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Wetland Breaking News - February 2017

All photos by
Jeanne Christie, ASWM

     


Dear Wetlanders,

I would be remiss if I did not once again comment on the events which have occurred on the Hill over the last two months as it has impacted every one of us in some way. With a new Administration and Congress that is focused on fundamentally changing the way in which the federal government has worked with states over the last several decades, there is bound to be confusion. Greater emphasis is being placed on state and local government than the strong federal oversight that has guided the nation in the recent past. This can be good or bad depending on the issue, the level of federal oversight and/or the level of collaboration among states. More than anything, a cloud of uncertainty hangs over Washington D.C. as we wait to see how all the new executive orders and changes in leadership play out.

In my Editor’s Choice section for this edition of Wetland Breaking News, you’ll find an interesting blog regarding regulatory uncertainty in D.C. that was written by the Association of State Drinking Water Administrators. You’ll also find a story about the Scientists March on Washington that is scheduled to occur on Earth Day, April 22nd of this year. There have already been several marches on Washington and around the world in protest of the new President and his policies. Scientists, who have traditionally shied away from politics, are now finding themselves embroiled in the conflict as well.

As I mused about last month, I expect we’ll see a lot of new lawsuits over the next four years. Already, we have one filed by three advocacy groups challenging President Trump’s executive order requiring two regulations to be removed for every new regulation added. The Dakota Access Pipeline controversy continues on with court cases filed by pipeline opponents that challenge its recent approval. Scott Pruitt, the new head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, will have an interesting start to his new position as an Oklahoma county district judge ruled on the same day as his confirmation that he is required to turn over emails and other documents requested two years ago regarding email communications between Pruitt, fossil fuel companies and conservative think-tanks. And if Congress revises the Endangered Species Act, it will most certainly result in multiple lawsuits.

It will be challenging to continue doing our jobs with so much uncertainty and with so many decisions that could be subject to extended legal disputes. The best we can do is to continue “to perform admirably” as Spock says in the latest new Star Trek movie. The changes in the balance between federal and state government may provide important opportunities for strengthening state wetland programs. As always, ASWM is fully committed to helping state wetland program managers navigate the new policies as they come and educate the new Administration about the importance of protecting and restoring wetlands.

Best regards,

Marla J. Stelk
Editor
Wetland Breaking News

 

     
                   

Judge rules against Oklahoma AG Pruitt, orders Trump’s EPA pick to release emails

By Joe Wertz – State Impact – February 16, 2017
An Oklahoma County District judge on Thursday ordered Attorney General Scott Pruitt’s office to turn over emails and other documents requested two years ago by a watchdog group. In the ruling against Trump’s pick to lead the U.S. Environmental Protection agency, judge Aletia Haynes Timmons said the agency violated state transparency laws. For full story, click here.

Green groups file sweeping lawsuit accusing Trump of usurping Congress’s powers on regulations

By Chris Mooney – The Washington Post – February 8, 2017
Three advocacy groups filed a sweeping federal lawsuit Wednesday, challenging President Trump’s executive order requiring two federal regulations to be “identified for elimination” for every new one added — arguing that the order fundamentally takes over Congress’s powers to enact laws to protect public health, safety, and the environment. For full story, click here.

Regulatory Uncertainty Reigns in DC

Association of State Drinking Water Administrators – February 3, 2017
Following through on yet another of his campaign promises, President Trump recently signed an Executive Order on Reducing Regulation and Controlling Regulatory Cost. Some of the key components of the Order are:

  • “for every one new regulation issued, at least two prior regulations be identified for elimination”
  • For 2017 the total incremental cost of all new regulations shall be zero, the “budget” for future years will be determined by OMB
  • Any new incremental costs must be offset by the elimination of costs from at least two prior regulations
  • A regulation can’t be issued unless it was listed on the Unified Regulatory Agenda
  • OMB will provide guidance on implementation, such as for cost calculations, determining which regulations are covered, and provisions for emergency waivers

For full blog post, click here.

‘Listen to Evidence’: March for Science Plans Washington Rally on Earth Day

By Nicholas St. Fleur – The New York Times – February 1, 2017
Within a week of its creation, the March for Science campaign had attracted more than 1.3 million supporters across Facebook and Twitter, cementing itself as a voice for people who are concerned about the future of science under President Trump. Now, hoping to transform that viral success into something approaching the significance of the women’s march last month, the campaign has scheduled its demonstration in Washington for Earth Day, April 22. For full story, click here.

Supporters say Dakota Access pipeline is back on. Activists counter: See you in court

By Sandy Tolan – Los Angeles Times – February 1, 2017
The stalled Dakota Access pipeline project is back on, its supporters say, but opponents vow to continue to fight against the hotly debated project, most likely in court. The latest twist in the long-running battle over the oil pipeline came Tuesday when Kevin Cramer, a North Dakota congressman, tweeted, “Start your engines. #DAPL #Approved.” The Republican lawmaker added in a video statement: “Got word from the White House today and the Dakota Access pipeline now has its final green light. They’re notifying Congress immediately that these final few feet of this critical piece of infrastructure … will finally be completed.” For full story, click here.

Members' Wetland Webinar – Working with Wetlands to Increase Resilience: A Panel on Innovative State Program Practices -Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 3:00 p.m. ET

The Association of State Wetland Managers Members’ Wetland Webinar – Working with Wetlands to Increase Resilience: A Panel on Innovative State Program Practices will be held on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 at 3:00 p.m. ET. Presented by:

  • Stephanie Santell, US Environmental Protection Agency
  • Karen Menetrey, New Mexico, Office of Environment
  • John Genet, Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
  • Collis Adams, New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services

For more information and to register for the Members’ webinar, click here.

Scott Pruitt confirmed to EPA

By Ted Barrett – CNN Politics – February 17, 2017 – Video
The Senate confirmed Scott Pruitt to head the Environmental Protection Agency, an agency Republicans desperately want to rein in after what they charge was eight years of dangerous activism under the Obama administration that hurt businesses, jobs and the economy. Pruitt may be just the person to do it. As Oklahoma attorney general he sued the agency many times in that pursuit and has vowed to curb the EPA's regulatory reach once in office. For full story and to view video, click here.

The Endangered Species Act may be heading for the threatened list. This hearing confirmed it.

By Darryl Fears – The Washington Post – February 15, 2017
A Senate hearing to “modernize the Endangered Species Act” unfolded Wednesday just as supporters of the law had feared, with round after round of criticism from Republican lawmakers who said the federal effort to keep species from going extinct encroaches on states’ rights, is unfair to landowners and stymies efforts by mining companies to extract resources and create jobs. For full story, click here.

Judge denies tribes' request to block final link in Dakota pipeline

By Timothy Gardner – Reuters – February 13, 2017
A U.S. federal judge on Monday denied a request by Native American tribes seeking to halt construction of the final link in the Dakota Access Pipeline, the controversial project that has sparked months of protests by activists aimed at stopping the 1,170-mile line. At a hearing, Judge James Boasberg of the U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., rejected the request from the Standing Rock Sioux and Cheyenne River Sioux tribes, who argued that the project would prevent them from practicing religious ceremonies at a lake they contend is surrounded by sacred ground. With this decision, legal options for the tribes continue to narrow, as construction on the final uncompleted stretch is currently proceeding. For full story, click here.

Nationwide Permits and FEMA LOMRs "Unfrozen"!

Wetland Studies and Solutions, Inc. Field Notes – February 9, 2017
The potential project delays from the recent “Regulatory Freeze Pending Review” described in our recent Field Notes article – has been avoided! The new Nationwide Permits and FEMA LOMRs have been granted an exception by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). For full article, click here.

Good Luck Killing the EPA

By Eric Roston – Bloomberg – February 8, 2017
The new U.S. president and Congress are taking a hard look at environmental rules—none harder than a freshman U.S. representative whose new bill would “terminate the Environmental Protection Agency.” Republicans have been known to threaten this from time to time, with the understanding that it was red meat for ideological or business interests with no real chance of success. “Everybody hates regulation,” said Republican Christine Todd Whitman, a former EPA administrator and New Jersey governor, “because it makes you either spend money or change behavior for a problem you may not see.” For full story, click here.

EPA Transition Leader, Longtime Foe of Regulation, to Stay on at Agency

By Zahra Hirji – InsideClimate News – February 3, 2017 – Video
The head of President Donald Trump's transition team at the Environmental Protection Agency—former Washington State Sen. Don Benton—will be staying on after the transition as the agency's senior White House adviser, the EPA's acting administrator Catherine McCabe announced in a video to employees. For the past few weeks Benton has been the main conduit for bringing instructions from the new administration to the EPA's acting leaders pending confirmation of Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, a staunch critic of the agency, as its new administrator. In his permanent role, Benton will in effect be the White House's eyes and ears at the agency. For full story and to view video, click here.

U.S. lawmaker to scrap bill to sell public lands after backlash

By Valerie Volcovici – Reuters Business Insider – February 2, 2017
Republican U.S. Congressman Jason Chaffetz said on Thursday he plans to withdraw a bill that would have sold off more than 3 million acres of federal land to private interests after it drew a barrage of negative comments from hunters and outdoor enthusiasts. Chaffetz said in a post on the Instagram social media site that he would scrap the so-called Disposal of Excess Federal Lands Act of 2017, which he introduced last week, saying he feared it sent “the wrong message.” For full story, click here.

Coal rule killed by U.S. Congress, others near chopping block

By Lisa Lambert – Reuters – February 2, 2017
The U.S. Congress moved swiftly on Thursday to undo Obama-era rules on the environment, corruption, labor and guns, with the Senate wiping from the books a rule aimed at reducing water pollution. By a vote of 54-45, the Senate approved a resolution already passed in the House of Representatives to kill the rule aimed at keeping pollutants out of streams in areas near mountaintop removal coal-mining sites. The resolution now goes to President Donald Trump, who is expected to sign it quickly. It was only the second time the Congressional Review Act, which allows lawmakers to stop newly minted regulations in their tracks, has been used successfully since it was passed in 2000. For full story, click here.

Wetlands Protected Worldwide to Reduce Disaster Risks

Environment News Service – February 2, 2017
Ten new Wetlands of International Importance in five countries have been designated to celebrate World Wetlands Day 2017, observed every year on February 2. World Wetlands Day marks the date in 1971 when the Convention on Wetlands, known as the Ramsar Convention, was adopted in the Iranian city of Ramsar on the shore of the Caspian Sea. Intact wetlands can absorb the impacts of floods, droughts and cyclones on communities, and help to build the resilience to withstand these extreme events. They help alleviate food insecurity, reduce poverty, combat climate change, and restore and promote the sustainable use of ecosystems. But around the world, wetlands are being lost to agriculture, urbanization, commercial and residential development, road construction, impoundment, resource extraction, industrial siting, dredge disposal and mosquito control. For full story, click here.

How Trump’s travel ban could hurt science

By Sarah Kaplan – The Washington Post – January 30, 2017
Ubadah Sabbagh felt goose bumps rise on his skin Saturday morning as he scrolled through the reports that immigrants from the Middle East — people just like him — were no longer being allowed into the United States. Sabbagh, 23, is a student at Virginia Tech, working on his PhD in neuroscience. He's also a green-card holder, and a citizen of Syria — one of the seven countries named in President Trump's executive order banning travelers from certain nations. What would this mean for him? What would it mean for his labmate, a “fantastic scientist” studying at VT on a student visa from Iran, one of the other affected countries? What would it mean for the American scientific community, which is composed of nearly 20 percent immigrants, and which depends on collaboration with researchers from all over the world? For full story, click here.

Chesapeake losing its oyster reefs faster than they can be rebuilt

By Timothy B. Wheeler – Bay Journal – January 29, 2017
The Chesapeake Bay has an oyster problem — but more fundamentally, it has a shell problem. Put simply, there aren’t enough oyster shells available to support a large-scale restoration of the Bay’s depleted bivalve population. And the way things are going, there may not even be enough to sustain the wild fishery a whole lot longer, at least in Virginia. For full article, click here.

Seventeen Playas Restored in Four States as Part of Demo Project

Playa Lakes Joint Venture – January 27, 2017
In December, PLJV finished a two-year playa restoration project, funded by the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Climate Adaptation Fund that filled pits in 17 playas in four states. Of those, 14 playas are on US Forest Service National Grasslands: four on Kiowa National Grassland in New Mexico, nine on Comanche National Grassland in Colorado, and one on Rita Blanca National Grassland in Texas. The other three playas include private land in collaboration with USFWS Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program in Colorado, and two in collaboration with the Oklahoma Commissioners of the Land Office. For full story, click here.

U.S. Scientists Resist Trump Team ‘Case By Case’ Review

Environmental News Service – January 26, 2017
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and other government scientists face Trump administration review on a “case by case basis” before they can publish or present their scientific findings, according to the head of communications for the Trump administration’s EPA transition team. Doug Ericksen, a Republican Washington state senator tapped for the EPA transition team, told National Public Radio Tuesday that EPA scientists must go through an internal vetting process before sharing their work outside the agency. For full story, click here.

Defying Trump, Twitter feeds for U.S. government scientists go rogue

By Steve Gorman – Reuters – January 26, 2017
Rogue Twitter feeds voicing employee concerns at more than a dozen U.S. government agencies have been launched in defiance of what they say are President Donald Trump's attempts to muzzle federal climate change research and other science. Representing scientists at the Environmental Protection Agency, NASA and other bureaus, either directly or through friends and supporters, the accounts protest restrictions they view as censorship since Trump took office on Jan. 20. For full story, click here.

After Seismic Political Shift, Modest Changes in Public’s Policy Agenda

Pew Research Center – January 24, 2017
As Donald Trump enters the White House, the nation’s leading policy priorities are little changed from the final years of Barack Obama’s presidency. And the partisan divisions over many of the public’s priorities – from dealing with global climate change to strengthening the nation’s military – remain as wide as ever. A majority of Americans (55%) now cite protecting the environment as a top priority, up from 47% a year ago. For full story, click here.

Trump tries to pave the way for development by accelerating environmental reviews

By Darryl Fears – The Washington Post – January 24, 2017
President Trump signed an executive order Tuesday to fulfill his goal of “expediting environmental reviews and approvals” to fast track an effort to “fix our country, our roadways and bridges.” The order said that too often, big government and commercial projects are snagged by agency processes and procedures that cost jobs and money. Under the order, agencies that undertake environmental and other analyses before greenlighting development should work with “maximum efficiency and effectiveness” to complete them. For full story, click here.

SER Launches New Certification for Ecological Restoration Practitioners

Society for Ecological Restoration – January 18, 2017
The Society for Ecological Restoration (SER) is pleased to announce the world's first certification program for ecological restoration practitioners and practitioners-in-training. Certification is intended to encourage a high professional standard for practitioners who are designing, implementing, overseeing, and monitoring restoration projects throughout the world. For full press release, click here.

Laws needed to protect Great Lakes from farm run-off, joint commission reports

By Colin Perkel – Guelph Mecrury Tribune – January 18, 2017
Voluntary measures to protect the Great Lakes from farm manure have proven insufficient and governments should now turn their minds to legislation, a binational report released Wednesday concludes. While the issue is of concern everywhere except Lake Superior, the problem is especially acute in Lake Erie, where out-of-control algae growth has created dead zones. "Frequent (harmful algal blooms) in the last 10 years suggest that the voluntary programs are not sufficient," the draft report by the International Joint Commission concludes. “A greater sense of urgency and inclusion of regulatory protections in domestic action plans are needed." For full story, click here.

People power in Puerto Rico: how a canal community escaped gentrification

By Maritza Stanchich – The Guardian – January 18, 2017
For years a graffiti message has appeared throughout San Juan, Puerto Rico’s capital, as an urgent demand: Dragado ya! (meaning “dredging now!”). Even passersby who have never set foot in the eight barrios making up the Caño Martín Peña community – a large informal settlement along 3.75 miles of canal in the central city – know the message points to the dire need to dredge the waterway, which has become so clogged with refuse that those driving by with the windows down can immediately smell the stagnant waters. For full story, click here.

NRCS Seeking Applications for 2018 Regional Conservation Partnership Program

Contact: Blaine Delaney – USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service – January 17, 2017
NRCS is now seeking applications for new partnership projects to help improve water quality, combat drought, enhance soil health, support wildlife habitat, and protect agricultural viability through the Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP). In this fourth RCPP Announcement for Program Funding (APF), NRCS will award up to $252 million to promote locally driven, public-private partnerships in 2018. Interested businesses, non-governmental organizations, Indian tribes, state and local governments, soil and water conservation districts, and universities should submit pre-proposals by April 21 to be considered for funding. For full new release, click here.

NOAA releases draft plans for proposed national marine sanctuaries in Wisconsin and Maryland

Contacts: Vernon Smith and Keeley Belva – NOAA – January 6, 2017
The public will be able to weigh in beginning Monday, January 9, on two proposals for new NOAA national marine sanctuaries in Wisconsin and Maryland that would protect nationally significant shipwrecks. The sanctuaries were originally proposed to NOAA in 2014, and if created would be the first since 2000. For full news release, click here.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Seeks Proposals from States for 2017 Endangered Species Grants

Fish Explorer – January 4, 2017
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is seeking proposals from states and U.S. territories for federal financial assistance for conservation activities that benefit the nation’s most imperiled species. The Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund (CESCF), authorized under Section 6 of the Endangered Species Act, provides grants to support voluntary conservation projects for listed species and species that are candidates for listing. For fiscal year (FY) 2017, the President’s budget requested $53.495 million for CESCF. The actual amount of funding available is based on Congress passing a final appropriations bill for the Department of the Interior. For more information on the proposals, click here.

Steve Bannon's Trip from Climate Conspiracy Theorist to Trump's White House

By Marianne Lavellie – InsideClimate News – November 16, 2016
President-elect Donald Trump has famously called climate change a hoax invented by the Chinese, but the man he has chosen as his chief White House strategist advances a far more elaborate conspiracy. Stephen Bannon has called government support of alternative energy "madness." His conservative website, Breitbart News, relentlessly pursues the idea that global warming is an invention of activists, university researchers and renewable energy industry profiteers determined to assert global governance for their own gain. For full story, click here.

 

 

CA: Oroville Dam’s flood-control manual hasn’t been updated for half a century

By Ryan Sabalow and Andy Furillo – The Sacramento Bee – February 15, 2017 – Video
The critical document that determines how much space should be left in Lake Oroville for flood control during the rainy season hasn’t been updated since 1970, and it uses climatological data and runoff projections so old they don’t account for two of the biggest floods ever to strike the region. Independent experts familiar with the flood-control manual at Oroville Dam said Wednesday there’s no indication the 47-year-old document contributed to the ongoing crisis involving the dam’s ailing spillways. The current troubles stem from structural failures, not how the lake’s flood-storage space was being managed. For full story and to view video, click here.

CA: San Joaquin Valley continues to sink because of groundwater pumping, NASA says

By Joseph Serna – Los Angeles Times – February 9, 2017 – Video
California’s San Joaquin Valley continues to sink at an alarming rate because of groundwater pumping and irrigation, according to a new study by NASA. Ground levels in some areas have dropped 1 to 2 feet in the last two years, creating deeper and wider “bowls” that continue to threaten the vital network of channels that transport water across Southern California, researchers say. For full story and to view video, click here.

CO: Southern Utes pursue EPA-approval for water-quality standards

By Jessica Pace – The Durango Herald – January 30, 2017
As the Southern Ute Indian Tribe pursues federal approval to set and manage water-quality standards, La Plata County officials are calling for a transparent process and clarity on which waters could be affected. In 2015, the tribe submitted an application to the Environmental Protection Agency asking for “treatment in the same manner as a state,” a request known as TAS, which would enable the tribe to develop and administer water-quality standards, just as states are allowed under the Clean Water Act. Now, the process is advancing, and the public has until Friday to submit comments to the EPA. On Tuesday, La Plata County commissioners will vote to submit a comment letter to the agency, including a request for clarification on potentially impacted waterways. For full story, click here.

DE: DNREC awarded $345,000 grant from EPA to protect Delaware wetlands through conservation and education

Cape Gazette – January 16, 2017
DNREC has been awarded a $345,000 Environmental Protection Agency Wetland Program Development Grant that will go to the Division of Watershed Stewardship Watershed Assessment and Management Section's Wetland Monitoring and Assessment Program to fund enhanced wetland conservation in Delaware through science, statewide mapping, and education and outreach. For full story, click here.

FL: Is Florida moving too slow to save the Everglades?

By Jenny Staletovich – Miami Herald – February 3, 2017– Video
Zooming over the vast Everglades in a helicopter, it’s easy to see how much work is being done to revive the wilted watershed: Newly restored bends in the Kissimmee River are resurrecting floodplains and wetlands to clean and slow the flow of dirty water running from farms and cities into Lake Okeechobee. Reservoirs are underway east and west of the lake to hold more water. To the south, sprawling treatment areas to scrub pollution from farm runoff water were expanded last year. Of 26 massive culverts needed to shore up the lake’s aging dike, 21 are under contract. And new and reconfigured canals began delivering more water in 2016 than ever before to Everglades National Park. For full story and to view video, click here.

FL: City to convert polluted wetlands into new $2M park, stormwater pond

By Drew Buchanan – The Pulse – January 25, 2017
Another Pensacola city park is about to undergo a major transformation, reducing the impacts of flooding and bringing more recreational opportunities to Pensacolians throughout the city. As part of the plan, a 2.5 acre pond will be constructed that will capture and treat stormwater runoff from nearly 40 acres in the surrounding neighborhoods. In addition to its water quality improvement, the pond will also serve as a wetland habitat for a variety of plants, birds and other aquatic animal species. For full story, click here.

FL: Court reinstates EPA rule to allow pumping dirty water unchecked

By Jenny Staletovich – Miami Herald – January 19, 2017
South Florida water managers can keep moving dirty water from farms and suburbs into the Everglades and Lake Okeechobee without obtaining federal pollution permits, a divided U.S. appeals court ruled this week in New York. The ruling stems from a decades-long battle by the Miccosukee Tribe and environmentalists to stop water managers from moving water from one body of water to another — for supplies, flood control or other purposes — without first obtaining a federal pollution permit. Dirty water has been at the heart of Everglades restoration, where marshes can quickly get choked by water rich in nutrients. Similar cases eventually surfaced around the country, with sporting groups and environmentalists similarly fighting to keep dirty water from natural areas. For full story, click here.

IA: Damages Not Allowed in Iowa Runoff Case

DTN The Progressive Farmer – January 27, 2017
Des Moines Water Works will not be allowed to collect damages in a lawsuit aimed at forcing the state to regulate nutrients runoff in Iowa, according to a 104-page ruling from the Iowa Supreme Court on Friday. DMWW filed a federal lawsuit in January 2015 in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Iowa in Sioux City against drainage districts in Buena Vista, Calhoun and Sac counties. The counties northwest of Des Moines are part of the Raccoon River watershed. The lawsuit also names county supervisors. One of the legal questions raised was whether DMWW could sue for monetary damages in the case. For full story, click here.

HI: NOAA designates 29th National Estuarine Research Reserve

NOAA – January 23, 2017
On Jan. 19, NOAA announced the establishment of the He'eia National Estuarine Research Reserve. Estuarine reserves protect a section of an estuary and provide a living laboratory to explore and understand the important areas where rivers meet the sea. The 1,385-acre He'eia National Estuarine Research Reserve encompasses upland forests and grasslands, wetlands, reefs and seagrass beds, as well as the largest sheltered body of water in the Hawaiian Island chain. It is located within the Kaneohe Bay estuary on the windward side of Oahu and includes significant historic and cultural resources. For full story, click here.

LA: State Progress on Federal Regulation Streamlining Crucial To Coastal Restoration Success

Water Online – January 24, 2017
An announcement recently by Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards is being hailed by the America's WETLAND Foundation (AWF) as essential to coastal restoration. Word that the White House Federal Permitting Improvement Steering Council rendered approval to Edwards' request to include Louisiana's Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion project on the Federal Permitting Dashboard was welcomed as a first step in a government-wide effort to streamline the federal permitting and review process which can hamper the urgency of restoration. For full story, click here.

LA: BP money helps restore barrier islands off Terrebonne, Lafourche

By Dan Boudreaux – Daily Comet – January 10, 2017
Work is underway or nearing a start to bolster barrier islands that protect Terrebonne and Lafourche from Gulf of Mexico storm surges and tidal flooding. "Right now, Whiskey Island is the only one currently under construction," Terrebonne Parish President Gordy Dove said. The islands, which over the years have suffered persistent erosion, are seen as a first line of defense that buffer wetlands and inland communities from storms and flooding. For full story, click here.

MD: At Blackwater refuge, rising sea levels drown habitat

By The Associated Press – WTOP – January 7, 2017
The view from the observation deck over a meadow of brown marsh grasses would make a nice postcard. Eagles roost on tall pines, muskrats burrow in mounds of mud and straw, and black ducks splash in a pond. But on a cold and drizzly day, Matt Whitbeck surveys the landscape with concern. Beyond the marsh is what the Fish and Wildlife Service biologist calls “Lake Blackwater.” “It’s this beautiful body of open water,” he says. “When you really start to think about why this is here, it’s disturbing.” The area was once an uninterrupted prairie of aquatic grasses. But waters have risen more than a foot over the past century, drowning the native plants and converting nearly eight square miles of marsh into open water. Models suggest most of the unique ecosystem will disappear by 2100. For full story, click here.

MA: Climate Investigation of Exxon Can Proceed in Massachusetts, State Judge Rules

By David Hasemyer – InsideClimate News – January 12, 2017
A Massachusetts Superior Court judge has refused to block the climate fraud investigation of ExxonMobil opened last year by state Attorney General Maura Healey. The ruling Wednesday means Exxon must comply with Healey's civil investigative demand for company records. Healey requested the documents as part of an investigation to determine if Exxon misled consumers about the risks climate change posed to its business. For full story, click here.

MI: In Michigan, a Fight Over the Future of a Fabled Trout River

By James Card – The New York Times – January 24, 2017
The greatest sign posted at a public fishing access spot in the United States is on the South Branch of the Au Sable River at a place called the Mason Tract. It reads: “Sportsman slow your pace … ahead lies the fabled land of the South Branch. Here generations of fisherman have cast a fly on one of the great trout streams of America. Hunters, too, have roamed these hills in the solitude so bountifully offered. The land is rich in tradition and stands ready to renew your soul. Tread lightly as you pass and leave no mark. Go forth in the spirit of George W. Mason, whose generous gift has made this forever possible.” For full story, click here.

MI: Aging septic systems fouling Michigan waters

By Keith Matheny – Detroit Free Press – January 16, 2017
Hundreds of thousands of septic systems in Michigan may be worn out, failed or failing, experts say. And research has shown they are polluting waters across the state. Up to 1.4 million septic systems — individual waste disposal systems for homes or businesses that aren't connected to a municipal sewer line — still remain in Michigan. More than 21 million homes in the U.S. still use them. For full story, click here.

MN: Enforcing the law: County must decide by March 31 to handle buffer compliance

By Julie Buntjer – Daily Globe – January 31, 2017
When Gov. Mark Dayton announced his proposal for a statewide plan to buffer Minnesota’s public waters and public drainage systems in 2015, it quickly became a contentious issue in farm country. Farmers were told they would need to seed 50-foot grassed buffers along streams meandering through their farm fields and 16.5-foot buffers along all public drainage systems. What would they get in return? Improved water quality for all is the goal, but any financial incentive for landowners giving up acres doesn’t yet, and may never, exist. For full story, click here.

MN: Dayton signs $500 million deal to protect rural waters

By Jennifer Bjorhus – Star Tribune – January 18, 2017
Thousands of acres of environmentally sensitive land in southwest Minnesota will be converted to native plants and grasses in an ambitious effort to protect local waters from polluted runoff, thanks to a major new infusion of cash for rural conservation. A highly anticipated state-federal deal, announced Tuesday by Gov. Mark Dayton, will provide $350 million from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and $150 million in state funds to the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) which pays farmers to idle vulnerable land near lakes, streams and rivers. For full story, click here.

MS: How the upper Mississippi goes from pristine to polluted

By Jennifer Bjorhus – Star Tribune – January 24, 2017
The Mississippi near Bemidji is the untainted river of our imagination. As it travels south of St. Cloud, however, the pollutants start pouring in, and by the time the historic waterway hits Minneapolis, the fish are often under consumption advisories and the water is sometimes unsafe for swimming. A comprehensive new study finds the majestic river under growing threats from changes in the landscape of central Minnesota and warns that growing levels of nitrates, primarily from fertilizer, threaten its safety for drinking. For full story, click here.

MO: Two decades later, conservation area's wetlands still doing the job

By Edward Husar – Herald-Whig – January 7, 2017
A conservation project undertaken 20 years ago in Lewis County is still reaping benefits. The project involved creating some managed wetland units within the Deer Ridge Conservation Area north of Lewistown. The aim was to provide a hospitable environment for wildlife, especially migrating birds. The wetland areas also were designed to create some new opportunities for waterfowl hunting. In addition, the wetlands would help filter out sediments and other impurities as runoff soaked through the ground and reentered the water table. All of those goals have been achieved. For full story, click here.

NV: Creating Nature from Our Flood Waters

By John Potter – KTVN – January 12, 2017 – Video
Besides the havoc and damage our floods have caused, at least they provided the first real test for the Truckee River Restoration Project, a huge 14-year effort to bring nature back along 11 miles of the river. Chris Sega, the project manager for the Nature Conservancy, told us it was a massive undertaking: "It was pretty daunting at first when I started working here. The scale of it was very large." For full story and to view video, click here.

NJ: Sandy's Lessons Lost: Jersey Shore Rebuilds in Sea's Inevitable Path

By Leslie Kaufman – InsideClimate News – October 26, 2016
For most of the last century, modest one-story summer bungalows lined this private strip of road that dead-ends at Vision Beach. Then Sandy made landfall here on Oct. 29, 2012, obliterating them. Today, except for the occasional vacant lot, the street has been transformed into two rows of gleaming brand-new three-story homes. For full story, click here.

NY: Cuomo's $2 billion clean water push called 'amazing'

By T. J. Pignataro – The Buffalo News – January 16, 2017
Raw sewage in Scajaquada Creek near the Buffalo History Museum. Manure and pesticides in Chautauqua Lake. Elevated levels of lead in drinking water in schools and homes.Floatable debris polluting beaches and even Canalside. Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo said he wants to address problems like these with a $2 billion proposal to improve water quality in the Buffalo Niagara region and the rest of New York State. For full story, click here.

NC: Duke study finds coal-ash byproduct in fish

By Ray Gronberg – The Herald Sun – February 7, 2017
Duke University researchers say the fish they caught in three North Carolina lakes that’ve taken power plants’ coal-ash waste showed relatively high levels of selenium, an element left over from the combustion process. The results show that two of the lakes remain “burdened” by contamination even after the shutdown of the boilers that helped pollute them, three Duke professors and a doctoral student said in a new journal article. For full story, click here.

NC: Coalition forms to protect dwindling wetland forests in the South

By Bruce Henderson – The Charlotte Observer – February 2, 2017
A multistate coalition has formed to protect wetland forests in the South, organizers said Thursday on World Wetlands Day. Wetland forests once covered much of the South, but most have fallen to farms or real estate development over the centuries. The Wetland Forest Initiative will work with landowners, communities, conservation organizations and government agencies to conserve and restore those that remain. For full story, click here.

PA: Methane Levels Have Increased in Marcellus Shale Region Despite a Dip in Well Installation

Contact: Britt Faulstick – Drexel Now – February 9, 2017
Despite a slowdown in the number of new natural gas wells in the Marcellus Shale region of Northeast Pennsylvania, new research led by Drexel University finds that atmospheric methane levels in the area are still increasing. Measurements of methane and other air pollutants, taken three years apart in the rural areas of Pennsylvania that have been the target of natural gas development over the last decade, revealed a substantial increase from 2012 to 2015. For full story, click here.

PA: Pennsylvania DCNR Announces $790,000 Investment to Plant Trees Along Streams to Improve Water Quality

PR Newswire – January 24, 2017
Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn today announced an investment of $790,000 for 13 grants to plant trees along streams in Pennsylvania to improve water quality. "Streamside forest buffers provide a wide range of benefits to both the environment, and to landowners, including better water quality, habitat for pollinators that can assist with crop production, and increased opportunities for recreational activities," Dunn said today at a meeting of the State Conservation Commission in State College. "These grants will help demonstrate a new multi-functional buffer option that incorporates some native plants in the buffer zone to provide a sustainable source of income for the landowner. For full story, click here.

UT: Avoiding wetlands could speed Alta lift project

By Mike Gorrell – The Salt Lake Tribune – February 17, 2017
Alta Ski Area did such a nice job revising its proposed alignment for a new Supreme chairlift that the U.S. Forest Service does not believe the project warrants as much environmental review as is being done on 11 other projects desired by the resort. But before finalizing that decision, Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest Supervisor David Whittekiend wants the public to weigh in on his agency's determination that the changes — which take some old lift towers out of Albion Basin's largest wetland and avoid putting new ones in — preclude the need for more detailed environmental review. For full story, click here.

VA: VIMS salt marsh study finds barrier island migration a threat

By Tamara Dietrich – Daily Press – January 30, 2017
Salt marshes don't always get the respect or recognition coastal scientists say they deserve. For the longest time, they were considered nuisances that had to be drained or filled to be made useful for development or farming. Today, it's understood salt marshes serve critical roles as nature's "kidneys" that filter out sediment and pollutants, as "sponges" that soak up excess water from floods or heavy rains and as important habitat for animals and plants. For full story, click here.

VA: Restoring the Lafayette: Norfolk’s largest watershed to get $4.6 million in upgrades

By Amy Poulter – Southside Daily – January 11, 2017
For almost six years, the city of Norfolk has deployed various projects to rehabilitate the Lafayette River watershed, which runs almost 14 square miles making it the largest in the city. Continuing their efforts into the new year, a series of projects will soon restore sections of the river’s shorelines. Using coastal resilience grants from the Department of Interior and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation totaling in $4.6 million, the city has selected five different locations – Knitting Mill Creek, Barraud Park and the Lindenwood neighborhood, Riverview, around the Lafayette Boulevard Bridge and along North Shore Road near the river’s mouth – that will see the placement of rock sills, logs, added marsh vegetation and oyster reefs. For full story, click here.

VA: Man-made wetland aims to filter stormwater

By The Associated Press News Plex January 9, 2017
The city of Waynesboro has opened a man-made wetland area that's designed to filter polluted stormwater before it reaches the South River. The News Leader of Staunton reported Thursday that 300 acres drain into the wetland, which is designed so that water flows through slowly and circuitously. That allows for pollutants such as phosphorous and nitrogen to settle or get absorbed by vegetation. For full story, click here.

WA: Ecology’s CAFO Water Quality Permit Sacrifices Public Health, Drinking Water, Shellfish Beds

By Waterkeeper Alliance – January 20, 2017
Today, a coalition of environmental, public health, social justice and public interest advocates and organizations representing tens of thousands of Washingtonians responded to the Washington State Department of Ecology’s issuance of a revised concentrated animal feeding operation (CAFO) general discharge permit, five years after the former permit expired. Faced with the opportunity to protect Washingtonians from industrial agriculture pollution, Ecology failed to address the four major sources of pollution from CAFOs: land application, lagoons, compost areas and animal pens. Instead, Ecology issued a problematic, two-tiered permit scheme that fails to protect our most fundamental natural resource–clean water. For full story, click here.

WI: Nature Conservancy protects wetland water supply

By Don Behm – Journal Sentinel – January 29, 2017
A conservation group long active in preserving the uncommon cluster of prairie ridges and wetland swales along the Lake Michigan coast in Kenosha County is extending its reach inland to protect sources of water that help sustain rare native plants in the shoreland swales. The Nature Conservancy recently purchased a 58.6-acre property east of state Highway 32 and north of the state line to prevent development and loss of this vital water-holding open space, said Nick Miller, the conservancy's science director in Wisconsin. Restoration of former wetlands that had been drained for agriculture will boost its rain absorbing capacity, he said. For full story, click here.

WI: Wisconsin City at forefront of ‘water wars’

By Tom Henry – The Blade – January 16, 2017
This city has become the battleground for one of North America’s fiercest water wars, one that is taking the Great Lakes region into more uncharted legal territory in 2017. A council of eight gubernatorial-level officials in charge of the landmark Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact is expected to decide soon if a Chicago-based coalition representing 127 U.S. and Canadian cities has grounds to challenge a major water-withdrawal permit issued last June to the city of Waukesha, Wis. For full story, click here.

 

Canadian glaciers now major contributor to sea level change, UCI study shows

UCI News – February 14, 2017
Ice loss from Canada’s Arctic glaciers has transformed them into a major contributor to sea level change, new research by University of California, Irvine glaciologists has found. From 2005 to 2015, surface melt off ice caps and glaciers of the Queen Elizabeth Islands grew by an astonishing 900 percent, from an average of three gigatons to 30 gigatons per year, according to results published today in the journal Environmental Research Letters. “In the past decade, as air temperatures have warmed, surface melt has increased dramatically,” said lead author Romain Millan, an Earth system science doctoral student. For full story, click here.

Trump administration puts off listing bumble bee as endangered

By Juliet Eilperin – The Washington Post – February 9, 2017
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Thursday delayed listing the rusty patched bumble bee as endangered, a result of a regulatory freeze White House chief of staff Reince Priebus imposed on President Trump’s first day in office. The previous administration announced Jan. 11 that the rusty patched bumble bee, whose numbers have declined 87 percent since the mid-1990s, was so imperiled that it should become the first bee species to be listed as endangered. But a day before the new protections were set to take effect, the Fish and Wildlife Service said they would not take effect before March 21. For full story, click here.

Republican elders call for new national carbon tax to replace federal regulations

By Oliver Milman – The Guardian – February 8, 2017
A group of senior Republicans will meet with White House officials on Wednesday to call for a new national carbon tax to replace federal regulations as a way to combat climate change. The GOP elder statesmen – which include former secretaries of state James Baker and George Shultz, and ex-treasury secretary Hank Paulson – will urge Donald Trump’s administration to impose a “free market, limited government” response to rising global temperatures. For full story, click here.

After decades of decreases, mercury rises in Great Lakes wildlife

By Brian Bienkowski – The Daily Climate – February 2, 2017
Toxic mercury is once again increasing in some Great Lakes fish and birds after decades of consistent, promising reductions. Scientists are still trying to figure out what’s going on, but one of the suspected culprits in reversing decades of mercury reductions in wildlife is a climate change-induced increase in water temperatures. For full story, click here.

Video: Why Greenland’s Ice Is So Quickly Melting

By Candice Gaukel Andrews – Good Nature Travel – February 2, 2017
Science fiction writer Kim Stanley Robinson authored a trilogy of futuristic eco-thrillers that I really enjoyed reading. In the three books, titled Forty Signs of Rain, Fifty Degrees Below Zero and Sixty Days and Counting, the planet’s climate has warmed so much—resulting in devastating floods, storms and the total immersion of several populated islands and coastlines—that the people of the Earth concoct a plan to jump-start the jet stream. Robinson wrote these books between 2004 and 2007. Now, life seems to be imitating art. Today, the Earth’s northern polar jet stream—a long, narrow, meandering current of high-speed winds in the upper atmosphere that typically blows from a western direction at a speed of 250 miles per hour or more—is truly out of whack. For full story and to view video, click here.

“Planned Retreat” Enters the Climate Dialogue

By Erika Bolstad, E&E News – Scientific American – January 31, 2017
As sea levels rise, U.S. communities have several strategies to cope with the effects of climate change, the president of the National Academy of Sciences said yesterday. There's triage for high-dollar assets, like airports and military installations and even the Statue of Liberty, Marcia McNutt said. But more and more, she added, “organized retreat” is a part of the conversation. That strategy, once politically unpalatable, has emerged from the shadows in recent months as scientists, community leaders and governments try to figure out how to move people out of the way of coastal flooding and other hazards. For full article, click here.

Psychologists have developed a “vaccine” against climate-change denial

By Sarah DeWeerdt – Anthropocene Magazine – January 31, 2017
A brief, up-front description of the arguments used by climate-change deniers makes people less susceptible to believing them, according to a study published recently in Global Challenges. The researchers liken this approach to a kind of psychological immunization. “We wanted to see if we could find a ‘vaccine’ by preemptively exposing people to a small amount of the type of misinformation they might experience. A warning that helps preserve the facts,” says University of Cambridge social psychologist Sander van der Linden, the study’s lead author. For full article, click here.

Role of terrestrial biosphere in counteracting climate change may have been underestimated

Contact Liz Bell – University of Birmingham – January 30, 2017
It is widely known that the terrestrial biosphere (the collective term for all the world’s land vegetation, soil, etc.) is an important factor in mitigating climate change, as it absorbs around 20% of all fossil fuel CO2 emissions. However, its role as a net carbon sink is affected by land-use changes such as deforestation and expanded agricultural practice. A new study, conducted by an international collaboration of scientists and published in the journal Nature Geoscience, has analyzed the extent to which these changing land-use practices affect carbon emissions – allowing the levels of CO2 uptake by the terrestrial biosphere to be more accurately predicted. For full story, click here.

Earthworm numbers dwindle, threatening soil health

By Karin Jäger – Deutsche Welle (DW) – January 30, 2017
Earthworms, it seems, are the unsung heroes of our world. Labeled slimy and disgusting by many, these lowly invertebrates work unseen and underground where they till, fertilize and improve soil. But environmentalists are concerned that industrial agricultural practices are making life difficult for this surprisingly important animal. Intensive use of manure and acidic soil with a pH value below five harm the worm, although it remains unclear whether herbicides affect earthworm's ability to reproduce. Still, one thing is for sure: the destruction of its habitat every few months with heavy machinery stresses the animal. For full story, click here.

Study: How Climate Change Threatens Mountaintops (and Clean Water)

By Joshua E. Brown – The University of Vermont – January 26, 2017
Mountains are far more than rocks. They also confer various natural benefits—for example, about half of the world’s drinking water filters through their high-elevation forests, plants, and soils. Now, a new, first-of-its kind study, in the journal Nature, shows how these mountain ecosystems around the globe may be threatened by climate change. Rising temperatures over the next decades appear likely to “decouple” key nutrient cycles in mountain soils and plants, an international team of sixteen scientists reports. Their study suggests that this is expected to disrupt the function of mountaintop ecosystems, as plant communities above and at treeline are thrown into turmoil faster than trees can migrate uphill in a warmer world. Read more here.

How the World Passed a Carbon Threshold and Why It Matters

By Nicola Jones Yale – Environment 360 – January 26, 2017
Last year will go down in history as the year when the planet’s atmosphere broke a startling record: 400 parts per million of carbon dioxide. The last time the planet’s air was so rich in CO2 was millions of years ago, back before early predecessors to humans were likely wielding stone tools; the world was a few degrees hotter back then, and melted ice put sea levels tens of meters higher. For full article, click here.

Study tracks ‘memory’ of soil moisture

NASA Global Climate Change – January 25, 2017
A new study of the first year of observational data from NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is providing significant surprises that will help in modeling Earth’s climate, forecasting our weather and monitoring agricultural crop growth. The findings are presented in a paper published recently in the journal Nature Geosciences by scientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge; and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. They used SMAP measurements to estimate soil moisture memory in the top 2 inches (5 centimeters) of Earth’s topsoils. The estimates improve upon earlier ones that were predicted from models or based on sparse data from ground observation stations. Soil moisture memory, which refers to how long it takes for soil moisture from rainfall to dissipate, can influence our weather and climate. For full story, click here.

Changes in Rainfall, Temperature Expected to Transform Coastal Wetlands This Century

U.S. Geological Survey – January 25, 2017
Sea-level rise isn’t the only aspect of climate change expected to affect coastal wetlands: changes in rainfall and temperature are predicted to transform wetlands in the Gulf of Mexico and around the world within the century. These changes will take place regardless of sea-level rise, a new study from the US Geological Survey and the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley concludes. Such changes are expected to affect the plant communities found in coastal wetlands. For example, some salt marshes are predicted to become mangrove forests, while others could become salty mud flats. These shifts in vegetation could affect the ecological and economic services wetlands provide to the communities that rely on them. For full news release, click here.

New Technique Quickly Predicts Salt Marsh Vulnerability

U.S. Geological Survey – January 24, 2017
Scientists working on a rapid assessment technique for determining which US coastal salt marshes are most imperiled by erosion were surprised to find that all eight of the Atlantic and Pacific Coast marshes where they field-tested their method are losing ground, and half of them will be gone in 350 years’ time if they don’t recapture some lost terrain. The US Geological Survey-led research team developed a simple method that land managers can use to assess a coastal salt marsh’s potential to survive environmental challenges. The method, already in use at two national wildlife refuges, uses any one of several remote sensing techniques, such as aerial photography, to gauge how much of an individual marsh is open water and how much of it is covered by marsh plants. By comparing the ratio of ponds, channels and tidal flats to marsh vegetation, land managers can determine which marshes stand the best chance of persisting in the face of changing conditions. For full news release, click here.

From the swamps of the Potomac, new hope for green electronics

By Sarah DeWeerdt – Anthropocene Magazine – January 24, 2017
Protein filaments just 3 nanometers wide that are produced by certain species of bacteria could be a key to environmentally friendly electronics manufacturing, according to microbiologists at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Scientists discovered the filaments, dubbed “nanowires,” about 5 years ago. Bacteria use them to make electrical connections with other bacterial cells or to generate reactions with metals in the environment. For full article, click here.

New Paper Explains Consequences of Plant Disappearance in Salt Marshes on the Atlantic Coast

American Phytopathological Society (APS) – January 24, 2017
An important new research paper, titled “Response of Sediment Bacterial Communities to Sudden Vegetation Dieback in a Coastal Wetland,” examines the consequences of plant disappearance and changes in salt marsh soil communities following Sudden Vegetation Dieback (SVD). The paper, published in Phytobiomes, an open-access journal of The American Phytopathological Society, is written by Wade Elmer, Peter Thiel, and Blaire Steven, scientists at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station in New Haven. The setting for this study was the marshes of Connecticut’s Hammonasset Beach State Park. These marshes, which produce large amounts of plant biomass, have been beneficial to Connecticut’s coastal ecosystems by providing protection from erosion, habitats for native birds and fish, and absorption of fertilizer runoff. For full news release, click here.

Sea Level Rise Estimate Grows Alarmingly Higher in Latest Federal Report

By Nicholas Kusnetz – InsideClimate News – January 24, 2017
New federal estimates say global sea levels could rise faster than previously thought, and the rise may be even worse in many coastal regions of the United States. A new report, written by scientists with several federal agencies and universities, says that under a worst-case scenario, climate change could raise the oceans an average of more than 8 feet by 2100, about 20 inches more than a previous federal estimate published in 2012. The best case now projected would be an average of about a foot. For full story, click here.

The Scramble to Protect Climate Data Under Trump

By Lisa Song and Zahra Hirji – InsideClimate News – January 20, 2017
More than 250 people gathered at the University of Pennsylvania last week for Data Rescue Philly, one of the latest examples of a grassroots effort to save environmental and climate change data that scientists fear could vanish under the Trump administration's many climate deniers. Over two days, volunteers from academia, nonprofits and the tech industry were trained and then preserved data from more than 3,000 websites hosted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. For full story, click here.

Warming Climate May Limit Lyme Disease's Spread in Parts of the U.S.

By Nicholas Kusnetz – InsideClimate News – January 19, 2017
While some research has linked the spread of Lyme disease to climate change, the details of that connection are complex. A new study suggests that a warming world may help tamp down the disease at the southern edge of the Northeastern coastal region where it is most prevalent. The research, published last week in the journal PLOS ONE, suggests that a warmer climate in the Southeastern United States has led to the evolution of deer ticks that are less likely to latch onto people, at least in some parts of the ticks' range. Other research has shown that climate change appears to be expanding the ticks' overall range, and that global warming may help spread many dangerous mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria and Zika into new areas. For full story, click here.

Managing 246 million acres: new science-based tools support Bureau of Land Management’s landscape approach

U.S. Geological Survey – January 19, 2017
The U.S. Geological Survey and the Bureau of Land Management today released a collaborative report with new information and tools to support effective management of millions of acres of BLM public lands. The report underscores the value of a landscape approach to management, and shows that the BLM manages some of the largest areas of intact public lands in the west. “By evaluating multiple resource uses within and across landscapes through a science-based approach,” said USGS lead author Sarah Carter, “managers will be able to think bigger and plan better than ever before to provide multiple benefits for current and future generations of Americans.” This report provides BLM with tools to advance a landscape approach to planning and management on the 246 million acres of western public lands they manage for the benefit of the American public. The report will also inform future BLM planning, monitoring and conservation initiatives, including the development of a coordinated nationwide multiscale monitoring effort. To read more and download the report, Multiscale Guidance and Tools for Implementing a Landscape Approach to Resource Management in the Bureau of Land Management, click here.

2016 was Earth's warmest year on record, continuing a three-year streak

By Andrew Freedman – Marsable – January 18, 2017 – Video
Last year was Earth's warmest on record since at least 1880, two federal agencies announced Wednesday. Last year's global average surface temperature eclipsed previous highs set in 2014 and 2015. In fact, both NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) found that 2016's temperatures exceeded all previous years since instrument records began 137 years ago, and that human-caused global warming was responsible for a majority of the planetary fever. Scientists are now warning that we should expect more such milestones in the years ahead, along with worsening climate impacts, as global warming progresses. For full story and to view video, click here.

Global Warming Is Changing How the Ocean Carries Sound

By Anna Nowogrodzki – Hakai Magazine – January 18, 2017
Climate change has affected many things about the ocean—the temperature; sea level; which creatures live where. But it’s also changed something surprising: how the ocean sounds. Two years ago, acoustic engineer Lee Freitag, from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, discovered a stark change in the Arctic Ocean’s Beaufort Sea: sounds, he found, could now travel about four times farther than they could a decade ago. For full article, click here.

New map reveals how roads devastate nature

By Tim Radford – Climate News Network – January 17, 2017
European, Brazilian and US scientists have delivered a new map of humanity’s mark on the world. Roads now fragment the terrestrial landscape and divide it into 600,000 patches – and only 7% of the roadless areas are larger than 100 square kilometres. More than half of the patches are less than 1 sq km and four-fifths are less than 5 sq km. The implication is that humans are getting everywhere, and bringing with them noise, pollution, damage to wildlife and biological invaders. For full story, click here.

NRCS, USFWS Partner to Accelerate Conservation on Agricultural Lands for the Monarch Butterfly

Contact: Justin Fritscher – USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service – January 13, 2017
The monarch butterfly is a new national priority species of Working Lands for Wildlife (WLFW), a partnership between the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Populations of monarchs, a pollinator species cherished across North America, have declined significantly during the past two decades. This collaboration aims to help the species recover by working with agricultural producers to make wildlife-friendly improvements on their farms, ranches and forests. For full news release, click here.

Adaptive management of soil conservation is essential to improving water quality

Centre for Ecology & Hydrology – Science Daily – January 13, 2017
The quality of our rivers and lakes could be placed under pressure from harmful levels of soluble phosphorus, despite well-intended measures to reduce soil erosion and better manage and conserve farmland for crop production, a new study shows. The UK-based Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) led a team of international scientists, who found that increased levels of soluble phosphorus in rivers entering Lake Erie, in the USA, may be linked to conservation measures, despite their success in reducing soil erosion and nutrient losses in particulate forms. For full story, click here.

Why It’s Impossible to Predict When That Giant Antarctic Ice Sheet Will Split

By Nick Stockton – Wired – January 12, 2017
Over the past several months, scientists working in Antarctica have been watching—with a mixture of professional fascination and personal horror—a fissure growing in the continent’s fourth-largest ice shelf. Since last November, the crack has lengthened by some 90 miles. It has 13 miles more before it rends completely, and a chunk of ice the size of Delaware goes bobbing into the Weddell Sea. The calving chunk could be a sign that the entire Larsen C ice shelf—nearly twice the size of Massachusetts—is breaking apart. For full story, click here.

Pressure from Grazers Hastens Ecosystem Collapse from Drought

Nicholas School of the Environment - Duke University – January 11, 2017
Extreme droughts, intensified by a warming climate, are increasingly causing ecosystem collapse in many regions worldwide. But models used by scientists to predict the tipping points at which drought stress leads to ecosystem collapse have proven unreliable and too optimistic. A new study by scientists at Duke University and Beijing Normal University may hold the answer why. For full story, click here.

Northeast US Temperatures are Decades Ahead of Global Average

Contact: Janet Lathrop – UMass – January 11, 2017
Results of a new study by researchers at the Northeast Climate Science Center (NECSC) at the University of Massachusetts Amherst suggest that temperatures across the northeastern United States will increase much faster than the global average, so that the 2-degrees Celsius warming target adopted in the recent Paris Agreement on climate change will be reached about 20 years earlier for this part of the U.S. compared to the world as a whole. For full story, click here.

Supporting wetland protection across the nation

Wisconsin Wetlands Association – 2016
In 2014, the North Carolina state legislature cut support for their wetland monitoring programs. Rick Savage, who had spent years monitoring wetlands for the state, knew he had to step up to make sure someone was still watching out for wetlands. Savage was looking for wetland organizations he could learn from when he came across Wisconsin Wetlands Association. “In March of 2015, I got an email from a close friend with a link to WWA’s website,” Savage said. “I spent about two minutes looking at your website and I said ‘I have got to do this for the Carolinas.’ There was no doubt about it in my mind.” For full story, click here.

 

State of Private Investment in Conservation 2016: A Landscape Assessment of an Emerging Market

Forest Trends – January 11, 2017
This new report by Forest Trends’ Ecosystem Marketplace builds upon the 2014 report by EKO Asset Management Partners (now Encourage Capital) and The Nature Conservancy’s NatureVest, Investing in Conservation: A Landscape Assessment of an Emerging Market. From 2004 until 2015, the private sector channeled $8.2 billion (B) of private capital into investments that seek measurable environmental benefits – in addition to financial returns. Within this field of “conservation investing,” investors committed their dollars to one of the following conservation outcomes: sustainable food and fiber production, habitat conservation, and water quality and quantity protection. For full report and to view the webinar, click here.

Smart Growth Fixes for Climate Adaptation and Resilience: Changing Land Use and Building Codes to Prepare for Climate Change

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – January 2017
Although broadly focused, this new publication, Smart Growth Fixes for Climate Adaptation and Resilience: Changing Land Use and Building Codes to Prepare for Climate Change, has green infrastructure information. It outlines more than 70 policies local government officials, staff, and boards can consider to help adapt to current or projected flooding and extreme precipitation, sea level rise and storm surge, extreme heat, drought, and wildfire. These policies range from modest adjustments to wholesale changes, giving communities a range of options to consider depending on their needs and context. The publication includes examples of communities implementing these policies, resources for more information, and metrics that communities could use taken three community-scale sustainability rating systems. Read Smart Growth Fixes for Climate Adaptation and Resilience here.

Alliances for Green Infrastructure: State of Watershed Investment 2016

Forest Trends – December 15, 2016
Forest Trends has just launched a new report, Alliances for Green Infrastructure: State of Watershed Investment 2016 that finds governments, water utilities, companies, and communities around the world responding to these challenges by channeling nearly US$25 billion in 2015 into nature-based solutions to secure reliable access to clean water. The report tracks the growing popularity of a holistic water management approach that combines engineered “gray infrastructure” with “green infrastructure,” which includes healthy forests, wetlands, grasslands, and mangroves. This natural infrastructure can reduce flood risk, protect from storm damage, and help deliver drinking water, often at a fraction of the cost of strategies that focus exclusively on gray infrastructure. To learn more, download the full report and visit our Watershed Connect portal to explore a comprehensive inventory of programs around the world.

Final EPA/USGS Technical Report: Protecting Aquatic Life from Effects of Hydrologic Alteration

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – 2016
EPA and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have released a report, Final EPA-USGS Technical Report: Protecting Aquatic Life from Effects of Hydrologic Alteration. This report presents:
• a literature review of the natural flow system and a description of the potential effects of flow alteration on aquatic life;
• examples of narrative water quality criteria that some states have developed to support natural flow and maintain healthy aquatic biota; and
• a flexible framework that can be used by states, tribes, and territories to quantify targets for flow regime components that are protective of aquatic life.
To download report, click here.

Climate Change Adaptation for Coastal Wetlands: A Toolkit of Best Management Practices for Coastal Wetlands in Michigan

Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council – October 2016
The best practices in this toolkit are framed as guidance for natural resource planners, regulators and managers within the state of Michigan. Not every practice will be relevant for every project. Some of the ideas and approaches identified herein may already be being implemented by local governments, or wetland managers. Applying just one best practice or policy to a project does not guarantee coastal wetland resiliency to climate change. Conversely, neglecting a single best practice may not compromise adaptation efforts. Optimally, users of this toolkit should consider all of the practices in the context of their responsibilities and select and apply an appropriate combination that fits the conditions of a particular natural resource management program or wetland project. Read more here.

Threatened Protection: Sea Level Rise and Coastal Protected Lands of the Eastern United States

By Rebecca Epanchin-Niell, Carolyn Kousky, Alexandra Thompson, and Margaret A. Walls – Resources for the Future – December 16, 2016
This article examines US coastal protected lands and the potential consequences and associated reductions in ecosystem services from sea level rise in the context of current funding and adaptation planning for conservation. For full article, click here.

A How-to Guide for Coproduction of Actionable Science

Paul Beier, Lara J. Hanse, Lynn Helbrecht, and David Behar – Wiley Online Library – November 9, 2016
Resource managers often need scientific information to match their decisions (typically short-term and local) to complex, long-term, large-scale challenges such as adaptation to climate change. In such situations, the most reliable route to actionable science is coproduction, whereby managers, policy makers, scientists, and other stakeholders first identify specific decisions to be informed by science, and then jointly define the scope and context of the problem, research questions, methods, and outputs, make scientific inferences, and develop strategies for the appropriate use of science. This new paper, co-authored by NPLCC committee member, Lynn Helbrecht of the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife, presents seven recommended practices intended to help scientists, managers, funders and other stakeholders carry out a coproduction project, one recommended practice to ensure that partners learn from attempts at coproduction, and two practices to promote coproduction at a programmatic level. For full article, click here.

 

Restoring America’s Wetland Forest Legacy

By Sam Davis – Union of Concerned Scientists Blog – February 7, 2017
Like many white, middle-class, suburban kids, I grew up with one foot in the forest. To me, that small woodlot, a green buffer along a half-polluted tributary, was a paradise unmatched by any other forest in the world. Unfortunately, like many other tracts of land across the United States, my childhood forest is gone—cleared for a housing development. Even small forests across the United States work to provide “ecosystem services”—non-monetary benefits like clean water, clean air, carbon sequestration, hunting, fishing, and yes—recreation for children. Ecosystem services may sound like “lip service” to the natural world, but it’s not. For full blog post, click here.

Restoration Spotlight: A forest’s hopes rest on golden wings

By Will Parson – Chesapeake Bay News – February 7, 2017 – Video
When Mike and Laura Jackson wanted to restore wildlife habitat on their slice of a forested Pennsylvania mountainside, they did something you might not expect. The husband and wife, who live on 114 acres in Bedford County, started cutting down trees. The Jacksons were motivated to drastic action in part by a small gray bird with flashes of yellow on its head and wings. “We’ve always been birders, so we keep track of what we see,” Laura said, while she and Mike followed the trails that wind through their land. “And we’ve had golden-winged warblers on our property—but the last one we saw or heard was in 2009.” For full blog post and to view video, click here.

New Court Decision on Water Transfers Reinstates EPA’s Existing Rule

Association of State Drinking Water Administrators (ASDWA) – February 3, 2017
A recent court decision provides a new milestone in an ongoing legal dispute over whether water transfers, such as a water system might use to move raw water between reservoirs, should require a NPDES permit. These water transfers situations have long been controversial, especially when the water quality differs between the source and the receiving water body. For full blog post, click here.

We Want Young Artists to Inspire the Conservation World

By Gina McCarthy – USFWS Blog – Open Spaces: A Talk on the Wild Side – February 2, 2017
Several contests give young visual artists a chance to show off their talent in support of conservation. I write for a living but know that a picture or photo can make a story. Art can stop people in their tracks and connect with them on a deep emotional level. Please take a look at these contests and see whether you have what it takes. For full blog post and a list of contests, click here.

How to Find Funding for Unpaid Internships

By Elizabeth Morgan – National Wildlife Federation’s Blog – January 26, 2017
Several years ago, I developed a passion for working in wildlife conservation. However, I’ve found that entering the wildlife industry is about much more than just having a passion. Many jobs in wildlife management and conservation — and in many green career sectors — require an advanced degree, several years of experience, and expert knowledge. Internships seem to be few and far between, and often I will find a great position only to discover it is unpaid or in a location out of my reach. I have had thoughts of giving up, but I have been fortunate to find alternate funding sources to continue pursuing my career. In this post, I’ll share some examples of how to find funding for unpaid internships and other work experiences. For full blog post, click here.

Progress in Strengthening Our Government-to-Government Relationship with Tribal Nations

By JoAnn Chase and Ethan Shenkman – EPA Connect – January 19, 2017
EPA has long honored tribal rights to sovereignty, self-governance and self-determination. These principles are enshrined in EPA’s Indian Policy, signed by Administrator Ruckelshaus in 1984 and reaffirmed by every EPA Administrator since. Thanks to the unique partnership between our offices — EPA’s American Indian Environmental Office (AIEO) and EPA’s Indian law team in the Office of General Counsel — we have made great strides in bringing these principles to life and weaving them into the very fabric of this agency. For full blog post, click here.

Iraq's Marsh Arabs test the waters as wetlands ruined by Saddam are reborn

The Guardian – January 18, 2017
The morning of 20 January 1992 began much like any other for the Mohammed family in the marshlands of southern Iraq. Rising at first light, they roused their herd of buffaloes and drove the beasts snorting and protesting into the surrounding wetlands to graze. After a quick breakfast of bread and yoghurt, washed down with sugary tea, they readied themselves for a long day out on the water. For full story, click here.

Making Natural Infrastructure Solutions Happen

By James Schwab – American Planning Association – January 17, 2017
Almost all planners know from training and experience that the path from idea to implementation can often be fraught with difficulty. The best environmental concepts can be particularly hard to explain both to elected and appointed officials and to the general public, even when support exists for the general idea of a healthy environment. The devil, as they say, is in the details. For full blog post, click here.

Congo Holds World’s Largest Tropical Peatland

Environment News Service – January 17, 2017
An extensive peatland in the Congo Basin has been mapped for the first time, showing it to be the largest such tropical peatland in the world, covering an area larger than England. The new study found that the Cuvette Centrale peatlands in the swamps of the central Congo Basin, unknown just five years ago, cover 145,500 square kilometers (56,178 square miles). The peat locks in 30 billion tonnes of carbon, making the region one of the most carbon-rich ecosystems on Earth. Peat is an organic wetland soil made from partly decomposed plant debris, found most commonly in cool environments. For full story, click here.

Continuing to Protect the Country’s Waters

By Gina McCarthy – EPA Forward – January 12, 2017
Water is something deeply personal to each of us. We depend on it for running our homes and operating our businesses. Americans collectively drink one billion glasses of tap water each day. We need it for fishing, swimming, and boating with our families. If we want to continue to seize opportunities for improvement in clean and reliable water, we must make water a top national priority. For full story, click here.

Affordable Water in the U.S.: A Burgeoning Crisis

Contacts: Elizabeth Mack and Andy Henion – MSU Today – January 11, 2017
If water rates continue rising at projected amounts, the number of U.S. households unable to afford water could triple in five years, to nearly 36 percent, finds new research by a Michigan State University scholar. Elizabeth Mack said a variety of factors, ranging from aging infrastructure to climate change to population decline in urban areas, are making residents’ ability to afford water and wastewater services a burgeoning crisis. For full story, click here.

America's WETLAND Foundation: Fixing Permitting Problems Essential To Eliminating Coastal Restoration Time And Cost Overruns

Water Online – January 5, 2017
In a New Year letter to Jo-Ellen Darcy, assistant secretary of the Army for Civil Works, R. King Milling, chair of America's WETLAND Foundation (AWF), says time is running out to save Louisiana's coast and urgent, emergency action must be considered, including repairing a broken Federal permitting process. Specifically, AWF is calling for actions that will provide incentives for private landowners which would not require them to re-title land to the Federal government for project authorization and would allow general or emergency permits predicated on consistent previous activity as allowance for new restoration projects. For full story, click here.

Bringing Back Diversity in Eastern Forests for Landowners, Wildlife

By Justin Fritscher – USDA Blog – December 29, 2016
What do biologists look for in a healthy forest? A diversity in the ages and composition of trees and occasional breaks in canopy to allow sunlight to reach understory plants. Healthy forests, just like healthy human populations, are sustained by a diversity of ages. Each group has a role to play in maintaining the whole community over the long term. But healthy, diverse forests are on the decline across the eastern United States. A lack of natural and human-induced disturbances because of fire suppression and certain timber harvest methods have led the forested landscape to become largely homogenous. For full blog post, click here.



 

WEBINARS

   

MEETINGS

 

TRAINING

 

SPECIAL EVENTS

 
WEBINARS
       
MARCH 2017
       
March 1, 2017
12:30 p.m. EST
  Trout Unlimited, the US Forest Service and the US Fish & Wildlife Service Webinar: An Introduction to Basic Stream and River Functions  
       
March 1, 2017
12:30 p.m. EST
  Webinar: Beyond Doom and Gloom: Include Solutions to Climate Change  
       
March 9, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org): Implications of spatial connectivity and climate change for the design and application of MPAs  
       
March 14, 2017
9:00 a.m. EST
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Webinar: Changes to Nationwide Permits 2017. Also on March 15, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. ET and March 16, 2017 at 4:00 p.m. ET.  
       
March 14, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  Webinar co-sponsored by the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org) and MEAM: Drivers and implications of change in global ocean health as demonstrated by the Ocean Health Index  
       
March 15, 2017
12:00 p.m. EST
  Land Use Webinar Series: Winter/Spring 2017: Pipelines & People: How Communities Can Better Understand & Manage Pipelines  
       
March 22, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  AWRA Webinar: Innovations in Sediment Monitoring
 
       
March 22, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Stormwater Contaminants of Emerging Concern  
       
APRIL 2017
       
April 12, 2017
12:00 p.m. EST
  Land Use Webinar Series: Winter/Spring 2017: Planning with School Districts: A Neighborhood Model Approach  
       
April 13, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org): Microplastics: What we know and discussion of research needs  
       
April 19, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  AWRA Webinar: High and Dry: Meeting the Challenges of the World's Growing Dependence on Groundwater
 
       
MAY 2017
       
May 17, 2017
12:00 p.m. EST
  Land Use Webinar Series: Winter/Spring 2017: Using Reverse Fiscal Impact Analysis in Pre-Disaster Planning  
       
May 17, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  AWRA Webinar: Groundwater Governance and Management in the U.S.  
       
May 17, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Nutrient Trading  
       
JUNE 2017
       
June 14, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  Creating an 'American Nile': Policy, Engineering, and Recreation in the Colorado River Basin & Abroad
 
       
June 21, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Making Urban Tress Count  
       
MEETINGS
 
FEBRUARY 2017
       
February 25-March 1, 2017
Washington, DC
  National Association of Counties 2017 Legislative Conference  
       
February 26-March 3, 2017
Honolulu, HI
  Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) 2017 Conference: “From the Mountains to the Sea”.
 
       
February 28–March 1, 2017
Virginia Beach, VA
  Virginia Turfgrass Council 2017 Come to the Bay  
       
February 28–March 2, 2017
Stevens Point, WI
  Wisconsin Wetlands Association's 22nd annual Wetland Science Conference
 
       
February 28–March 3, 2017
Lansing, MI
  30th Annual Michigan Stormwater Floodplain Association (MSFA) Conference  
       
MARCH 2017
       
March 1-2, 2017
Atlanta, GA
  EUCI 2017 Plant Retirement: Mitigation of Risk, Project Execution, and Redevelopment
 
       
March 1-2, 2017
Toronto, Canada
  50th International Conference: Water Management Modeling. Call for papers deadline is December 31, 2016.  
       
March 1-3, 2017
Chicago, IL
  Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) and The Climate Registry: Climate Leadership Conference: Connecting People, Innovation, and Opportunity
 
       
March 3, 2017
East Lansing, MI
  Michigan Chapter of the Soil and Water Conservation Society: A Matter of Balance: Feeding Our Crops, Protecting the Waters of the Great Lakes
 
       
March 3-5, 2017
Estero, FL
  14th annual Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference (SEEC)  
       
March 4, 2017
East Lansing, MI
  Quiet Water Society: 22nd Annual Quiet Water Symposium  
       
March 4, 2017
Worcester, MA
  Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commissions Annual Environmental Conference 2017  
       
March 4-11, 2017
Spokane, WA
  Wildlife Management Institute 82nd North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference  
       
March 5-7, 2017
Richmond, VA
  The Virginia Lakes & Watersheds Association: Virginia Water Conference
 
       
March 6-7, 2017
Corvallis, OR
  Oregon State University: 7th Annual Pacific Northwest Water Research Symposium
 
       
March 6-9, 2017
Missoula, MT
  18th Annual Association of Montana Floodplain Managers (AMFM) Conference  
       
March 7-9, 2017
Fort Myers, FL
  Florida Gulf Coast University Conference: Conserving Biodiversity Challenges for Florida in the Anthropocene
 
       
March 7-9, 2017
New Orleans, LA
  RES/CON  
       
March 8-9, 2017
Springfield, IL
  Illinois Association for Floodplain and Stormwater Management (IAFSM) Conference  
       
March 10-1, 2017
Antigonish, Nova Scotia
  Science Atlantic Student Conference: Biology, Aquaculture & Fisheries  
       
March 14-16, 2017
Washington, DC
  Great Lakes Commission Semiannual Meeting and Great Lakes Day  
       
March 15-16, 2017
Saratoga Springs, NY
  Land Trust Alliance: 2017 New York Land Trust Symposium  
       
March 16-17, 2017
University of Denver
Denver, CO
  Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law: 26th Annual Western Places/Western Spaces Conference. Additional workshops will be held on March 15, 2017.  
       
March 20-23, 2017
Buford, GA
  Georgia Association of Floodplain Managers (GAFM) Conference: Mountains to Shore - Managing a Multitude of Risks
 
       
March 22-24, 2017
Bartlett, Boksburg, Africa
  Local Climate Solutions for Africa Congress: Water & Climate 2017
 
       
March 24-26, 2017
Grand Rapids, MI
  Midwest-Great Lakes Chapter of the Society for Ecological Restoration: Annual Meeting: Assembling the Restoration
 
       
March 26-28, 2017
Scottsdale, AZ
  National Flood Determination Association: 20th Annual NFDA Conference
 
       
March 29-30, 2017
Grand Rapids, MI
  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality: 2017 Great Lakes Areas of Concern Conference
 
       
March 29-April 1, 2017
Montgomery, AL
  Association of Southeastern Biologist: 2017 Annual Meeting
 
       
APRIL 2017
       
April 3-7, 2017
Boston, MA
  CUAHSI - NASA Remote Sensing Hydrology Workshop. Application Deadline: February 15, 2017.  
       
April 4, 2017
Online and remote
hub locations
  Center for Watershed Protection Association 2017 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference
 
       
April 4-6, 2017
Front Royal, VA
  EcoAgriculture Partners: Landscape Leadership 3-Day Intensive Workshop  
       
April 4-7, 2017
Montréal, Canada
  International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA) Conference: Impact Assessment’s Contribution to the Global Efforts in Addressing Climate Change
 
       
April 5-9, 2017
Boston, MA
  American Association of Geographers meeting: Decolonizing Water: Indigenous water politics, resource extraction, and settler colonialism. Proposals due by October 20, 2016.  
       
April 7, 2017
Washington, DC
  AWRA: National Capital Region Water Resources Symposium
 
       
April 9-11, 2017
Norfolk, VA
  Northeast Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies: 73rd Annual Northeast Fish & Wildlife Conference  
       
April 9-13, 2017
Ottawa, Ontario Canada
  NatureServe Canada: Biodiversity Without Boundaries 2017
 
       
April 9-13, 2017
Baltimore, MD
  US-International Association for Landscape Ecology (IALE): 2017 Annual Meeting, People, Places, Patterns: Linking Landscape Heterogeneity and Socio-Environmental Systems. Abstracts due by December 18, 2016  
       
April 15, 2017
Keene, NH
  12th Annual Center for Tropical Ecology and Conservation Symposium: New Approaches to Conservation Conflicts  
       
April 17-21, 2017
Coral Springs, FL
  Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (GEER 2017) Conference  
       
April 20-22, 2017
San Diego, CA
  Sponsored by USA National Science Foundation: Agent-Based Modeling (ABM) 17: A Symposium That Advance the Science of ABM
 
       
April 21-22, 2017
Thompsonville, MI
  2017 Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program (CLMP) Training will be held on in. In conjunction with the 2017 Michigan Lake and Stream Associations Annual Conference, MiCorps will also be offering training on the lake monitoring techniques used in the Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program (CLMP).  
       
April 21-22, 2017
Thompsonville, MI

  Michigan Lake and Stream Association, Inc.: 2017 Annual Conference
 
       
April 21-23, 2017
Washington, DC
  Smithsonian Conservation Commons: Earth Optimism Summit
 
       
April 21-23, 2017
Cromwell, CT
  Eagle Hill Institute: 2017 Northeast Natural History Conference
 
       
April 21-23, 2017
Galloway, NJ
  Mid-Atlantic Annual Conference: Biodiversity in the Mid-Atlantic: Present and Future  
       
April 25-26, 2017
Suffern, NY
  New York State Wetlands Forum, Inc. & Society of Wetland Scientists-Mid-Atlantic Chapter 2017 Joint Annual Conference and Meeting: Our Wetland Future: Resiliency in Uncertain Times
 
       
April 26-27, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  Green Technology: Green California Summit  
       
April 27, 2017
Hyde Park, NY
  Hudson River on the Rise: Waterfront Planning for Communities and Nature Conference  
       
April 30-May 3, 2017
Snowbird, UT
  2017 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference: Connecting the Dots: The Emerging Science of Aquatic System Connectivity. Abstract deadline is January 9, 2017.  
       
April 30-May 5, 2017
Kansas City, MO
  2017 ASFPM Conference: "Flood Risk Management in the Heartland"  
       
MAY 2017
       
May 4-6, 2017
Lancaster, PA
  2017 Pennsylvania Land Conservation Conference: Where Land Meets Water: Protecting Our Farmland, Natural Lands, and Waterways  
       
May 5-6, 2017
Biddeford, ME
  Society of Wetland Scientist New England Chapter Annual Meeting and Field Trip  
       
May 7-11, 2017
Victoria, British Columbia
Canada
  Canadian Society for Ecology and Evolution Meeting 2017. Abstract deadline is March 1, 2017.  
       
May 9-11, 2017
Saint Paul, MN
  National Adaptation Forum  
       
May 9-12, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Invest in the Environment
 
       
May 15-19, 2017
Detroit, MI
  IAGLR's 60th Annual Conference: From Cities to Farms: Shaping Great Lakes Ecosystems
 
       
May 17-20, 2017
Saint Paul, MN
  Citizen Science Association: CitSci2017
 
       
May 20-25, 2017
Makuhari Messe
Chiba, Japan
  Japan Geoscience Union-American Geophysical Union (JpGU-AGU) Joint Meeting  
       
May 21-25, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  Environmental & Water Resources Institute of ASCE: World Environmental & Water Resources Congress  
       
May 23-24, 2017
Stockholm, Sweden
  Stockholm Environment Institute Workshop: Emerging Complexity of Climate Adaptation Governance in a Globalizing World
 
       
May 29-June 2, 2017
Cancun, Mexico
  International Water Resources Association: World Water Congresses: Bridging Science and Policy  
       
May 31–June 1, 2017
Champaign, IL
  The Illinois Sustainable Technology Center (ISTC), a division of the Prairie Research Institute at the University of Illinois, and Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant: Emerging Contaminants in the Aquatic Environment Conference. Oral Presentation: Abstract by January 31, 2017. Poster Presentation: Abstract by February 28, 2017.  
       
May 31-June 1, 2017
Cornwall, Ontario, Canada
  River Institute: Assessing River Ecosystem Challenges in a Changing Environment. Please register by April 20, 2017.  
       
May 31-June 2, 2017
Detroit, MI
  Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Green Infrastructure Conference: Integrated Stormwater Management from Duluth to Quebec  
       
May 31-June 3, 2017
Browns Summit, NC
  4th Symposium on Urbanization and Stream Ecology: Making urban stream rehabilitation a co-evolutionary process  
       
JUNE 2017
       
June 4-9, 2017
Raleigh, NC
  Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting: Designing Our Freshwater Futures
 
       
June 5-8, 2017
Olympic Valley, CA
  National Hydrologic Warning Council 2017 Conference  
       
June 5-8, 2017
San Juan, Puerto Rico
  Society of Wetland Scientists’ 2017 Annual Meeting: Celebrating Wetland Diversity Across the Landscape: Mountains to Mangroves
 
       
June 12-14, 2017
Binghamton, NY
  New York State Floodplain and Stormwater Managers Association 2017 Annual Meeting. Abstract deadline is February 10, 2017.  
       
June 15-16, 2017
San Antonio, TX
  Land Trust Alliance: Sixth Symposium on Advanced Legal Topics in Land Conservation  
       
June 18-21, 2017
Duluth, MN
  9th International Charr Symposium
 
       
June 19-21, 2017
Oregon State University
Corvallis, Oregon
  International Conference: Engineering and Ecohydraulics for Fish Passage  
       
June 19-22, 2017
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
  University of Alberta: 11th North American Forest Ecology Workshop  
       
June 20-22, 2017
Kamloops, BC
  Thompson Rivers University (TRU) and the Invasive Species Council of BC (ISCBC): Invasive Species Research Conference - Turning Science into Action at TRU  
       
June 23-27, 2017
Portland, OR
  The American Society of Naturalists invites symposium proposals for a special symposium to be held at the 2017 annual joint meeting of the Society for the Study of Evolution, the American Society of Naturalists, and the Society of Systematic Biologists.  
       
June 25-28, 2017
Tysons, VA
  2017 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: Climate Change Solutions: Collaborative Science, Policy and Planning for Sustainable Water Management. Abstracts due by February 6, 2017.
 
       
June 27-29, 2017
New Orleans LA
  US Water Alliance: One Water Summit 2017  
       
JULY 2017
       
July 10-14, 2017
New York, NY
  World Climate Research Programme: Regional Sea Level Changes and Coastal Impacts Conference  
       
July 21-24, 2017
Franklin County, OH
  National Association of Counties: 2017 Annual Conference
 
       
July 25-27, 2017
Duluth, MN
  Michigan Technological University workshop: Science and Management of Ash Forests after Emerald Ash Borer. Abstract deadline is February 28, 2017.  
       
AUGUST 2017
       
August 6-11, 2017
Portland, OR
  2017 ESA Annual Meeting: Linking biodiversity, material cycling and ecosystem services in a changing world
 
       
August 14-17, 2017
Iselin, NJ
  Association of State Floodplain Managers: The National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop
 
       
August 20-23, 2017
Bergen, Norway
  3rd International Workshop on Trait-based Approaches to Ocean Life  
       
August 21-25, 2017
Beijing, China
  12th International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL 2017 Beijing): Ecology and Civilization in a Changing World
 
       
August 22-26, 2017
Big Sky, MT
  7th International Symposium: Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control (WETPOL). Submit an abstract by January 31, 2017.  
       
August 24-26, 2017
Corum, Montpellier, France
  Biodiversity and Ecosystem Scenarios Network (ScenNet): Scenarios and Models of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Support of Decision Making  
       
August 27-September 1, 2017
Stockholm, Sweden
  SIWI World Water Week: Water and Waste: Reduce and Reuse’. Abstract deadline is January 22, 2017.  
       
SEPTEMBER 2017
       
September 5-7, 2017
University of Leeds, UK
  7th International Conference on Flood Management (ICFM7). Submit abstract by January 31, 2017  
       
September 20-22, 2017
Baltimore, MD
  Rhode Island Resource Institute: 8th Mid-Atlantic Stream Restoration Conference. Abstracts due by January 31, 2017.  
       
OCTOBER 2017
       
October 19-21, 2017
University of Oklahoma
  4th Life Discovery – Doing Science Biology Education Conference  
       
October 24-26, 2017
Atlantic City, NJ
  2017 NJAFM Annual Conference  
       
October 26-28, 2017
Denver, CO
  Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2017 National Land Conservation Conference  
       
NOVEMBER 2017
       
November 5-9, 2017
Portland, OR
  2017 AWRA Annual Conference  
       
TRAINING
       
FEBRUARY 2017
       
February 27-March 10, 2017
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology
 
       
MARCH 2017
       
March 6, 2017
eLearning
  The Swamp School Workshop: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals  
       
March 6-May 28, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Botanist
 
       
March 6-May 28, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
 
       
March 13-April 9, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Habitat Conservation Plans  
       
March 15-16, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Successful CEQA Compliance: An Intensive Two-Day Seminar
 
       
March 18, 2017
MD & Washington, DC
  Audubon Naturalist Society Class: Urban Watershed Restoration Challenges - the Foundry Branch
 
       
March 24, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Clean Water Act Section 404: Nationwide and Other Specialized Permits  
       
March 28, 2017
Chevy Chase, MD
  Audubon Naturalist Society Class: How to Read Your Stream
 
       
APRIL 2017
       
April 3-6, 2017
Pittsburgh, PA
  The Swamp School: Wetland Delineation Training
 
       
April 3-7, 2017
Boston, MA
  CUAHSI: NASA Remote Sensing Hydrology Workshop. Application Deadline: February 15, 2017.  
       
April 3-June 25, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Delineator  
       
April 3-June 25, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design
 
       
April 3-June 25, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training  
       
April 4-5, 2017
St. Louis Park, MN
  Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Wetlands: Science and Regulatory Management. This course will also be held in February, June, and September  
       
April 4-5, 2017
Hilliard, OH
  MBI (Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Ohio Rapid Assessment Method (ORAM) for Wetlands
 
       
April 10-May 14, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments  
       
April 10-May 14, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment  
       
April 17-20, 2017
Hilliard, OH
  MBI (Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Wetland Delineation
 
       
April 24-28, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Basic Wetland Delineation. Instructor: William S. Sipple  
       
April 26-27, 2017
Hilliard, OH
  MBI (Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Primary Headwater Habitat (PHWH) Training
 
       
MAY 2017
       
May 2-4, 2017
Boulder, CO
  CUAHSI Training Workshop: The Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System  
       
May 8-11, 2017
Spartanburg, SC
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Identifying Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes  
       
May 8-13, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Creatively Communicating Biology & Ecology  
       
May 8-18, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: River Assessment and Monitoring (Wildland Hydrology)  
       
May 8-20, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Darwin and the Origin of Species: A Field Course  
       
May 8-June 5, 2017
Online
  UC Davis Extension Online Course: Introduction to National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)  
       
May 9-10, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Environmental and Toxics Laws and Regulations  
       
May 9-10, 2017
Charleston, SC
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Hydrophytic Vegetation (Coastal Plain). This course will also be held on August 7 - 8, 2017 (Piedmont) in Atlanta, GA.  
       
May 11-12, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Community Involvement and Communication in Planning  
       
May 15-19, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Climate-Smart Conservation with Scenario Planning  
       
May 15-27, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Landscape Conservation of Amphibians  
       
May 16-17, 2017
Hilliard, OH
  MBI (Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Amphibian Index of Biotic Integrity (AmphIBI)  
       
May 16-18, 2017
Raleigh, NC
  North Carolina State University Stream Restoration River Course: Stream Morphology Assessment  
       
May 16-19, 2017
Flagstaff, AZ
  CUAHSI Course: Water Sustainability in a Global Economy Master Class  
       
May 18, 2017
Charleston, SC
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Endangered Species Identification  
       
May 19, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Redesigning the Zoning Ordinance  
       
May 21-27, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Crustose Lichens of the Acadian Forest  
       
May 21-27, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Undergraduate Field Studies: Marine Intertidal Community Ecology  
       
May 22-26, 2017
Steuben, ME
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Advanced Plant ID: Grasses, Sedges, Rushes and Composites  
       
May 23-26, 2017
Hays, KS
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Graminoid Identification for Wetlands and Wetland Delineators  
       
May 24-25, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Chemicals and Product Stewardship  
       
May 28-June 3, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Microlepidoptera: Collection, Preparation, Dissection, Identification, and Natural History  
       
May 28-June 3, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Drawing and Painting Birds in Watercolor and Colored Pencil  
       
May 28-June 3, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: A-B-C's of Birding: Introduction to Coastal Maine Bird Identification  
       
May 29-June 3, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Biology & Identification of Ferns  
       
JUNE 2017
       
June 1-2, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Urban Planning and Design Studio  
       
June 4-10, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Undergraduate Field Studies: Introduction to Bryophytes and Lichens  
       
June 4-10, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Undergraduate Field Studies – Natural History of Freshwater Fishes
 
       
June 5-10, 2017
Poolesville, MD
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation with Emphasis on Soils and Hydrology
 
       
June 5-17, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Flora of the Blue Ridge  
       
June 7, 2017
Online
  UC Davis Extension Online Course: NEPA Case Law and Policy Update  
       
June 7-9, 2017
San Diego, CA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Coastal Southern California
 
       
June 8, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Endangered Species Regulation and Protection  
       
June 11-17, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Mosses: Structure, Ecology, and Identification
 
       
June 11-17, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Systematics, Biology, and Ecology of Important Lotic and Lentic Aquatic Insects: Mayflies, Stoneflies, Caddisflies, Odonata, and Coleoptera, and Identification
 
       
June 12-24, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: General Ecology  
       
June 18-24, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Bogs and Fens: Maine Peatlands
 
       
June 18-24, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Exploring Medicinal Plants of Maine (and Beyond)
 
       
June 19-23, 2017
Willows, CA
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Wetland Assessment, Restoration and Management. This course will also be held on August 21-25, 2017 in Alexandria Bay NY.  
       
June 20-21, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Wetlands: Science and Regulatory Management
 
       
June 20-23, 2017
State College, PA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Planning Hydrology, Vegetation, and Soils for Constructed Wetlands  
       
June 21-22, 2017
Williamsport, PA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
June 26-30, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  Conservation Leadership Network Training Course: Mitigation Banking & In-Lieu Fee Program Interagency Review Teams  
       
June 25-July 1, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Liverworts and Liverwort Ecology
 
       
June 25-July 1, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Moths and Butterflies: Identification, Specimen Preparation, and Taxonomy
 
       
June 26-July 7, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Conservation Ecology  
       
June 26-July 8, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Conservation Biology in the Field  
       
June 26-July 20, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Field Ecology  
       
June 26-July 21, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Seminars in Ecology and Resource Management  
       
JULY 2017
       
July 2-8, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Lichens and Lichen Ecology  
       
July 2-8, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Sedges and Rushes: Identification and Ecology  
       
July 2-8, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Dragonflies and Damselflies: Field Techniques and Identification  
       
July 9-15, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Native Bees as Pollinators: Diversity, Ecology, Conservation, and Habitat Enhancement  
       
July 9-15, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Finding Words in Nature: Creative Writing for Aspiring Authors ... Study Retreat  
       
July 9-15, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Nature Journaling: Black and White Illustration Techniques  
       
July 10-21, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Landscape Ecology  
       
July 12-14, 2017
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Problematic Delineation Seminar  
       
July 16-22, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Boletes and Other Fungi of New England  
       
July 16-22, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Survey of Grasses: Their Structure, Identification, and Ecology  
       
July 23-29, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Wetlands Identification, Delineation, and Ecology  
       
July 23-29, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Spiders: Identification, Biology, and Ecology  
       
July 23-29, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Lichens, Biofilms, and Stone  
       
July 24-August 4, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Stream Ecology  
       
July 24-August 4, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Alpine Ecology  
       
July 25-28, 2017
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Wetland Delineators  
       
July 30-August 5, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Mushroom Identification for New Mycophiles: Foraging for Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms  
       
July 30-August 5, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Art and Science of Photographing Insects and their Kin  
       
AUGUST 2017
       
August 6-12, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Submersed and Floating Aquatic Plants  
       
August 6-12, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Independent Studies: Interesting and Challenging Saxicolous Lichens of North America  
       
August 7-18, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Ecology of Forests and Grasslands  
       
August 7-18, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Drone Remote Sensing of Freshwater Ecosystems
 
       
August 13-19, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Field Botany and Plant Ecology of the Eastern Maine Coast  
       
August 14-17, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Grasses, Sedges and Rushes. Instructor: William S. Sipple. Early Bird Registration $700 before 7/14/2017. After deadline $725/  
       
August 14-20, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Tidal Marsh Restoration: A Traveling Course from Rhode Island to Maine  
       
August 15-18, 2017
Hays, KS
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Wetlands and Wetland Delineators  
       
August 20-26, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Identification, Biology, and Natural History of Ferns and Lycophytes  
       
August 20-26, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Banding/research Techniques for Studying Songbirds and Raptors  
       
August 21-22, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Evaluating Hydric Soils in the Field. Instructor: Autumn N. Starcher, Ph.D. Early Bird Registration $350 before 7/21/2017. After deadline $375.  
       
August 27-September 2, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Better Birding: Passerines and Seabirds for Advancing Birders  
       
SEPTEMBER 2017
       
September 11-15, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Basic Wetland Delineation. Instructor: William S. Sipple. Early Bird Registration $950 before 3/24/2017. After deadline $975  
       
September 14-15, 2017
San Diego, CA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Riparian Habitat Restoration for the Arid Southwest  
       
September 19-20, 2017
Arlington, VA
  Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Wetlands: Science and Regulatory Management. This course will also be held in February, April, and June.  
       
September 20-21, 2017
Arlington, VA
  Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Habitat Site Restoration. This course will also be held in January.  
       
OCTOBER 2017
       
October 2-5, 2017
Hilliard, OH
  MBI (Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Wetland Delineation. This course will also be held on April 17-20, 2017.  
       
SPECIAL EVENTS
       
February 27-March 3, 2017   National Invasive Species Awareness Week  
       
April 22, 2017   Earth Day
 
       
May 19, 2017   Endangered Species Day  
       
June 24, 2017
Rapids, MI
  2017 Grand River Water Festival  
       
For more wetland events, meetings, conferences, and courses nationwide, visit the ASWM calendar.
       

       
INDEX      

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • Judge rules against Oklahoma AG Pruitt, orders Trump’s EPA pick to release emails
  • Green groups file sweeping lawsuit accusing Trump of usurping Congress’s powers on regulations
  • Regulatory Uncertainty Reigns in DC
  • ‘Listen to Evidence’: March for Science Plans Washington Rally on Earth Day
  • Supporters say Dakota Access pipeline is back on. Activists counter: See you in court
  • Members' Wetland Webinar – Working with Wetlands to Increase Resilience: A Panel on Innovative State Program Practices -Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 3:00 p.m. ET

NATIONAL NEWS

  • Scott Pruitt confirmed to EPA
  • The Endangered Species Act may be heading for the threatened list. This hearing confirmed it.
  • Judge denies tribes' request to block final link in Dakota pipeline
  • Nationwide Permits and FEMA LOMRs "Unfrozen"!
  • Good Luck Killing the EPA
  • EPA Transition Leader, Longtime Foe of Regulation, to Stay on at Agency
  • U.S. lawmaker to scrap bill to sell public lands after backlash
  • Coal rule killed by U.S. Congress, others near chopping block
  • Wetlands Protected Worldwide to Reduce Disaster Risks
  • How Trump’s travel ban could hurt science
  • Chesapeake losing its oyster reefs faster than they can be rebuilt
  • Seventeen Playas Restored in Four States as Part of Demo Project
  • U.S. Scientists Resist Trump Team ‘Case By Case’ Review
  • Defying Trump, Twitter feeds for U.S. government scientists go rogue
  • After Seismic Political Shift, Modest Changes in Public’s Policy Agenda
  • Trump tries to pave the way for development by accelerating environmental reviews
  • SER Launches New Certification for Ecological Restoration Practitioners
  • Laws needed to protect Great Lakes from farm run-off, joint commission reports
  • People power in Puerto Rico: how a canal community escaped gentrification
  • NRCS Seeking Applications for 2018 Regional Conservation Partnership Program
  • NOAA releases draft plans for proposed national marine sanctuaries in Wisconsin and Maryland
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Seeks Proposals from States for 2017 Endangered Species Grants
  • Steve Bannon's Trip from Climate Conspiracy Theorist to Trump's White House

STATE NEWS

  • CA: Oroville Dam’s flood-control manual hasn’t been updated for half a century
  • CA: San Joaquin Valley continues to sink because of groundwater pumping, NASA says
  • CO: Southern Utes pursue EPA-approval for water-quality standards
  • DE: DNREC awarded $345,000 grant from EPA to protect Delaware wetlands through conservation and education
  • FL: Is Florida moving too slow to save the Everglades?
  • FL: City to convert polluted wetlands into new $2M park, stormwater pond
  • FL: Court reinstates EPA rule to allow pumping dirty water unchecked
  • IA: Damages Not Allowed in Iowa Runoff Case
  • HI: NOAA designates 29th National Estuarine Research Reserve
  • LA: State Progress on Federal Regulation Streamlining Crucial To Coastal Restoration Success
  • LA: BP money helps restore barrier islands off Terrebonne, Lafourche
  • MD: At Blackwater refuge, rising sea levels drown habitat
  • MA: Climate Investigation of Exxon Can Proceed in Massachusetts, State Judge Rules
  • MI: In Michigan, a Fight Over the Future of a Fabled Trout River
  • MI: Aging septic systems fouling Michigan waters
  • MN: Enforcing the law: County must decide by March 31 to handle buffer compliance
  • MN: Dayton signs $500 million deal to protect rural waters
  • MS: How the upper Mississippi goes from pristine to polluted
  • MO: Two decades later, conservation area's wetlands still doing the job
  • NV: Creating Nature from Our Flood Waters
  • NJ: Sandy's Lessons Lost: Jersey Shore Rebuilds in Sea's Inevitable Path
  • NY: Cuomo's $2 billion clean water push called 'amazing'
  • NC: Duke study finds coal-ash byproduct in fish
  • NC: Coalition forms to protect dwindling wetland forests in the South
  • PA: Methane Levels Have Increased in Marcellus Shale Region Despite a Dip in Well Installation
  • PA: Pennsylvania DCNR Announces $790,000 Investment to Plant Trees Along Streams to Improve Water Quality
  • UT: Avoiding wetlands could speed Alta lift project
  • VA: VIMS salt marsh study finds barrier island migration a threat
  • VA: Restoring the Lafayette: Norfolk’s largest watershed to get $4.6 million in upgrades
  • VA: Man-made wetland aims to filter stormwater
  • WA: Ecology’s CAFO Water Quality Permit Sacrifices Public Health, Drinking Water, Shellfish Beds
  • WI: Nature Conservancy protects wetland water supply
  • WI: Wisconsin City at forefront of ‘water wars’

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • Canadian glaciers now major contributor to sea level change, UCI study shows
  • Trump administration puts off listing bumble bee as endangered
  • Republican elders call for new national carbon tax to replace federal regulations
  • After decades of decreases, mercury rises in Great Lakes wildlife
  • Video: Why Greenland’s Ice Is So Quickly Melting
  • “Planned Retreat” Enters the Climate Dialogue
  • Psychologists have developed a “vaccine” against climate-change denial
  • Role of terrestrial biosphere in counteracting climate change may have been underestimated
  • Earthworm numbers dwindle, threatening soil health
  • Study: How Climate Change Threatens Mountaintops (and Clean Water)
  • How the World Passed a Carbon Threshold and Why It Matters
  • Study tracks ‘memory’ of soil moisture
  • Changes in Rainfall, Temperature Expected to Transform Coastal Wetlands This Century
  • New Technique Quickly Predicts Salt Marsh Vulnerability
  • From the swamps of the Potomac, new hope for green electronics
  • New Paper Explains Consequences of Plant Disappearance in Salt Marshes on the Atlantic Coast
  • Sea Level Rise Estimate Grows Alarmingly Higher in Latest Federal Report
  • The Scramble to Protect Climate Data Under Trump
  • Warming Climate May Limit Lyme Disease's Spread in Parts of the U.S.
  • Managing 246 million acres: new science-based tools support Bureau of Land Management’s landscape approach
  • 2016 was Earth's warmest year on record, continuing a three-year streak
  • Global Warming Is Changing How the Ocean Carries Sound
  • New map reveals how roads devastate nature
  • NRCS, USFWS Partner to Accelerate Conservation on Agricultural Lands for the Monarch Butterfly
  • Adaptive management of soil conservation is essential to improving water quality
  • Why It’s Impossible to Predict When That Giant Antarctic Ice Sheet Will Split
  • Pressure from Grazers Hastens Ecosystem Collapse from Drought
  • Northeast US Temperatures are Decades Ahead of Global Average
  • Supporting wetland protection across the nation

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • State of Private Investment in Conservation 2016: A Landscape Assessment of an Emerging Market
  • Smart Growth Fixes for Climate Adaptation and Resilience: Changing Land Use and Building Codes to Prepare for Climate Change
  • Alliances for Green Infrastructure: State of Watershed Investment 2016
  • Final EPA/USGS Technical Report: Protecting Aquatic Life from Effects of Hydrologic Alteration
  • Climate Change Adaptation for Coastal Wetlands: A Toolkit of Best Management Practices for Coastal Wetlands in Michigan
  • Threatened Protection: Sea Level Rise and Coastal Protected Lands of the Eastern United States
  • A How-to Guide for Coproduction of Actionable Science

POTPOURRI

  • Restoring America’s Wetland Forest Legacy
  • Restoration Spotlight: A forest’s hopes rest on golden wings
  • New Court Decision on Water Transfers Reinstates EPA’s Existing Rule
  • We Want Young Artists to Inspire the Conservation World
  • How to Find Funding for Unpaid Internships
  • Progress in Strengthening Our Government-to-Government Relationship with Tribal Nations
  • Iraq's Marsh Arabs test the waters as wetlands ruined by Saddam are reborn
  • Making Natural Infrastructure Solutions Happen
  • Congo Holds World’s Largest Tropical Peatland
  • Continuing to Protect the Country’s Waters
  • Affordable Water in the U.S.: A Burgeoning Crisis
  • America's WETLAND Foundation: Fixing Permitting Problems Essential To Eliminating Coastal Restoration Time And Cost Overruns
  • Bringing Back Diversity in Eastern Forests for Landowners, Wildlife

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

WEBINARS, MEETINGS, TRAINING

Webinars

  • Trout Unlimited, the US Forest Service and the US Fish & Wildlife Service Webinar: An Introduction to Basic Stream and River Functions
  • Webinar: Beyond Doom and Gloom: Include Solutions to Climate Change
  • Webinar: Implications of spatial connectivity and climate change for the design and application of MPAs
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Webinar: Changes to Nationwide Permits 2017
  • Webinar: Drivers and implications of change in global ocean health as demonstrated by the Ocean Health Index
  • Land Use Webinar Series: Winter/Spring 2017: Pipelines & People: How Communities Can Better Understand & Manage Pipelines
  • AWRA Webinar: Innovations in Sediment Monitoring
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Stormwater Contaminants of Emerging Concern
  • EPA's Office of Research and Development: Safe and Sustainable Water Resources Research Program Webinar: Upcoming Research on the Impacts of Water Conservation on Water Quality in Premise Plumbing
  • Land Use Webinar Series: Winter/Spring 2017: Planning with School Districts: A Neighborhood Model Approach
  • Webinar: Microplastics: What we know and discussion of research needs
  • AWRA Webinar: High and Dry: Meeting the Challenges of the World's Growing Dependence on Groundwater
  • Land Use Webinar Series: Winter/Spring 2017: Using Reverse Fiscal Impact Analysis in Pre-Disaster Planning
  • AWRA Webinar: Groundwater Governance and Management in the U.S.
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Nutrient Trading
  • Creating an 'American Nile': Policy, Engineering, and Recreation in the Colorado River Basin & Abroad
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Making Urban Tress Count

Meetings

  • National Association of Counties 2017 Legislative Conference
  • Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) 2017 Conference: From the Mountains to the Sea
  • Virginia Turfgrass Council: 2017 Come to the Bay
  • Wisconsin Wetlands Association's 22nd Annual Wetland Science Conference
  • 30th Annual Michigan Stormwater Floodplain Association (MSFA) Conference
  • EUCI 2107 Plant Retirement: Mitigation of Risk, Project Execution, and Redevelopment
  • 50th International Conference: Water Management Modeling
  • Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) and The Climate Registry: Climate Leadership Conference: Connecting People, Innovation, and Opportunity
  • St. Clair-Detroit River System Initiative 2017 Annual Meeting: Charting the Course for Action in the St. Clair-Detroit River System
  • Michigan Chapter of the Soil and Water Conservation Society: A Matter of Balance: Feeding Our Crops, Protecting the Waters of the Great Lakes
  • 14th annual Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference (SEEC)
  • Quiet Water Society: 22nd Annual Quiet Water Symposium
  • Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commissions Annual Environmental Conference 2017
  • Wildlife Management Institute 82nd North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference
  • The Virginia Lakes & Watersheds Association: Virginia Water Conference
  • Oregon State University: 7th Annual Pacific Northwest Water Research Symposium
  • 18th Annual Association of Montana Floodplain Managers (AMFM) Conference
  • Florida Gulf Coast University Conference: Conserving Biodiversity Challenges for Florida in the Anthropocene
  • RES/CON
  • Illinois Association for Floodplain and Stormwater Management (IAFSM) Conference
  • Science Atlantic Student Conference: Biology, Aquaculture & Fisheries
  • Great Lakes Commission Semiannual Meeting and Great Lakes Day
  • Land Trust Alliance: 2017 New York Land Trust Symposium
  • Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law: 26th Annual Western Places/Western Spaces Conference
  • Atlantic Estuary Research Society Meeting: Continuing Science in the Face of Change
  • Georgia Association of Floodplain Managers (GAFM) Conference, Mountains to Shore - Managing a Multitude of Risks
  • Local Climate Solutions for Africa Congress: Water & Climate 2017
  • Midwest-Great Lakes Chapter of the Society for Ecological Restoration: Annual Meeting: Assembling the Restoration
  • National Flood Determination Association: 20th Annual NFDA Conference
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality: 2017 Great Lakes Areas of Concern Conference
  • Association of Southeastern Biologist: 2017 Annual Meeting
  • CUAHSI - NASA Remote Sensing Hydrology Workshop
  • Center for Watershed Protection Association: 2017 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference
  • EcoAgriculture Partners: Landscape Leadership 3-Day Intensive Workshop
  • International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA) Conference: Impact Assessment’s Contribution to the Global Efforts in Addressing Climate Change
  • American Association of Geographers meeting: Decolonizing Water: Indigenous water politics, resource extraction, and settler colonialism
  • AWRA: National Capital Region Water Resources Symposium
  • Northeast Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies: 73rd Annual Northeast Fish & Wildlife Conference
  • NatureServe Canada: Biodiversity Without Boundaries 2017
  • US-International Association for Landscape Ecology (IALE): 2017 Annual Meeting, People, Places, Patterns: Linking Landscape Heterogeneity and Socio-Environmental Systems
  • International Sea Turtle Society 37th Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation
  • 12th Annual Center for Tropical Ecology and Conservation Symposium: New Approaches to Conservation Conflicts
  • Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (GEER 2017) Conference
  • Agent-Based Modeling (ABM) 17: A Symposium That Advance the Science of ABM
  • 2017 Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program (CLMP) Training
  • Michigan Lake and Stream Association, Inc.: 2017 Annual Conference
  • Smithsonian Conservation Commons: Earth Optimism Summit
  • Eagle Hill Institute: 2017 Northeast Natural History Conference
  • Mid-Atlantic Annual Conference: Biodiversity in the Mid-Atlantic: Present and Future
  • New York State Wetlands Forum, Inc. & Society of Wetland Scientists-Mid-Atlantic Chapter 2017 Joint Annual Conference and Meeting: Our Wetland Future: Resiliency in Uncertain Times
  • Green Technology: Green California Summit
  • Hudson River on the Rise: Waterfront Planning for Communities and Nature Conference
  • 2017 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference: Connecting the Dots: The Emerging Science of Aquatic System Connectivity
  • 2017 ASFPM Conference: "Flood Risk Management in the Heartland"
  • 2017 Pennsylvania Land Conservation Conference: Where Land Meets Water: Protecting Our Farmland, Natural Lands, and Waterways
  • Society of Wetland Scientist New England Chapter Annual Meeting and Field Trip
  • Canadian Society for Ecology and Evolution Meeting 2017
  • National Adaptation Forum
  • National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Invest in the Environment
  • IAGLR's 60th Annual Conference: From Cities to Farms: Shaping Great Lakes Ecosystems
  • Citizen Science Association: CitSci2017
  • Japan Geoscience Union-American Geophysical Union (JpGU-AGU) Joint Meeting
  • World Environmental & Water Resources Congress
  • Stockholm Environment Institute Workshop: Emerging Complexity of Climate Adaptation Governance in a Globalizing World
  • International Water Resources Association: World Water Congresses: Bridging Science and Policy
  • The Illinois Sustainable Technology Center: Emerging Contaminants in the Aquatic Environment Conference
  • River Institute: Assessing River Ecosystem Challenges in a Changing Environment
  • Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Green Infrastructure Conference: Integrated Stormwater Management from Duluth to Quebec
  • 4th Symposium on Urbanization and Stream Ecology: Making urban stream rehabilitation a co-evolutionary process
  • Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting: Designing Our Freshwater Futures
  • National Hydrologic Warning Council 2017 Conference
  • Society of Wetland Scientists’ 2017 Annual Meeting: Celebrating Wetland Diversity Across the Landscape: Mountains to Mangroves
  • New York State Floodplain and Stormwater Managers Association 2017 Annual Meeting
  • Land Trust Alliance: Sixth Symposium on Advanced Legal Topics in Land Conservation
  • 9th International Charr Symposium
  • International Conference: Engineering and Ecohydraulics for Fish Passage
  • University of Alberta: 11th North American Forest Ecology Workshop
  • Invasive Species Research Conference - Turning Science into Action at TRU
  • 2017 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: Climate Change Solutions: Collaborative Science, Policy and Planning for Sustainable Water Management
  • US Water Alliance: One Water Summit 2017
  • World Climate Research Programme: Regional Sea Level Changes and Coastal Impacts Conference
  • National Association of Counties: 2017 Annual Conference
  • Michigan Technological University workshop: Science and Management of Ash Forests after Emerald Ash Borer
  • 2017 ESA Annual Meeting: Linking biodiversity, material cycling and ecosystem services in a changing world
  • Association of State Floodplain Managers: The National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop
  • 3rd International Workshop on Trait-based Approaches to Ocean Life
  • 12th International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL 2017 Beijing): Ecology and Civilization in a Changing World
  • 7th International Symposium for Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control (WETPOL)
  • Biodiversity and Ecosystem Scenarios Network (ScenNet): Scenarios and Models of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Support of Decision Making
  • SIWI World Water Week: Water and Waste: Reduce and Reuse
  • 7th International Conference on Flood Management (ICFM7)
  • Rhode Island Resource Institute: 8th Mid-Atlantic Stream Restoration Conference
  • 4th Life Discovery – Doing Science Biology Education Conference
  • 2017 NJAFM Annual Conference
  • Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2017 National Land Conservation Conference
  • 2017 AWRA Annual Conference

Training

  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology
  • The Swamp School Workshop: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Botanist
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • Forest University Webinar Course: Streambank Protection Design: Hard & Soft Techniques & Applications
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Habitat Conservation Plans
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Successful CEQA Compliance: An Intensive Two-Day Seminar
  • Audubon Naturalist Society Class Urban Watershed Restoration Challenges - the Foundry Branch
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Clean Water Act Section 404: Nationwide and Other Specialized Permits
  • Audubon Naturalist Society Class: How to Read Your Stream
  • The Swamp School: Wetland Delineation Training
  • CUAHSI - NASA Remote Sensing Hydrology Workshop
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Wetlands: Science and Regulatory Management
  • MBI (Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Ohio Rapid Assessment Method (ORAM) for Wetlands
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment
  • MBI (Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Wetland Delineation
  • Environmental Concern Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • MBI (Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Primary Headwater Habitat (PHWH) Training
  • CUAHSI Training Workshop: The Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Identifying Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Creatively Communicating Biology & Ecology
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: River Assessment and Monitoring (Wildland Hydrology)
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Darwin and the Origin of Species: A Field Course
  • UC Davis Extension Online Course: Introduction to National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Environmental and Toxics Laws and Regulations
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Hydrophytic Vegetation (Coastal Plain)
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Community Involvement and Communication in Planning
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Climate-Smart Conservation with Scenario Planning
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Landscape Conservation of Amphibians
  • MBI (Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Amphibian Index of Biotic Integrity (AmphIBI)
  • North Carolina State University Stream Restoration River Course: Stream Morphology Assessment
  • CUAHSI Course: Water Sustainability in a Global Economy Master Class
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Endangered Species Identification
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Redesigning the Zoning Ordinance
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Crustose Lichens of the Acadian Forest
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Undergraduate Field Studies: Marine Intertidal Community Ecology
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Advanced Plant ID: Grasses, Sedges, Rushes and Composites
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Graminoid Identification for Wetlands and Wetland Delineators
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Chemicals and Product Stewardship
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Microlepidoptera: Collection, Preparation, Dissection, Identification, and Natural History
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Drawing and Painting Birds in Watercolor and Colored Pencil
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: A-B-C's of Birding: Introduction to Coastal Maine Bird Identification
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Biology & Identification of Ferns
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Urban Planning and Design Studio
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Undergraduate Field Studies: Introduction to Bryophytes and Lichens
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Undergraduate Field Studies – Natural History of Freshwater Fishes
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation with Emphasis on Soils and Hydrology
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Flora of the Blue Ridge
  • UC Davis Extension Online Course: NEPA Case Law and Policy Update
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Coastal Southern California
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Endangered Species Regulation and Protection
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Mosses: Structure, Ecology, and Identification
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Systematics, Biology, and Ecology of Important Lotic and Lentic Aquatic Insects: Mayflies, Stoneflies, Caddisflies, Odonata, and Coleoptera, and Identification
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: General Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Bogs and Fens: Maine Peatlands
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Exploring Medicinal Plants of Maine (and Beyond)
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Wetland Assessment, Restoration and Management
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Wetlands: Science and Regulatory Management
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Planning Hydrology, Vegetation, and Soils for Constructed Wetlands
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Conservation Leadership Network Training Course: Mitigation Banking & In-Lieu Fee Program Interagency Review Teams
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Liverworts and Liverwort Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Moths and Butterflies: Identification, Specimen Preparation, and Taxonomy
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Conservation Ecology
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Conservation Biology in the Field
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Field Ecology
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Seminars in Ecology and Resource Management
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Lichens and Lichen Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Sedges and Rushes: Identification and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Dragonflies and Damselflies: Field Techniques and Identification
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Native Bees as Pollinators: Diversity, Ecology, Conservation, and Habitat Enhancement
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Finding Words in Nature: Creative Writing for Aspiring Authors ... Study Retreat
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Nature Journaling: Black and White Illustration Techniques
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Landscape Ecology
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Problematic Delineation Seminar
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Boletes and Other Fungi of New England
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Survey of Grasses: Their Structure, Identification, and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Wetlands Identification, Delineation, and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Spiders: Identification, Biology, and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Lichens, Biofilms, and Stone
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Stream Ecology
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Alpine Ecology
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Wetland Delineators
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Mushroom Identification for New Mycophiles: Foraging for Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Art and Science of Photographing Insects and their Kin
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Submersed and Floating Aquatic Plants
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Independent Studies: Interesting and Challenging Saxicolous Lichens of North America
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Ecology of Forests and Grasslands
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Drone Remote Sensing of Freshwater Ecosystems
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Field Botany and Plant Ecology of the Eastern Maine Coast
  • Environmental Concern Course: Grasses, Sedges and Rushes
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Tidal Marsh Restoration: A Traveling Course from Rhode Island to Maine
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Wetlands and Wetland Delineators
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Identification, Biology, and Natural History of Ferns and Lycophytes
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Banding/research Techniques for Studying Songbirds and Raptors
  • Environmental Concern Course: Evaluating Hydric Soils in the Field
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Better Birding: Passerines and Seabirds for Advancing Birders
  • Environmental Concern Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Riparian Habitat Restoration for the Arid Southwest
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Wetlands: Science and Regulatory Management
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Habitat Site Restoration
  • MBI (Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Wetland Delineation

SPECIAL EVENTS

  • National Invasive Species Awareness Week
  • Earth Day
  • Huron River Watershed Council (HRWC): River Roundup
  • Endangered Species Day
  • 2017 Grand River Water Festival
  • Rouge River Water Festival
       
Wetland Breaking News - December 2015

Wetland Breaking News - March 2016

The Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News (WBN) is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those working in water resources and related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published Wetland Breaking News - January 2017for over fifteen years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to .

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled and Edited by Marla Stelk, Editor; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors. Executive Director: Jeanne Christie. Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399 Fax: 207-892-3089
All photos by Jeanne Christie, ASWM
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