make the watershed more absorbent since the record flood of 2008 “really helped” communities along the Cedar come through the 2016 flood — the second highest in Cedar Rapids history — with minimal damage, said State Sen. Rob Hogg, D-Cedar Rapids, co-chairman of the coalition. For full story, click here.

IA: Who will pay for water pollution cleanup divides urban and rural Iowa

By Judy Woodruff – BS Newshour – October 25, 2016 – Video
Last week, we aired a report about new and old technologies being used to help clean up water runoff in the nation’s heartland. Tonight, a second report about water and the tensions between rural agriculture and urban areas over keeping it clean. From Detroit Public Television, David Biello reports, as part of the documentary “The Ethanol Effect.” For full story and to view video, click here.

KS: EPA grant aids Rowe-KPS plans for wetland, outdoor classroom at high school

By Lori Potter – Kearney Hub – October 27, 2016
The National Audubon Society’s Rowe Sanctuary southwest of Gibbon has received one of three environmental education grants awarded by the Environmental Protection Agency’s Region 7 based in Lenexa, Kan. The grant will help pay for a Wetlands for Schools and Communities project that is a partnership between Rowe and Kearney Public Schools. It is estimated to cost $132,290. Rowe Sanctuary Director Bill Taddicken said the EPA grant is for $91,000, and applications have been made for other grants for the balance of project funds needed. The plan is to create an outdoor wetland at the new Kearney High School. For full story, click here.

KS: It's Official: Injection of Fracking Wastewater Caused Kansas’ Biggest Earthquake

By Lorraine Chow – EcoWatch – October 14, 2016 – Video
The largest earthquake ever recorded in Kansas—a 4.9 magnitude temblor that struck northeast of Milan on Nov. 12, 2014—has been officially linked to wastewater injection into deep underground wells, according to new research from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The epicenter of that extremely rare earthquake struck near a known fracking operation. For full story and to view video, click here.

LA: $10.7 billion available for coastal master plan's first 15 years

By Mark Schleifstein – NOLA.com – The Times Picayune – October 25, 2016
Louisiana expects to have at least $10.7 billion for coastal master plan projects during the first 15 years of the 2017 rewrite of the plan, state officials said Tuesday (Oct. 25). But the state must still clear a variety of financial hurdles to be able to turn that money into projects, and must identify ways to pay the remainder of the 50 year plan's expected $50 billion price tag. That's the conclusion of a variety of state officials, university researchers and business leaders who attended the second day of the a coastal protection and restoration leadership roundtable cosponsored by the state Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority and the America's WETLAND Foundation at the Lod Cook Alumni Center on the Louisiana State University Campus in Baton Rouge. For full story, click here. For a related story, click here.

MD: Partnership to Accelerate Conservation in Bay Watershed

Lancaster Farming – October 28, 2016
The USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service has announced funding for Accelerating Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plans, a regional conservation partnership program project led by the Maryland Department of Agriculture. The project will boost implementation of conservation measures to meet resource protection and nutrient reduction goals of total maximum daily loads, or TMDLs, in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. More than $450,000 is now available in Maryland to help farmers implement animal waste management practices. Producers who are interested in waste storage facilities, ag waste pumping plants, heavy-use areas and solid-liquid waste separation facilities are encouraged to visit their local USDA Service Center to apply. Interested producers must submit an application on or before Nov. 18. Applications are available at your local USDA Service Center and at www.md.nrcs.usda.gov. For full story, click here.

MD: Land donation expands Great Cypress Swamp

Cape Gazette – October 12, 2016
Delaware Wild Lands (DWL) has announced its newest land acquisition: a donation of 15 acres in Worcester County, MD, just south of the Delaware border. The permanent protection of this parcel expands DWL's conservation of the Great Cypress Swamp. This 15-acre tract of wooded wetlands was generously donated to DWL by Dr. Peter Whaley and Mrs. Mary Hitch, two siblings of the Whaley family. It is located within the headwaters of the Pocomoke River, a tributary to the Chesapeake Bay. For full story, click here.

MI: Federal judge: Deliver bottled water to Flint residents

By Chad Livergood – The Detroit News – November 10, 2016 – Video
A federal judge ruled Thursday the state of Michigan and Flint have to provide home-delivered bottled water to residents if they can’t prove faucet filters are working to remove harmful lead from the drinking water. U.S. District Judge David Lawson ordered home delivery of four cases of water per resident each week unless state and city officials can verify each resident has a properly installed and maintained faucet water filter. For full story and to view video, click here.

MI: Michigan adds algae-choked Lake Erie to list of 'impaired waters'

By Garret Ellison – MLive – November 10, 2016
Michigan has designated its portion of the Western Lake Erie Basin as an impaired watershed under the Clean Water Act following a harmful algal bloom that scientists say was smaller - but more toxic - than last year. On Thursday, Nov. 10, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality added western Lake Erie to a biennial list of impaired state waters the agency was supposed to submit to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in April. Environment and conservation groups have lobbied for the designation, which opens the door to stronger protections, enforcement measures and funding to energize state and regional efforts to fix the chronic algae problem. For full story, click here.

MI: Michigan's Newest Dirty Job: Wetland Monitoring

By Rebecca Thiele – WMUK – October 26, 2016
If you enjoy long walks through the mud, scaling fences, and doing paperwork under the hot sun - you’d love working for the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality’s first ever wetland monitoring program. It’s a dirty job, but it’s the only way to find out if the state’s wetlands are healthy. Anne Garwood and her team traipse through the water at one of the more than 18 wetland sites they visited this summer. Getting to these spots can be an adventure. Garwood says each location is randomly selected by a computer. Sometimes that point is easy to get to - like when it’s near the edge of the wetland. For full story, click here.

MN: Minnesota Groups Fear Environmental Shortcuts in Enbridge's Plan to Rebuild Faulty Pipeline

By David Hasemyer – InsideClimate News – October 31, 2016
As the Canadian company Enbridge faces a proposed federal deadline to replace an aging pipeline, environmental organizations in Minnesota are raising concerns the company is using that as leverage with state regulators to bypass a rigorous environmental review. A battle has been brewing over the approval process for the new pipeline ever since a settlement was announced between the federal government and the company over a massive oil spill in Michigan six years ago. For full story, click here.

NJ: Warren Co. Freeholders miffed over wetland mitigation

WFMZ-TV – October 27, 2016
Warren County Freeholders are mad that Green Acres money is being spent to turn Warren County properties into wetlands. Fresh off the heels of a Land Usage meeting in Independence Township, freeholder Edward Smith updated the board on how wetlands mitigation projects were affecting the county’s open space. The land around Independence Township is prone to flooding and was once considered swampland. However, the land was drained to prevent mosquito-born illnesses and to create farmland. For full story, click here.

NJ: Sandy's Lessons Lost: Jersey Shore Rebuilds in Sea's Inevitable Path

By Leslie Kaurman – InsideClimate News – October 26, 2016
For most of the last century, modest one-story summer bungalows lined this private strip of road that dead-ends at Vision Beach. Then Sandy made landfall here on Oct. 29, 2012, obliterating them.
Today, except for the occasional vacant lot, the street has been transformed into two rows of gleaming brand-new three-story homes. The main floors are about 14 feet off the ground, perched on pillars. Below, instead of an enclosed ground floor, many have parking spaces or picnic tables. Jay Lynch, the town's planner, calls the new developments "canyons" because of the heights. Similarly towering construction is occurring on almost every nearby road. For full story, click here.

NM: New Mexico Maps Wetlands to Identify and Quantify Resources

ECOS – October 28, 2016
The New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) Surface Water Quality Bureau Wetlands Program (SWQB) has mapped and classified wetland and riparian resources and deepwater habitats in a portion of the state. While the projects map the northcentral and northeastern parts of the state and the U.S. Forest Service Wilderness Areas, the goal is to map and classify the wetlands in the entire state. The SWQB believes that the information from this effort will help state and federal agencies alike to improve wetland planning and restore and protect wetlands. For full story, click here.

NY: Pain of Sandy endures: Recovery from 2012 superstorm not possible in a few neighborhoods

By Ula Ilnytzky, Associated Press – Albany Times Union – October 28, 2016
For four years, people have worked hard and mostly successfully to erase the deep scars Superstorm Sandy left on the New York and New Jersey coastlines when it crashed ashore with deadly force Oct. 29, 2012. But recovery will never come to Oakwood Beach, among several places along the coast that have seen permanent changes wrought by the storm. The Staten Island neighborhood, improbably built on a salt marsh, is slowly being returned to nature after state officials concluded it would be foolish to rebuild in a place with so little protection from the ocean. For full story, click here.

NY: Niagara River restoration: 'It's like Jurassic Park there'

By T.J. Pignataro – The Buffalo News – November 14, 2016
It can be hard to see from the shoreline at Riverside Park, but the upper Niagara River is teeming with life. Great blue herons, bald eagles, egrets and cormorants soar through the sky. Sturgeon, muskellunge and other fish species spawn in the river’s swift current. Turtles, beavers and mink are all there, too. Not long ago, it wasn’t that way, as nature often took the brunt of change during the industrialized 20th century. Now it's a comeback story of the 21st century. For full story, click here.

NY: Mayor De Blasio and FEMA Announce Plan to Revise NYC’s Flood Maps

FEMA – October 17, 2016
Mayor Bill de Blasio and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) today announced an agreement to revise New York City’s flood maps. This is the result of the de Blasio administration’s 2015 appeal of FEMA’s flood risk calculations for New York City and the region, which mapped 35,000 more homes and buildings across the city into highest flood risk areas. For full news release, click here.

NC: What the Election Could Mean for NC: Environmental Health

By Catherine Clabby – North Carolina Health News– November 14, 2016
When it comes to environmental policies with health implications, expect last week’s elections to bring plenty of change to North Carolina. President-elect Donald Trump ran against many environmental policies that Barack Obama embraced, including the current president’s support of a broad regulatory agenda at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). That includes a drive to require states to reduce reliance on burning carbon dioxide-emitting coal as a power source in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions causing global climate change. For full story, click here.

NC: Photos Show Overflowing Factory Farm Waste in NC After Hurricane Matthew

By Georgina Gustin – InsideClimate News –November 4, 2016
After Hurricane Matthew swept across North Carolina last month, environmental groups took to the air and have released photos showing dozens of factory farms deluged by the storm's heavy rains, spilling potentially toxic animal waste into the state's rivers. The Environmental Working Group and Waterkeeper Alliance released the images on Friday, organized in "before and after" photos that show the extent of the flooding and potential pollution in the hardest hit areas. For full story, click here.

ND: On Dakota Access, Obama says Army Corps is weighing whether to ‘reroute’ pipeline

By Derek Hawkins and Jullet Ellperin – The Washington Post – November 2, 2016 – Video
President Obama said Tuesday that his administration was considering ways to “reroute” the Dakota Access oil pipeline after a week of violent clashes between authorities and activists protesting the controversial project. In an interview with NowThis, Obama addressed concerns from Native Americans that the pipeline cuts too close to tribal lands in North Dakota. The $3.8 billion project was approved by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and is slated to cross under a section of the Missouri River less than a mile from the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. For full story and to view video, click here.

OH: Why Big Industry is Paying Small Farmers to Cut Pollution in the Ohio River

By Julie Grant – Public Broadcasting – November 4, 2016
Some water quality advocates think getting big industrial polluters to pay for farm runoff prevention projects is an innovative way to control water pollution. But critics of the Ohio River’s pollution credit trading system say it’s just another pay-to-pollute scheme. For full story, click here.

OK: Oklahoma regulators target more disposal wells following Cushing quake

By Liz Hampton – Reuters – November 8, 2016
The Oklahoma Corporation Commission (OCC) on Tuesday said it was implementing an action plan that shuts or reduces volumes from 58 wastewater disposal wells in the Arbuckle formation of Oklahoma following Sunday's magnitude 5.0 earthquake. In a statement, the state's oil and gas regulator said that under the new directive, it will require seven wells to shut by Nov. 14 with an additional 47 more to reduce volume by Nov. 21. Four wells in the impacted area have already been shut as part of an October directive. The 47 wells that must reduce volume had already made a 40 percent reduction following an earlier directive. For full story, click here.

OR: Oregon Occupation Unites Native American Tribes to Save Their Land

By Kirk Siegler – NPR – October 27, 2016
As the six-week trial of Ammon Bundy and his co-defendants wound its way to Thursday's startling conclusion, Bundy's supporters were a colorful presence outside the federal courthouse in Portland, Ore. They dressed in traditional cowboy attire and waved American flags at passing cars. Some even rode horses up and down the busy city sidewalk. A block away, Jarvis Kennedy watched all of this and rolled his eyes. "We don't claim to be victims, but we were," he said. Kennedy is a councilman with the Burns Paiute Tribe in Harney County, Ore. That's the home of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, which armed militants — led by brothers Ammon and Ryan Bundy — occupied in protest of the government's ownership of federal lands. For full story, click here.

OR: Renowned fisheries scientist to answer question: 'With all this reclaimed wetland, will we see more salmon returns?'

Tillamook County Pioneer – October 18, 2016
Tillamook has been the center of intensive salmon-habitat restoration efforts over the last two summers.
We are currently hosting the largest wetland-restoration project in Oregon’s history. Tillamook County’s “Southern Flow Corridor Landowner Preferred Alternative” project is reconnecting 520 acres of tidal wetlands in the Wilson-Trask delta, and is due to be completed in a few weeks. For full story, click here.

PA: Pennsylvania Ruling on Eminent Domain Puts Contentious Pipeline Project on Alert

By Zahra Hirji – InsideClimate News – October 18, 2016
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has unanimously ruled unconstitutional a section of state law that lets companies seize private land for certain natural gas projects, with potentially major implications for one of the biggest proposed pipelines in the state. Under the original rule, passed in 2012, any company has the authority to take private land through eminent domain for the purpose of storing natural gas underground. The justices decided on Sept. 28 that this section of the law unconstitutionally lets private companies profit from taking people's land with no direct or obvious benefit to Pennsylvanians. The oil and gas companies argued the projects could benefit the state by creating new jobs, for example, but the justices were not convinced. For full story, click here.

SD: How land use change affects water quality, aquatic life

ScienceDaily – November 7, 2016
Examining how land-use changes may affect water quality and fisheries resources in lakes and rivers will help natural resource agencies manage wildlife populations, according to Steven Chipps, leader of the U.S. Geological Survey, South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at South Dakota State University. The fisheries biologist and Muthiah Muruganandam, a Fulbright scholar from the Indian Council of Agricultural Research, will use existing data to track changes in the characteristics and water quality of surface waters in northeastern South Dakota. For full story, click here.

TX: Evaluating water resources for Texas agriculture and the potential for a water crisis

By Logan Hawkes – Southwest Farm Press – November 1, 2016
Exponential economic and population growth over the next 25 years will turn Texas into the biggest population center and largest economic base of any state in the nation, surpassing California by the year 2040 and potentially tripling in size over the next 60 years according to some estimates. Those numbers were supported by a report offered by Texas A&M Executive Director of the Water Resources Institute, Dr. John Tracy, who addressed participants during a session at the South Texas Farm and Ranch Show in Victoria in late October. For full story, click here.

UT: NASA images show Utah's Great Salt Lake shrinking dramatically

By Brad Plumer – Vox – November 6, 2016
The good folks at NASA never miss a chance to let us know when vital bodies of water around the world are shriveling up and vanishing. First it was Lake Mead. Then it was the Aral Sea. Now it’s poor Utah’s turn. Earlier this week, NASA’s Earth Observatory posted satellite images showing the dramatic decline of Utah’s Great Salt Lake over the past five years. For full story, click here.

UT: Unprecedented algal blooms offer lessons for the future

By Amy Joi O’Donoghue – Deseret News Utah – October 23, 2016
Scofield State Park manager Jonathan Hunt spent an anxious summer looking at the algae-infested waters of the high mountain reservoir devoid of boats, fishermen and parents with their children splashing about. At a time when the place should have been teeming with water enthusiasts, the waters were still. Even with this, he was grateful that science backed the decision to declare the water off limits, to keep people safe until the threat of potentially deadly toxins had vanished. "We had the numbers and we knew what the unacceptable numbers were," he said. "It was good to get a baseline." This summer's unprecedented harmful algal bloom outbreak "closed" Utah Lake to public access, shut down marinas there and infected Payson Lakes as well as Scofield Reservoir. For full story, click here.

VT: Four Unique Vermont Wetlands Slated for Class I Protection

Contact: Laura Lapierre – Vermont Digger– October 19, 2016
The Agency of Natural Resources is starting a process to provide special protections for four unique Vermont wetlands by designating them Class I. The four wetlands vary in size, region, and function, but all have been determined to be irreplaceable or exceptional in their contribution to Vermont’s natural heritage. The Agency has reviewed over 20 wetlands with potential for Class I status and is focusing on the following four: Black Gum Swamps in Vernon, Dennis Pond Wetlands in Brunswick, Chickering Fen in Calais, and Sandbar Wetlands in Milton and Colchester. Three wetlands are currently designated as Class I, with the most recent being designated over ten years ago. For full story, click here.

VA: Farmers Find Cleaning Waterways Can Help The Bottom Line

The Roanoke Star – October 21, 2016
Nestled in the mountains of Luray, Virginia, in the northern part of the Shenandoah Valley, David Sours’ produce farm is one of many in the Shenandoah and Rappahannock river watersheds to benefit from a grant supporting farm-to-table connections. “Everybody believes local food is an easy thing and take it for granted but it is complicated, especially on the distribution side,” said Dale Gardner, field scientist and value chain facilitator. “People don’t realize how labor intensive it is.” For full story, click here.

WA: No more sewage dumping in Puget Sound, new Ecology rule proposes

By Lynda V. Mapes – The Seattle Times – November 7, 2016
Puget Sound would no longer be a toilet for vessels dumping raw or partially treated sewage overboard under a regulation proposed by the state Department of Ecology. The new rule would require any vessel with a permanent toilet aboard to store waste until it could be pumped out ashore, instead of dumping it overboard. Vessel owners now may dump raw sewage in Puget Sound 3 miles from shore, and dump partially treated sewage overboard — even at the dock. For full story, click here.

WA: Updated program protects shorelines in Southeast Washington

Contact: Brook Beeler – Washington Department of Ecology – October 27, 2016
In an effort to preserve and protect more than 300 miles of shoreline along rivers in Southeast Washington, three counties worked with the city of Clarkston and the town of Starbuck to update their shoreline program. Asotin, Columbia and Garfield counties, along with Clarkston and Starbuck, participated in a regional planning process to update their shoreline program. The group developed one program that applies throughout Southeast Washington with specific detail to address individual needs of Clarkston and Starbuck. They then submitted their program to the Washington Department of Ecology for review and approval. As part of the review process, Ecology is making the program available for public review and comment Oct. 27 through Nov. 30. For full news release, click here.

WA: How the western water wars may end

By Zack Colman – The Christian Science Monitor – October 16, 2016
Over the past 100 years, this arid region of Central Washington has undergone a stunning transformation. Engineers and farmers have captured the annual mountain snowmelt and used it to change the sagebrush steppe into an agricultural Eden of tree fruits, mint, hay, and corn. Rows of green crops adorn a once-parched landscape. Reservoirs funnel water to farms and turn massive turbines that spirit electricity to far-off coastal cities. And Central Washington has become an apple basket for the world. For full story, click here.

WV: What we know and don't know about the WV water crisis deal

By Ken Ward Jr. Charleston – Gazette-Mail – November 1, 2016
Late Monday afternoon, U.S. District Judge John Copenhaver made public the “term sheets” in tentative class-action settlements with West Virginia American Water Co. and Eastman Chemical Co. The aim is to resolve litigation over the role the companies played in the water crisis that followed the Jan. 9, 2014, chemical spill at Freedom Industries. The settlements are far from final, and there are many steps left to go before residents, businesses and workers will see any compensation. For full story, click here.


Wetland Breaking News - November 2016

Slime, Shorebirds, and a Scientific Mystery

By Daniel Wood – Hakai Magazine – November 15, 2016
As the tide pulls out over British Columbia’s Roberts Bank on an early October morning, it pools amid the hummocks, follows intertidal runnels seaward, and leaves a silvery-green sheen on the exposed mudflats where Canadian researcher Bob Elner walks. Thousands of southbound snow geese, propelled skyward by a hawk’s approach, move in ever-shifting murmurations to Elner’s right. Dunlin and ducks grub along the tideline to his left. But the western sandpipers, he observes, are gone. A scientist emeritus at Environment and Climate Change Canada, Elner has long studied the sandpipers, and he knows they have headed south on their 10,000-kilometer fall migration from the Arctic to Latin America. The big unspoken question hanging over these mudflats is how long the sandpipers and other shorebirds will continue to stop on the Fraser River estuary and fuel up, before flying onward. For full article, click here.

An Ecosystem's Lifeblood, Flowing Through Gravel

By Jim Robbins – The New York Times – November 14, 2016
They are beautiful, glistening icons of the West, filled with life and history. But there is far more to mountain rivers, scientists are learning, than the water churning between their banks. In a paper published earlier this year, a team of ecologists sought to outline the essential role of gravel-bed rivers in Western mountain ecosystems — the first time an interdisciplinary team has looked at river systems on such a large scale. For full story, click here.

Stunningly good news for the planet: Carbon emissions were flat for the third straight year

By Chris Mooney – The Washington Post – November 13, 2016
A world greatly concerned about how the election of Donald Trump as the next U.S. president could stall global climate policy received a major dose of welcome news Sunday, when scientists published a projection suggesting that for the third straight year, global carbon dioxide emissions did not increase much in 2016. The news comes from the Global Carbon Project, a group of scientists who measure how much carbon dioxide humans emit each year, as well as how much is subsequently absorbed by plants, land surfaces and oceans. The difference between the two determines the amount of carbon dioxide that remains in the atmosphere and drives global warming. For full story, click here.

Climate change is changing nature so much it may need ‘human-assisted evolution’, scientists say

By Ian Johnston – Independent – November 10, 2016
Life on Earth has already been fundamentally altered by global warming, affecting the genes of plants and animals and altering every ecosystem on the planet, according to a major review of the scientific literature. A paper in the leading journal Science warned the changes were so dramatic – and potentially dangerous – that scientists might be forced to intervene in some cases to create “human-assisted evolution”. For full story, click here.

Endangered species database may have misclassified hundreds of animals

By Michael Price – Science Magazine – November 9, 2016
The world’s most respected database of endangered species is underestimating—sometimes severely—the risk of extinction to many animals around the world. That’s the conclusion of a new study, which finds that, by failing to incorporate new technologies like satellite and aerial imaging, the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources' (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species has misclassified the threats to hundreds of animals. As a result, conservation groups may be missing numerous species at risk of disappearing. For full article, click here.

Will families be protected from the next flood?

By Gerrit Jöbsis – American Rivers – November 7, 2016
For decades scientists have been warning us that a warmer climate will bring more frequent and more violent storms to the Southeast. While the models are complex the concept is simple. Warmer temperatures evaporate more water adding more moisture to the atmosphere. This leads to more precipitation and more large storms. For full story, click here.

'Last Chance' to Limit Global Warming to Safe Levels, UN Scientists Warn

By John H. Cushman, Jr. – InsideClimate News – November 3, 2016
The next three years provide the "last chance" to limit global warming to safe limits in this century, the United Nations said, as it geared up for a conference in Morocco intended to carry forward the Paris agreement on climate change. Unless nations move before 2020 to cut their emissions more aggressively than they have promised, the window of opportunity will close and the job that lies ahead will become more costly, it said. The annual "emissions gap" report compares the goals of the treaty to the pledges of its signatories. In it, the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) warned that unless reductions in carbon pollution from the energy sector are reduced swiftly and steeply, it will be nearly impossible to keep warming below 2 degrees, let alone to the 1.5 degree aspiration. For full story, click here.

African Wetlands Project: A Win For the Climate and the People?

By Winifred Bird – Environment 360 – November 3, 2016
Standing calf-deep in the warm, brackish water of Senegal’s Saloum Delta, Saly Sarr points to a mass of ripples colored silver by the setting sun. “You see that movement?” she says. “The fish are coming out.” All around her, the spindly trunks of young mangrove trees poke through the water. Seven years ago, this area on the edge of the island of Niodior was a sandy wasteland ravaged by drought. Today, thanks to reforestation work done by Sarr and other women, it is covered in mangroves that shelter young fish from the midday sun and hold the soil in place as the tides wash in and out. For full story, click here.

Ghost Forests: How Rising Seas Are Killing Southern U.S. Woodlands

By Roger Real Drouin – Environment 360 – November 1, 2016
On a recent afternoon, University of Florida watershed ecologist David Kaplan and Ph.D. candidate Katie Glodzik hiked through the Withlacoochee Gulf Preserve, on the Big Bend coast of northwestern Florida. Not long ago, red cedar, live oaks, and cabbage palms grew in profusion on the raised “hammock island” forests set amid the preserve’s wetlands. But as the researchers walked through thigh-high marsh grass, the barren trunks of dead cedars were silhouetted against passing clouds. Dead snag cabbage palms stood like toothpicks snapped at the top. Other trees and shrubs, such as wax myrtle, had long been replaced by more salt-tolerant black needlerush marsh grass. For full story, click here.

Biased Tide Gauges Mean We’ve Been Systematically Underestimating Sea Level Rise

By Rebecca Boyle – Hakai Magazine – November 1, 2016
In harbors and ports around the world, tide gauges bob up and down with the sea, recording its height over time. In some places, these instruments—through various iterations—have been recording continuously since 1700. Originally installed to help fishing and merchant vessels plan when to enter and leave harbors, the data produced by these old-school gauges has been co-opted by scientists, and now forms the basis of climatologists’ understanding of long-term sea level rise. But as a new study shows, because the majority of these tide gauges were located in North Atlantic port cities, scientists have been systematically underestimating the rate of global sea level rise. For full article, click here.

IARC Scientists Defend Glyphosate Cancer Link; Surprised by Industry Assault

By Carey Gillam – The Huffington Post – October 31, 2016
Don’t mess with Monsanto Co. That is the message being delivered right now by the agrichemical industry as it makes a full-fledged assault on the team of international cancer scientists who dared to declare cancerous connections to the widely used herbicide called glyphosate, the chief ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup brand. Industry swagger is on full display in Washington where Monsanto and its friends at CropLife America are driving efforts to cut off U.S. funding for the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) after IARC scientists declared glyphosate a probable human carcinogen in March 2015. The industry is also demanding that the Environmental Protection Agency fully repudiate the IARC classification and green-light continued use of glyphosate herbicides, which spell billions of dollars in sales annually to Monsanto and the agrichemical brethren. For full blog post, click here.

Two-thirds of the world's vertebrate wildlife could be gone by 2020, report warns

By Chelsea Harvey – The Virginian-Pilot – October 28, 2016
A new report from the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) predicts devastating declines in wildlife populations over the next five years, unless quick action is taken. By the end of the decade, we're likely to have lost 67 percent loss of all vertebrate wildlife compared to 1970, it claims. According to this year's Living Planet Report, released by the WWF every two years, wildlife populations have already suffered tremendous losses in the last few decades. Vertebrate populations have plunged by 58 percent overall since 1970, the report states. And organisms living in freshwater systems, such as rivers and lakes, have fared even worse, declining by 81 percent in the last four decades. For full story, click here.

Recovery plan issued for U.S. Northwest salmon, steelhead

By Laura Zukerman – Reuters – October 28, 2016
U.S. fisheries managers have unveiled a plan seeking to restore dwindling runs of salmon and trout that migrate 900 miles up the Snake River from the Pacific to spawning grounds in Idaho while leaving intact their greatest barrier - four hydropower dams. The recovery plan, proposed on Thursday, calls for a myriad of measures to ease the increasingly treacherous passage of spring-summer Chinook salmon and steelhead trout through the Snake, a major tributary of the Columbia River in the Pacific Northwest. The proposal hinges on a combination of efforts that include improving stream habitat, enhancing water quality and installing structural dam modifications along the Snake River system. For full story, click here.

Study suggests people prefer conservation as way to protect drinking water

By Adam Thomas – PHYS.org – October 28, 2016 – Video
The water crisis in Flint, Michigan put the need to protect and invest in clean drinking water front and center in the minds of many Americans. But how to go about investing, as well as how to get the public on board with such spending, is a difficult challenge that faces policymakers. A new study from the University of Delaware has found that when given the choice, people prefer to invest their money in conservation, such as protecting key areas of a watershed—also referred to as green infrastructure—than traditional water treatment plants— also referred to as gray infrastructure. They also found that different messages related to climate change, global warming, extreme weather events and decaying infrastructure affect people's willingness to contribute to projects. For full story and to view video, click here.

Warming Triggers Early Algae Blooms, Potential Ripple Effects to Come

By Nicholas Kusnetz – InsideClimate News – October 27, 2016
Warmer oceans are acting like a catalyst for one of the world's most abundant species of plankton, triggering earlier blooms of blue-green algae in the waters of the North Atlantic. Because of plankton's fundamental role in the marine ecosystem, researchers expect this shift to have far-reaching impacts throughout the world's oceans. For full story, click here.

The Methane Riddle: What Is Causing the Rise in Emissions?

By Fred Pearce – Environment360 – October 25, 2016
The stomachs of cattle, fermentation in rice fields, fracking for natural gas, coal mines, festering bogs, burning forests — they all produce methane, the second most important greenhouse gas, after carbon dioxide. But how much? And how can we best cut these emissions? And is fracking frying the planet, or are bovine emissions more to blame? Until now, the world has not had a definitive answer to these questions. But in recent months, researchers believe they have finally begun to crack the problem — and the results are surprising. For full story, click here.

Taking Down Dams and Letting the Fish Flow

By Murray Carpenter – The New York Times – October 24, 2016
Joseph Zydlewski, a research biologist with the Maine Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit of the United States Geological Survey, drifted in a boat on the Penobscot River, listening to a crackling radio receiver. The staccato clicks told him that one of the shad that his team had outfitted with a transmitter was swimming somewhere below. Shad, alewives, blueback herring and other migratory fish once were plentiful on the Penobscot. “Seven thousand shad and one hundred barrels of alewives were taken at one haul of the seine,” in May 1827, according to one historian. Three enormous dams erected in the Penobscot, starting in the 1830s, changed all that, preventing migratory fish from reaching their breeding grounds. The populations all but collapsed. For full story, click here.

Species may be listed as threatened based on climate change projections, court says

By Maura Donlan – Los Angeles Times – October 24, 2016
Federal authorities may list a species as “threatened” based on climate models that show habitat loss in the coming decades, an appeals court decided Monday. The state of Alaska, oil company groups and Alaskan natives had challenged a decision by the federal government to list a sea ice seal subspecies as threatened and deserving of protection. For full story, click here.

Researchers examining effectiveness of stream restoration

By Timothy B. Wheeler – Bay Journal – October 23, 2016
From the way it looks, Muddy Creek would seem to deserve its name. The Maryland stream is decidedly murky, with an orange tint to its slow-moving water. That’s not necessarily a bad thing. This tributary of the Rhode River near Edgewater underwent an extreme makeover earlier this year, and it’s still adjusting to being dramatically altered by a $1 million stream restoration project that raised its bed, widened its banks and added some meanders and pools to its channel. Whether the creek has been “restored,” or just rehabilitated, remains to be seen. Its condition is being closely monitored by scientists at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, on whose sprawling campus the project was performed. For full article, click here.

Climate Change Impairs the Survival Instincts of Fish and Can Make Them Swim Towards Predators

University of Exeter – October 22, 2016
Fish farms may hold key to studying the impact of rising CO2 on marine life, and if fish could adapt to climate change. Climate change is disrupting the sensory systems of fish and can even make them swim towards predators, instead of away from them, a paper by marine biologists at the University of Exeter says. Research into the impact of rising CO2 has shown it can disrupt the senses of fish including their smell, hearing and vision. High CO2 levels can impair the way they behave, including making them swim towards predator smells instead of away and even ignoring the sounds that normally deter them from risky habitats. For full story, click here.

How Imagery Can Enhance Visualization and Analysis

By Nicole Blake Johnson – GovLoop – October 20, 2016
We all know the saying, “a picture is worth a thousand words.” In government, this saying holds especially true for imagery. Images help us analyze and derive information that shapes policies, educates us about our environments and informs decisions that affect millions of citizens’ lives. Imagery analysis methods like change detection help provide critical data for environmental monitoring and natural resource management. Beach erosion, melting ice caps and forest fires are types of change detection analysis that can be done to offer a new view into how the land has transformed over time. For full story, click here.

Transforming Agriculture From Threat To Solution For Environmental Challenges

By Sara Scherr – EcoAgriculture Partners – October 20, 2016
The past year has seen a remarkable evolution of the discourse on agricultural development around the world. From the sharp focus on increasing production and yields that dominated after the 2008 food price crisis, the narrative expanded after Rio+20 to ‘sustainable intensification’—how these yields could be achieved without undue environmental cost. Now discussions are moving—in a still fragmented way–towards a vision of sustainable agriculture systems and landscapes that provide both secure food supplies and the ecosystem services and climate resilience needed for sustainable development in agriculture and more broadly. For full blog post, click here.

The Delightful and Doomed Mollusks Among Us

By Jimmy Tobias – Pacific Standard Magazine – October 19, 2016
During a long weekend last August, a friend and I got together for a low-budget bachelor party and went fishing near Missoula, Montana. I won’t tell you where exactly — the spot is too good, too unspoiled, to share. It’s a remote canyon boxed in by thick pine forests and mountain walls, punctuated here and there with crumbling boulders and cold clean streams. As we drove in, a black bear lumbered across the road to welcome us. The trout were tough and hungry. Osprey drifted overhead. In the river, you could see the first of the salmon returning to spawn and die. And, after wading into the cool water one warm afternoon, I discovered another rare and beautiful surprise — at my feet, scattered like jewels in crevices and eddies and pools, a sprawling bed of freshwater mussels surrounded me on all sides. For full article, click here.

Regional cooperation key to adapting to sea level rise, ODU report says

By Brock Vergakis – The Virginian-Pilot – October 19, 2016
If Hampton Roads is going to successfully adapt to sea level rise and protect its vast military infrastructure, local governments will have to learn to work together and with the federal government. That’s one of the major takeaways from a two-year pilot project led by Old Dominion University at the request of the National Security Council. The project focused on recurrent flooding, sea level rise and how the myriad localities and government agencies that call the region home can address it. For full story, click here.

It's the diversity of pesticides, not the types or doses that may be killing bees

By Ron Meador – MinnPost – October 13, 2016
The policy landscape for protecting honeybees from pesticides has just become a little more complicated, thanks to a new study suggesting that the sheer diversity of pesticides may be more of a problem than particular products. Another key finding: Certain fungicides long thought to be harmless to the bees are in fact fairly toxic to them. For full story, click here.

It’s RAINing Data in the Ohio River Basin

By Catherine Magliocchetti – Healthy Waters – October 13, 2016
Want to know about water quality in the Ohio River Basin? The information is only a few clicks away. My colleagues and I recently traveled to Pittsburgh to learn more about the River Alert Information Network (RAIN) and its interactive website that tracks the condition of the basin’s six mighty rivers and displays that information in near real time. The website’s monitoring map has a wealth of river data available and accessible to the public. For full blog post, click here.

The Politics of Climate

By Cary Funk and Brian Kennedy – Pew Research Center – October 4, 2016
Political fissures on climate issues extend far beyond beliefs about whether climate change is occurring and whether humans are playing a role, according to a new, in-depth survey by Pew Research Center. These divisions reach across every dimension of the climate debate, down to people’s basic trust in the motivations that drive climate scientists to conduct their research. For full story, click here.

Greenland ice is melting seven percent faster than previously thought

Ohio State University – ScienceDaily – September 21, 2016
The same hotspot in Earth's mantle that feeds Iceland's active volcanoes has been playing a trick on the scientists who are trying to measure how much ice is melting on nearby Greenland. According to a new study in the journal Science Advances, the hotspot softened the mantle rock beneath Greenland in a way that ultimately distorted their calculations for ice loss in the Greenland ice sheet. This caused them to underestimate the melting by about 20 gigatons (20 billion metric tons) per year. That means Greenland did not lose about 2,500 gigatons of ice from 2003-2013 as scientists previously thought, but nearly 2,700 gigatons instead -- a 7.6 percent difference, said study co-author Michael Bevis of The Ohio State University. For full story, click here.

 

Wetland Breaking News - November 2016

EPA Launches New Guide for Long-Term Stormwater Planning, Names Five Pilot Communities

Contact: Tricia Lynn – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency –October 27, 2016
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today announced a package of tools to help communities plan long-term strategies for managing stormwater pollution. EPA’s tools promote the use of flexible solutions that spur economic growth, stimulate infrastructure investments, and help compliance with environmental requirements. EPA has released a step-by-step guide to help communities develop long-term stormwater plans, a web-based toolkit for the planning process, and technical assistance for five communities to develop plans as national models. This approach was built on input from states, communities, industry, academia, and nonprofits. For more information, click here. To download the Guide, click here.

Regional Aquatic Prioritization and Mapping Tool

Climate Adaptation Knowledge Exchange – 2016
This tool was designed as a web interface to solve the question, "Given a set of constraints, which sub-basins should I focus on to maximize conservation objectives for specified fish species?" Typically, solving these problems, compiling the data and analyzing it, is prohibitively complex and too time-consuming for the majority of potential users. We have created a suite of GIS datasets coupled with a back-end decision support model, packaged within this web-based tool to facilitate iterative and collaborative exploration of regional aquatic priorities. To view tool, click here.

Coastal Wetlands and Flood Damage Reduction: Using Risk Industry-based Models to Assess Natural Defenses in the Northeastern USA

PreventionWeb – 2016
This study illustrates the direct and indirect flood risk reduction benefits that coastal wetlands provide by reducing flood heights and also by decreasing exposure. It shows that coastal wetlands can reduce property damage from storms and that these effects can be readily incorporated into the insurance industry’s risk models. These results help inform (i) risk reduction and conservation management priorities and (ii) the development of incentives for the conservation and restoration of natural defenses. For more information, click here. To download the study, click here.

EPA Releases Report on Progress Made to Reduce Water Pollution from Nonpoint Sources

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – October 2016
EPA has released the first-ever national snapshot of the agency's work to reduce water pollution from nonpoint sources, which affect more than 80 percent of the country's assessed rivers, streams, lakes and reservoirs. Through the strong state, tribal, and territorial partnerships built through EPA's Clean Water Act Section 319 Nonpoint Source Pollution Management Program, more than 6,000 miles of streams and 164,000 acres of lakes have been removed from EPA's impaired waters list. The report found that EPA's 319 grants are a catalyst toward water quality improvement-of 538 water bodies with documented water quality improvement, states reported a total $1.78 billion of funding was provided for restoration work. Of that amount, $13% ($238 million) is attributed to Section 319 funding. EPA's Nonpoint Source Program Report highlights other major accomplishments and offers a glimpse of the more than 2,000 nonpoint source projects underway across the country. For more information, click here.To download this report, click here.

Maryland Online Water Mapper

The Maryland Water Monitoring Council (MWMC) has created an online interactive map that allows users to see the various types of waterway monitoring in Maryland. Included are sampling points from State, Federal and local agencies, consultants, and citizen monitoring groups as well as basic program and contact information. For more information, click here. A draft version of the Mapper can be found here.

 

Wetland Breaking News - November 2016

This isn't Big Bang Theory, but ordinary citizens are getting their hands on science

By Krystle Alarcon – National Observer – November 14, 2016
It was two degrees below freezing on a November morning in Montreal and some residents were still strolling around in sweaters and sneakers. But Suzanne Labbé and Pierre Bannon were decked out in puffy parkas, hiking boots and mittens. A camera with a foot-long lens extension hung on Labbé’s neck and a heavy tripod with a nifty set of binoculars was slung around Bannon’s shoulders. Labbé and Bannon are what researchers call "citizen scientists" and they were off to take photos of birds. The retired couple contribute thousands of entries to eBird, a database of millions of observations submitted by bird watchers around the world. The database is public, which in turn helps scientists do research and design conservation solutions. For full story, click here.

Exxon Widens Climate Battle, May Depose 17 State AGs Over Investigations

By David Hasemyer – InsideClimate News – November 10, 2016
Attorneys for ExxonMobil have revealed a plan to ratchet up pressure on state attorneys general who have vowed to hold Exxon and fossil fuel companies accountable for their conduct on climate change. Exxon attorney Theodore Wells told a New York judge that the company is working on deposing at least 17 attorneys general and their staffs who earlier this year joined with New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman under the banner of AGs United for Clean Power. By pulling those attorneys general into the fight, Exxon could trigger years of legal wrangling over disclosure of its understanding of climate risks. For full story, click here.

Media's Next Challenge: Overcoming the Threat of Fake News

By Jim Rutenberg – New York Times – November 6, 2016
The last year has turned the United States into a country of information addicts who compulsively check the television, the smartphone and the good old-fashioned newspaper with a burning question: What fresh twist could our national election drama and its executive producer, Donald J. Trump, possibly have in store for us now? No doubt about it: Campaign 2016 has been a smash hit. And to the news media have gone the spoils. With Mr. Trump providing must-see TV theatrics, cable news has drawn record audiences. Newspapers have reached online readership highs that would have been unimaginable just a few years ago. On Wednesday comes the reckoning. For full story, click here.

A Gorgeous Map Showing Every River Basin In The US

By Dan Fallon – Dig – October 20, 2016
It can be difficult to visualize the vast network of rivers that criss-crosses the US. This map, made by Imgurian Fejetlenfej, shows all the different river basins around the country. The Mississippi River basin (pink), for instance, takes up most of the map. To view map, click here.

The Space Between Two Worlds

By Jonathan Foley – The Macroscope – October 20, 2016
People working on environmental issues, especially climate change and the ongoing onslaught of Earth’s biosphere, are dealing with some of the most depressing news on the planet. (We’re not alone, naturally. Human rights activists and international relief workers face even more dire realities on a daily basis.) Every day there’s more news, most of it bad, about how we’re destabilizing our climate, degrading our ecosystems, and leaving a crippling mess for future generations. There is some good news, too, but most days it feels like the bad news vastly overwhelms the good. For full story, click here.

What’s smothering coal? Not the EPA

By Prachi Patel – Anthropocene Magazine – October 13, 2016
Backers of the coal industry are quick to point fingers at the Environmental Protection Agency as the reason for its decline. A new study shows that those fingers should be turned back toward the fossil fuel industry itself. Cheap shale gas produced by fracking has brought down the coal industry, according to the report published in The Electricity Journal. The coal industry is on a downward spiral. Coal mining jobs are quickly being lost, and coal’s share as a fuel for power generation is going down. For full article, click here.

A Burning Problem for Mangroves

By Helen Scales – Hakai Magazine – October 11, 2016
Beyond Antananarivo—Madagascar’s capital city—signs of urbanization give way to sprawling farms and sweeping grasslands. At the coastal city of Toliara to the south, after a full day’s journey, the road turns into tire-sucking sandy track that mainly serves cattle-drawn wooden carts. For seven more hours, travelers cross a desert marked with spiny trees, where the sun bakes everything to a dusty crisp. Finally, the Bay of Assassins appears, an oasis thrumming with life, fringed with lush evergreen mangroves. For full article, click here.

The Road to Empowerment: In the Field with Faith-based Environmentalists

By Michael W. Fincham – Chesapeake Quarterly – October 2016
JODI ROSE FOUND HER CALLING AT A RED LIGHT. She was on the road that morning driving to work, when she decided work wasn’t driving her soul. Her job at the time was running environmental site assessments of inner-city properties in Indianapolis, Indiana. She was managing soil and groundwater remediation projects and handling due-diligence property research, and her clients were usually lawyers and bankers and real estate developers who wanted to buy or flip or develop properties in depressed neighborhoods. Were there any problems with these sites? Were there buried tanks, groundwater contamination, soil contamination, confused title records? Were there any economic liabilities attached to the site, any costs and cleanup problems left over from earlier owners or industries? It was her job to find out. For full story, click here.

Portraits of Women Scientists

National Geographic – Video
With a new portrait series, "Outnumbered," photographer Clare Fieseler offers a fresh look at women scientists at work in the field. Her images—featuring a tough-as-nails swamp biologist, a tattooed nanochemist who cycles competitively, and others—challenge monochrome preconceptions of women scientists. The portraits also provide a touchstone for young women who aspire to careers in science. Fieseler is also a marine ecologist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. To view video, click here.

 

Wetland Breaking News - November 2016

 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

WEBINARS

   

MEETINGS

 

TRAINING

 

SPECIAL EVENTS

 
WEBINARS
       
NOVEMBER 2016
       
November 29, 2016
2:00 p.m. EST
  Webinar: Building Resilient Communities with Green Infrastructure One Code at a Time  
       
November 30, 2016
1:00 p.m. EST
  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Watershed Academy Webcast Webinar: Understanding Nutrient Issues Affecting Ohio’s Inland Lakes  
       
November 30, 2016
3:00 p.m. EST
  Association of State Wetland Managers Members' Wetland Webinar: State Integration Practices Panel: Stromwater, TMDL and Wetland Management
 
       
DECEMBER 2016
       
December 1, 2016
12:00 p.m. EST
  Graham Sustainability Institute, University of Michigan Webinar: Living with Highs and Lows - Climate Change, Water Levels, Tribal Fisheries and Culturally Important Sites. To register, click here.  
       
December 1, 2016
1:00 p.m. EST
  Association of State Floodplain Managers: Using Tolerable Risk Guidelines to Manage and Communicate Flood Risk Webinar
 
       
December 2, 2016
12:00 p.m. EST
  Great Lakes Clean Communities Network Webinar: Improve Ecological Health in Your Community using the EcoScore Framework  
       
December 2, 2016
1:00 p.m. EST
  American Planning Association (APA), Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM) Webinar: Subdivision Design & Flood Hazard Areas
 
       
December 2, 2016
1:00 p.m. EST
  The Swamp School Webinar: What is a "Waters of the US?
 
       
December 6, 2016
3:00 p.m. EST
  Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar: Comprehensive Local Planning and Programs: Charlotte-Mecklenburg’s Approach
 
       
December 7, 2016
1:00 p.m. EST
  EPA’s Water Infrastructure and Resiliency Finance Center and Water Security Division Webinar: Resilience Mitigation Financing for Water and Wastewater Utilities  
       
December 8, 2016
12:00 p.m. EST
  Graham Sustainability Institute, University of Michigan Webinar: Living with Highs and Lows - Developing Land-use Regulation and Infrastructure Policy. To register, click here.  
       
December 21, 2016
1:00 p.m. EST
  Association of State Floodplain Managers Webinar
CRS: CRS & Coastal Hazards
 
       
December 21, 2016
3:00 p.m. EST
  Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Maps of Potential Wetland Extent for Selected Streams in Indiana
 
       
JANUARY 2017
       
January 18, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  AWRA Webinar: Water is for Fighting Over and Other Myths About Water in the West  
       
January 19, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  The Swamp School Webinar: 2017 Wetland Status and Trends  
       
FEBRUARY 2017
       
February 15, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  AWRA Webinar: Climate change and Water Management in Eastern States: Overcoming Barriers to Innovation in Regulated Riparianism  
       
MARCH 2017
       
March 22, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  AWRA Webinar: Innovations in Sediment Monitoring
 
       
MEETINGS
DECEMBER 2016
       
December 2, 2016
North Linthicum, MD
  Maryland Water Monitoring Council’s 22nd Annual Conference: A River Runs Through It – Strengthening Networks and Connections
 
       
December 5-9, 2016
Jacksonville, FL
  ACES: A Community on Ecosystem Services Conference: Linking Science, Practice, and Decision Making
 
       
December 7, 2016
Loveland, CO

  Southern Rockies Seed Network 2016 Conference: Ecotypes: Science, Practice, & Policy
 
       
December 7, 2016
Pequea, PA

  The Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay and The Lancaster Chamber of Commerce & Industry Forum: Chesapeake Business Forum: Linking Businesses and Waterway Protection
 
       
December 10-15, 2016
New Orleans, LA
  8th National Summit: Our Coasts, Our Future, Our Choice and 25th Biennial Meeting of The Coastal Society
 
       
December 12-16, 2016
San Francisco, CA
  AGU Fall Meeting
 
       
JANUARY 2017
       
January 4-6, 2017
Acme, MI
  Northern Michigan Waterways Hazardous Material Spill Planning Committee (No-Spills): 27th Annual No-Spills Conference
 
       
January 4-8, 2017
New Orleans, LA
  Society of Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB) Annual Meeting  
       
January 5-8, 2017
Litchfield Park, AZ
  Western Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies: 2017 Mid-Winter Conference  
       
FEBRUARY 2017
       
February 5-8, 2017
Lincoln, NE
  77th Midwest Fish & Wildlife Conference  
       
February 6-9, 2017
New Orleans, LA
  Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science Conference  
       
February 6-9, 2017
North Charleston, SC
  Coastal GeoTools 2017  
       
February 6-10, 2017
Reno, NV
  The Western Section of the Wildlife Society: 2017 Annual Meeting. Abstract deadline is October 20, 2016.
North American Pika Consortium (NACP):4th meeting will be held on February 6-7, 2017.
 
       
February 7-9, 2017
Fort Collins, CO
  14th Annual Tamarisk Coalition Conference: The Future is Now: Forward-Thinking Restoration, Planning, and Adaptation
 
       
February 13-15, 2017
Denver, CO
  17th Annual International LiDAR Mapping Forum (ILMF)  
       
February 13-16, 2017
Washington, D.C.
  Native Seed Network: 2017 National Native Seed Conference
 
       
February 16-19, 2017
Little Rock, AR
  2017 Annual SEPARC Meeting: "Aligning Conservation Goals"  
       
February 25-March 1, 2017
Washington, DC
  National Association of Counties 2017 Legislative Conference  
       
February 26-March 3, 2017
Honolulu, HI
  Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) 2017 Conference: “From the Mountains to the Sea”. Abstracts due by October 14, 2016.  
       
February 28–March 1, 2017
Virginia Beach, VA
  Virginia Turfgrass Council 2017 Come to the Bay  
       
February 28–March 2, 2017
Stevens Point, WI
  Wisconsin Wetlands Association's 22nd annual Wetland Science Conference
 
       
MARCH 2017
       
March 1-2, 2017
Toronto, Canada
  50th International Conference: Water Management Modeling. Call for papers deadline is December 31, 2016.  
       
March 1-3, 2017
Chicago, IL
  Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) and The Climate Registry: Climate Leadership Conference: Connecting People, Innovation, and Opportunity
 
       
March 4-11, 2017
Spokane, WA
  Wildlife Management Institute 82nd North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference  
       
March 7-9, 2017
New Orleans, LA
  RES/CON.  
       
March 15-16, 2017
Saratoga Springs, NY
  Land Trust Alliance: 2017 New York Land Trust Symposium  
       
March 16-17, 2017
University of Denver
Denver, CO
  Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law: 26th Annual Western Places/Western Spaces Conference. Additional workshops will be held on March 15, 2017.  
       
March 24-26, 2017
Grand Rapids, MI
  Midwest-Great Lakes Chapter of the Society for Ecological Restoration: Annual Meeting: Assembling the Restoration
 
       
March 26-28, 2017
Scottsdale, AZ
  National Flood Determination Association: 20th Annual NFDA Conference
 
       
March 29-April 1, 2017
Montgomery, AL
  Association of Southeastern Biologist: 2017 Annual Meeting
 
       
APRIL 2017
       
April 4, 2017
Online and remote hub locations
  Center for Watershed Protection Association 2017 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference
 
       
April 4-6, 2017
Front Royal, VA
  EcoAgriculture Partners: Landscape Leadership 3-Day Intensive Workshop  
       
April 5-9, 2017
Boston, MA
  American Association of Geographers meeting: Decolonizing Water: Indigenous water politics, resource extraction, and settler colonialism. Proposals due by October 20, 2016.  
       
April 9-11, 2017
Norfolk, VA
  Northeast Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies: 73rd Annual Northeast Fish & Wildlife Conference  
       
April 9-13, 2017
Baltimore, MD
  US-International Association for Landscape Ecology (IALE): 2017 Annual Meeting, People, Places, Patterns: Linking Landscape Heterogeneity and Socio-Environmental Systems. Abstracts due by December 18, 2016  
       
April 17-21, 2017
Coral Springs, FL
  Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (GEER 2017) Conference  
       
April 30-May 3, 2017
Snowbird, UT
  2017 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference: Connecting the Dots: The Emerging Science of Aquatic System Connectivity. Abstract deadline is January 9, 2017.  
       
April 30-May 5, 2017
Kansas City, MO
  2017 ASFPM Conference: "Flood Risk Management in the Heartland"  
       
MAY 2017
       
May 4-6, 2017
Lancaster, PA
  2017 Pennsylvania Land Conservation Conference: Where Land Meets Water: Protecting Our Farmland, Natural Lands, and Waterways  
       
May 9-12, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Invest in the Environment
 
       
May 15-19, 2017
Detroit, MI
  IAGLR's 60th Annual Conference: From Cities to Farms: Shaping Great Lakes Ecosystems
 
       
May 17-20, 2017
Saint Paul, MN
  Citizen Science Association: CitSci2017
 
       
May 31-June 2, 2017
Detroit, MI
  Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Green Infrastructure Conference: Integrated Stormwater Management from Duluth to Quebec  
       
May 31-June 3, 2017
Haw River State Park
Browns Summit, NC
  4th Symposium on Urbanization and Stream Ecology:
Making urban stream rehabilitation a co-evolutionary process
 
       
JUNE 2017
       
June 4-9, 2017
Raleigh, NC
  Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting: Designing Our Freshwater Futures
 
       
June 5-8, 2017
San Juan, Puerto Rico
  Society of Wetland Scientists’ 2017 Annual Meeting: Celebrating Wetland Diversity Across the Landscape: Mountains to Mangroves
 
       
June 15-16, 2017
San Antonio, TX
  Land Trust Alliance: Sixth Symposium on Advanced Legal Topics in Land Conservation  
       
June 19-21, 2017
Oregon State University
Corvallis, Oregon
  International Conference: Engineering and Ecohydraulics for Fish Passage  
       
June 19-22, 2017
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
  University of Alberta: 11th North American Forest Ecology Workshop  
       
June 25-28, 2017
Tysons, VA
  2017 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: Climate Change Solutions: Collaborative Science, Policy and Planning for Sustainable Water Management. Abstracts due by February 6, 2017.
 
       
June 27-29, 2017
New Orleans LA
  US Water Alliance: One Water Summit 2017  
       
JULY 2017
       
July 21-24, 2017
Franklin County, OH
  National Association of Counties: 2017 Annual Conference
 
       
AUGUST 2017
       
August 6-11, 2017
Portland, OR
  2017 ESA Annual Meeting: Linking biodiversity, material cycling and ecosystem services in a changing world
 
       
August 21-25, 2017
Beijing, China
  12th International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL 2017 Beijing): Ecology and Civilization in a Changing World
 
       
August 24-26, 2017
Corum, Montpellier, France
  Biodiversity and Ecosystem Scenarios Network (ScenNet): Scenarios and Models of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Support of Decision Making  
       
OCTOBER 2017
       
October 14-17, 2017
Iselin, NJ
  Association of State Floodplain Managers: National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop  
       
October 26-28, 2017
Denver, CO
  Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2017 National Land Conservation Conference  
       
TRAINING
       
DECEMBER 2016
       
December 1-2, 2016
Denver, CO
  Urban Watersheds Research Institute Course: Watershed Modeling Using CUHP-SWMM  
       
December 1-2, 2016
University of Phoenix-Arlington Arlington, VA
  Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: Planning and Preparing an Ecological Risk Assessment  
       
December 2, 2016
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Water Quality Regulation and Permitting
 
       
December 5-8, 2016
Santa Fe, NM
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Federal Wetland / Waters Regulatory Policy  
       
December 5, 2016-February 26, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Class: Certified Wetland Hydrologist  
       
December 5, 2016-February 26, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Workshop: Principles of Wetland Design
 
       
December 5, 2016-February 26, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training  
       
December 6, 2016
St Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: WOW! The Wonders of Wetlands  
       
December 6-7, 2016
Leesburg, VA
  The Swamp School: Ecological Risk Assessment Workshop  
       
December 7, 2016
St Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Rain Gardens as Outdoor Classrooms  
       
December 8, 2016
St Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: POW! The Planning of Wetlands  
       
December 8, 2016
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Subdivision Map Act: An Advanced Seminar  
       
December 9, 2016
St Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Student Action Projects for Watershed Improvement  
       
December 9, 2016
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Habitat Conservation Planning  
       
December 12-13, 2016
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement (Eastern Mountains/Piedmont)
 
December 12-15, 2016
Pittsburgh, PA
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
 
       
December 12-15, 2016
Aliquippa, PA
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
 
       
December 12-16, 2016
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Statistical Downscaling of Global Climate Models using SDSM 5.2  
       
December 12, 2016-January 8, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment
 
       
December 12, 2016-January 8, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment  
       
December 12, 2016-November 30, 2016
Online
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. eSession: Plants of the Wetland Boundary
 
       
December 13-14, 2016
Tigard, OR
  Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA): Writing the Perfect EA/FONSI, or EIS  
       
December 15-16, 2016
Charleston, South Carolina
(& others)
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
 
       
December 16, 2016
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Mitigation Measure Development and Monitoring  
   
JANUARY 2017  
       
January 6-7, 2017
Saukville, WI
  University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Workshop: Ecology and Physiology of Plants in Winter: Surviving the Big Chill
 
       
January 9-12, 2017
Raleigh, NC
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
 
       
January 9-April 2, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
 
       
January 9-April 28, 2017
Online
  Montana State University On-line Training Course: Wetland and Riparian Ecology and Management
 
       
January 10, 2017
Los Angeles, CA
  Floodplain Management Association Course: 2D HEC-RAS Modeling Course
 
       
January 12, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: CEQA: A Step-by-Step Approach  
       
January 13-14, 2017
Charlotte, NC
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Wetland Permitting Training
 
       
January 18, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Online Course: Overview of California Water Law and Policy
 
       
January 18-19, 2017
February 16-17, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Planning in California: An Overview  
       
January 23, 2017-June 5, 2017
Online
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. eSession: Principles of Wetland Ecology
 
       
January 27, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Online Course: CEQA Update, Issues and Trends
 
       
FEBRUARY 2017  
       
February 6-April 30, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training  
       
February 8, 2017
Online
  UC Davis Extension Online Course: Environmental Justice and NEPA: Overview and Update on Recent Developments  
       
February 10, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Online Course: Endangered Species Regulation and Protection  
       
February 14-17, 2017
Vicksburg, MS
  Stream Functions Pyramid Workshop
Stream Mechanics: Stream Functions Pyramid Workshop
 
       
MARCH 2017
       
March 6-May 28, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
 
       
March 15-16, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Successful CEQA Compliance: An Intensive Two-Day Seminar
 
       
March 24, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Clean Water Act Section 404: Nationwide and Other Specialized Permits  
       
APRIL 2017
       
April 3-June 25, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
 
       
JUNE 2017
       
June 7, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Online Course: NEPA Case Law and Policy Update  
       
SPECIAL EVENTS
       
December 4, 2016
Madison WI
  Cherokee Marsh Conservation Park: Bird and Nature Walk
 
       
January 28, 2017
Richmond, VA
  Shiver in the River
 
       
February 2, 2017   World Wetlands Day  
       
April 22, 2017   Earth Day
 
       

For more wetland events, meetings, conferences, and courses nationwide, visit the ASWM calendar.

 

Wetland Breaking News - November 2016


INDEX

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • Giving Tuesday Fun with ASWM!
  • AWM’S Members’ Wetland Webinar: Innovations in State Buffer Management – November 30, 2016
  • Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar: Compreh
  • nsive Local Planning and Programs: Charlotte-Mecklenburg’s Approach – December 6, 2016
    Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Maps of Potential Wetland Extent for Selected Streams in Indiana – December 21, 2016
  • SMU GeoSpatial Services staff, students to inventory Minnesota wetlands
  • During Sandy, Wetlands Averted US $625-Million in Damages
  • USDA Announces Applications Available for Conservation Stewardship Program
  • Celebrating 40 Years of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
  • EPA Awarding $1.3 Million to Revitalize America’s Urban Waters and Surrounding Communities
  • NOAA awards $44 million for climate research to improve community resilience
  • 2017 National Wetlands Awards – Deadline for Nominations is December 21st
  • Funding Opportunity: Five Star & Urban Waters Restoration Grants

NATIONAL NEWS

  • Clean Water Rule: WOTUS ‘ultimately doomed.’ What happens next?
  • Republicans seek quick repeal of latest Obama administration regulations
  • Dakota pipeline protesters win temporary victory with promise for more review
  • Crow Creek tribe sues U.S. government for $200 million
  • 'The Pantanal is national heritage': Protecting the world's largest wetlands
  • Donald Trump's US election win stuns scientists
  • Revived 'compact' could be court's answer to Georgia-Florida water war
  • USDA Begins National Project to Quantify Effects of Ag Conservation
  • Plan unveiled to protect U.S. sagebrush
  • Which states have most land in CRP?
  • Climate Change Is Already Forcing Americans to Move
  • Oregon standoff defendants found not guilty in 'unbelievable, truly astonishing' verdict
  • EPA Releases the EJ 2020 Action Agenda, the Agency’s Environmental Justice Strategic Plan for 2016-2020
  • Great Lakes Commission to help accelerate adoption of green infrastructure across the Great Lakes
  • U.S. EPA approves Pala Band of Mission Indians authority to develop water quality standards
  • A bold new vision for restoring America’s most polluted river
  • Coastal crisis, conflicting ideas: How a complex restoration plan found success
  • Does the Agua Caliente tribe have rights to groundwater?
  • Dakota Access: Regulators regret tribe 'didn't come to the table' sooner
  • Landscape architect Thomas Woltz is coming to a park near you.
  • Data Show Farmers Must Do More to Protect the Environment, Public Health
  • Coalition Launched to Scale up Conservation Finance
  • Trump taps climate-change skeptic to oversee EPA transition

STATE NEWS

  • AL: Alabama’s ‘Worst Drought In Memory’ Is About To Get Even Worse
  • CA: Feds say 25% of California is drought-free, but state experts are still cautious
  • CA: San Francisco Bay Joint Venture just launched a new video shorts campaign
  • CA: Toxins from freshwater algae found in San Francisco Bay shellfish
  • CA: New California Law Recognizes Meadows, Streams As "Green Infrastructure", Eligible For Public Works Funding
  • FL: Florida Votes to Release Millions of Zika-Fighting Mosquitos
  • FL: Pasco official: $14M wetland project will help environment
  • IA: Wetland credited with reducing flood's crest
  • IA: Who will pay for water pollution cleanup divides urban and rural Iowa
  • KS: EPA grant aids Rowe-KPS plans for wetland, outdoor classroom at high school
  • KS: It's Official: Injection of Fracking Wastewater Caused Kansas’ Biggest Earthquake
  • LA: $10.7 billion available for coastal master plan's first 15 years
  • MD: Partnership to Accelerate Conservation in Bay Watershed
  • MD: Land donation expands Great Cypress Swamp
  • MI: Federal judge: Deliver bottled water to Flint residents
  • MI: Michigan adds algae-choked Lake Erie to list of 'impaired waters'
  • MI: Michigan's Newest Dirty Job: Wetland Monitoring
  • MN: Minnesota Groups Fear Environmental Shortcuts in Enbridge's Plan to Rebuild Faulty Pipeline
  • NJ: Warren Co. Freeholders miffed over wetland mitigation
  • NJ: Sandy's Lessons Lost: Jersey Shore Rebuilds in Sea's Inevitable Path
  • NM: New Mexico Maps Wetlands to Identify and Quantify Resources
  • NY: Pain of Sandy endures: Recovery from 2012 superstorm not possible in a few neighborhoods
  • NY: Niagara River restoration: 'It's like Jurassic Park there'
  • NY: Mayor De Blasio and FEMA Announce Plan to Revise NYC’s Flood Maps
  • NC: What The Election Could Mean for NC: Environmental Health
  • NC: Photos Show Overflowing Factory Farm Waste in NC After Hurricane Matthew
  • NC: Factory Farms Get Bigger, Pollution Grows, but Regulators Don't Even Know Where They Are
  • ND: On Dakota Access, Obama says Army Corps is weighing whether to ‘reroute’ pipeline
  • OH: Why Big Industry is Paying Small Farmers to Cut Pollution in the Ohio River
  • OK: Oklahoma regulators target more disposal wells following Cushing quake
  • OR: Oregon Occupation Unites Native American Tribes to Save Their Land
  • OR: Renowned fisheries scientist to answer question: 'With all this reclaimed wetland, will we see more salmon returns?'
  • PA: Pennsylvania Ruling on Eminent Domain Puts Contentious Pipeline Project on Alert
  • SD: How land use change affects water quality, aquatic life
  • TX: Evaluating water resources for Texas agriculture and the potential for a water crisis
  • UT: NASA images show Utah's Great Salt Lake shrinking dramatically
  • UT: Unprecedented algal blooms offer lessons for the future
  • VT: Four Unique Vermont Wetlands Slated for Class I Protection
  • VA: Farmers Find Cleaning Waterways Can Help The Bottom Line
  • WA: No more sewage dumping in Puget Sound, new Ecology rule proposes
  • WA: Updated program protects shorelines in Southeast Washington
  • WA: How the western water wars may end
  • WV: What we know and don't know about the WV water crisis deal

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • Slime, Shorebirds, and a Scientific Mystery
  • An Ecosystem's Lifeblood, Flowing Through Gravel
  • Stunningly good news for the planet: Carbon emissions were flat for the third straight year
  • Climate change is changing nature so much it may need ‘human-assisted evolution’, scientists say
  • Endangered species database may have misclassified hundreds of animals
  • Will families be protected from the next flood?
  • 'Last Chance' to Limit Global Warming to Safe Levels, UN Scientists Warn
  • African Wetlands Project: A Win For the Climate and the People?
  • Ghost Forests: How Rising Seas Are Killing Southern U.S. Woodlands
  • Biased Tide Gauges Mean We’ve Been Systematically Underestimating Sea Level Rise
  • IARC Scientists Defend Glyphosate Cancer Link; Surprised by Industry Assault
  • Two-thirds of the world's vertebrate wildlife could be gone by 2020, report warns
  • Recovery plan issued for U.S. Northwest salmon, steelhead
  • Study suggests people prefer conservation as way to protect drinking water
  • Warming Triggers Early Algae Blooms, Potential Ripple Effects to Come
  • The Methane Riddle: What Is Causing the Rise in Emissions?
  • Taking Down Dams and Letting the Fish Flow
  • Species may be listed as threatened based on climate change projections, court says
  • Researchers examining effectiveness of stream restoration
  • Climate Change Impairs the Survival Instincts of Fish and Can Make Them Swim Towards Predators
  • How Imagery Can Enhance Visualization and Analysis
  • Transforming Agriculture From Threat To Solution For Environmental Challenges
  • The Delightful and Doomed Mollusks Among Us
  • Regional cooperation key to adapting to sea level rise, ODU report says
  • It's the diversity of pesticides, not the types or doses, that may be killing bees
  • It’s RAINing Data in the Ohio River Basin
  • The Politics of Climate
  • Greenland ice is melting seven percent faster than previously thought

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • EPA Launches New Guide for Long-Term Stormwater Planning, Names Five Pilot Communities
  • Regional Aquatic Prioritization and Mapping Tool
  • Coastal Wetlands and Flood Damage Reduction: Using Risk Industry-based Models to Assess Natural Defenses in the Northeastern USA
  • EPA Releases Report on Progress Made to Reduce Water Pollution from Nonpoint Sources
  • Maryland Online Water Mapper

POTPOURRI

  • This isn't Big Bang Theory, but ordinary citizens are getting their hands on science
  • Exxon Widens Climate Battle, May Depose 17 State AGs Over Investigations
  • Media's Next Challenge: Overcoming the Threat of Fake News
  • A Gorgeous Map Showing Every River Basin In The US
  • The Space Between Two Worlds
  • What’s smothering coal? Not the EPA
  • A Burning Problem for Mangroves
  • The Road to Empowerment: In the Field with Faith-based Environmentalists
  • Portraits of Women Scientists

WEBINARS, MEETINGS, TRAINING

  • Webinar: Building Resilient Communities with Green Infrastructure One Code at a Time
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Watershed Academy Webcast Webinar: Understanding Nutrient Issues Affecting Ohio’s Inland Lakes
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Members' Wetland Webinar: Innovations in State Buffer Management
  • Graham Sustainability Institute, University of Michigan Webinar: Living with Highs and Lows - Climate Change, Water Levels, Tribal Fisheries and Culturally Important Sites
  • Association of State Floodplain Managers: Using Tolerable Risk Guidelines to Manage and Communicate Flood Risk Webinar
  • Great Lakes Clean Communities Network Webinar: Improve Ecological Health in Your Community using the EcoScore Framework
  • American Planning Association (APA), Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM) Webinar: Subdivision Design & Flood Hazard Areas
  • The Swamp School Webinar: What is a "Waters of the US?
  • Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar: Comprehensive Local Planning and Programs: Charlotte-Mecklenburg’s Approach
  • EPA’s Water Infrastructure and Resiliency Finance Center and Water Security Division Webinar: Resilience Mitigation Financing for Water and Wastewater Utilities
  • Graham Sustainability Institute, University of Michigan Webinar: Living with Highs and Lows - Developing Land-use Regulation and Infrastructure Policy
  • Association of State Floodplain Managers Webinar CRS: CRS & Coastal Hazards
  • Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Maps of Potential Wetland Extent for Selected Streams in Indiana
  • AWRA Webinar: Water is for Fighting Over and Other Myths About Water in the West
  • The Swamp School Webinar: 2017 Wetland Status and Trends
  • AWRA Webinar: Climate change and Water Management in Eastern States: Overcoming Barriers to Innovation in Regulated Riparianism
  • AWRA Webinar: Innovations in Sediment Monitoring

Meetings

  • A River Runs Through It – Strengthening Networks and Connections
  • ACES: A Community on Ecosystem Services Conference: Linking Science, Practice, and Decision Making
  • Southern Rockies Seed Network 2016 Conference: Ecotypes: Science, Practice, & Policy
  • Chesapeake Business Forum: Linking Businesses and Waterway Protection
  • 8th National Summit: Our Coasts, Our Future, Our Choice and 25th Biennial Meeting of The Coastal Society
  • ASWM Invasive Species Workshop
  • AGU Fall Meeting
  • Northern Michigan Waterways Hazardous Material Spill Planning Committee (No-Spills): 27th Annual No-Spills Conference
  • Society of Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB) Annual Meeting
  • Western Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies: 2017 Mid-Winter Conference
  • 77th Midwest Fish & Wildlife Conference
  • Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science Conference
  • Coastal GeoTools 2017
  • The Western Section of the Wildlife Society: 2017 Annual Meeting
  • 14th Annual Tamarisk Coalition Conference: The Future is Now: Forward-Thinking Restoration, Planning, and Adaptation
  • 17th Annual International LiDAR Mapping Forum (ILMF)
  • Native Seed Network: 2017 National Native Seed Conference
  • 2017 Annual SEPARC Meeting: "Aligning Conservation Goals"
  • National Association of Counties 2017 Legislative Conference
  • Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) 2017 Conference: “From the Mountains to the Sea”
  • Virginia Turfgrass Council 2017 Come to the Bay
  • Wisconsin Wetlands Association's 22nd Annual Wetland Science Conference
  • 50th International Conference: Water Management Modeling
  • Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) and The Climate Registry: Climate Leadership Conference: Connecting People, Innovation, and Opportunity
  • Wildlife Management Institute 82nd North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference
  • RES/CON
  • Land Trust Alliance: 2017 New York Land Trust Symposium
  • 26th Annual Western Places/Western Spaces Conference
  • Midwest-Great Lakes Chapter of the Society for Ecological Restoration: Annual Meeting: Assembling the Restoration
  • National Flood Determination Association: 20th Annual NFDA Conference
  • Association of Southeastern Biologist 2017 Annual Meeting
  • Center for Watershed Protection Association: 2017 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference
  • EcoAgriculture Partners Landscape Leadership 3-Day Intensive Workshop
  • American Association of Geographers meeting: Decolonizing Water: Indigenous water politics, resource extraction, and settler colonialism
  • Northeast Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies: 73rd Annual Northeast Fish & Wildlife Conference
  • US-International Association for Landscape Ecology (IALE): 2017 Annual Meeting, People, Places, Patterns: Linking Landscape Heterogeneity and Socio-Environmental Systems
  • Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (GEER 2017) Conference
  • 2017 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference: Connecting the Dots: The Emerging Science of Aquatic System Connectivity
  • 2017 ASFPM Conference: "Flood Risk Management in the Heartland"
  • 2017 Pennsylvania Land Conservation Conference: Where Land Meets Water: Protecting Our Farmland, Natural Lands, and Waterways
  • National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Invest in the Environment
  • IAGLR's 60th Annual Conference: From Cities to Farms: Shaping Great Lakes Ecosystems
  • Citizen Science Association: CitSci2017
  • Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Green Infrastructure Conference: Integrated Stormwater Management from Duluth to Quebec
  • 4th Symposium on Urbanization and Stream Ecology: Making urban stream rehabilitation a co-evolutionary process
  • Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting: Designing Our Freshwater Futures
  • Society of Wetland Scientists’ 2017 Annual Meeting: Celebrating Wetland Diversity Across the Landscape: Mountains to Mangroves
  • Land Trust Alliance: Sixth Symposium on Advanced Legal Topics in Land Conservation
  • International Conference: Engineering and Ecohydraulics for Fish Passage
  • University of Alberta: 11th North American Forest Ecology Workshop
  • 2017 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: Climate Change Solutions: Collaborative Science, Policy and Planning for Sustainable Water Management
  • US Water Alliance: One Water Summit 2017
  • National Association of Counties 2017 Annual Conference
  • 2017 ESA Annual Meeting: Linking biodiversity, material cycling and ecosystem services in a changing world
  • 12th International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL 2017 Beijing): Ecology and Civilization in a Changing World
  • Biodiversity and Ecosystem Scenarios Network (ScenNet): Scenarios and Models of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Support of Decision Making
  • Association of State Floodplain Managers: National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop
  • Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2017 National Land Conservation Conference

Training

  • Urban Watersheds Research Institute Course: Watershed Modeling Using CUHP-SWMM
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: Planning and Preparing an Ecological Risk Assessment
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Water Quality Regulation and Permitting
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Federal Wetland / Waters Regulatory Policy
  • The Swamp School Online Class: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
  • The Swamp School Online Workshop: Principles of Wetland Design
  • The Swamp School Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • Environmental Concern Course: WOW! The Wonders of Wetlands
  • The Swamp School: Ecological Risk Assessment Workshop
  • Environmental Concern Course: Rain Gardens as Outdoor Classrooms
  • Environmental Concern Course: POW! The Planning of Wetlands
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Subdivision Map Act: An Advanced Seminar
  • Environmental Concern Course: Student Action Projects for Watershed Improvement
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Habitat Conservation Planning
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement (Eastern Mountains/Piedmont)
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Statistical Downscaling of Global Climate Models using SDSM 5.2
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. eSession: Plants of the Wetland Boundary
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA): Writing the Perfect EA/FONSI, or EIS
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Mitigation Measure Development and Monitoring
  • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Workshop: Ecology and Physiology of Plants in Winter: Surviving the Big Chill
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • Montana State University On-line Training Course: Wetland and Riparian Ecology and Management
  • Floodplain Management Association Course: 2D HEC-RAS Modeling Course
  • UC Davis Extension Course: CEQA: A Step-by-Step Approach
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Wetland Permitting Training
  • UC Davis Extension Online Course: Overview of California Water Law and Policy
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Planning in California: An Overview
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. eSession: Principles of Wetland Ecology
  • UC Davis Extension Online Course: CEQA Update, Issues and Trends
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • UC Davis Extension Online Course: Environmental Justice and NEPA: Overview and Update on Recent Developments
  • UC Davis Extension Online Course: Endangered Species Regulation and Protection
  • Stream Mechanics: Stream Functions Pyramid Workshop
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Successful CEQA Compliance: An Intensive Two-Day Seminar
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Clean Water Act Section 404: Nationwide and Other Specialized Permits
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • UC Davis Extension Online Course: NEPA Case Law and Policy Update

SPECIAL EVENTS

  • Cherokee Marsh Conservation Park: Bird and Nature Walk
  • Shiver in the River
  • World Wetlands Day
  • Earth Day

 

Wetland Breaking News - December 2015

Wetland Breaking News - March 2016


The Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News (WBN)
is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those Wetland Breaking News - April 2016working in water resources and related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published for over fifteen years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.

The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to .

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled and Edited by Marla Stelk, Editor; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors. Executive Director: Jeanne Christie. Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399 Fax: 207-892-3089

All photos by Jeanne Christie, ASWM


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