Wetland Breaking News - January 2016

                     
   
IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES &
PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

 

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Wetland Breaking New: January 2016

All photos by
Jeanne Christie, ASWM

       

EDITOR'S NOTEWetland Breaking News - January 2016

The beginning of the New Year is a great time to take stock of what has been accomplished and to set goals for the future. ASWM accomplished a lot last year and has ambitious plans for 2016. Among many other achievements in 2015, ASWM completed a number of publications, including the comprehensive analysis, Status and Trends Report on State Wetland Programs in the United States, Uses of Wetland Monitoring and Assessment: Considerations for State and Tribal Programs, Wetlands and Climate Change: Considerations for Wetland Program Managers and the draft white paper Wetland Restoration: Contemporary Issues & Lessons Learned. ASWM also established a formal Memorandum of Cooperation with the Society of Wetland Scientists to pave the way for greater collaboration between both organizations to promote and enhance protection and management of wetland resources, to promote application of sound science to wetland management efforts, and to provide training and education for our members and the public.

In 2015, ASWM made several significant website updates including a massive upgrade to a newer platform. We developed new webpages on the topic of wetland restoration (to access them click here and/or here) and wetland mapping, with information about the new federal standards for wetland mapping and a webpage with wetland mapping training webinars. And we updated the State Wetland Programs webpage with the new data gathered while creating the Status and Trends Report (see link in paragraph above). ASWM also provided timely and informative webinars on hot topics such as the Clean Water Rule, and developed critical partnerships with other organizations such as the Association of Clean Water Administrators and the Environmental Council of States.

In 2016, ASWM plans to continue the successful webinar series, Improving Wetland Restoration Success, and complete the draft restoration white paper with a national strategy to improve wetland restoration outcomes. We plan to continue to expand our partnerships and work with other organizations to protect and restore wetlands. We plan to improve our ability to share knowledge through an electronic forum and online training webinars.

“Integration” is the word du jour, and ASWM plans to expand its participation in topics that impact wetlands such as watershed planning, beaver reintroduction, stormwater management, and nature based alternatives to traditional engineering while continuing to offer the same great services and opportunities for professional development as we have in the past. And as always, we plan to keep our members up to date with information and analysis of time sensitive policy issues that impact wetlands management.

In my Editor’s Choice section this month, you’ll see articles that reflect on the past and look to the future. The New Year always brings new funding opportunities such as the Sustain our Great Lakes RFP. Notably, the 2015 in review article focuses on how environmental and climate issues “left their silos” (aka integration). And in recognition of how important it is to keep an eye on future trends, you’ll find an article on Top Trends Conservationists Should Be Paying Attention To.

All of us at ASWM wish you the very best for 2016!

Marla J. Stelk, Editor
Wetland Breaking News

     
                     

Wetland Breaking News - January 2016

EDITOR'S CHOICE

EPA Survey Shows $271 Billion Needed for Nation’s Wastewater Infrastructure

Contact: Robert Daguillard – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – January 13, 2016
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today released a survey showing that $271 billion is needed to maintain and improve the nation’s wastewater infrastructure, including the pipes that carry wastewater to treatment plants, the technology that treats the water, and methods for managing stormwater runoff. The survey is a collaboration between EPA, states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and other U.S. territories. To be included in the survey, projects must include a description and location of a water quality-related public health problem, a site-specific solution, and detailed information on project cost. For full news release, click here.

Sustain Our Great Lakes 2016 Funding Opportunity

Sustain Our Great Lakes
Sustain Our Great Lakes is soliciting pre-proposals to restore and enhance habitat in the Great Lakes basin. The program will award grants for on-the-ground habitat improvements, with a focus on improving the quality and connectivity of streams, riparian zones and coastal wetlands. Up to $5 million is expected to be available for grant awards in 2016. To be eligible for funding, projects must occur within the Great Lakes basin. Eligible applicants include non-profit 501(c) organizations, state government agencies, local governments, municipal governments, Indian tribes, and educational institutions. Details about this funding opportunity are provided in the Request For Proposals. A list of FAQs provides complementary information related to funding eligibility, timelines, and matching funds. Application information for quick reference is provided in a Tip Sheet. For more information, go here. Pre-proposals are due on February 17.

Water Runoff From Farming Will Be Major Issue In 2016

By Dr. Mike Rosmann – Yankton Daily Press & Dakotan – January 5, 2016
Increasingly, complaints are being lodged about runoff and discharged water from U.S. farms and other sources, such as industries and metropolitan areas, by downstream users of the water who raise concerns about its safety to drink, as well as the costs to treat contaminated water to make it drinkable. Last week’s Farm and Ranch Life column provided information about the availability of water worldwide for agriculture and other uses. Underground aquifers have almost been used up in some countries and are dwindling slower--but declining nevertheless--in key agricultural-producing regions of the U.S., chiefly the seven western-most states and the Ogalalla Aquifer which underlies parts of seven High Plains states. For full story, click here.

U.S. budget includes millions for Chesapeake Bay watershed

By Associated Press – WAVY.com – December 24, 2015
The massive federal tax and spending plan includes $11 million for land conservation in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Joel Dunn of the Chesapeake Conservancy says an additional $2 million is aimed at improving access to the bay. The CEO and president of the conservancy says less than 2 percent of the bay’s 12,000 miles of shoreline is publicly accessible. For full story, click here.

2015 in review: The year environmental and climate issues left their silos

By Douglas Fischer – Environmental Health News – December 29, 2015
Call it the grand convergence: Coverage of environmental issues, especially climate change, jumped traditional boundaries to pick up broader—and slightly ominous—geopolitical and health angles. At the successful Paris climate talks in December, President Obama and other world leaders tied terrorism to human-induced bouts of erratic and severe weather. Drought and water crises, they said, exacerbated civil distress in Syria and the Middle East. For full story, click here.

Top Trends Conservationists Should be Paying Attention to — But Aren’t

By Mary Hoff Ensia – December 28, 2015
Artificial intelligence, testosterone and ship tracking technology probably aren’t on many conservation organizations’ “top things to think about” lists right now. But they should be, suggests a new report in the scientific journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution. “A Horizon Scan of Global Conservation Issues for 2016,” authored by University of Cambridge conservation biologist William Sutherland and 23 other researchers, practitioners, professional horizon scanners and journalists, offers a list of 15 emerging trends and developments that are not well known but could have big implications — positive, negative or both — for biodiversity on a global scale. For full story, click here.

Toxic, Vomit-Green Algae Blooms Forecast to Double in Lake Erie

By Michael Byrne – Mother Board – December 17, 2015
In the summer of 2014 the city of Toledo and surrounding areas (pop. 500,000) were forced to cut off their own drinking water supply due to a massive toxic algae bloom in Lake Erie. For two days, residents were told not to cook with or drink tap water. While not quite as bleak as the lake's 1970s pollution heyday of actual burning water, images of supernaturally green sludge lapping at the city's shores were about the next best/worst thing. And, according to research presented Wednesday at the annual American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco, they're also likely to be a new normal, with the number of severe Lake Erie algae blooms expected to double this century. For full story, click here.

ASWM’s Members’ Wetland Webinar: Wetlands and Nutrient Uptake – January 27, 2016

ASWM’s Members’ Wetland Webinar: Wetlands and Nutrient Uptake will be held on Wednesday, January 27, 2016 at 3:30 p.m. ET. Presented by Tom Harcarik, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, Division of Environmental and Financial Assistance; Bill Schumacher, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, Division of Surface Water; and Eric Saas, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, Division of Surface Water. For more information and to register, click here.

Wetland Mapping Consortium (WMC) Webinar: Changes in the FGDC Wetland Classification Standard – Cowardin 2.0 – January 28, 2016

Wetland Mapping Consortium (WMC) Webinar: Changes in the FGDC Wetland Classification Standard – Cowardin 2.0 will be held on Thursday, January 28, 2016 at 3:00 p.m. ET. Presented by Rusty Griffin, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's, National Standards and Support Team. For more information and to register, click here.

ASWM’s Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar: Evaluating the Ecological Performance of Compensatory Mitigation – February 2, 2016

ASWM’s Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar: Evaluating the Ecological Performance of Compensatory Mitigation will be held on February 2, 2016 at 3:00 p.m. ET. Presented by Joseph A. Morgan, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Wetlands Division; Dr. Eric Stein, Southern California Coastal Water Research Project; and Dr. Siobhan Fennessy, Kenyon College. For more information and to register, go here.

 

Wetland Breaking News - January 2016

NATIONAL NEWS

Senate fails to override Obama veto

By Timothy Cama – The Hill – January 21, 2016
Senate Republicans fell short Thursday in their attempt to override a veto from President Obama and repeal a contentious water regulation from the Environmental Protection Agency. Fifty-two senators voted to move forward with an attempt to override Obama’s veto of the resolution, short of the 60 votes that were needed. Democratic Sens. Heidi Heitkamp (N.D.), Joe Donnelly (Ind.) and Joe Manchin (W.Va.) joined Senate Republicans in voting to proceed with the veto override. Sen. Susan Collins (Maine) was the only Republican to vote against. Even if the Senate had achieved cloture on the resolution, final passage would have required a two-thirds majority in both chambers of Congress, a steep climb. The 52-40 Thursday vote closes the latest chapter in the GOP’s push to stop the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) attempt to assert power over small waterways like streams and wetlands. The rule is known as the Clean Water Rule or “waters of the United States,” and was made final last year. For full story, click here.

Watchdog finds no wrongdoing in EPA’s moves to block controversial Alaskan gold mine

By Joby Warrick – The Washington Post – January 13, 2016
The Environmental Protection Agency’s internal watchdog has found no evidence of bias in the agency’s efforts to block a proposed gold mine from being built near Alaska’s Bristol Bay. The EPA’s Inspector General, in a report released on Wednesday, said agency officials followed normal guidelines in assessing whether the controversial Pebble Mine project should be built. The EPA is moving toward a formal decision to bar mining operations in the region citing risks to wildlife, including the world’s biggest run of sockeye salmon. For full story, click here.

Bees threatened by a common pesticide, EPA finds

By Geoffrey Mohan – The Baltimore Sun – January 6, 2016
An insecticide widely used on grains, vegetables, fruit and other crops nationwide threatens honeybees, federal environmental regulators said in a decision that could lend impetus to efforts to ban the chemical. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Wednesday that imidacloprid, a nicotine-imitating chemical found in at least 188 farm and household products in California, “potentially poses risk to hives when the pesticide comes in contact with certain crops that attract pollinators.” The EPA's decision was prompted by increasing concern that the chemicals might be contributing to the sudden collapse of commercial honey bee colonies over the last decade. For full blog post, click here.

TransCanada Launches Two Legal Challenges to Obama's Rejection of Keystone

By John H. Cushman Jr. – InsideClimate News – January 7, 2016
Moving on two new legal fronts to overturn President Barack Obama’s rejection of its Keystone XL pipeline, TransCanada Corp. on Wednesday launched a free-trade challenge and a federal lawsuit to salvage the stranded project. The first maneuver, under provisions of the North American Free Trade Agreement, (NAFTA) seeks compensation of $15 billion – a prize rich enough not just to repay the money already invested, but also to compensate for the loss of future income investors had expected. For full story, click here.

Scientists worry that the Chesapeake’s natural shoreline is turning into a wall

By Darryl Fears – The Washington Post – December 26, 2015
On the banks of the Potomac River, construction cranes that look like metal dinosaurs tower over Southwest Washington. They swivel in all directions, delivering concrete and other heavy material to workers building a large development behind a steel-and-concrete wall that holds back the water. Within two years, the Wharf will begin emerging as a playground of trendy apartments, shops and entertainment venues. But below the river’s surface, animals that depend on vegetation in the water may continue to struggle, marine scientists say. For full story, click here.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Releases 2015 List of Candidates for Endangered Species Act Protection

Contact: Vanessa Kauffman – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – December 23, 2015
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) today released the Candidate Notice of Review, a yearly status appraisal of plants and animals that are candidates for Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection. Two species were removed from the list, and two changed in priority from the last review, conducted in December 2014. There are now 60 species recognized by the Service as candidates for ESA protection. All candidate species are assigned a listing priority number based on the magnitude and imminence of the threats they face. When adding species to the list of threatened or endangered species, the Service first addresses species with the highest listing priority. Today’s notice announces changes in priority for two species. For full press release, click here.

Endangered Species Act protection sought for rare frog in California, Oregon

By Steven Moore – Times-Standard – December 23, 2015
Conservationists on Wednesday filed a notice of their intent to sue the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service over whether to extend Endangered Species Act protection to the foothill yellow-legged frog, which thrives in North Coast rivers and creeks. The Center for Biological Diversity accuses federal officials of delaying their decision to protect the foothill yellow-legged frog, which has disappeared from more than half its historical streams in California and Oregon. Jeff Miller, a conservation advocate for the center, calls the Smith, Klamath, Trinity and Eel rivers and Redwood Creek “the stronghold for the entire species.” For full story, click here.

President Obama signs massive spending bill, tax measures into law

Mary Troyan – USA Today – December 18, 2015
President Obama signed a huge tax and spending package into law on Friday following congressional votes that avoided a year-end showdown over the budget and ended legislative business until lawmakers return in 2016. The Senate's 65-33 vote approved both the $1.1 trillion catch-all spending bill and a $622 billion series of tax breaks. The House earlier passed the two pieces separately by solid majorities — the tax package Thursday and the spending bill Friday morning. Lawmakers generally viewed the legislation as an imperfect but acceptable compromise between conservative and liberal priorities. “Congress can now move into 2016 with a fresh start,” House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., said. For full story, click here.

Wisconsin and Illinois wetland has international importance

By Morgan Linn – Great Lakes Echo – December 17, 2015
The Chiwaukee Illinois Beach Lake Plain is one special wetland. It encompasses 15 miles of Lake Michigan coast in Wisconsin and Illinois and is “known for its spectacular wildflowers, with spring, fall and summer each offering a different suite of colors and textures,” says the Wisconsin Wetlands Association (WWA). It is home to lots of rare plants and animals and diverse wetland types. It “provides a habitat for over 400 prairie plant species, and … provides just wonderful places for birds, amphibians, reptiles, and insects,” said Steve Richter, the director of conservation programs for the Wisconsin chapter of the Nature Conservancy. It has survived being surrounded by urban development, and contains some of the last areas of natural vegetation in the Lake Plain system, he said. And now it’s been added to the List of Wetlands of International Importance by the Ramsar Convention. For full story, click here.

After rocky road, U.S. Senate passes landmark chemical law overhaul

By Puneet Kollipara – Science Magazine – December 17, 2015
These days in Congress, not even strong bipartisan support seems to guarantee a bill’s success. But the Republicans and Democrats who backed a U.S. Senate bill to overhaul the nation’s environmental safety law for industrial chemicals refused to give up. Overcoming a thicket of procedural barriers, they won a signature victory tonight as the Senate unanimously approved, on a voice vote, an overhaul of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). The vote puts Congress close to reforming one of the nation’s most maligned environmental laws for the first time in nearly 40 years. For full article, click here.

Great Lakes cleanup, protection and dredging funds in omnibus bill

By Garret Ellison – mLIVE – December 17, 2015
Environmental groups and lawmakers say the Great Lakes did well in the 2016 federal omnibus spending bill, which includes millions of federal dollars for pollution cleanup, habitat protection, waterway projects and port dredging. The year-end appropriations bill, a $1.1 trillion spending package that funds the federal government through September, includes $1.25 billion for U.S. harbor maintenance and navigation projects and $300 million for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI), a multi-year federal program that oversees pollution cleanup, funds habitat restoration and fights invasive species. The five-year-old program has relied on annual appropriations, but Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Lansing, said the budget bill formally establishes the GLRI into law. "For the first time, this finally establishes this fund," she said. For full story, click here.

Wetland Breaking News - January 2016

 

Wetland Breaking News - January 2016STATE NEWS

AK: Starvation Suspected in Massive Die-off of Alaska Seabirds

By San Joling – Associated Press – abc news – January 12, 2016
Seabird biologist David Irons drove recently to the Prince William Sound community of Whittier to check on a friend's boat and spotted white blobs along the tide line of the rocky Alaska beach. He thought they were patches of snow. A closer look revealed that the white patches were emaciated common murres, one of North America's most abundant seabirds, washed ashore after apparently starving to death. "It was pretty horrifying," Irons said. "The live ones standing along the dead ones were even worse." Murre die-offs have occurred in previous winters but not in the numbers Alaska is seeing. Federal researchers won't estimate the number, and are trying to gauge the scope and cause of the die-off while acknowledging there's little they can do. For full story, click here.

AZ: EPA Announces $25 Million to Improve Water Quality, Infrastructure in Arizona

Contact: Margot Perez-Sullivan – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – December 22, 2015
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $25 million in funding to Arizona for investment in statewide improvements in local drinking water and wastewater infrastructure and the reduction of water pollution. The funds are directed to the Water Infrastructure Finance Authority (WIFA), which will use them to provide low-cost loans for drinking water and wastewater infrastructure projects and to provide funding for innovative water quality improvement projects. For full news release, click here.

CA: $12 annual Bay tax on June ballot: First-ever nine-county parcel tax proposed to support restoration

By Samantha Weigel – The Daily Journal – January 15, 2016
In an unprecedented move asking voters across all nine Bay Area counties to help fund critical tidal marsh restoration and flood protection projects, environmental groups and the business community are partnering to promote the “Clean and Healthy Bay Ballot Measure.” This week, the San Francisco Bay Restoration Authority, a seven-member government agency, unanimously moved to propose a $12 parcel tax in the June election — a first of its kind regional effort anticipated to raise $500 million over 20 years. From protecting vital public infrastructure like bustling freeways to re-establishing habitats that support a variety of species, the funds generated by the tax could help restore nearly 30,000 acres of wetlands that naturally promote resiliency against sea level rise. For full article, click here.

CA: Northern California fog bringing mercury onshore

By Samantha Clark, Santa Cruz Sentinel – Daily Democrat – December 26, 2015
Northern California’s famous fog carries a surprising amount of mercury, according to new research. The levels aren’t high enough to harm humans, but mercury accumulates in wildlife and can climb up the food chain, so it could be bad news for coastal ecosystems. While a small amount of mercury is naturally present in the environment, people have pumped more of the toxin into the air and ocean. Mercury concentrations in the rain have increased about five fold since the Industrial Revolution. Scientists reported these findings at the American Geophysical Union’s fall conference last week. They’ve been collecting fog and ocean water from Big Sur to Humboldt County to study the chemistry of water droplets, plankton and sediments. Mercury emitted from coal-powered plants and mining operations often finds its way into the ocean, where it affects marine ecosystems. Mercury poisoning can damage the brain and nervous system and impair reproductive functions. For full story, click here.

CA: NRDC Report: Is California Doing Enough To Manage Drought?

WaterOnline – December 14, 2015
A report card released today by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) finds that the state is making mixed progress, and, in some cases, failing to invest in 21st century solutions that would promote a healthy economy and environment and make California more resistant to future droughts. The report analyzes the state’s response under Gov. Brown’s leadership to the current drought and assesses successes and shortcomings. For full story, click here.

FL: Chinese billionaire Wenliang Wang has agreed to donate money for long-delayed restoration of dying mangroves

By Eric Staats – Naples Daily News – January 11, 2016
Wenliang Wang has never seen the leafless dead mangroves that poke into the sky over a flooded mud flat between Goodland and Marco Island. But the Chinese billionaire wants to restore them anyway. Rookery Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve is counting on as much as $5 million from Wang's international conglomerate Rilin Industrial Group to restore the 225-acre black mangrove forest along San Marco Road and then apply the same fix to die-offs around the world. For full story, click here.

GA: Georgians, wildlife will soon roam on what tycoons called home

By Dan Chapman – The Atlanta Journal-Constitution – December 26, 2015
Wealthy farmers owned Altama Plantation in the 1700s and 1800s. William DuPont, the chemical magnate, wintered and trained racehorses here during the early years of the 19th century. Atlanta entrepreneur and philanthropist Cator Woolford bought Altama in 1933. A year after Woolford’s death, in 1945, the scion of the Sea Island Co. acquired the property and turned it into a hunting preserve for family and friends. Altama Plantation, today, belongs to you. The state of Georgia, with much financial help from the Nature Conservancy, the federal government and private donors, bought the historic, biologically diverse 4,000-acre tract along a tributary to the Altamaha River. It will throw open the main gate, a stone’s throw from I-95, to the public any day now. For full story, click here.

IL: Geneva may hire firm to fix Prairie Green Preserve, sell wetland credits

By Susan Sarkauskas – Daily Herald – December 31, 2015
Geneva may try one more time to get the Prairie Green Preserve to help pay for itself by hiring a firm to fix the site's 80 acres of wetlands and then sell wetland credits. The council is expected to vote in January whether to hire Land and Water Resources Inc. of Rosemont. The firm would repair drainage, and try to get the Army Corps of Engineers to recertify 35 acres it initially certified in 2010 as eligible for a wetland mitigation bank. The bank is a way for land developers elsewhere in a watershed to compensate for filling in wetlands, instead of having to build replacement wetlands or water retention areas on their sites. For full story, click here.

IA: 'Biggest and boldest' water quality plan gets mixed reception

By Jason Noble and Brianne Pfannenstiel – The Des Moines Register – January 5, 2016
Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad called his plan committing $4.7 billion to water quality efforts the “biggest and boldest” he’s ever offered, but it received a cool reception after it was formally announced Tuesday. The proposal would extend an existing sales tax earmarked for school infrastructure improvements but divert billions over the next three decades to address water pollution caused by farm runoff. “This would be an extraordinary investment and have a huge impact,” Branstad, a Republican, said Tuesday during a meeting with reporters. But Senate Majority Leader Michael Gronstal, D-Council Bluffs, said the plan amounted to “robbing Peter to pay Paul” by cutting from one top priority – education – to fund another, water quality. For full story, click here.

KY: Invasive plants hit Kentucky hard

By James Bruggers – Courier-Journal – January 8, 2016
It was so warm in December it seemed as if those buttercup bullies might soon be spreading a blanket of invasive yellow across Cherokee Park bottomlands. Ranunculus ficaria, or the fig buttercup, forms dense mats and is one of many plants remaking Kentucky and Indiana's landscapes, threatening to replace a variety of native wildflowers including populations of wild geranium, crinkleroot, certain native onions and trillium. For full article, click here.

LA: What the Bonnet Carre Spillway opening means for Lake Pontchartrain

By Mark Schleifstein – NOLA.com - The Times-Picayune – January 08, 2016
The opening of the Bonnet Carre Spillway at 10 a.m. Sunday by the Army Corps of Engineers will kick off a variety of efforts to track the environmental effects of nutrient-rich Mississippi River water that will flow into Lake Pontchartrain, freshening both the lake, and adjacent Lake Borgne and the Mississippi Sound. The U.S. Geological Survey, which has been contracted by the corps to collect data during the release, also will track the effects of moving Mississippi River water into the Atchafalaya River basin, when the corps opens the Morganza Floodway, now expected to occur on Tuesday. For full story, click here.

ME: Study finds chemicals may be affecting Maine bass

By Kevin Miller – Portland Press Herald – December 26, 2015
A federal study is raising concerns about the impacts of hormone-disrupting chemicals on fish at national wildlife refuges across the Northeast, including two Maine refuges where nearly every smallmouth bass showed potential effects of chemical exposure. Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge near Orono and Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge outside of Calais were among five locations where biologists found enough evidence of physiological changes in bass for them to urge more study. Between 90 percent and 100 percent of the male smallmouth bass tested at both refuges had developed female characteristics in their reproductive systems, likely the result of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in the environment. For full story, click here.

MD: Watermen seek, win, halt in Tred Avon oyster restoration project

By Tim Wheeler and Rona Kobell – Bay Journal – January 13, 2016
Maryland’s ambitious effort to restore its depleted oyster population has hit a snag, as watermen critical of the effort succeeded in at halting construction of new oyster reefs this winter in an Eastern Shore river.
Acting after three watermen met with Maryland Lt. Gov. Boyd Rutherford, the state’s natural resources secretary asked the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to hold up a federally funded reef building project about to begin in the Tred Avon River near St. Michaels. DNR secretary Mark J. Belton declined to explain his request for the delay when asked about it by Bay Journal reporters. For full article, click here.

MD: Maryland moves toward trading, as many watch warily

By Rona Kobell – Bay Journal – December 28, 2015
When Larry Hogan bested Anthony Brown to become the third Republican governor of Maryland in half a century, environmentalists were concerned about who he might choose to lead the Maryland Department of the Environment. Many breathed a sigh of relief when Hogan appointed Ben Grumbles to the top job at MDE. But one issue troubled some in the environmental community. They suspected Grumbles was in favor of nutrient trading and would soon push a policy that outlined how Maryland would enter into such a market. For full article, click here.

MD: MD energy department to relocate in same office as MDE

By Rona Kobell – Bay Journal – December 27, 2015
The Maryland Energy Administration will be leaving its Annapolis office and moving in with the Maryland Department of the Environment, a move state and Chesapeake Bay officials hope will foster better communication on key climate-change and pollution-control issues. The move will also save taxpayers $1.6 million over four years on rent and other bills for the Annapolis office. The impetus for the move appears to be a desire to charge forward on manure to energy as the state implements new phosphorus management rules. The rules will require many farmers to spread less chicken manure on their land, and will result in about 200,000 tons of excess manure that the state hopes to turn into energy. For full article, click here.

MI: President Obama declares emergency in Flint

Paul Egan and Todd Spangler – Detroit Free Press – January 16, 2016
President Barack Obama on Saturday declared a federal emergency in Flint, freeing up to $5 million in federal aid to immediately assist with the public health crisis, but he denied Gov. Rick Snyder's request for a disaster declaration. A disaster declaration would have made larger amounts of federal funding available more quickly to help Flint residents whose drinking water is contaminated with lead. But under federal law, only natural disasters such as hurricanes and floods are eligible for disaster declarations, federal and state officials said. The lead contamination of Flint's drinking water is a manmade catastrophe. For full story, click here.

MI: Steady decline in wetlands endangers Great Lakes

By Doug Gorby – Michigan Radio – January 4, 2016
In Michigan and across the country, wetlands are known as marshes, swamps, bogs, fens and pocosins.
They are also known as threatened. A recent study by the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, which used data collected by our (Ducks Unlimited) mapping experts, points to staggering losses. Since the early 1800s, 40 percent, or 4.3 million acres, of Michigan’s wetlands has vanished in favor of farming, housing and other development. For a state like ours which is rich in wetland habitat, that loss is nearly equal to the size of Connecticut and Rhode Island combined. There are plenty of reasons why we should be alarmed about this. For full story, click here.

MO: Floodwaters draw warnings anew about wastewater, pollutants

By Jim Suhr – Daily Journal Online – January 5, 2016
Veronica Tate knew from the stench that sewage was among the 8 feet of water that swamped the basement of her ranch-style home after the nearby Meramec River overflowed. The larger concern for residents of her suburban St. Louis neighborhood is the unknown of what else the noxious blend might have contained. "It came up through the sewers, I guess," Tate, a customer service representative for an insurance company, said of last week's flooding. "When you get down there and look at it, there's a smell. There's an odor." Wastewater was a certainty in her Arnold neighborhood, given that two nearby treatment plants failed when the Meramec flooded in record fashion after days of unrelenting rain. The inundation has spewed tens of millions of gallons of untreated human waste, according to the sewer district's website, on a path toward the Mississippi River and an unavoidable southward trek to the Gulf of Mexico. Those plants remained offline Tuesday. For full article, click here.

NM: New Mexico Is 1st to Issue Plans to Sue EPA Over Mine Spill

By Russell Contreras and Susan Montoya Bryan – Associated Press – ABC News – January 14, 2016
New Mexico plans to sue the federal government and the owners of two Colorado mines that were the source of a massive spill last year that contaminated rivers in three Western states, officials said Thursday. The New Mexico Environment Department said it filed a notice of its intention to sue the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency over the spill, becoming the first to do so. The lawsuit also would target the state of Colorado and the owners of the Gold King and Sunnyside Mines. An EPA cleanup crew accidentally unleashed millions of gallons of contaminated wastewater in August at the inactive Gold King Mine near Silverton, Colorado. For full story, click here.

OK: Okla. shaking jumped 50% in 2015

By Mike Soraghan – E&E Publishing, LLC – January 4, 2016
The number of earthquakes in Oklahoma rose 50 percent last year, easily surpassing the record number that hit the state in 2014. Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS) data show that the state was shaken by 881 earthquakes of magnitude 3 or greater, or an average of 2.4 per day. That's up from 585 in 2014. U.S. Geological Survey data show that California had 128 such quakes in 2015. Scientists and state officials say the increase in earthquakes in Oklahoma likely has been caused by wastewater disposal from oil and gas operations. Oil production methods that yield unusually large volumes of water have combined with favorably aligned faults under the state to cause the unprecedented shaking. For full story, click here.

PA: Farmers to be surveyed on use of conservation practices in Chesapeake Bay basin

Contact: Chuck Gill – Penn State News – January 8, 2016
If you're a farm operator in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, you soon will have a chance to highlight what steps you and your fellow farmers have taken to protect and enhance water quality in the region. Several agricultural and governmental organizations have partnered to develop a survey that will ask producers to document conservation practices they have adopted to promote water quality and soil health in the bay watershed. For full story, click here.

PA: Applying proven flood controls along with green infrastructure, Philly stays above water

By Kyrie Greenberg – Newsworks – December 29, 2015
When Philadelphia gets too much rain for its storm sewers to handle, millions of tons of sewage drain into surrounding rivers. Many of the city's sewers are from the 19th century. And with climate change projecting a soggier future for Philadelphia, the city's water department is working hard to be able to accommodate all that extra moisture. Instead of building ever larger storm sewers and treatment plants, the department has been investing in "green infrastructure" so more rain is diverted or absorbed into the soil. That all adds up to meeting an ambitious goal months ahead of schedule. For full story, click here.

PA: Nixon Park gets a wetland from Mount Rose project

By Teresa Boeckel – ydr.com – December 16, 2015
About nine miles away from the construction at the Mount Rose interchange, crews are moving earth at Richard M. Nixon County Park to create wetlands to replace the ones being removed as part of the road project. The public will be able to walk through the area -- which will include a boardwalk and a bridge -- when it is ready. It will attract dragonflies, butterflies and breeding frogs. More than two acres of wetlands are being created at the park, said Francis A. Velazquez, manager of education and outreach for the York County Parks and Recreation Department. For full story, click here.

TX: In 2015, Water, EPA Dominated Environment News

By Kiah Collier – The Texas Tribune Collier – December 22, 2015
Even though the yearslong drought broke this year amid torrential rains and deadly flooding, water remained a huge issue and point of contention for Texas in 2015. Several controversial water supply projects in Central Texas grabbed headlines. And many people along the Texas-Mexico border don't have access to water, period. Meanwhile, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton spent much time suing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency over a slew of new regulations. For full story, click here.

VA: Dominion wins permit to discharge treated coal-ash water into Va. Creek

By Antonio Olivo – The Washington Post – January 14, 2016
A state regulatory board on Thursday approved a permit allowing Dominion Virginia Power to divert treated water from coal-ash ponds in Prince William County into a nearby creek that links to the Potomac River. The decision, which state officials said was approved 5 to 1, is part of an effort by the utility company to permanently seal five coal-ash ponds at the Possum Point Power Plant, near Quantico Creek. For full story, click here.

VA: DEQ official: State may still impose civil fines on Duke Energy for Dan River spill, other violations

By John Downey – Charlotte Business Journal – January 13, 2016
A top environmental regulator defended the state’s efforts to clean up Duke Energy’s coal ash ponds to legislators. He blamed delays on federal counterparts and public concerns on an unfriendly press. Tom Reeder, assistant secretary of the Department of Environmental Quality, went before the General Assembly’s Environmental Review Commission in Raleigh Wednesday to outline enforcement of the state’s Coal Ash Management Act. He said his department was ready to impose civil fines on Duke for environmental violations involving the Dan River coal ash spill and other problems in April 2014. But he said the Environmental Protection Agency got involved and has delayed action. For full article, click here.

WA: Ecology grants improve water supplies, support jobs

Contact: Dan Partridge – Washington Department of Ecology – January 6, 2016
The Washington Department of Ecology is awarding grants to public utility, conservation and irrigation districts to help improve local and regional water supplies in river basins across the state. For full news release, go here. Twelve grants totaling $3.4 million from a legislative appropriation will benefit water supplies and fish habitat, support jobs and population growth in 13 counties: Yakima, Chelan, Stevens, Spokane, Garfield, Lincoln, Pend Oreille, Ferry, King, Whatcom, San Juan, Mason and Skamania. For full news release, click here.

WA: Ecology releases draft rule to cap carbon pollution

Contact: Camille St. Onge – Washington Department of Ecology – January 6, 2016
A proposed rule would set Washington’s first-ever limits on carbon pollution, acting to help slow climate change and limit projected effects on our state’s coastal communities, agricultural industries and drinking water supplies. After working with industry, local governments, environmentalists, and the public to gain input on how to limit carbon pollution, the Washington Department of Ecology is now sharing details of the clean air rule. Ecology is seeking more feedback through public comment and stakeholder meetings to further refine the rule. Greenhouse gases, also referred to as carbon pollution, are the primary cause of climate change. About 60% of Washington’s greenhouse gases would be covered under the proposed rule that would first set a maximum limit on these emissions and then gradually reduce them over time. For full news release, click here.

WI: Should Wisconsin city get OK to tap Lake Michigan water?

By Keith Matheny – Detroit Free Press – December 28, 2015
Some worry a Wisconsin city's plan to divert Lake Michigan water for its use could set a precedent allowing others from far outside the Great Lakes region to come seeking water. The plan for Waukesha, Wis., a city of about 70,000 residents, is now being forwarded to Great Lakes states for a regional review process. It seems unremarkable at first glance; hundreds of communities around the Great Lakes source their water from the lakes. The deep aquifer from which Waukesha typically takes water is severely depleted, compounding a naturally occurring problem of high levels of radium, a carcinogen, in the water. For full story, click here.

WI: Administering the Wetland Conservation Act: Wetland worries

By Chelsey Perkins – Brainerd Dispatch – December 18, 2015
A property owner on South Long Lake is challenging Crow Wing County's decision to rescind approval on his plan to fill in a previously tax-forfeited parcel of wetland. Some area water advocates, meanwhile, are concerned the initial approval of the plan - along with other recent examples of wetland filling - raises questions about the county's application of a state rule intended to protect the sensitive habitat. For full story, click here.

 Wetland Breaking News - January 2016WETLAND SCIENCE NEWS

Antarctic icebergs have surprise role in slowing warming: study

By Alister Doyle – Planet Ark – January 12, 2016
The biggest icebergs breaking off Antarctica unexpectedly help to slow global warming as they melt away into the chill Southern Ocean, scientists said on Monday. The rare Manhattan-sized icebergs, which may become more frequent in coming decades because of climate change, release a vast trail of iron and other nutrients that act as fertilizers for algae and other tiny plant-like organisms in the ocean. These extract carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as they grow, a natural ally for human efforts to limit the pace of climate change blamed on man-made greenhouse gas emissions. For full story, click here.

Environment group warns against reducing manatees' endangered status

By Oliver Milman – The Guardian – January 12, 2016
A US government move to downgrade the conservation status of manatees and green sea turtles is premature, an environment group has warned, despite encouraging signs that both species are recovering. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) has proposed that the West Indian manatee be down-listed from endangered to threatened under the endangered species act. The move follows a notable recovery in manatee numbers – in 1991, it was estimated there were just 1,267 of the hefty aquatic beasts off the coast of Florida. That number has now swelled to 6,300 in Florida, with 13,000 in total across the manatee’s entire range, which stretches throughout the south-eastern US, Caribbean, Mexico and the northern coasts of South America. The FWS said that work to reduce collisions with speedboats and unintentional entanglements with fishing nets has paid off, as well as the effective rehabilitation of sick and injured manatees, which can weigh over 3,000 pounds and are nicknamed “sea cows” because they eat copious amounts of sea grass. For full story, click here.

How Probiotics Can Save the East Coast Shellfish Industry

By Eilis O'Neill – Civil Eats – January 12, 2016
Bob Rheault was having an open house at his young shellfish hatchery, so he arrived early in the morning with bottles of wine and plates of cheese. That’s when he noticed he had a problem. “There was an odd substance floating on the surface of the tanks,” Rheault says. He looked through a microscope, “and there were no bodies to be seen … just empty shells with bacteria climbing all over them.” For full story, click here.

Natural carbon sinks and their role in climate

ENN Environmental – News Network – January 10, 2016
Protected areas such as rainforests occupy more than one-tenth of the Earth’s landscape, and provide invaluable ecosystem services, from erosion control to pollination to biodiversity preservation. They also draw heat-trapping carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere and store it in plants and soil through photosynthesis, yielding a net cooling effect on the planet. Determining the role protected areas play as carbon sinks — now and in decades to come — is a topic of intense interest to the climate-policy community as it seeks science-based strategies to mitigate climate change. For full story, click here.

Environmental Change Rate Unprecedented, Study Says

By James Crugnale – The Weather Channel – January 7, 2016
A new study published in the journal Nature Geosciences and conducted by researchers at the University of Bristol's Cabot Institute found that the pace of environmental change is occurring faster now than at any other previous time in the Earth's history. "The rate of change was considerably slower in the past," lead author David Naafs told weather.com. Naafs and his research team showed that previous environmental change events that occurred naturally happened potentially a "thousand times slower than today." For full story, click here.

Levees among possible cause of more frequent flooding

By Jim Salter, Associated Press – Las Vegas Sun – January 4, 2016
The Mississippi River floods more often than it used to, and at higher levels. Richard Knaup thinks he knows why. The veteran emergency management director for southeast Missouri's Cape Girardeau County is fighting floods again, just as he did last year, and the year before that, and the year before that. "Prior to levee building, the river was a wild thing and it spread out between the river bluffs," Knaup said Monday. "Now we've tried to tame it. Mother Nature and Old Man River will fight back." The rains that caused this winter's flood, blamed already for 25 deaths and damage to hundreds of homes and businesses, ended a week ago, but the water was still rising Monday in southern Missouri and Illinois. For full story, click here.

California's 'Staggering' Leak Could Spew Methane for Months

By Lisa Song – InsideClimate News – January 4, 2016
In 2016, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will issue long-awaited rules to control methane emissions from the oil and gas industry. The regulations will emerge after years of activism and scientific studies on the climate risk posed by methane, a powerful greenhouse gas that's dozens of times more potent that carbon dioxide. But the regulations will likely be overshadowed by the ongoing saga in Aliso Canyon, Calif., where a leaking natural gas storage field continues to belch thousands of tons of methane into the air every week. For full story, click here.

Asian carp could cause some Lake Erie fish to decline, others to increase

Notre Dame News – January 4, 2016
If they successfully invade Lake Erie, Asian carp could eventually account for about a third of the total weight of fish in the lake and could cause declines in most fish species — including prized sport and commercial fish such as walleye, according to a new computer modeling study. However, most of the expected declines in Lake Erie will not be as extreme as some experts have predicted, according to the food-web study by the University of Notre Dame’s David Lodge and colleagues from other American and Canadian research institutions. A few fish species, including smallmouth bass, would likely increase. For full story, click here.

Sea Lamprey Mating Pheromone Registered by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as First Vertebrate Pheromone Biopesticide

Contacts: Dr. Marc Gaden and Marisa Lubeck – U.S. Geological Survey – January 4, 2016
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency registered a sea lamprey mating pheromone, 3kPZS, as the first ever vertebrate pheromone biopesticide in late December, 2015. Like an alluring perfume, the mating pheromone is a scent released by male sea lampreys to lure females onto nesting sites. Research and development of the mating pheromone was funded by the Great Lakes Fishery Commission, with additional support from the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, in collaboration with federal government, university, and private industry partners. For full news release, click here.

A Reprieve for Fungus-Battered Frogs

By Rachel Nuwer – The New York Times – January 4, 2016
After a six-year effort, researchers on the Spanish island of Majorca have rid several groups of Majorcan midwife toads of the pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis — better known as chytrid fungus, or B.d. It’s the first time the disease, which is devastating amphibians worldwide, has been eradicated in a wild population. For full story, click here.

Scientist: Barrier islands could be unlivable in 50 years

By Russ Zimmer – 10 News – January 2, 2016
Much of this country's barrier islands will be under water in 50 years because of climate change, according to a University of Miami professor and expert on sea-level rise. On the Jersey Shore, not only would places like Long Beach Island and Seaside Heights be partially covered by sea water, but so would flood-prone coastal communities from Bay Head to Tuckerton. These areas also would face more flooding and greater risk from storm surges, according to Harold Wanless, chairman of the university's Department of Geological Sciences. For full story, click here.

Sitting Ducks: Why Millions of Arctic Seabirds Are in Danger

By Scott Weidensaul – Audubon Magazine – January-February 2016
Nourished by the waters’ abundant fish, squid, and other sea creatures, most of the Bering’s seabirds appear to be doing okay—at least for now. But across the world, seabirds are in trouble. One study published last year documented a nearly 70 percent decline in global populations between 1950 and 2010. Scientists worry that seabirds are especially sensitive to the threats of climate change, ocean acidification, commercial fishing, and shifts in marine ecosystems—threats that are only expected to intensify in the coming years. For full article, click here.

Organic farming can cut nitrate leaching in half

By Francis Thicke, Margaret Smith and Paul Mugge – The Des Moines Register – December 24, 2015
New research indicates that organic farming can be one solution to the problem of excess nitrate in Iowa’s rivers. Recent research published by Cynthia Cambardella and Dan Jaynes, USDA Agricultural Research Service in Ames and Kathleen Delate, Iowa State University in the journal “Sustainable Agriculture Research” demonstrated that a typical organic crop rotation reduced nitrate leaching from crop fields by nearly 50 percent, compared to the conventional corn and soybean rotation common in Iowa. The researchers measured how much nitrate leached down through the soil profile and out through the field tile drainage systems, which drain into streams and rivers. Over three years, the conventional corn/soybean cropping system leached a total of 69.7 lb/acre of nitrate-nitrogen, compared to 35.1 lb/acre for the organic cropping system. For full story, click here.

U.S. and Canada Report on Relevant and Available Groundwater Science to meet GLWQA Commitment

Binational.net – December 3, 2015
The 2012 Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement includes a commitment to publish a report on relevant and available groundwater science. In response to this commitment, a draft report has been completed that documents groundwater science relevant to the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The draft report is a product of extensive collaboration among experts in a variety of subject areas and summarizes current knowledge on groundwater in the Great Lakes region. For more information and to download the draft report, click here. Comments due by January 31, 2016.

Hot Research Topic

By Lee Sausley – KRISTV.COM – December 2, 2015 – Video
A groundbreaking scientific study is underway testing the use of fire as a way to help endangered coastal habitats adapt to rising sea levels. Thanks to the Gulf of Mexico Foundation based here in Corpus Christi, scientists in Mississippi are looking at controlled burns as way to increase bio-diversity in coastal ecosystems, and help wetland marshes migrate inland as shorelines recede. For full story and to view video, click here.

 

Wetland Breaking News: January 2016RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONS

Using Graywater and Stormwater to Enhance Local Water Supplies: An Assessment of Risks, Costs, and Benefits

National Academies Press – 2016
Chronic and episodic water shortages are becoming common in many regions of the United States, and population growth in water-scarce regions further compounds the challenges. Increasingly, alternative water sources such as graywater-untreated wastewater that does not include water from the toilet but generally includes water from bathroom sinks, showers, bathtubs, clothes washers, and laundry sinks- and stormwater-water from rainfall or snow that can be measured downstream in a pipe, culvert, or stream shortly after the precipitation event-are being viewed as resources to supplement scarce water supplies rather than as waste to be discharged as rapidly as possible. Graywater and stormwater can serve a range of non-potable uses, including irrigation, toilet flushing, washing, and cooling, although treatment may be needed. Stormwater may also be used to recharge groundwater, which may ultimately be tapped for potable use. In addition to providing additional sources of local water supply, harvesting stormwater has many potential benefits, including energy savings, pollution prevention, and reducing the impacts of urban development on urban streams. Similarly, the reuse of graywater can enhance water supply reliability and extend the capacity of existing wastewater systems in growing cities. For more information, click here.

Benefit Indicators for Flood Regulation Services of Wetlands: A Modeling Approach

By Justin Bousquin, Kristen Hychka, and Marisa Mazzotta – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency –September 2015
This report builds on research reported in Bousquin et al. (2014). Whereas the previous report focused on developing an event-based flood modeling process that would explicitly account for flood water retention in freshwater wetlands, this report improves the modeling and details how that modeling process was used to develop indicators to assess increases in flood protection benefits from potential wetlands restoration. The assessment of flood protection benefits follows a non-monetary benefit indicators framework outlined in Mazzotta and Wainger (in preparation). The intensive modeling performed for the watershed case study presented in this report may be too extensive for some watersheds and flood benefits assessments. In light of this, we used the results to develop a set of indicators that could be collected without the modeling. In this report we outline a three-tiered approach, present indicators for Tiers II and III, and describe the process one would follow to apply such indicator sets. Future work will further investigate the transferability of these flood benefit indicators and the modeling process to other watersheds, as well as ways of making the assessment and tools more accessible to a wider audience of users. To download report, click here.

Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment Tool for Coastal Habitats (CCVATCH)

Climate Adaptation Knowledge Exchange (CAKE) – May 2015
The Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment Tool for Coastal Habitats (CCVATCH) is a decision support tool for land managers, decision-makers, and researchers that integrates local data and knowledge and current research with local/regional climate change predictions to provide an assessment of potential habitat vulnerabilities. Through a facilitated and inclusive process, it guides the evaluation of how changes in CO2, precipitation, air and water temperature, sea level change, and storm frequency and severity will directly affect a habitat and also interact with non-climate stressors of invasive/nuisance species, nutrients, sedimentation, erosion, and environmental contaminants. Using this spreadsheet-based tool and guidance document, the direct sensitivity of a given habitat to climate change, the current condition of the habitat, and natural and anthropogenic conditions that affect adaptive capacity can be used to calculate a numerical vulnerability score. This score can then be used to rank the relative vulnerability of assessed habitats within a defined area. For full story, click here.

 

Wetland Breaking News: January 2016

POTPOURRI

In Climate Move, Obama Halts New Coal Mining Leases on Public Lands

By Coral Davenport – The New York Times – January 14, 2016
The Obama administration announced on Friday a halt to new coal mining leases on public lands as it considers an overhaul of the program that could lead to increased costs for energy companies and a slowdown in extraction. “Given serious concerns raised about the federal coal program, we’re taking the prudent step to hit pause on approving significant new leases so that decisions about those leases can benefit from the recommendations that come out of the review,” said Interior Secretary Sally Jewell. For full story, click here.

Welcome to the Anthropocene: Five Signs Earth Is in a Man-Made Epoch

By Eric Roston – Bloomberg.com – January 7, 2016
More than two dozen scientists have spent at least six years debating whether humanity's wear and tear on the planet qualifies as a new geological epoch that deserves its own name. The origins of coal date back to the Carboniferous Period 350 million years ago. Dinosaurs roamed the earth until a meteor brought an end to their Cretaceous Period 66 million years ago. Civilization grew up in the Holocene, which started only 11,700 years ago. Now, these researchers argue, human industry and population have created the Anthropocene, or human epoch. Essentially, they argue, over the past 75 years or so we've installed a new operating system for our 4.5 billion-year-old planet. For full story, click here.

Unnatural Balance: How Food Waste Impacts World’s Wildlife

By Richard Conniff – Environment 360 – January 6, 2016
The world wastes more than $750 billion worth of food every year — 1.6 billion tons of food left in farm fields, sent to landfills, or otherwise scattered across the countryside, plus another seven million tons of fishery discards at sea. That waste has gotten a lot of attention lately, mostly in terms of human hunger. Hardly anyone talks about what all that food waste is doing to wildlife. But a growing body of evidence suggests that our casual attitude about waste may be reshaping the way the natural world functions across much of the planet, inadvertently subsidizing some opportunistic predators and thus contributing to the decline of other species, including some that are threatened or endangered. For full story, click here.

Czosek Named Managing Director of Society of Wetland Scientists

Society of Wetland Scientists – 2016
The Society of Wetland Scientists (SWS) is pleased to announce that Michelle Czosek, CAE has been appointed as its new managing director. Czosek, who has been an associate director of SWS since 2013, succeeds Lynda J. Patterson, FASAE, CAE, president and owner of AMPED-Association Management Partners & Executive Directors, a full-service association management company that manages SWS. Patterson will continue supporting SWS in an advisory role. “I’m excited for this opportunity to take on a leadership role and further my involvement with SWS,” said Czosek. “Being entrusted to work at a high level to advance an organization of this stature is a true honor.” Czosek has nearly 25 years of experience managing a variety of professional and trade associations, including the North American Building Material Distribution Association, International Association for Human Resource Information Management, Information User Association, International Women in Boating, and The Harmonie Group. For full story, click here.

By the Numbers: 589

By Catherine Krikstan – Chesapeake Bay Program – December 29, 2015
With its rough shell, gray body and big ecological value, the eastern oyster is one of the most iconic species in the Chesapeake Bay. And for decades, protecting oyster populations has been part of the Chesapeake Bay Program’s work. But it was not until the signing of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement that our partners committed to what is known as a tributary-based restoration strategy, setting a goal to restore oyster reefs in ten Maryland and Virginia rivers by 2025 in order to foster the ecological services these reefs provide. For full blog post, click here.

Agriculture is big threat to water quality. These farmers are doing something about it.

By Richard Mertens – The Christian Science Monitor – December 27, 2015
Mike Werling shoulders his way into a field of head-high corn and peers down a row. “That’s a beautiful sight!” he exclaims. It was not the corn that delighted Mr. Werling in late September as much as what was growing underneath. Shoots of rapeseed and rye poked up through the dirt, spreading a green flush beneath the tangled leaves. The new plants, sown the week before into the ripe corn, will remain in the field long after the harvest. They’ll protect the soil over the winter and absorb nutrients that might otherwise find their way into the St. Marys River, whose brown-green waters flow past Werling’s farm on their way to Lake Erie. For full story, click here.

EPA struggles to ditch contentious rule's catchy nickname

By Tiffany Stecker – E&E Publishing, LLC – December 24, 2015
As the 92nd Congress ironed out the Clean Water Act amendments in 1972, lawmakers were unhappy with a well-worn term for resources deserving federal protection, "navigable waters." So House and Senate negotiators cooked up "navigable waters of the United States." "This new definition clearly encompasses all water bodies, including mainstreams and their tributaries, for water quality purposes," one of the bill's architects, Michigan Democrat John Dingell, said then on the House floor. And when the Obama administration released new rules last year for defining what waterways and wetlands get Clean Water Act protection, U.S. EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers turned to the old reliable, "Waters of the United States," which quickly got turned into an acronym, WOTUS. For full story, click here.

We Won't Back Down from our Mission

By Liz Purchia – EPA Connect – December 17, 2015
It’s that time again. Like clockwork, mere days after the world reached a historic global climate agreement in Paris, a small but vocal group are grasping at anything to distract from and derail our progress. The latest attempt cites EPA’s public communications about providing clean water to the American people as cause to investigate EPA’s use of social media around our Clean Power Plan-an essential rule to fight climate change by cutting carbon pollution from power plants. For full blog post, click here.

Marsh on the Move

By Sharon Oosthoek – Hakai Magazine – December 14, 2015
Biologist Matt Whitbeck leans against the rail of a wooden platform and looks across the seemingly immutable marshlands of Maryland’s Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge. The waist-high grasses beneath his feet are rooted in a four-meter layer of peat and silt built up over nine centuries. Monarch butterflies fly in lazy circles. A stand of pines rises in the distance. There is nothing here to suggest this is an ecosystem on the move, but Whitbeck knows better. The marsh is migrating inland—running from the sea level rise and land subsidence that are eating away at the coastline. For full article, click here.

Wetland Breaking News - January 2016

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

WEBINARS

   

MEETINGS

   

TRAINING

 

SPECIAL EVENTS

 
WEBINARS
                   
JANUARY 2016
                   
January 26, 2016
2:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m. EST
      The Utah State University Forestry Extension, Utah Division of Forestry, Fire, & State Lands webinar: Adapting to Climate Change in Western National Forests.          
                   

January 26, 2016
4:30 p.m.-6:00 p.m. EST

      Minnesota Sea Grant webinar: Visualize Your Water          

January 27, 2016
2:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m. EST

      Land Trust Alliance webinar: Smart Planning for Stewardship          
                   

January 27, 2016
3:30 p.m. EST

     

ASWM Members’ Wetland Webinar: Wetlands and Nutrient Uptake

         
                   
January 28, 2016
11 a.m.-12:00 p.m. EST
      Sustain Our Great Lakes webinar: Navigating the Fishworks Tool          
                   
January 28, 2016
12:00 p.m.-1:00 p.m. EST
      Ohio State University Climate Change Outreach Team webinar: “Why we don’t believe science: a perspective from decision psychology          
                   

January 28, 2016
3:30 p.m. EST

      Wetland Mapping Consortium (WMC) Webinar: Changes in the FGDC Wetland Classification Standard – Cowardin 2.0          
                   
FEBRUARY 2016
                   

February 2, 2016
3:00 p.m. EST

      ASWM’s Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar: Evaluating the Ecological Performance of Compensatory Mitigation          
                   
February 2, 2016
3:00 p.m. EST
      The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service - Science and Technology National Technology Support Centers webinar: Conservation Buffers to Support Beneficial Insects on Organic Farms          
                   
February 3, 2016
12:00 p.m.-1:00 p.m. EST
      NAI - A Common Sense Strategy for Floodplain Management – An Indiana Perspective          
                   
February 3, 2016
1:00 p.m. EST
      AWRA webinar: Climate Change Adaption: Flood          
                   
February 10, 2016
2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. EST
      Environmental Law Institute webinar: In-Lieu Fee Mitigation Training Webinar: Getting Started on an ILF Program          
                   

February 11, 2016
11:30 a.m. EST

      USDA NRCS West National Technology Support Center webinar: on Soil Water Sensors for Agriculture - Applications and Usefulness          
                   

February 11, 2016
1:00 p.m. EST

      Webinar: Maps and Datasets for Blue Carbon Habitats is co-sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, the EBM Tools Network, OpenChannels.org, and MPA News          
                   

February 23, 2016
12:00 p.m.-12:45 p.m. CST

      FEMA Region 6 webinar: Using Flood Risk Products Virtual Brown Bag Webinar: "Using Percent Annual Chance Data"          
                   
February 24, 2016
1:00 p.m. EST
      AWRA webinar: Climate Change Adaption: Drought Response and Governance          
                   
February 26, 2016
1:00p.m.-2:00 p.m. EST
      In cooperation with the Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM), the American Planning Association (APA) presents this webinar on Adapting Urban Vacant Land to Mitigate Hazards          
                   
MARCH 2016
                   
March 29 2016
1:00 p.m.-1:45 p.m. EST
      Using Flood Risk Products Virtual Brown Bag Webinar: "Using Depth Grid Data"          
                   
MEETINGS
                   
JANUARY 2016
                   
January 28-30, 2016
New Haven, Connecticut
      Yale Chapter of International Society of Tropical Foresters (ISTF): 22nd Annual ISTF Conference          
                   
FEBRUARY 2016
                   
February 1-4, 2016
Tampa, Florida
      2016 Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill and Ecosystem Science Conference: One Gulf: Healthy Ecosystems, healthy communities          
                   
February 3-4, 2016
Wilmington, Delaware
      Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control: 2016 Delaware Wetlands Conference: Advancing Wetland Science and Conservation in the Mid-Atlantic Region          
                   
February 4-5, 2016
Anaheim, California
      EUCI conference: Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands          
                   
February 4-5, 2016
Wichita, Kansas
      2016 Kansas Natural Resources Conference (KNRC): Conversations on Conservation - Engaging landowners thru Effective Communication          
                   
February 4-7, 2016
Ocean City, Maryland
      Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education (MAEOE) Annual Conference: Today’s Youth, Tomorrow’s Stewards: Engaging Students, Schools and Communities          
                   
February 6, 2016
Clayton, New York
      Save The River’s 27th Annual Winter Environmental Conference          
                   
February 7-10, 2016
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
      Partnership for River Restoration and Science in the Upper Midwest: 2016 Upper Midwest Stream Restoration Symposium          
                   
February 8-12, 2016
Anchorage, Alaska
      Alaska Forum on the Environment          
                   
February 9-11, 2016
St. Grand Junction, Colorado
      Tamarisk Coalition's 13th Annual Conference: The Road to Riparian Restoration          
                   
February 9-12, 2016
Tasmania, Australia
      Species on the Move International Conference          
                   
February 10-12, 2016
Nelson, New Zealand
      National Wetland Trust: National Wetland Restoration Symposium          
                   
February 11-13, 2016
Portland, Oregon
      New Partners for Smart Growth Conference: Practical Tools & Innovative Strategies for Creating Great Communities          
                   
February 16-18, 2016
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
      Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan: 11th Prairie Conservation and Endangered Species Conference          
                   
February 16-19, 2016
San Antonio, Texas
      International Erosion Control Association Conference: Environmental Connection          
                   
February 18-21, 2016
Nauvoo, Alabama
      Joint Annual Meeting of SEPARC and ALAPARC - Herp Conservation on Private Lands          
                   
February 19-20, 2016
New Orleans, Louisiana
      Tulane University Law School: Environment 2016 (21st Annual Tulane Summit on Environmental Law and Policy)          
                   
February 19-21, 2016
Vallejo, California
      San Francisco Bay Flyway Festival. The festival includes field trips to San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge.          
                   
February 21-24, 2016
San Diego, California
      National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA’s) 2016 Winter Conference:Back to Basics . . . Will Compliance Concerns Derail Efforts to Innovate?          
                   
February 21-26, 2016
New Orleans, Louisiana
      2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting          
                   
February 22-24, 2016
Denver, Colorado
     

International LiDAR Mapping Forum

         
                   
February 23-24, 2016
Albuquerque, New Mexico
      National Groundwater Association Conference: Hydrology and Water Quality in the Southwest          
                   
February 23-25, 2016
Washington, D.C.
     

Semiannual Meeting of the Great Lakes Commission and Great Lakes Day

         
                   
February 23-25, 2016
Green Bay, Wisconsin
      Wisconsin Wetlands Association 21st Annual Wetland Science Conference          
                   
February 24-25, 2016
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
      Computational Hydraulics International (CHI): 49th International Conference on Water Management Modeling. Call for papers due on February 3, 2016.          
                   
February 25-26, 2016
Albuquerque, New Mexico
      Xeriscape Council of New Mexico: 2016 Land & Water Summit: Creating a New Paradigm for Living in Arid Lands          
                   
MARCH 2016
                   
March 1-3, 2016
New Orleans, Louisiana
      RES/CON New Orleans          
                   
March 2-3, 2016
University of Michigan
Dearborn, Michigan
      Annual Great Lakes Areas of Concern Conference. Hosted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. More information will be available soon.          
                   
March 6-11, 2016
Sydney, Australia
      International Coastal Symposium (ICS2016): ‘Coasts in Space and Time’          
                   
March 7-10, 2016
Providence, Rhode Island
      American Water Works Association: Sustainable Water Management Conference          
                   
March 8-10, 2016
Seattle, Washington
      2016 Climate Leadership Conference          
                   

March 9, 2016
Washington, DC

      Law Seminars International conference or webcast: Natural Resource Damages 101          
                   
March 10-11, 2016
Denver, Colorado
      Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute 25th Anniversary Conference: Western Places/Western Spaces: Examining the Past, Exploring the Future          
                   
March 10-11, 2016
Washington, DC
      Law Seminars International Fifth Annual Advanced Conference: Natural Resource Damages Evolving Strategic, Tactical and Substantive Issues          
                   
March 10-11, 2016
Wisconsin Dells
      Annual meeting of the Wisconsin Section of the American Water Resources Association (AWRA): 40 Years of Wisconsin Waters: Quantity, Quality, Technology          
                   

March 11-13, 2016
Monte Vista, Colorado

      Monte Vista Crane Festival. This year’s 33rd annual festival includes bus tours to Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuge.          
                   

March 11-13, 2016
Florida State University
Tallahassee, Florida

      13th Annual Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference          
                   

March 12-13, 2016
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

      The Fifth International Conference: Advances in Applied Science and Environmental Engineering          
                   
March 18-19, 2016
Baltimore, Maryland
      Ecological Society of America's 3rd Life Discovery - Doing Science Education Conference          
                   
March 19-20, 2016
Miami University
Oxford, Ohio
      2016 Midwest Ecology and Evolution Conference (MEEC)          
                   
March 20-22, 2016
Scottsdale, Arizona
      National Flood Determination Association 2016 Conference          
                   
March 21-24, 2016
San Diego, California
      Association for Environmental Health and Sciences Foundation, Inc.: 26th Annual International Conference on Soil, Water, Energy, and Air          
                   
March 22-24, 2016
Burlington, Vermont
      14th Annual Climate Prediction Application Science Workshop (CPASW): hosted by the NOAA National Weather Service Climate Services Branch, University of Vermont, and other climate services partners.          
                   
March 29-31, 2016
Oracle, Arizona
      2016 NASA/CUAHSI Remote Sensing Hydrology Workshop. Register by February 15, 2016          
                   
March 29-April 2, 2016
Vancouver, BC
      Society for Applied Anthropology 76th Annual Meeting          
                   
APRIL 2016
                   
April 3-7, 2016
Asheville, North Carolina
     

US-IALE 2016 Annual Meeting: Landscape Change

         
                   
April 7-9, 2016
Waterville, Maine
      Colby College conference: Community, Culture, and Conservation: Sustaining Landscapes and Livelihoods. The deadline for abstracts in February 15, 2016.          
                   
April 8-10, 2016
Kutztown, Pennsylvania
      Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Ecological Society of America: 2016 annual meeting. Registration and abstract submission is scheduled to open early February.          
                   
April 12, 2016
Multiple Locations
      Center for Watershed Protection: 2016 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference. This conference will take place in multiple locations across the US. The two main sites are Atlanta and Sacramento, but additional hub locations will be announced soon. The conference will also be available as a webcast.          
                   
April 13-19, 2016
Arcata, California
      21st Annual Godwit Days Spring Migration Bird Festival          
                   
April 14-17, 2016
Orlando, Florida
      2016 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference          
                   

April 17-22, 2016
Vienna, Austria

      European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016. Call for abstracts due by January 13, 2016.          
                   

April 18-22, 2016
Coral Springs, Florida

     

University of Florida 6th National Conference:Ecosystem Restoration (NCER): Ecosystem Restoration in Action. Call for abstracts submission deadline: Friday, January 8, 2016 [5:00 PM Eastern].

         
                   
April 20-21, 2016
Hartford, Connecticut
      The New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission (NEIWPCC) 27th Annual Nonpoint Source Pollution Conference          
                   
April 22-24, 2016
Marble Falls, Texas
      Balcones Canyonlands National Wildlife Refuge: Balcones Songbird Festival          
                   
April 25-27, 2016
Anchorage, Alaska
      2016 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference          
                   
MAY 2016
                   
May 2-6, 2016
Tampa, Florida
      National Water Quality Monitoring Council: 10th National Monitoring Conference: Working Together for Clean Water          
                   
May 3-6, 2016
Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
      4th International Symposium on Ocean in a High-CO2 World          
                   
May 4-6, 2016
Sharonville, Ohio
      Tinker’s Creek Watershed Partners and the Ohio Stormwater Association: 2016 Ohio Stormwater Conference          
                   
May 8-12, 2016
Towson University
Baltimore, Maryland
      International Society for Ecological Modelling Global Conference 2016          
                   
May 10-13, 2016
Fort Worth, Texas
      JT&A, Inc.: 2016 National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference          
                   
May 10-13, 2016
Rotterdam, The Netherlands
      4th International Climate Change Adaptation Conference: Adaptation Futures is the biennial conference of PROVIA (Global Programme of Research on Climate Change Vulnerability, Impacts and Adaptation          
                   
May 16-18, 2016
Saratoga Springs, New York
      New York State Floodplain and Stormwater Managers Association:16th Annual Meeting. Abstracts due by January 22, 2016.          
                   
May 20-23, 2016
Mobile, Alabama
     

River Network: River Rally

         
                   
May 21-26, 2016
Sacramento, California
      Society for Freshwater Science annual meeting: Running on Empty: Increasing Demands on Freshwater Resources in the Face of a Changing Climate. Submit abstracts by January 29, 2016.          
                   
May 22-29, 2016
University of Washington
Friday Harbor Laboratories
      ScienceFilm 7-day immersion workshop: Introduction to Science Film Making          
                   
May 23-27, 2016
Busan, Korea
      World Fisheries Congress          
                   
May 31-June 3, 2016
Ann Arbor, Michigan
      23rd IAHR International Symposium on Ice. November 25th, 2015 abstracts due.          
                   
May 31-June 4, 2016
Corpus Christi, Texas
      Society of Wetland Scientist's 2016 Annual Meeting: Protecting wetland ecosystem services. Promoting stronger economies          
                   
JUNE 2016
                   
June 1-3, 2016
San Antonio, Texas
      Resource Institute: Southwest Stream Restoration Conference. Submit abstracts by January 15, 2016.          
                   
June 1-5, 2016 Anchorage, Alaska       79th Annual Ducks Unlimited National Convention          
                   
June 3-4 2016
Ames, Iowa
      5th Iowa State University Summer Symposium: Science Communication: Confronting the challenges of public participation in environmental, planning and health decision-making. Call for proposal deadline is January 29, 2016.          
                   
June 5-10, 2016
Santa Fe, New Mexico
      ASLO 2016 Summer Meeting          
                   
June 6–10, 2016
Guelph, Ontario
      International Association for Great Lakes - 59th Annual Conference on Great Lakes Research: Great Lakes Solutions: Integrating Across Disciplines & Scales          
                   
June 12-14, 2016
Toronto, Canada
      Coastal Zone Canada Association: Coastal Zone Canada Conference          
                   
June 19-24, 2016
Honolulu, Hawai’i
      13th International Coral Reef Symposium: Bridging Science to Policy          
                   
June 19-24, 2016
Grand Rapids, Michigan
      ASFPM's 40th Annual National Conference: "Great Lakes - Grand Partners"          
                   
June 20-22, 2016
University of Massachusetts -Amherst
      Fish Passage 2016 International Conference: River Connectivity Best Practices and Innovations. Abstracts are due by February 24, 2016.          
                   
JULY 2016
                   
July 10-13, 2016
Broomfield, Colorado
      Natural Hazard Center: 41st Annual Natural Hazards Research and Applications Workshop. Proposal submissions due by January 15, 2016.          
                   
July 11-13, 2016
Sacramento, California
      2016 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: GIS and Water Resources          
                   
July 12-15, 2016
St. Louis University
St. Louis, Missouri
      River Flow 2016 Eighth International Conference: Fluvial Hydraulics          
                   
July 17-20, 2016
Illinois State University
Normal, Illinois
      24th North American Prairie Conference: From Cemetery Prairies to National Tallgrass Prairies          
                   
July 17-20, 2016
Madison, Wisconsin
      Society for Conservation Biology North America: 3rd North America Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB): Communicating Science for Conservation Action          
                   

July 18-20, 2016

Arlington, Virginia
      Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum. Abstracts due by December 10, 2015.          
                   
July 18-22, 2016
St. Augustine, Florida
      University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences: Mangrove & Macrobenthos Meeting. Call for abstracts deadline is December 20, 2015.          
                   
July 19-21, 2016
Breckenridge, Colorado
      Resource Institute's Rocky Mountain Stream Restoration Conference. Submit an abstract by January 31, 2016.          
                   
July 19-23, 2016
Kaliningrad, Russia
      European Association of Remote Sensing Laboratories: 2nd Student Workshop on Ecology and Optics of Coastal Zones          
                   
July 24-29, 2016
University of New England,
Biddeford, Maine
      2016 Gordon Research Conference: Unifying Ecology Across Scales: Linking the Levels from Physiological to Ecosystem Ecology          
                   
July 30-August 3, 2016
St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
      4th International Marine Conservation Congress (IMCC4): Making Marine Science Matter          
                   
AUGUST 2016
                   
August 3-4, 2016
Gifford Pinchot State Park
Lewisberry, Pennsylvania
      Wetland Restoration and Training LLC: Wetland Restoration Workshop. Participants will help design and restore wetlands. Contact Betsy Leppo (mailto:) for more information.          
                   
August 7-12, 2016
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
      2016 Ecological Society of America's (ESA) annual meeting          
                   
August 14-18, 2016 Chicago, Illinois       American Society of Civil Engineers: GEO Sustainability & Geoenvironment
         
                   
August 22-25, 2016 Indianapolis, Indiana       StormCon: Designing the Future of Stormwater. Call for papers deadline is December 9, 2015          
                   
August 27-
September 2, 2016

Stockholm, Sweden
      2016 World Water Week. Abstract due by January 24, 2016.          
                   
SEPTEMBER 2016
                   
September 1-10, 2016
Waikiki, Hawaii
      IUCN World Conservation Congress: Planet at the crossroads          
                   
September 19-24, 2016
Changshu, China
      INTECOL Wetland Working Group, People’s Government of Changshu, Nanjing University: 10th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference          
                   
September 27-30, 2016
Mount Royal University
Alberta, Canada
      Under Western Skies (UWS) is a biennial, interdisciplinary conference series on the environment with the theme Water: Events, Trends, Analysis. Call for proposal deadline is January 31, 2016.          
                   
OCTOBER 2016
                   
October 19-21, 2016
San Diego, California
      Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum - West Coast          
                   
October 28-30, 2016
Minneapolis, Minnesota
      Land Trust Alliance Rally 2016 National Land Conservation Conference. Call for presentations due by February 22, 2016.          
                   
NOVEMBER 2016
                   
November 14-17, 2016
Orlando, Florida
      2016 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference          
                   
DECEMBER 2016
                   
December 10-15, 2016
New Orleans, Louisiana
      8th National Summit: Our Coasts, Our Future, Our Choice and 25th Biennial Meeting of The Coastal Society          
                   
TRAINING
           
JANUARY 2016
                   
January 25, 2016
Lacey, Washington
     

Coastal Training Program course: High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (MORNING SESSION ONLY)

         
                   
January 25, 2016
Lacey, Washington
      Coastal Training Program course: High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (BOTH MORNING AND AFTERNOON)          
                   
January 25-
March 4, 2016

Online
      UC Davis Extension online course: Building Efficiencies: Low Carbon and Renewable Energies          
                   
January 26-28, 2016 Seattle Washington       National Environmental Training Center Course: ArcGIS 10: An Introduction to Environmental Applications          
                   
January 28-29, 2016
Denver, Colorado
      Urban Watershed Research Institute course: Modeling LID Performance with EPA SWMM 5          
                   
FEBRUARY 2016
                   
February 3, 2016
Padilla Bay Reserve Mount Vernon, Washington
     

Coastal Training Program course: Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats

         
                   
February 3-5, 2016
Washington, DC
      The Environmental Law Institute course: Environmental Law 2016          
                   

February 8-12, 2016
San Diego, California

     

Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation. For other dates and locations, go here.

         
February 8 - April 22, 2016
Online
      The Swamp School online class: Principles of Wetland Design          
                   

February 16-17, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia

     

Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species This course will also be held on October 11-12, 2016 in Atlanta, GA.

         
                   

February 17-18, 2016
Kauai, Hawaii

     

Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher. For other dates and locations, go here.

         
                   
February 22-25, 2016
Oriskany, New York
      ASFPM is co-sponsoring the FEMA Emergency Management Institute (EMI) 273 course: Managing Floodplain Development Through the NFIP          
                   

February 23-25, 2016
Padilla Bay Reserve
Mt. Vernon, Washington

     

Coastal Training Program course: Environmental Negotiations

         
                   
February 24-25, 2016
Charleston, South Carolina
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement (Atlantic & Gulf Coastal Plain). Eastern Mountains/Piedmont: December 12-13, 2016, Atlanta, GA.          
                   
February 25-26, 2016
Denver, Colorado
      Urban Watershed Research Institute course: Dam Safety Practices & Hydrology          
                   
February 29-March 11, 2016
Front Royal, Virginia
      Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation course: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology          
                   
MARCH 2016
                   
March 3-4, 2016
Sacramento California
      UC Davis Extension course: Environmental Planning and Site Analysis          
                   
March 16-17, 2016
University of Phoenix-St. Louis Park, St. Lois Park, Minnesota
      Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) course: Habitat Site Restoration          
                   
March 17-18, 2016
Sacramento, California
      UC Davis Extension course: Planning and Environmental Law          
                   
March 22-24, 2016
Yakima, Washington
     

Coastal Training Program course: Environmental Negotiations (Eastern WA)

         
                   
March 24-25, 2016
Denver, Colorado
      Urban Watersheds Research Institute course: LID and BMP Selection, Design & Economics          
                   
March 29, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Endangered Species Act Overview. This course will also be held on September 27, 2016 in Atlanta, GA.          
                   

March 29-31, 2016
Oracle, Arizona

     

2016 NASA/CUAHSI Remote Sensing Hydrology Workshop. Register by February 15, 2016.

         
                   

March 30-31, 2016
Lacey, Washington

     

Coastal Training Program course: Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington

         
                   
APRIL 2016
                   
April 4-6, 2016
Naples, Florida
      Everglades Wetland Research Park course: Creation and Restoration of Wetlands. Register by February 19, 2016 for a 10% discount.          
                   
April 21, 2016
Denver, Colorado
      Urban Watersheds Research Institute course: FIRM Map Revisions – Technical/Administrative Aspects          
                   
MAY 2016
                   
May 3-5, 2016
Asheville, North Carolina
      North Carolina State University Stream Restoration Program course: Stream Morphology Assessment          
                   
May 9-10, 2016
Charleston, South Carolina
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Hydrophytic Vegetation (Coastal Plain). Piedmont: August 8-9, 2016 in Atlanta, GA          
                   

May 19-20, 2016
Washington, DC

      Environmental Law Institute course: Clean Water Act 2016: Law and Regulation (ELI/ALI CLE Course of Study)          
                   
May 23-27, 2016
Eastern Kentucky University
      Wetland Restoration and Training LLC: Wetland Design and Restoration Techniques training. Field course at Maywoods, 8:30am to 4:30pm each day and on May 30–June 3, 2016: Online Reading and Assessment. Instructors: Tom Biebighauser and Dr. Stephen Richter          
                   
May 30-June 10, 2016
Eastern Kentucky University
      Wetland Restoration and Training LLC is offering Wetland Assessment and Monitoring training. June 13–17, 2016: Online Reading and Assessment. Instructor: Dr. Stephen Richter          
                   
JUNE 2016
                   
June 3, 2016
University at Buffalo
      University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Aquatic & Terrestrial Invasive Species Management          
                   
June 6-7, 2016
University at Buffalo
      University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Fundamentals of Stream Channel          
                   
June 6-10, 2016
Charleston, South Carolina
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Basic Wetland Delineation. Other dates: March 14-18, 2016 in Atlanta, GA; and October 3-7, 2016, Atlanta, GA.          
                   
June 8-9, 2016
University at Buffalo
      University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Watershed Management Planning, Assessment, & Monitoring          
                   
AUGUST 2016
                   
August 8-9, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Hydrophytic Vegetation (Piedmont). Coastal Plain: May 9-10, 2016 in Charleston, SC          
                   
SEPTEMBER 2016
                   
September 12-13, 2016
Charleston, South Carolina
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes          
                   

September 26-
October 7, 2016
Front Royal, Virginia

     

Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation course: Spatial Ecology, Geospatial Analysis and Remote Sensing for Conservation

         
                   
September 27, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Endangered Species Act Overview. This course will also be held on March 29, 2016 in Atlanta, GA.          
                   
OCTOBER 2016
                   
October 3-7, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Basic Wetland Delineation. Other dates: March 14-18, 2016 in Atlanta, GA; and June 6-10, 2016 in Charleston, SC.          
                   
October 11-12, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species. This course will also be held on February 16-17, 2016 in Atlanta, GA.          
NOVEMBER 2016
                   
November 2-4, 2016
Raleigh, North Carolina
      North Carolina State University Stream Restoration Program course: Natural Channel Design Principles          
                   
November 14-15, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology (Piedmont. Coastal Plain: April 4-5, 2016 in Charleston, SC.          
                   
DECEMBER 2016
                   
December 12-13, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement (Eastern Mountains/Piedmont). Atlantic & Gulf Coastal Plain: February 24-25, 2016, Charleston, SC.          
                   
SPECIAL EVENTS 2015
                   
January 27-31, 2016
Chico, California
      Snow Goose Festival of the Pacific Flyway          
                   
February 2, 2016       World Wetlands Day 2016: Wetlands for our Future: Sustainable Livelihoods          
                   
February 11-14, 2016
Klamath Falls, Oregon
      Winter Wings Bird Festival. The four-day festival offers visitors the chance to visit nearby Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge, Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Crater Lake National Park and other Klamath Basin birding hotspots. Register by February 7.          
                   
February 13, 2016
Oscar Scherer State Park, Osprey, Florida
      Florida Scrub-Jay Festival          
                   
February 13, 2016
Brussels, Illinois
      Two Rivers National Wildlife Refuge: Eagle Watching Open House          
                   

February 20, 2016

Christmas, Florida
      Orlando Wetlands Festival          
                   
February 25-28, 2016
Port Aransas, Texas
      Port Aransas Chamber of Commerce/Tourist Bureau: Whooping Crane Festival          
                   
May 21, 2016
Global
      World Fish Migration Foundation: World Fish Migration Day: Connecting Fish, Rivers and People          
                   

For more wetland events, meetings, conferences, and courses nationwide, visit the ASWM calendar.

         
           

Wetland Breaking News - January 2016


INDEX

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • AEPA Survey Shows $271 Billion Needed for Nation’s Wastewater Infrastructure
  • Sustain Our Great Lakes 2016 Funding Opportunity
  • Water Runoff From Farming Will Be Major Issue In 2016
  • U.S. budget includes millions for Chesapeake Bay watershed
  • 2015 in review: The year environmental and climate issues left their silos
  • Top Trends Conservationists Should be Paying Attention to — But Aren’t
  • Toxic, Vomit-Green Algae Blooms Forecast to Double in Lake Erie
  • ASWM’s Members’ Wetland Webinar: Wetlands and Nutrient Uptake – January 27, 2016
  • Wetland Mapping Consortium (WMC) Webinar: Changes in the FGDC Wetland Classification Standard – Cowardin 2.0 – January 28, 2016
  • ASWM’s Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar: Evaluating the Ecological Performance of Compensatory Mitigation – February 2, 2016

NATIONAL NEWS

  • Senate fails to override Obama veto
  • Watchdog finds no wrongdoing in EPA’s moves to block controversial Alaskan gold mine
  • Bees threatened by a common pesticide, EPA finds
  • TransCanada Launches Two Legal Challenges to Obama's Rejection of Keystone
  • Scientists worry that the Chesapeake’s natural shoreline is turning into a wall
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Releases 2015 List of Candidates for Endangered Species Act Protection
  • Endangered Species Act protection sought for rare frog in California, Oregon
  • President Obama signs massive spending bill, tax measures into law
  • Wisconsin and Illinois wetland has international importance
  • After rocky road, U.S. Senate passes landmark chemical law overhaul
  • Great Lakes cleanup, protection and dredging funds in omnibus bill

STATE NEWS

  • AK: Starvation Suspected in Massive Die-off of Alaska Seabirds
  • AZ: EPA Announces $25 Million to Improve Water Quality, Infrastructure in Arizona
  • CA: $12 annual Bay tax on June ballot: First-ever nine-county parcel tax proposed to support restoration
  • CA: Northern California fog bringing mercury onshore
  • CA: NRDC Report: Is California Doing Enough To Manage Drought?
  • FL: Chinese billionaire Wenliang Wang has agreed to donate money for long-delayed restoration of dying mangroves
  • GA: Georgians, wildlife will soon roam on what tycoons called home
  • IL: Geneva may hire firm to fix Prairie Green Preserve, sell wetland credits
  • IA: 'Biggest and boldest' water quality plan gets mixed reception
  • KY: Invasive plants hit Kentucky hard
  • LA: What the Bonnet Carre Spillway opening means for Lake Pontchartrain
  • ME: Study finds chemicals may be affecting Maine bass
  • MD: Watermen seek, win, halt in Tred Avon oyster restoration project
  • MD: Maryland moves toward trading, as many watch warily
  • MD: MD energy department to relocate in same office as MDE
  • MI: President Obama declares emergency in Flint
  • MI: Steady decline in wetlands endangers Great Lakes
  • MO: Floodwaters draw warnings anew about wastewater, pollutants
  • NM: New Mexico Is 1st to Issue Plans to Sue EPA Over Mine Spill
  • OK: Okla. shaking jumped 50% in 2015
  • PA: Farmers to be surveyed on use of conservation practices in Chesapeake Bay basin
  • PA: Applying proven flood controls along with green infrastructure, Philly stays above water
  • PA: Nixon Park gets a wetland from Mount Rose project
  • TX: In 2015, Water, EPA Dominated Environment News
  • VA: Dominion wins permit to discharge treated coal-ash water into Va. Creek
  • VA: DEQ official: State may still impose civil fines on Duke Energy for Dan River spill, other violations
  • WA: Ecology grants improve water supplies, support jobs
  • WA: Ecology releases draft rule to cap carbon pollution
  • WI: Should Wisconsin city get OK to tap Lake Michigan water?
  • WI: Administering the Wetland Conservation Act: Wetland worries

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • Antarctic icebergs have surprise role in slowing warming: study
  • Environment group warns against reducing manatees' endangered status
  • How Probiotics Can Save the East Coast Shellfish Industry
  • Natural carbon sinks and their role in climate
  • Environmental Change Rate Unprecedented, Study Says
  • Levees among possible cause of more frequent flooding
  • California's 'Staggering' Leak Could Spew Methane for Months
  • Asian carp could cause some Lake Erie fish to decline, others to increase
  • Sea Lamprey Mating Pheromone Registered by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as First Vertebrate Pheromone Biopesticide
  • A Reprieve for Fungus-Battered Frogs
  • Scientist: Barrier islands could be unlivable in 50 years
  • Sitting Ducks: Why Millions of Arctic Seabirds Are in Danger
  • Organic farming can cut nitrate leaching in half
  • U.S. and Canada Report on Relevant and Available Groundwater Science to meet GLWQA Commitment
  • Hot Research Topic

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • Using Graywater and Stormwater to Enhance Local Water Supplies: An Assessment of Risks, Costs, and Benefits
  • Benefit Indicators for Flood Regulation Services of Wetlands: A Modeling Approach
  • Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment Tool for Coastal Habitats (CCVATCH)

POTPOURRI

  • In Climate Move, Obama Halts New Coal Mining Leases on Public Lands
  • Welcome to the Anthropocene: Five Signs Earth Is in a Man-Made Epoch
  • Unnatural Balance: How Food Waste Impacts World’s Wildlife
  • Czosek Named Managing Director of Society of Wetland Scientists
  • By the Numbers: 589
  • Agriculture is big threat to water quality. These farmers are doing something about it.
  • EPA struggles to ditch contentious rule's catchy nickname
  • We Won't Back Down from our Mission
  • Marsh on the Move

WEBINARS, MEETINGS, TRAINING

Webinars

  • Adapting to Climate Change in Western National Forests
  • Minnesota Sea Grant webinar: Visualize Your Water
  • Land Trust Alliance webinar: Smart Planning for Stewardship
  • ASWM Members’ Wetland Webinar: Wetlands and Nutrient Uptake
  • Sustain Our Great Lakes webinar: Navigating the Fishworks Tool
  • Ohio State University Climate Change Outreach Team webinar: “Why we don’t believe science: a perspective from decision psychology”
  • Wetland Mapping Consortium (WMC) Webinar: Changes in the FGDC Wetland Classification Standard – Cowardin 2.0
  • ASWM’s Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar: Evaluating the Ecological Performance of Compensatory Mitigation
  • Conservation Buffers to Support Beneficial Insects on Organic Farms
  • NAI - A Common Sense Strategy for Floodplain Management – An Indiana Perspective
  • AWRA webinar: Climate Change Adaption: Flood
  • Environmental Law Institute webinar: In-Lieu Fee Mitigation Training Webinar: Getting Started on an ILF Program
  • Soil Water Sensors for Agriculture - Applications and Usefulness
  • Maps and Datasets for Blue Carbon Habitats
  • Using Flood Risk Products Virtual Brown Bag Webinar: "Using Percent Annual Chance Data"
  • AWRA webinar: Climate Change Adaption: Drought Response and Governance
  • Adapting Urban Vacant Land to Mitigate Hazard

Meetings

  • Yale Chapter of International Society of Tropical Foresters (ISTF): 22nd Annual ISTF Conference
  • One Gulf: Healthy Ecosystems, healthy communities
  • Advancing Wetland Science and Conservation in the Mid-Atlantic Region
  • EUCI conference: Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands
  • Conversations on Conservation - Engaging landowners thru Effective Communication
  • Today’s Youth, Tomorrow’s Stewards: Engaging Students, Schools and Communities
  • Save The River’s 27th Annual Winter Environmental Conference
  • 2016 Upper Midwest Stream Restoration Symposium
  • Alaska Forum on the Environment
  • Tamarisk Coalition's 13th Annual Conference: The Road to Riparian Restoration
  • Species on the Move International Conference
  • National Wetland Trust: National Wetland Restoration Symposium
  • Practical Tools & Innovative Strategies for Creating Great Communities
  • 11th Prairie Conservation and Endangered Species Conference
  • International Erosion Control Association Conference: Environmental Connection
  • Joint Annual Meeting of SEPARC and ALAPARC - Herp Conservation on Private Lands
  • Tulane University Law School: Environment 2016 (21st Annual Tulane Summit on Environmental Law and Policy)
  • San Francisco Bay Flyway Festival
  • Back to Basics . . . Will Compliance Concerns Derail Efforts to Innovate?
  • 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting
  • International LiDAR Mapping Forum
  • Hydrology and Water Quality in the Southwest
  • Semiannual Meeting of the Great Lakes Commission and Great Lakes Day
  • 21st Annual Wetland Science Conference
  • 49th International Conference on Water Management Modeling
  • 2016 Land & Water Summit: Creating a New Paradigm for Living in Arid Lands
  • RES/CON New Orleans
  • Annual Great Lakes Areas of Concern Conference
  • International Coastal Symposium (ICS2016): ‘Coasts in Space and Time’
  • American Water Works Association: Sustainable Water Management Conference
  • 2016 Climate Leadership Conference
  • Law Seminars International conference or webcast: Natural Resource Damages 101
  • Western Places/Western Spaces: Examining the Past, Exploring the Future
  • Natural Resource Damages Evolving Strategic, Tactical and Substantive Issues
  • 40 Years of Wisconsin Waters: Quantity, Quality, Technology
  • Monte Vista Crane Festival
  • 13th Annual Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference
  • Advances in Applied Science and Environmental Engineering
  • Ecological Society of America's 3rd Life Discovery - Doing Science Education Conference
  • 2016 Midwest Ecology and Evolution Conference
  • National Flood Determination Association 2016 Conference
  • 26th Annual International Conference on Soil, Water, Energy, and Air
  • 14th Annual Climate Prediction Application Science Workshop (CPASW)
  • Remote Sensing Hydrology Workshop
  • Society for Applied Anthropology 76th Annual Meeting
  • US-IALE 2016 Annual Meeting: Landscape Change
  • Community, Culture, and Conservation: Sustaining Landscapes and Livelihoods
  • Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Ecological Society of America: 2016 annual meeting
  • Center for Watershed Protection: 2016 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference
  • 21st Annual Godwit Days Spring Migration Bird Festival
  • 2016 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference
  • European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016
  • Ecosystem Restoration (NCER): Ecosystem Restoration in Action
  • 27th Annual Nonpoint Source Pollution Conference
  • Balcones Canyonlands National Wildlife Refuge: Balcones Songbird Festival
  • 2016 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference
  • 10th National Monitoring Conference
  • 4th International Symposium on: Ocean in a High-CO2 World
  • 2016 Ohio Stormwater Conference
  • International Society for Ecological Modelling Global Conference 2016
  • 2016 National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference
  • 4th International Climate Change Adaptation Conference: Adaptation Futures
  • New York State Floodplain and Stormwater Managers Association:16th Annual Meeting
  • River Network: River Rally
  • Running on Empty: Increasing Demands on Freshwater Resources in the Fae of a Changing Climate
  • ScienceFilm 7-day immersion workshop: Introduction to Science Film Making
  • World Fisheries Congress
  • 23rd IAHR International Symposium on Ice
  • Protecting wetland ecosystem services. Promoting stronger economies
  • Resource Institute: Southwest Stream Restoration Conference
  • 79th Annual Ducks Unlimited National Convention
  • Science Communication: Confronting the challenges of public participation in environmental, planning and health decision-making
  • ASLO 2016 Summer Meeting
  • Great Lakes Solutions: Integrating Across Disciplines & Scales
  • Coastal Zone Canada Association: Coastal Zone Canada Conference
  • 13th International Coral Reef Symposium: Bridging Science to Policy
  • ASFPM's 40th Annual National Conference: "Great Lakes - Grand Partners"
  • Fish Passage 2016 International Conference: River Connectivity Best Practices and Innovations
  • 41st Annual Natural Hazards Research and Applications Workshop
  • 2016 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: GIS and Water Resources
  • River Flow 2016 Eighth International Conference: Fluvial Hydraulics
  • From Cemetery Prairies to National Tallgrass Prairies
  • 3rd North America Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB): Communicating Science for Conservation Action
  • Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum
  • University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences: Mangrove & Macrobenthos Meeting
  • Resource Institute's Rocky Mountain Stream Restoration Conference
  • 2nd Student Workshop on Ecology and Optics of Coastal Zones
  • 2016 Gordon Research Conference: Unifying Ecology Across Scales: Linking the Levels from Physiological to Ecosystem Ecology
  • 4th International Marine Conservation Congress (IMCC4): Making Marine Science Matter
  • Wetland Restoration Workshop
  • 2016 Ecological Society of America's (ESA) annual meeting
  • American Society of Civil Engineers: GEO Sustainability & Geoenvironment
  • StormCon: Designing the Future of Stormwater
  • 2016 World Water Week
  • IUCN World Conservation Congress: Planet at the crossroads
  • 10th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference
  • Water: Events, Trends, Analysis
  • Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum - West Coast
  • Land Trust Alliance Rally 2016 National Land Conservation Conference
  • 2016 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference
  • 8th National Summit: Our Coasts, Our Future, Our Choice and 25th Biennial Meeting of The Coastal Society
  • 4th International Symposium on: Ocean in a High-CO2 World
  • 2016 Ohio Stormwater Conference
  • International Society for Ecological Modelling Global Conference 2016
  • 2016 National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference
  • 4th International Climate Change Adaptation Conference: Adaptation Futures
  • River Network: River Rally
  • Running on Empty: Increasing Demands on Freshwater Resources in the Fae of a Changing Climate
  • World Fisheries Congress
  • 23rd IAHR International Symposium on Ice
  • Protecting wetland ecosystem services. Promoting stronger economies
  • Resource Institute: Southwest Stream Restoration Conference
  • 79th Annual Ducks Unlimited National Convention
  • Science Communication: Confronting the challenges of public participation in environmental, planning and health decision-making
  • ASLO 2016 Summer Meeting
  • Great Lakes Solutions: Integrating Across Disciplines & Scales
  • Coastal Zone Canada Association: Coastal Zone Canada Conference
  • ASFPM's 40th Annual National Conference: "Great Lakes - Grand Partners"
  • 41st Annual Natural Hazards Research and Applications Workshop
  • 2016 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: GIS and Water Resources
  • From Cemetery Prairies to National Tallgrass Prairies
  • 3rd North America Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB): Communicating Science for Conservation Action
  • Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum
  • University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences: Mangrove & Macrobenthos Meeting
  • 2016 Gordon Research Conference: Unifying Ecology Across Scales: Linking the Levels from Physiological to Ecosystem Ecology
  • 4th International Marine Conservation Congress (IMCC4): Making Marine Science Matter
  • 2016 Ecological Society of America's (ESA) annual meeting
  • American Society of Civil Engineers: GEO Sustainability & Geoenvironment
  • StormCon: Designing the Future of Stormwater
  • 2016 World Water Week
  • IUCN World Conservation Congress: Planet at the crossroads
  • 10th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference
  • Water: Events, Trends, Analysis
  • Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum - West Coast8th National Summit: Our Coasts, Our Future, Our Choice and 25th Biennial Meeting of The Coastal Society

Training

  • High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (MORNING SESSION ONLY)
  • High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (BOTH MORNING AND AFTERNOON)
  • Building Efficiencies: Low Carbon and Renewable Energies
  • ArcGIS 10: An Introduction to Environmental Applications
  • Urban Watershed Research Institute course: Modeling LID Performance with EPA SWMM 5
  • Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
  • The Environmental Law Institute course: Environmental Law 2016
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • The Swamp School online class: Principles of Wetland Design
  • Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher
  • ASFPM is co-sponsoring the FEMA Emergency Management Institute (EMI) 273 course: Managing Floodplain Development Through the NFIP
  • Coastal Training Program course: Environmental Negotiations
  • Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement (Atlantic & Gulf Coastal Plain)
  • Urban Watershed Research Institute course: Dam Safety Practices & Hydrology
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation course: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology
  • Environmental Planning and Site Analysis
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC)course: Habitat Site Restoration
  • UC Davis Extension course: Planning and Environmental Law
  • Coastal Training Program course: Environmental Negotiations (Eastern WA)
  • Urban Watersheds Research Institute course: LID and BMP Selection, Design & Economics
  • Endangered Species Act Overview
  • 2016 NASA/CUAHSI Remote Sensing Hydrology Workshop
  • Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
  • Everglades Wetland Research Park course: Creation and Restoration of Wetlands
  • FIRM Map Revisions – Technical/Administrative Aspects
  • North Carolina State University Stream Restoration Program course: Stream Morphology Assessment
  • Hydrophytic Vegetation (Coastal Plain)
  • Environmental Law Institute course: Clean Water Act 2016: Law and Regulation (ELI/ALI CLE Course of Study)
  • Wetland Restoration and Training LLC: Wetland Design and Restoration Techniques training
  • Wetland Restoration and Training LLC is offering Wetland Assessment and Monitoring training
  • University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Aquatic & Terrestrial Invasive Species Management
  • University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Fundamentals of Stream Channel
  • Basic Wetland Delineation
  • University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Watershed Management Planning, Assessment, & Monitoring
  • Hydrophytic Vegetation (Piedmont)
  • Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
  • Spatial Ecology, Geospatial Analysis and Remote Sensing for Conservation
  • Endangered Species Act Overview
  • Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
  • Natural Channel Design Principles
  • Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology (Piedmont)
  • Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement (Eastern Mountains/Piedmont)

SPECIAL EVENTS

  • Snow Goose Festival of the Pacific Flyway
  • World Wetlands Day 2016: Wetlands for our Future: Sustainable Livelihoods
  • Winter Wings Bird Festival
  • Florida Scrub-Jay Festival
  • Two Rivers National Wildlife Refuge: Eagle Watching Open House
  • Orlando Wetlands Festival
  • Whooping Crane Festival
  • World Fish Migration Day: Connecting Fish, Rivers and People


Wetland Breaking News - December 2015

 

Wetland Breaking News

Wetland Breaking News - January 2016The Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News (WBN) is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those working in water resources and related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published for over fifteen years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.

The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to .

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled and Edited by Marla Stelk, Editor; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors. Executive Director: Jeanne Christie. Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399 Fax: 207-892-3089

All photos by Jeanne Christie, ASWM

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