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Wetland Breaking News

Wetland Breaking News: October 2014 

                 
 
IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES &  
PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

Wetland Breaking News - July 2014

To view past issues of Wetland Breaking News on our website, please click here.

Visit ASWM online to read weekly news updates between issues.

Please send comments and news stories to news@aswm.org.

Thank you for your continued interest.

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EDITOR'S NOTE

Bribes! 

I received a call one day from an applicant that wanted to talk to me about his project. The project exceeded the stream threshold impacts on his site.  Because the impacts exceeded the limits, the project would have required either payment into the in-lieu fee program, reduction of the impacts, or an offset of the impacts by mitigation.  This, of course, is what is required any time the impacts exceed the allowable limits.  However, what happened next was not what normally happens.  

As the discussion continued, I noticed one of the members of the applicants group pulled out a pamphlet.  At first I didn’t have any idea what the pamphlets were about and the discussion continued.  At the end of the discussion, the member showed me the pamphlets and explained them to me.  The pamphlets described condominiums in Florida.  He told me I could use them anytime I wanted to take a vacation.  Of course no one said that I had to accommodate his wishes, but I am pretty sure that was the intent. 

I thought to myself, “Wow”, my first real bribe. 

I accepted the pamphlet, stuck it in my drawer and made no mention of it to anyone.  No, I never went to Florida for that two week vacation.  I never even considered it. During my years as a regulator, I was never tempted to take any kind of bribe.  I guess my "price" was too steep or my integrity was too high.  I hope it was the latter. 

Alan Grant, Editor

Wetland Breaking News 

 

 

     
                 

EDITOR'S CHOICE

The 2015 National Wetlands Awards–Call for Nominations  

ELI has opened the nomination period for the 2015 National Wetlands Awards (NWA). The NWA program recognizes individuals who have demonstrated extraordinary commitment to the protection and restoration of our nation’s wetlands. The 2015 NWAs will honor individual wetland achievement in six categories: Conservation and Restoration; Education and Outreach; Landowner Stewardship; Science Research; State, Tribal, and Local Program Development; and Wetland Community Leader. Organizations and federal employees are not eligible. The ceremony will take place at the U.S. Botanic Garden on May 21, 2015. The deadline for submitting nominations is December 1, 2014 

Detailed information about the 2015 NWA nomination process can be found on the NWA website. For more information on the program contact Narayan Subramanian at (202) 939-3860 or e-mail wetlandsawards@eli.org.

EPA Launches Broad Collaborative of External Stakeholders to Advance Green Infrastructure 

EPA – October 9, 2014
On October 8th, EPA’s Green Infrastructure Program and the White House Council on Environmental Quality launched a broad collaborative of external stakeholders to advance green infrastructure implementation. The Green Infrastructure Collaborative will leverage efforts from the federal family, non-governmental organizations, the private sector and academia to advance green infrastructure as a means of supporting water quality and community development goals. 

As part of the announcement, EPA released a Statement of Support outlining specific commitments from Collaborative members to advance cooperation and coordination around green infrastructure initiatives. 

The Collaborative will build capacity for green infrastructure by providing a platform for national stakeholders to: 

  1. Leverage joint efforts to promote the multiple community benefits of green infrastructure;
  2. Share and build knowledge around emerging green infrastructure technologies and policy issues; and
  3. Facilitate shared inquiry into the best ways to encourage adoption of green infrastructure technologies at the local level. 

The Collaborative will build on the Green Infrastructure Partnership launched in 2007 by EPA and its founding partner organizations. 

For more information on the Collaborative, click here. White House fact sheet, click here

In wake of drought and fires, turtle habitat becomes death trap 

By Louis Sahagun Los Angeles Times October 4, 2014
Biologists strode along the cracked, dry mud surrounding this evaporating north Los Angeles County lake last week, pausing periodically to pick up an emaciated turtle and wash alkaline dust off its head and carapace. "A lot of these animals are severely ill and starving," said Tim Hovey, a state Department of Fish and Wildlife biologist, as he gestured toward a group of turtles bobbing in the murky water offshore. After three years of drought, this natural 2-mile-long lake, about 15 miles west of Lancaster, has become a smelly, alkaline death trap for one of the largest populations of state-protected Western pond turtles in Southern California. For full story, click here. 

Study: Extra $22.5B a year in environmental gains for Chesapeake region if cleanup proceeds 

By Hope Yen Daily Journal October 6, 2014
The Chesapeake Bay region would reap an additional $22.5 billion a year from improved hurricane protection, crab and fish production and climate stability if the Obama administration's contested plan to clean up the watershed proceeds, an environmental group says. The assessment released Monday is based on a peer-reviewed analysis of the economic benefits to the entities — six states and the District of Columbia — charged with reducing pollution into the nation's largest estuary. It comes as the Environmental Protection Agency is defending its cleanup plan in federal court against a challenge from farmers and 21 attorneys general who say the pollution limits are unreasonably costly and an unjustified power grab by the federal government. For full article, click here

UN biodiversity report highlights failure to meet conservation targets 

By Adam Vaughan The Guardian October 5, 2014
International efforts to meet targets to stem the loss of wildlife and habitats are failing miserably, according to a UN report. The Global Biodiversity Outlook 4, published as nearly 200 countries meet on Monday in South Korea in a bid to tackle biodiversity loss, paints a damning picture of governments’ efforts to meet a set of targets agreed in 2010 to slow the destruction of species’ habitats, cut pollution and stop overfishing by the end of the decade. Conservationists said the lack of progress, nearly halfway to the 2020 deadline for the targets, was a troubling sign and a reality check. For full story, click here. 

Earth Has Lost Half of its Wildlife in the Past 40 Years, says WWF  

By Damian Carrington – The Guardian – September 29, 2014
The number of wild animals on Earth has halved in the past 40 years, according to a new analysis. Creatures across land, rivers and the seas are being decimated as humans kill them for food in unsustainable numbers, while polluting or destroying their habitats, the research by scientists at WWF and the Zoological Society of London found. If half the animals died in London zoo next week it would be front page news,” said Professor Ken Norris, ZSL’s director of science. “But that is happening in the great outdoors. This damage is not inevitable but a consequence of the way we choose to live.” He said nature, which provides food and clean water and air, was essential for human wellbeing. For full story, click here. 

Toxic algae cocktail brews in Lake Erie 

By Dan Egan Journal Sentinel September 13, 2014
Before the 1972 passage of the Clean Water Act and a separate phosphorus-reduction agreement between the U.S. and Canada, Lake Erie received an average of about 24,000 metric tons of phosphorus annually. The lake has typically been well under its 11,000-metric ton target since, but in the last decade the blooms have returned. The reason: changes in farming practices and more intense spring storms mean the phosphorus flowing into Lake Erie has increasingly been in its highly potent dissolved state. For full article, click here.
 

ASWM Members’ Webinar: ELI and The Nature Conservancy's Watershed Approach Handbook – October 20, 2014 

The Association of State Wetland Managers will hold a members’ webinar: ELI and The Nature Conservancy's Watershed Approach Handbook: Improving Outcomes and Increasing Benefits Associated with Wetland and Stream Restoration and Protection Projects. The webinar will be held on October 20, 2014 at 3:00 p.m. ET.  Presenters: Nicholas Miller, Science Director, The Nature Conservancy in Wisconsin; Mark Smith, Deputy Director of the North America Freshwater Program, The Nature Conservancy; and Jessica Wilkinson, Senior Policy Advisor for Mitigation, The Nature Conservancy. For more information and to register, click here

ASWM Wetland Restoration Webinar: How to Prepare a Good Wetland Restoration – November 4, 2014 

ASWM Wetland Restoration Webinar: How to Prepare a Good Wetland Restoration Plan will be held on November 4, 2014 at 3:00 p.m. ET. Presenters:  Richard Weber, NRCS Wetland Team, CNTSC; Tom Harcarik, Ohio EPA, Division of Environmental & Financial Assistance; John Teal, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (Scientist Emeritus); Lisa Cowan, Professional Landscape Architect, Studioverde. For more information, click here. To register, click here

Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar: The Impact of wetland drainage on streamflow and flooding in the northern prairie pothole region – November 17, 2014 

NFFA webinar: The impact of wetland drainage on streamflow and flooding in the northern prairie pothole region webinar will be held on November 17, 2014 at 3:00 p.m. ET. Presented by Dr. John Pomeroy, Centre for Hydrology, University of Saskatchewan. For more information, click here. To register, click here

Wetland Mapping Consortium (WMC) Webinar: Variable Width Riparian Areas Mapping: a Robust GIS Approach – November 19, 2014

WMC webinar: The variable width riparian areas mapping webinar will be held on November 19, 2014 at 3:00 p.m. ET. Presented by Sinan A. Abood, PhD, USDA Forest Service. For more information, click here. To register, click here.

 

NATIONAL NEWS

FEMA Will Require States to Examine Climate Risks in Disaster Planning 

By Katherine Bagley – Inside Climate News – October 1, 2014
The Federal Emergency Management Agency is about to make a significant shift in the way it handles climate change. FEMA will soon require states to examine the impacts of global warming on their communities as a condition for receiving federal disaster preparedness funding, according to draft guidelines released by the agency earlier this month. For full story, click here

EPA chief Gina McCarthy asks water professionals to back new wetland rules 

By Marck Schleifstein – NOLA.com-The Times-Picayume – September 29, 2014
Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy came to New Orleans on Monday to ask 18,000 water and wastewater professionals for help in supporting the agency's controversial "Waters of the U.S." rule. The rule, proposed jointly by EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers, attempts to re-extend Clean Water Act protection to greater portions of river and stream watersheds. Those protections were stripped away by two U.S. Supreme Court decisions several years ago. The proposed rule has been attacked by critics, including most of Louisiana's Congressional delegation, as an unconstitutional expansion of federal government control over private property that would slow Louisiana's economic expansion. McCarthy, speaking to the Water Environment Federation Technical Exhibition and Conference at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, said the renewed regulation of wetlands and runoff that enters rivers and streams is necessary to keep the nation's water supplies safe. For full story, click here

Obama to Create World’s Largest Protected Marine Reserve in Pacific Ocean 

By Jullet Ellperin – The Washington Post – September 25, 2014
President Obama will use his legal authority Thursday to create the world’s largest fully protected marine reserve in the central Pacific Ocean, demonstrating his increased willingness to advance a conservation agenda without the need for congressional approval. By broadening the Pacific Remote Islands National Marine Monument from almost 87,000 square miles to more than 490,000 square miles, Obama has protected more acres of federal land and sea by executive power than any other president in at least 50 years and makes the area off-limits to commercial fishing. For full story, click here. 

World Stands By as Algae and Dead Zones Ruin Water 

By Codi Koacek – Circle of Blue – September 25, 2014
Decades of research and billions of dollars spent to understand the causes of toxic algae blooms and oxygen-starved aquatic dead zones around the world have produced more scientific knowledge but achieved few results to solve two of the most dangerous threats to the world’s oceans and fresh water reserves. In fact, according to a growing body of scientific evidence, the algae blooms and near shore ocean dead zones are growing larger, more numerous and endangering important fisheries and drinking water consumed by millions of people. For full story, click here. 

Judge Rejects BP's Request for Repayment on Oil Spill Claims 

By Jennifer Larino – NOLA.com-The Times-Picayune – September 24, 2014
A federal judge Wednesday (Sept. 24) ruled that BP has no right to recover more than $185 million the company says was overpaid to claimants under its oil spill settlement. BP said it plans to appeal the decision. U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier said the settlement BP agreed to makes it clear the British oil giant cannot claw back payments, even if the terms change as a result of future court rulings. BP sought repayment - plus interest - after a May court order approved a change in accounting rules for how oil spill losses were calculated under the settlement. For full story, click here. 

EPA Unveils Second Phase of Plan to Reverse Great Lakes Damage 

By Michael Wines – The New York Times – September 24, 2014
The federal government issued a new blueprint Wednesday for its efforts to restore the Great Lakes, including plans to clean up 10 contaminated rivers and harbors and step up its attack on poisonous algae blooms that coat parts of three lakes each summer. The program will include a new attempt to buffer the lakes against the effects of climate change. It will require, for example, that new wetlands include plants that can thrive in warmer temperatures. For full story, click here

Fracking or Drinking Water? That May Become the Choice 

By Mark Koba – NBC News Business – September 14, 2014 – Videos
Fracking for oil and natural gas—or having enough water to drink. That's the possible dilemma facing a number of countries including the United States, according to a new report released by the World Resources Institute last week—though experts disagree on the real implications of the report and what should be done about it. Forty percent of countries with shale-rich deposits—the types where hydraulic fracturing or "fracking" is used to extract natural gas and oil—face water scarcity in and around the shale deposits, according to the WRI report. For full story and to view videos, click here

Establishing requirements to control nonpoint source pollution 

By Dr. Melissa McCoy – Global Water Forum – September 9, 2014
The Clean Water Act (CWA) is a federal law of the United States that governs the protection of surface waters from pollution. Enacted in 1972, the CWA was established to “restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of [U.S.] waters.” At the time of its enactment, two key goals of the CWA were to achieve fishable/swimmable ambient water quality throughout the U.S. by 1983 and to eliminate discharges of pollutants into U.S. waters by 1985. More than forty years later, these goals still have not been met. Nevertheless, the CWA has led to significant improvements in U.S. water quality, and other nations (including, recently, Iraq) have looked to the CWA while drafting environmental legislation. For full story, click here

EPA Tool for Water & Wastewater Utilities on Flood Resilience 

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – September 2014
With a user-friendly layout, embedded videos, and flood maps to guide you, EPA's Flood Resilience Guide is your one-stop resource to know your flooding threat and identify practical mitigation options to protect your critical assets. For more information, click here. To download guide, click here

Analysis of State Oil & Gas Regs Finds States Are on the Right Track   

Ground Water Protection Council – 2014
The Ground Water Protection Council report is an update to their 2009 report and includes an overview of 2013 groundwater protection rules in 27 states that account for more than 98 percent of the country’s oil and gas production. In addition to the most up-to-date accounting of state regulatory activities, the report includes a series of items states might consider when evaluating and revising their rules and policies regarding hydraulic fracturing, chemical disclosure, storage and spill prevention. For more information and to download report, click here

U.S. Senator Supporting Rigs to Reef Program in Gulf of Mexico 

Eco Magazine
U.S. Sen. David Vitter (R-La.), top Republican on the Environment and Public Works Committee, recently sent a letter to Sally Jewell, Secretary of the Department of the Interior, requesting that the Department allow a collapsed structure to remain serving as an artificial reef in the Gulf of Mexico. “Decommissioned, idle platforms that develop into artificial reefs are becoming an indispensable resource for aquatic life in the Gulf of Mexico,” said Vitter. “While this particular site has yet to obtain official status as an artificial reef site, the thriving ecosystem that has grown around it is already playing an important role in growing and sustaining our Gulf fisheries. The Administration should back off and allow it to prosper.” For full story, click here.

 

STATE NEWS

AK: What 35,000 Walruses Forced to the Beach Tell Us About Global Warming 

By Sarah Lazare – Common Dreams – October 1, 2014
Federal biologists have discovered an unusual phenomenon on a beach in northwest Alaska: a massive gathering of walruses—35,000 of them—crowded onto a small strip of shore. This swarm, which was sighted in a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration aerial survey on Saturday, is a direct result of a warming climate and declining sea ice, say scientists. Pacific walruses, who live in the Bering Sea during winter, require floating sea ice to meet their survival needs, using them for rest in between journeys to forage for food, such as clam, snails, and worms, as well as for giving birth and caring for their young. But as the oceans warm, this sea ice is receding, especially near coastal areas, forcing these walruses to take to the beach for resting and foraging, according to an explanation from the NOAA. "The walruses are telling us what the polar bears have told us and what many indigenous people have told us in the high Arctic, and that is that the Arctic environment is changing extremely rapidly and it is time for the rest of the world to take notice and also to take action to address the root causes of climate change," said Margaret Williams, managing director of the group’s Arctic program, in a statement. For full story, click here

CA: Rice Farmers Rent Crucial ‘Pop-Up’ Wetlands for Migrating Birds 

By Ari Phillips – Think Progress – September 14, 2014
With California’s enduring drought keeping more than four-fifths of the state in severe drought conditions, millions of birds starting their annual migration south will have a much harder than usual time finding rest and feeding stops. However a new, first-of-its-kind program from the Nature Conservancy is alleviating part of this struggle by paying rice farmers to create “pop-up habitats” in their fields for migrating waterfowl. With only around 15 percent of the typically available wetland habitat surviving the drought, this innovative program offers birds traversing the parched Central Valley 14,000 more acres of usable landing strip for the long trip south. For full story, click here

CA: Lake Tahoe's clarity improves, but fires, invasive species, erosion remain severe threats 

By Benjamin Hulac – E & E Publishing – September 12, 2014
A superficial test devoid of test tubes, lab coats and modern scientific analysis -- anyone with a boat, a rope, a white metal disk and good vision could carry out the task -- is perhaps the most important method observers use to assess Lake Tahoe's environmental health. The 191-square-mile lake gained its fame from its pristine water. Mark Twain, who made the lake an American icon with his book "Roughing It," called it an "enchanted mirror." But now Lake Tahoe's overall worsening clarity provides signals of how the warming climate is detrimentally affecting the region's ecosystem. For full story, click here

CA: California’s Water-Starved Farmers Stymied by Fish Protections 

By Alison Vekshin – Bloomberg  – September 11, 2014
Environmental protections for endangered salmon in California’s rivers and streams are drawing complaints from drought-stricken farmers who say water that could be pumped to them is allowed to empty into the ocean. Authorities have sharply curtailed allocations in the largest U.S. agricultural producing state, with 2012 sales valued at $42.6 billion, forcing growers to leave farmland unplanted or pay escalated prices for water from other sources. “The Endangered Species Act does not have any consideration for human impact, and that’s a little disturbing,” said Joe Del Bosque, 65, president of Del Bosque Farms in Firebaugh, who grows melons and tomatoes. “It’s already harming us now. It could be worse next year.” For full story, click here

FL: Miami foundation offers $10 million for phosphate pollution solution 

By Zachary Fagenson – Reuters – September 23, 2014
A Florida environmental group is offering $10 million to anyone who can devise a method for ridding the Everglades and other waterways around the country of the fertilizer byproduct phosphorous that has caused disastrous algal blooms in Florida and the Midwest. The competition seeks to tackle intertwined problems: clearing out algae-fostering phosphorous while also recycling it into increasingly rare phosphate for farms. For full story, click here. 

IL: Great Lakes in unprecedented danger, Chicago mayor says 

By Dan Egan – Detroit Free Press – September 26, 2014
When Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel ran for Congress in 2002, he vowed that protecting the Great Lakes would be high on his agenda. The primary concerns at the time were environmental damages wrought by invasive species such as zebra mussels, as well as urban and industrial pollutions. Twelve years and three jobs later — Emanuel went from Congress to chief of staff for President Barack Obama before becoming mayor of Chicago in 2011 — the Great Lakes have received $1.6 billion in federal restoration funds. Yet despite all of that money earmarked for things like combating the spread of invasive species, cleaning up toxic hot spots and restoring wetlands, Emanuel said Wednesday that the world's largest freshwater system has just entered an era of unprecedented peril. For full story, click here.

KY: Developers: Why Can't Wetlands Money Be Used For Sewers? 

By Carrie Blackmore Smith – Cincinnati.com – October 2, 2014
Most people would agree that destroying wetlands – important because they ease flooding and drought and support plant and animal life – isn't a particularly good idea. Given that half of America's wetlands – and up to 90 percent of them in Ohio and Kentucky – are estimated to have been destroyed since European settlers first arrived here, it's logical to want to replace and restore them. But as construction ramps back up after the recession, developers are finding that the cost to replace wetlands – a federal requirement – has become an expensive endeavour. For full story, click here. 

LA: The most ambitious environmental lawsuit ever 

By Nathaniel Rich – The New York Times Magazine – October 2, 2014
In Louisiana, the most common way to visualize the state’s existential crisis is through the metaphor of football fields. The formulation, repeated in nearly every local newspaper article about the subject, goes like this: Each hour, Louisiana loses about a football field’s worth of land. Each day, the state loses nearly the accumulated acreage of every football stadium in the N.F.L. Were this rate of land loss applied to New York, Central Park would disappear in a month. Manhattan would vanish within a year and a half. The last of Brooklyn would dissolve four years later. New Yorkers would notice this kind of land loss. The world would notice this kind of land loss. But the hemorrhaging of Louisiana’s coastal wetlands has gone largely unremarked upon beyond state borders. This is surprising, because the wetlands, apart from their unique ecological significance and astounding beauty, buffer the impact of hurricanes that threaten not just New Orleans but also the port of South Louisiana, the nation’s largest; just under 10 percent of the country’s oil reserves; a quarter of its natural-gas supply; a fifth of its oil-refining capacity; and the gateway to its internal waterway system. The attenuation of Louisiana, like any environmental disaster carried beyond a certain point, is a national-security threat. For full article, click here

LA: Amid rising water, sinking land, folks in southern La. sit tight 

By Evan Lehmann – E & E Publishing LLC – October 3, 2014
This is where the mainland ends in southern Louisiana -- at least for now. You get here by following an old road that abruptly ends at an expanse of marshy water, which is moving in on the land at one of the fastest clips in the world, according to scientists. Residents note that the road, known as LA-1, now leads in more directions than just north and south. It's also sinking. Its two lanes reach into this part of the state, about two hours south of New Orleans, through treeless fields and spongy marshes that sit near sea level. With little height to spare, the combined effects of subsidence and rising oceans, measured at over an inch every three years, are obvious. "The Gulf of Mexico has basically gotten closer to us," said Windell Curole, who manages the South Lafourche Levee District. He suspects that without a major government effort, this sprawling area could sink below the surface within two or three generations. "We can see the trend, and the trend is not good." For full story, click here

MD: With unhealthy stream pollution, Jones Falls targeted for restoration and maintenance projects 

By Ryan Bacis – The Baltimore Sun – September 20, 2014
Jones Falls, whose watershed is home to about 200,000 people and spans some 40 square miles from Garrison to the Inner Harbor, is set to begin a series of restoration and maintenance projects to improve recreational conditions and overall stream health. Thanks to a $200,000 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency, Small Watershed Action Plans already have been approved for the northeast and lower parts of the Falls. For full story, click here

MI: Manistee dam removal yields snake hibernaculum 

By Kevin Duffy – Great Lakes Echo – September 19, 2014
Conservation biologists have built the first artificial home for snakes in northern Michigan. And they removed an entire dam to do it. Experts say that the snakes need the help. Native snakes, including the Eastern Massasauga rattlesnake and Northern water snake, require shelter from cold winters. But development threatens their habitat in what is “the greatest impact to amphibian and reptile populations and reproduction,” said David Mifsud, a wetland ecologist at Herpetological Resource and Management who helped with the restoration. To meet their needs, some biologists create homes for snakes out of existing restoration projects. That’s what recently happened on the North Branch of the Manistee River near Kalkaska. For full story, click here

MN: Drinking Water Solutions May Help Construction Site Runoff 

By Shannon Fiecke – Minnesota Transportation Research Blog – September 15, 2014
The same chemicals used to treat drinking water might now be able to treat stormwater runoff to reduce the amount of pollutants entering Minnesota lakes and rivers from road construction sites. A research project headed by Mankato State University and funded by the Minnesota Department of Transportation has identified three chemical flocculants that are effective at removing a broad range of Minnesota soils from water. For full blog post, click here

MN: Minnesota lake first in nation to use new product to kill zebra mussels 

By Kelly Smith – Star Tribune – September 9, 2014
A small Minnesota lake is on the forefront of the national effort to kill off the zebra mussels that threaten lakes and rivers around the country. Christmas Lake in Shorewood became the first in the nation Monday to use a new technology that utilizes dead bacterial cells to eradicate the razor-shelled creatures that can damage boat motors, slice swimmers’ feet and threaten fish populations. The outcome could be a defining turning point in what has been a losing battle to control an invasive species that has spread to 29 states. For full story, click here. 

MO: NRCS Helping Landowners Restore 1,638 More Acres of Wetlands in Missouri 

USDA – September 9, 2014
The USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) will be providing about $5.8 million in financial and technical assistance to help landowners voluntarily restore 1,638 more acres of wetlands in Missouri, mostly along the Mississippi River and the Missouri River. The funding is part of a $328 million national effort by USDA to protect and restore key farmlands, grasslands and wetlands through NRCS’ Agricultural Conservation Easements Program (ACEP). The program is part of the 2014 Farm Bill. It consolidates three former NRCS programs – the Farm and Ranch Lands Protection Program, Grassland Reserve Program and Wetlands Reserve Program. For full story, click here

NJ: N.J. Braces for Future Disasters by Fleeing, and Fortifying, The Coast 

By Franklyn Cater – NPR – September 26, 2014
It has been nearly two years since Hurricane Sandy crashed ashore in New Jersey, devastating cities throughout the region. As cities and towns along the coast consider how to prepare for future weather patterns, and avert the kind of damage that happened in 2012, a two-pronged response has emerged — a kind of municipal fight-or-flight response. One option is to retreat — encourage residents to move away from the water. The other is to resist — armor the coast so it can take a battering without flooding city streets. The Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, and the Department of Housing and Urban Development, or HUD, are dedicating hundreds of millions of dollars to the first response — and billions to the second. For full story, click here

NC: EPA halts N.C. coal ash plan 

By Taft Wireback – News & Record – October 4, 2014
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency interceded recently to put the brakes on a state-approved plan that allowed Duke Energy to flush water from its numerous coal ash ponds into nearby streams and lakes. The federal agency said the state Department of Environment and Natural Resources’ approval did not fully consider pollution such a wholesale “decanting” of the ponds could cause. For full story, click here

NC: Duke Energy creates $10 million water fund 

By Bruce Henderson – Charlotte Observer – September 24, 2014
In a counter to its February coal ash spill into the Dan River, Duke Energy announced a $10 million fund Wednesday for Carolinas waterways. The money will be used to improve water quality, enhance fish and wildlife habitat, and expand public access. It may also buff a corporate image battered by the “profound event,” as CEO Lynn Good called the nation’s third-largest ash spill. For full story, click here.
 

OH: State receives $8m for farmland protection & wetland restoration 

Perry Daily – September 15, 2014
Last week, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced the Department of Agriculture’s investment of $328 million to help private landowners protect and restore key farmlands, grasslands and wetlands. The 2014 Farm Bill created the new Agricultural Conservation Easement Program, or ACEP, to protect critical wetlands and keep lands in farming for the future. “Conservation easements help farmers protect valuable agricultural lands from development while enhancing lands best suited for grazing and wetlands to their natural conditions,” State Conservationist Terry Cosby said. “These easements have a dramatic and positive impact on food supply, rural communities, and wildlife habitat.” Through ACEP, private landowners and eligible conservation partners can request assistance from USDA to protect and restore agricultural land through an agricultural or wetland easement. For full story, click here

OH: Farmers on board to limit area’s phosphorus runoff 

By Tom Troy – The Blade – September 14, 2014
While scientists and some politicians crank up the pressure on agriculture to stop the flow of algae “nutrients” into the rivers, farmers are going to school and planting “cover crops” to keep the fertilizer down on the farm. For full story, click here

OH: Ohio lawmakers seek toxin limits from EPA 

By Deirdre Shesgreen – Telegraph-Forum – September 11, 2014
Central Ohio lawmakers are pushing on two fronts to address problems stemming from last month's water crisis in Toledo, where toxic algae blooms in Lake Erie sparked a two-day ban on drinking the city's tap water. On Wednesday, three area lawmakers introduced legislation that would push federal officials to develop a standard for a safe level of microcystins in drinking water. Microcystins are a poisonous byproduct of algae. For full story, click here

PA: DEP releases updated details on water contamination near drilling sites 

By Laura Legere – Power Source Post – September 9, 2014
Pennsylvania regulators found an array of contaminants in the roughly 240 private water supplies they said were damaged by oil and gas operations during the past seven years. Most were the usual culprits: methane, metals and salt that had apparently seeped from well sites or been stirred up by the activity of extracting fossil fuels from the earth. But on May 14, after the Department of Environmental Protection responded to a Susquehanna County resident’s complaint of rank, foamy water, inspectors said they found something else. The water contained volatile organic compounds, ethylene glycol and 2-butoxyethanol — chemicals regulators said were consistent with the surfactant Air Foam that was used to drill a natural gas well 1,500 feet away. For full story, click here

TX: Groundwater-Level Declines Continue To Cause Land Elevation Loss In Houston – Galveston Region  

Water Online – October 8, 2014
Historical groundwater withdrawals have caused the loss of land-surface elevation, or subsidence, in the Houston-Galveston region. Loss of surface elevation is a concern as it may increase the potential for more intense flooding in the study area according to the latest annual report conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey. For full story, click here.

TX: Aquifer Is No Quick Fix for Central Texas Thirst 

By Neena Satija – The New York Times – September 11, 2014
As drought continues to grip Central Texas, those looking to provide water to the region’s fast-growing cities and suburbs see a solution in a relatively untapped aquifer. Water marketers, who bundle groundwater rights and sell the water to cities, say the region’s Carrizo-Wilcox Aquifer holds hundreds of trillions of gallons of water. They say that is enough water to sustain growth for centuries in areas around Austin, whose reservoirs are only 34 percent full, and San Antonio, whose own aquifer is at such low levels that federally protected species are at risk. For full story, click here. 

WA: New era in stormwater management is here 

By John Dodge – The Olympian – October 5, 2014
Ready or not, low-impact development is coming to a neighborhood near you. Some midsize local jurisdictions in Western Washington, including Thurston County, Lacey, Olympia and Tumwater, have until Dec. 31, 2016, to change their development rules and regulations to require developers and builders to retain and treat on-site any stormwater their projects generate. Say goodbye to building sites cleared of all vegetation, stormwater pipes and ponds and outfalls and hard pavement surfaces. Say hello to rain gardens, green roofs, retained trees and vegetation, and porous sidewalks, driveways and private roads. For full story, click here

WA: Algae blooms that kill pose puzzles 

By Ron Judd – The Seattle Times – September 19, 2014
THE HAPPY little lake that could kill you looks as harmless as a watercolor painting. Anderson Lake’s 60 acres of glassy green water is surrounded by marshes, rolling grass fields and quiet trees, all nestled within a Washington state park west of Chimacum in Jefferson County. The closest “civilization” is an RV park about a mile up the road. The critters here include the usual sorts: Deer, beaver, migratory waterfowl and schools of rainbow trout, stocked for Port Townsend-area anglers who have plied these waters for decades. But in a mystery that has confounded scientists for the better part of a decade, the placid waters also now host an alarmingly deadly life-form. Anatoxin-a, which attacks the central nervous system of mammals, emerges here in potent levels with algae blooms every spring. In the past decade, the lake’s toxic soup has arrived as regularly — and, disarmingly, perhaps every bit as naturally — as the blossom of Northwest skunk cabbage. The toxin is one of several produced by “cyanobacteria” or blue-green algae — the sort often seen fouling lakes ranging from tranquil ponds to concrete-jungle oases, such as Seattle’s Green Lake. Numbers of outbreaks — or at least their diagnoses — are on the rise across the country, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. For full story, click here

WV: EPA's Right to Rescind W.Va. Coal Mine's Clean Water Permit Upheld by Federal Court 

By Bebe Raupe – Bloomberg – October 2, 2014
A federal judge has upheld the Environmental Protection Agency's revocation of a West Virginia surface mine's Clean Water Act permit, calling the agency's action “reasonable” and within its purview (Mingo Logan Coal Co. v. EPA, D.D.C. Ruling Sept. 30 in a case mining interests have said epitomizes the agency's “war on coal,” Judge Amy Berman Jackson of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia concluded the EPA “did not drastically change its position” in 2011 when it vetoed a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-issued Section 404(a) permit for Arch Coal's Spruce No. 1 Mine. For full story, click here

WV: DEP concerned about pace of Freedom Industries cleanup 

By Ken Ward Jr. – West Virginia Gazette – September 22, 2014
Managers of bankrupt Freedom Industries continue to work toward getting their Elk River facility into a “voluntary” industrial remediation program, but Department of Environmental Protection officials want the company more focused on actually cleaning up contaminated soil at the site of the January chemical spill that polluted the drinking-water supply for hundreds of thousands of people. For full story, click here

WI: Dead zones haunt Green Bay as manure fuels algae blooms 

By Dan Egan – Journal Sentinel – September 13, 2014
Phones at the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources started ringing in early August 2005 with an outrageous tale of a mass migration of fish from the center of the bay to its rocky beaches. "The report from the caller was 100,000s of dead and dying small fish nosed up against the shore," Paul Peeters, a DNR fisheries biologist, reported in an email to his bosses at the time. For full story, click here.


WETLAND SCIENCE

EPA Plans to Issue Health Advisories On Harmful Algal Blooms   

By Amena H. Saiyid – Bloomberg Bureau of National Affairs – October 1, 2014
The Environmental Protection Agency is aiming to issue by May 2015 drinking water health advisories for cyanobacteria, the harmful forms of blue-green algae that contaminated water supplies in Toledo, Ohio, and resulted in a weekend-long ban in early August, an agency official said Sept. 29. The agency is working on health advisories for microcystin L-R and cylindrospermopsin, with plans to have them out before the season of the harmful algal blooms begins next year, Betsy Southerland, director of the EPA Office of Science and Technology with the Office of Water, told participants at a Clean Water Act policy developments discussion in New Orleans. All three forms of cyanobacteria, or harmful algae blooms, release toxics. In particular, freshwater cyanobacterial blooms that produce highly potent cyanotoxins are known as cyanobacterial HABs (cyanoHABs). These species are capable of producing compounds that are hepatotoxic (affect the liver), neurotoxic (affect the nervous system) and acutely dermatotoxic (affect the skin), according to EPA. For full story, click here. 

Obama Administration Launches Global Alliance for Climate Smart Agriculture   

By Secretary of State John Kerry, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Dr. Rajiv "Raj" Shah, Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development – USDA Blog – September 24, 2014
From record droughts in Kansas to deadly wildfires in California, the United States is feeling the effects of climate change. These same conditions have a dire impact across the developing world, especially for poor, rural smallholder farmers whose very lives are threatened every time the rains arrive late, the floods rush in, or the temperature soars. By 2050, the world’s population is expected to reach nine billion people. Feeding them will require at least a 60 percent increase in agricultural production. There is no greater challenge to meeting this need than climate change. It poses a range of unprecedented threats to the livelihoods of the world’s most vulnerable people and to the very planet that sustains us. In order to ensure that hundreds of millions of people are not born into a debilitating cycle of under-nutrition and hunger, we must address the urgent threat that climate change poses. For full blog post, click here. 

Researchers: 2013 Carbon Emissions Jumped More Than Ever 

By Timothy Cama – The Hill – September 22, 2014
The world emitted more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere last year than any year before, according to a series of new studies. Human activity, mainly burning fossil fuels such as oil, gas and coal, emitted 39.8 billion tons of heat-trapping carbon dioxide last year, 2.3 percent more than 2012, according to the studies published Sunday in Nature Geoscience and Nature Climate Change. For full story, click here. 

The Pacific Starfish Die-Off Continues, but There Is New Hope 

By Megan Scudellari – Newsweek – September 20, 2014
A grisly horror show is playing out along the West Coast of North America. Remains of millions of dead and dying sea stars, commonly known as starfish, litter the shoreline from Vancouver to San Diego. Those stars are the victims of a swift and brutal illness. First, the animal’s body deflates, as if drained of all its water. Then the trademark arms begin to curl, detaching from rocks. White lesions appear, like festering canker sores. Then the star explodes as organs rupture though the body wall. The arms fall off. Ultimately, the sea star dissolves, as if melted by acid, disintegrating into goo. Researchers in Washington state first noticed signs of the so-called “wasting syndrome” in June 2013 during routine monitoring of populations of bright purple and orange Pisaster ochraceus sea stars. The outbreak continued through the summer, spreading down into California’s central and southern coasts. Scientists hoped it would subside during the winter. It did not. For full story, click here. 

Coca Cola, Heinz and Other Major Food Companies Warn Climate Change Threatens Business 

By Emily Atkin – Think Progress – September 15, 2014
Back in March, popular burrito chain Chipotle made news when ThinkProgress reported that climate change could threaten its guacamole supply. That report was based on a statement Chipotle made in its annual report to its investors, filed with the Securities Exchange Commission. Chipotle took issue with the story, noting that its language about how climate change could affect guacamole was routine for annual reports and other SEC filings. The SEC requires companies to tell investors about any business risk they face, no matter how small. Indeed, companies mention things like freak accidents and terrorist attacks in these reports as well. In all, Chipotle just didn’t want its customers to become alarmed about a guacamole shortage (and in fact, guacamole hasn’t budged from the menu). But as ThinkProgress noted at the time, the real story was not a guacamole shortage, but the emerging reality of doing business in a warming world. While politicians continue to bicker over whether or not climate change exists, companies now have no choice in the matter — they must acknowledge the science and the risk and disclose the reality of that risk to their investors’ pocketbooks. Whether that risk actually manifests itself is another matter, but the fact that companies are increasingly putting climate change on their threat lists speaks volumes to the severity of the problem. For full story, click here.  

20-Year Study Shows Levels of Pesticides Still a Concern for Aquatic Life In U.S. Rivers and Streams 

Pollution Online – September 11, 2014
Levels of pesticides continue to be a concern for aquatic life in many of the Nation’s rivers and streams in agricultural and urban areas, according to a new USGS study spanning two decades (1992-2011). Pesticide levels seldom exceeded human health benchmarks. Over half a billion pounds of pesticides are used annually in the U.S. to increase crop production and reduce insect-borne disease, but some of these pesticides are occurring at concentrations that pose a concern for aquatic life. For full story, click here

Mussels don't stick around in acidic ocean water 

By Miguel Llanos – The Daily Climate – September 9, 2014
Cookie tray in hand and lifejacket around chest, Laura Newcomb looks more like a confused baker than a marine biologist. But the University of Washington researcher is dressed for work. Her job: testing how mussels in this idyllic bay, home to the nation’s largest harvester of mussels, are affected by changing ocean conditions, especially warmer and more acidic waters. It’s a question critical to the future of mussel farmers in the region. More important, it's key to understanding whether climate change threatens mussels around the world, as well as to the food chains mussels support and protect in the wild. For full story, click here. 

Verdict: Charges Dropped on Account of Climate Change 

By Jason Plautz – National Journal – September 8, 2014
When two environmental activists used a lobster boat to block a shipment of coal to a power plant, they planned to cite the urgency of climate change to justify their actions if the case went to trial. As it turns out, a Massachusetts county was one step ahead of them. Bristol County District Attorney Sam Sutter announced Monday that he had reached a deal to dismiss or downgrade the charges against the two activists because of the need to address climate pollution. For full article, click here. 

Half of North American bird species threatened by climate change 

By Louis Sahagun – Los Angeles Times – September 8, 2014
Half of all bird species in North America — including the bald eagle — are at risk of severe population decline by 2080 if the swift pace of global warming continues, the National Audubon Society concluded in a study released Monday. "The scale of the disruption we're projecting is a real punch in the gut," said Gary Langham, Chief Audubon scientist. Langham led an Audubon study that examined more than 500 bird species and determined that more than 300 in Canada and the United States face large climate shifts that could reduce their habitat by half or more by 2080. The changing environment will force birds to adapt to new habitats with different temperature and precipitation rates if they are to survive. For full story, click here. 

How Much Is Climate Change To Blame For Extreme Weather? 

By Maggie Loerth-Baker – Conservation Magazine – July 10, 2014
A lot of journalists think the public can’t possibly comprehend the complicated probability and risk assessments associated with climate change. Myles Allen thinks they’re wrong. There’s not much difference between explaining how climate change could contribute to a specific weather event and explaining how smoking for 50 years could contribute to developing lung cancer, he says. People understand what you mean when you tell them that smoking doesn’t always cause cancer and isn’t likely to be the only reason a cancer happens. Likewise, they can understand you when you tell them that climate change isn’t the cause of every weather disaster but is a contributing factor to many of them. For full article, click here. 


RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONS

Downstream Voices: Wetland Solutions to Reducing Disaster Risk 

By Fred Pearce – Wetlands International – September 22, 2014
In the new book “Downstream Voices” commissioned by Wetlands International, Fred Pearce takes you along his journey to three large river basins in India, Mali and Senegal where Wetlands International improves water resource management and the condition of wetlands to make communities more resilient to extreme weather events and impacts from climate change. To download the book, click here.

My Healthy Wetland:  A Handbook for Wetland Owners 

Wisconsin Wetlands Association
A full color handbook designed for private wetland landowners by the Wisconsin Wetlands Association. It provides basic information about what wetlands are, why they matter, and how to care for them in an attractive, accessible format. It's a quick read, full of information about wetlands and the actions landowners can take to keep their wetlands healthy and teeming with wildlife. You can learn more about the handbook here, where individuals can also place orders for individual handbooks. For more information and to order the handbook, click here

Low Impact Development (LID) "Barrier Busters" Fact Sheet Series 

EPA
This fact sheet series is primarily intended for state and local decision makers who are considering adoption of Low Impact Development (LID), but who have concerns with LID. These fact sheets explain the benefits of LID in clear terms and through examples. Specific fact sheets in this series directly address specific concerns that have been raised about adopting LID, thereby busting barriers. For more information and to view factsheets, click here. 

POTPOURRI

Report offers ideas for a Boston beset by rising seas 

By Casey Ross – The Boston Globe – September 30, 2014
By the end of this century, the romance of Venice might be a lot closer to Boston than you’d expect — like just off Storrow Drive. A report scheduled to be released Tuesday about preparing Boston for climate change suggests that building canals through the Back Bay neighborhood would help it withstand water levels that could rise as much as 7 feet by 2100. Some roads and public alleys, such as Clarendon Street, could be turned into narrow waterways, the report suggests, allowing the neighborhood to absorb the rising sea with clever engineering projects that double as public amenities. The canal system was among the more imaginative solutions offered by some of the city’s leading planning, architecture, and engineering firms in a report compiled by the local chapter of the Urban Land Institute. For full story, click here

Proposed APA Division -- Hazard Mitigation and Disaster Recovery Planning 

American Planning Association – September 17, 2014
Flood, fire, earthquake, hurricane or other hazard – all part of the job for planners?  Many of your fellow planners and members of the American Planning Association think so! Members of the Hazard Mitigation and Disaster Recovery Interest Group of APA have developed a proposal (below) to form a new membership Division of APA that will support planners’ interests in creating communities safer from disaster and engaging in recovery efforts after a natural or man-made hazard event. Support from APA members favoring the formation of this new Division is now being collected via an online petition here

Australia Unveils Its Plan to Protect Great Barrier Reef 

By Michelle Innis – The New York Times – September 15, 2014
In a bid to keep the Great Barrier Reef from being reclassified by the United Nations as “in danger,” the Australian government on Monday unveiled a 35-year plan to manage risks to the reef, one of the natural wonders of the world. But conservationists warned that the plan did not go far enough. “The plan does not deliver bold, concrete actions that scientists have told us we need to turn around the future of the reef,” said Louise Matthiesson, a reef campaigner with the group WWF-Australia. “Over all, it is not business as usual, but it is close enough to it.” WWF-Australia contributed to the report, but Ms. Matthiesson said that only some of the group’s views had been adopted. For full story, click here. 

Beer fight brewing over EPA rule 

By Tim Devaney – The Hill – September 19, 2014
A battle is brewing in the beer industry over a new regulation from the Environmental Protection Agency that spells out the agency’s authority to regulate bodies of water. Dozens of small craft brewers, such as Sierra Nevada and New Belgium, are rallying behind the EPA’s proposed Waters of the U.S. rule, arguing it will help ensure that they have clean water for their products. But farmers who supply beer ingredients like barley, wheat and hops, say the rule has the potential to massively cut production on their lands, raising beer prices in the process. For full story, click here. 

The Wetland Foundation 2015 Travel Grants 

The Wetland Foundation is soliciting applications for 2015 travel grants. Application deadline is November 22, 2014. Applications will be accepted from any student currently enrolled full-time at an academic institution in the USA and who meets the specific criteria for one of the types of grants listed below:  

Conference Travel Grant Type 1 ($600): For advanced undergraduate and graduate students who have never attended a wetland scientific conference and who have limited funds for travel. 

Conference Travel Grant Type 2 ($1200): For advanced undergraduate and graduate students with limited funding to present their wetland research findings at a conference. 

Field Travel Grant Type 1 ($800): For outstanding graduate students with limited funding to defray field expenses associated with thesis or dissertation research on wetlands. 

Field Travel Grant Type 2 ($1000): For promising undergraduate students to attend field courses focused on wetlands.  


For more information, click here.
 

 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS    
             
WEBINARS     MEETINGS
  TRAINING
   
             
WEBINARS          
                   
OCTOBER              
                   
October 20, 2014
3:00 p.m. ET
     

ASWM Members’ Webinar: ELI and The Nature Conservancy's Watershed Approach Handbook: Improving Outcomes and Increasing Benefits Associated with Wetland and Stream Restoration and Protection Projects

         
October 21, 2014
3:00 p.m. ET
      Rock River Coalition and Environmental Law Institute Webinar: Landscape-scale Identification of Actually Restorable Wetlands: An overview of a procedure for identifying restorable wetlands at large scales           
                   
October 28, 2014
2:00 p.m. EDT
      The National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center Webinar: Predicting Climate Change Impacts on River Ecosystems and Salmonids across the Pacific Northwest          
                   
October 29, 2014 
1:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m. ET
      EPA Watershed Academy webinar: Climate Resilience: What to Expect. How to Prepare, and What You Can Learn from Others          
                   
October 30, 2014
2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m.
      Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation’s Ecosystem Restoration Program webinar: Community/ Watershed Approach with Build-Out and Traditional Stormwater Focus          
                   
NOVEMBER              
                   
November 4, 2014
3:00 p.m. ET
      ASWM Wetland Restoration Webinar: How to Prepare a Good Wetland Restoration Plan          
                   
November 4, 2014
1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m. EST
      EPA Green Infrastructure Program Webinar: Innovative Financing for Green Infrastructure          
                   
November 5, 2014
4:00 p.m. ET
      Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN) webinar. Green Infrastructure and Coastal Resilience          
                   
November 11, 2014
3:00 p.m.

      Rock River Coalition and Environmental Law Institute Webinar: Cost Benefit Analysis and Natural Conservation as a Mitigation Strategy          
                   
November 12, 2014
1:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m. EST
      Center for Watershed Protection Webcast Series: Series 2, Session 2: Retrofitting Existing Stormwater Ponds & Basins          
                   
November 14, 2014
2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m.
      Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation’s Ecosystem Restoration Program: Stormwater Master Planning Webinar 5 - Regional or Multi-Town Approach with Rural Road Focus          
                   
November 17, 2014
3:00 p.m. EST
      NFFA Webinar: The impact of wetland drainage on streamflow and flooding in the northern prairie pothole region           
                   
November 18, 2014
11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
      Iowa Storm Water Education Program - Stormwater Design Series Webinar:  Working Upstream in the Watershed- Turning to our Agriculture Neighbors for Flood Control with SRF Sponsored Project Funding (or click here)          
                   
November 19, 2014
3:00 p.m. ET
      ASWM  Wetland Mapping Consortium (WMC) Webinar: Variable Width Riparian Areas Mapping: a Robust GIS Approach          
                   
November 19, 2014
3:30 p.m. EST
      Northeast Climate Science Center (NCSC) webinar: Making decisions in complex landscapes: Headwater stream management across multiple agencies using structured decision making           
                   
November 26, 2014
3:00 p.m. EST
      ASWM Members’ Webinar: EPA Region 5 Watershed Handbook          
                   
DECEMBER              
                   
December 2, 2014
1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m. ET
      EPA 2014 Green Infrastructure Webcast Series: Green Infrastructure for Localized Flood Management          
                   
December 9, 2014
3:00 p.m. ET
      ASWM Wetland Restoration Webinar: Atlantic/Gulf Coast Coastal Marshes and Mangrove Restoration           
                   

December 10, 2014


12:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m. ET

3:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m. ET
     

ASWM Members’ Webinar: How to Use Video to Communicate a Science Message

Webinar Part 1: Demystifying the Science Filmmaking Process

Webinar Part 2: An Introduction to Science Videography
         
                   
December 17, 2014
3:00 p.m. ET
      ASWM Wetland Mapping Consortium (WMC) Webinar: Mapping With Ecological Site Descriptors          
                   
MEETINGS             
                   
OCTOBER          
                   
October 23, 2014 
Bronx, New York
      Wildlife Conservation Society, NOAA and Partners Symposium: Urban River Restoration           
                   
October 27-28, 2014
Higgins Lake, Michigan
      10th annual Michigan Clean Water Corps (MiCorps) Conference          
                   
October 27-29, 2014
St. Louis, Missouri
      Midwest Levees and Rivers Technical Exchange 2014 Conference: Celebrating Our Rivers          
                   
October 27-30, 2014
Broomfield, Colorado
      Association of State Floodplain Mangers: National Mitigation and Floodproofing Workshop          
                   
October 28-29, 2014
Kansas City, Missouri

     

The Great Rivers Chapter of The International Erosion Control Association Fall Conference and Expo: Resilience in a Changing World

         
October 31, 2014
Kent, Ohio
      Kent State University symposium: Water Infrastructure and Rebounding Cities          
           
NOVEMBER          
                   
November 4-6, 2014
Fairlee, Vermont
      International Erosion Control Association Northeast Chapter Conference and Trade Show: Where the Land Meets the Water          
                   
November 12-14, 2014
Cholula, Puebla, Mexico
      University of the Americas Puebla International Conference on Hydro-Meteorological Risks and Climate Change          
                   
November 14-15, 2014
Alton, Illinois 
      The National Great Rivers Research and Education Center: Mississippi River Watershed Education Symposium           
                   
November 15, 2014
Wallingford, Connecticut
      Connecticut Association of Conservation & Inland Wetlands Commissions (CACIWC) 37th Annual Meeting & Environmental Conference: Preparing Connecticut for The Impact of Global Changes          
                   
November 15-16, 2014
Columbus, Ohio
      Ohio Wetlands Association: Ohio Wetlands Summit 2014: Wetland Restoration          
                   
November 17-20, 2014
Charlotte, North Carolina
      North Carolina State University: EcoStream - Stream Ecology and Restoration Conference          
                   
November 18-20, 2014
Washington, DC
      Association of Climate Change Officers: Defense, National Security & Climate Change Symposium          
                   
November 21, 2014 
Linthicum, Maryland
      Maryland Water Monitoring Council 20th Annual Conference: Looking to the Past to Guide our Future           
                   
DECEMBER          
                   
December 2-3, 2014
Washington, DC
      The Council of Scientific Society President: The World Science Summit on Climate Engineering: Future Guiding Principles and Ethics          
                   
December 11-14, 2014
New Orleans, Louisiana
      International Symposium on Sediment Dynamics: From the Summit to the Sea is part of a series of symposia organized under auspices of The International Commission on Continental Erosion (ICCE) and International Association of Hydrological Sciences.

Abstracts due by November 10, 2014.
         
                   

December 15-19, 2014
San Francisco, California

      American Geophysical Union’s 47th annual Fall Meeting          
                   
JANUARY 2015                  
                   
January 23-24, 2015
East Lansing, Michigan
      Stewardship Network: The Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference          
                   
FEBRUARY 2015          
                   
February 8-11, 2015
Dubuque, Iowa
      Partnership for River Restoration and Science in the Upper Midwest: Upper Midwest Stream Restoration Symposium           
                   
February 11-12, 2015
San Jose, California
      Citizen Science Association: Citizen Science 2015           
                   
February 16-19, 2015
Houston, Texas
      Consortium for Ocean Leadership: 2015 Oil Spill and Ecosystem Science Conference          
                   

February 23-25, 2015 Washington, DC 

      Center for Climate and Energy Solutions Climate Leadership Conference          
                   
February 24-26, 2015
Madison, Wisconsin
      Wisconsin Wetlands Association 20th Anniversary Wetland Science Conference: Telling Our Stories

Abstract deadline: November 14, 2014
         
           
MARCH 2015          
                   
March 12-13, 2015
Denver, Colorado
      2015 Annual Land Use Conference: Western Places/Western Spaces: Building Fair and Resilient Communities          
                   
March 25-27, 2015 
Berkeley, California
     

UC Berkeley, in partnership with the National Park Service and National Geographic Society: Science for Parks, Parks for Science: The Next Century

Abstract deadline: November 1, 2014.
         
                   
March 30-April 2, 2015
North Charleston, South Carolina
      Association of State Floodplain Managers: Coastal GeoTools Conference          
                   
APRIL 2015                  
                   
April 10-11, 2015
Vancouver, British Columbia
      International Conference on Climate Change: Impacts and Responses          
                   
MAY 2015                  
                   
May 12-14, 2014
St. Louis, Missouri
     

EcoAdapt: National Adaptation Forum

Proposal deadline: October 24, 2014
         
                   
May 25-29, 2015
Burlington, Vermont
     

International Association for Great Lakes Research (IAGLR): 58th Annual Conference on Great Lakes Research

Session Proposals due: October 24, 2014
         
                   
May 31-June 4, 2015  Providence, Rhode Island

     

2015 Society of Wetland Scientists Annual Meeting: Changing climate. Changing wetlands

Abstract deadline: October 31, 2014
         
                   
JUNE 2015                  
                   
June 22-24 2015
Groningen, The Netherlands
     

University of Massachusetts-Amherst: Fish Passage 2015

Important Dates
         
July 2015
                 
                   
July 5-10, 2015
Portland, Oregon
      9th Annual IALE World Congress: Crossing Scales, Crossing Borders; Global Approaches to Complex Challenges

Call for presentations deadline: March 1, 2015
         
July 21-23, 2015
Breckenridge, Colorado
       Rocky Mountain Stream Restoration Conference          
                   
July 27-August 2, 2015
Nagoya Japan  
     

XIX INQUA Congress Quaternary Perspectives on Climate Change, Natural Hazards and Civilization

Abstract deadline: December 20, 2014
         
                   
AUGUST 2015                  
                   
August 9-14, 2015
Baltimore, Maryland
     

The Ecological Society of America: Ecological Science at the Frontier: Celebrating ESA's Centennial

 

Abstract deadlines
         
                   
August 23-28, 2015
La Crosse, Wisconsin
     

4th Biennial Symposium of the International Society for River Science

Abstract deadline: January 7, 2015
         
SEPTEMBER 2015                  
                   
September 23-25, 2015  Baltimore, Maryland      

Resource Institute, Inc.: Mid-Atlantic Stream Restoration Conference

Abstract deadline: January 15 2015
         
                   
TRAINING             
                   
OCTOBER          
                   
October 28-30, 2014
Olympia, Washington
     

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, National Conservation Training Center Course: Climate-Smart Conservation

         
                   
October 29-30, 2014
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species (Section 7)          
                   
NOVEMBER          
                   
November 6, 13, 20, and December 4, 2014
New Brunswick, New Jersey
      Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education course: ArcGIS Editing & Data Development          
                   

November 7-8, 2014 
Columbus, Ohio

      Richard Chinn Environmental Training course: Wetland Permitting Training. For other dates and locations, click here.          
                   
November 12-13, 2014
Lancaster, Pennsylvania
      Field Geology Services course: Using Fluvial Geomorphology in Watershed Assessment and Stream Restoration          
                   
November 17-20, 2014
Richmond, Virginia
      Richard Chinn Environmental Training course: Wetland Delineation Training. For other dates and locations, click here.          
                   
DECEMBER          
                   
December 4-5, 2014
Atlanta, Georgia    
      Duncan & Duncan course: Problem and Atypical Wetland Delineation - Piedmont           
                   
December 8-9, 2014
St. Michaels, Maryland
      Environmental Concern course: Winter Woody Plant ID          
                   
December 12, 2014
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan course: Endangered Species Act Overview          
                   
JANUARY 2015                  
                   
January 26-27, 2015 
Basking Ridge, New Jersey
      Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education course: Vegetation Identification for Wetland Delineation: Winter          
                   
FEBRUARY 2015                  
                   
February 9-13, 2015
San Diego, California
      Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Basic Wetland Delineation          
                   
MARCH 2015                  
                   
March 16-18, 2015
Naples, Florida
      Everglades Wetland Research Park course: Treatment Wetlands           

     

For more wetland events, meetings, conferences, and courses nationwide, visit the ASWM calendar.

 

Wetland Breaking News - October 2014

 



INDEX

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • The 2015 National Wetlands Awards–Call for Nominations
  • EPA Launches Broad Collaborative of External Stakeholders to Advance Green Infrastructure
  • In wake of drought and fires, turtle habitat becomes death trap
  • Study: Extra $22.5B a year in environmental gains for Chesapeake region if cleanup proceeds
  • UN biodiversity report highlights failure to meet conservation targets
  • Earth Has Lost Half of its Wildlife in the Past 40 Years, says WWF 
  • Toxic algae cocktail brews in Lake Erie
  • ASWM Members’ Webinar: ELI and The Nature Conservancy's Watershed Approach Handbook – October 20, 2014
  • ASWM Wetland Restoration Webinar: How to Prepare a Good Wetland Restoration – November 4, 2014
  • Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar: The Impact of wetland drainage on streamflow and flooding in the northern prairie pothole region – November 17, 2014
  • Wetland Mapping Consortium (WMC) Webinar: Variable Width Riparian Areas Mapping: a Robust GIS Approach – November 19, 2014

NATIONAL NEWS  

  • FEMA Will Require States to Examine Climate Risks in Disaster Planning
  • EPA chief Gina McCarthy asks water professionals to back new wetland rules
  • Obama to Create World’s Largest Protected Marine Reserve in Pacific Ocean
  • World Stands By as Algae and Dead Zones Ruin Water
  • Federal Judge Rejects BP's Request for Repayment on Oil Spill Claims
  • EPA Unveils Second Phase of Plan to Reverse Great Lakes Damage
  • Fracking or Drinking Water? That May Become the Choice
  • Establishing requirements to control nonpoint source pollution
  • EPA Tool for Water & Wastewater Utilities on Flood Resilience
  • Analysis of State Oil & Gas Regs Finds States Are on the Right Track  
  • U.S. Senator Supporting Rigs to Reef Program in Gulf of Mexico

STATES NEWS  

  • AK: What 35,000 Walruses Forced to the Beach Tell Us About Global Warming
  • CA: Rice Farmers Rent Crucial ‘Pop-Up’ Wetlands for Migrating Birds
  • CA: Lake Tahoe's clarity improves, but fires, invasive species, erosion remain severe threats
  • CA: California’s Water-Starved Farmers Stymied by Fish Protections
  • FL: Miami foundation offers $10 million for phosphate pollution solution
  • IL: Great Lakes in unprecedented danger, Chicago mayor says
  • KY: Developers: Why Can't Wetlands Money Be Used For Sewers?
  • LA: The most ambitious environmental lawsuit ever
  • LA: Amid rising water, sinking land, folks in southern La. sit tight
  • MD: With unhealthy stream pollution, Jones Falls targeted for restoration and maintenance projects
  • MI: Manistee dam removal yields snake hibernaculum
  • MN: Drinking Water Solutions May Help Construction Site Runoff
  • MN: Minnesota lake first in nation to use new product to kill zebra mussels
  • MO: NRCS Helping Landowners Restore 1,638 More Acres of Wetlands in Missouri
  • NJ: N.J. Braces for Future Disasters by Fleeing, and Fortifying, The Coast
  • NC: EPA halts N.C. coal ash plan
  • NC: Duke Energy creates $10 million water fund
  • OH: State receives $8m for farmland protection & wetland restoration
  • OH: Farmers on board to limit area’s phosphorus runoff
  • OH: Ohio lawmakers seek toxin limits from EPA
  • PA: DEP releases updated details on water contamination near drilling sites
  • TX: Groundwater-Level Declines Continue To Cause Land Elevation Loss In Houston – Galveston Region
  • TX: Aquifer Is No Quick Fix for Central Texas Thirst
  • WA: New era in stormwater management is here
  • WA: Algae blooms that kill pose puzzles
  • WV: EPA's Right to Rescind W.Va. Coal Mine's Clean Water Permit Upheld by Federal Court
  • WV: DEP concerned about pace of Freedom Industries cleanup
  • WI: Dead zones haunt Green Bay as manure fuels algae blooms

WETLAND SCIENCE  

  • EPA Plans to Issue Health Advisories On Harmful Algal Blooms  
  • Obama Administration Launches Global Alliance for Climate Smart Agriculture  
  • Researchers: 2013 Carbon Emissions Jumped More Than Ever
  • The Pacific Starfish Die-Off Continues, but There Is New Hope
  • Coca Cola, Heinz and Other Major Food Companies Warn Climate Change Threatens Business
  • 20-Year Study Shows Levels of Pesticides Still a Concern for Aquatic Life In U.S. Rivers and Streams
  • Mussels don't stick around in acidic ocean water
  • Verdict: Charges Dropped on Account of Climate Change
  • Half of North American bird species threatened by climate change
  • How Much Is Climate Change To Blame For Extreme Weather?

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • Downstream Voices: Wetland Solutions to Reducing Disaster Risk
  • My Healthy Wetland:  A Handbook for Wetland Owners
  • Low Impact Development (LID) "Barrier Busters" Fact Sheet Series

POTPOURRI

  • Report offers ideas for a Boston beset by rising seas
  • Proposed APA Division -- Hazard Mitigation and Disaster Recovery Planning
  • Australia Unveils Its Plan to Protect Great Barrier Reef
  • Beer fight brewing over EPA rule
  • The Wetland Foundation 2015 Travel Grants

WEBINARS, MEETINGS, TRAINING

 Webinars

  • ELI and The Nature Conservancy's Watershed Approach Handbook: Improving Outcomes and Increasing Benefits Associated with Wetland and Stream Restoration and Protection Projects
  • Landscape-scale Identification of Actually Restorable Wetlands: An overview of a procedure for identifying restorable wetlands at large scales 
  • Working With the New FY2015 SSURGO and gSsURGO Soil Databases
  • Climate Change and Federal Land Management: Assessing Priorities Using a Social Network Approach
  • What to Expect. How to Prepare, and What You Can Learn from Others
  • Community/ Watershed Approach with Build-Out and Traditional Stormwater Focus
  • How to Prepare a Good Wetland Restoration Plan
  • Innovative Financing for Green Infrastructure
  • Green Infrastructure and Coastal Resilience
  • Cost Benefit Analysis and Natural Conservation as a Mitigation Strategy
  • Series 2, Session 2: Retrofitting Existing Stormwater Ponds & Basins
  • Stormwater Master Planning Webinar 5 - Regional or Multi-Town Approach with Rural Road Focus
  • The impact of wetland drainage on streamflow and flooding in the northern prairie pothole region 
  • Working Upstream in the Watershed- Turning to our Agriculture Neighbors for Flood Control with SRF Sponsored Project Funding
  • Variable Width Riparian Areas Mapping: a Robust GIS Approach
  • Making decisions in complex landscapes: Headwater stream management across multiple agencies using structured decision making 
  • EPA Region 5 Watershed Handbook
  • Green Infrastructure for Localized Flood Management
  • Atlantic/Gulf Coast Coastal Marshes and Mangrove Restoration 
  • How to Use Video to Communicate a Science Message
  • Mapping With Ecological Site Descriptors

Meetings

  • Urban River Restoration 
  • 10th annual Michigan Clean Water Corps (MiCorps) Conference
  • Celebrating Our Rivers
  • National Mitigation and Floodproofing Workshop
  • Resilience in a Changing World
  • Water Infrastructure and Rebounding Cities
  • Where the Land Meets the Water
  • Hydro-Meteorological Risks and Climate Change
  • Mississippi River Watershed Education Symposium 
  • Preparing Connecticut for The Impact of Global Changes
  • Ohio Wetlands Summit 2014: Wetland Restoration
  • EcoStream - Stream Ecology and Restoration Conference
  • Defense, National Security & Climate Change Symposium
  • Looking to the Past to Guide our Future 
  • The World Science Summit on Climate Engineering: Future Guiding Principles and Ethics
  • Sediment Dynamics: From the Summit to the Sea
  • American Geophysical Union (AGU) 47th Annual Fall Meeting
  • The Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference
  • Upper Midwest Stream Restoration Symposium 
  • Citizen Science 2015 
  • 2015 Oil Spill and Ecosystem Science Conference
  • Climate Leadership Conference
  • Telling Our Stories
  • Western Places/Western Spaces: Building Fair and Resilient Communities
  • Science for Parks, Parks for Science: The Next Century
  • Water for Urban Areas
  • Coastal GeoTools Conference
  • Impacts and Responses
  • National Adaptation Forum
  • 58th Annual Conference on Great Lakes Research
  • Changing climate. Changing wetlands
  • Fish Passage 2015
  • Crossing Scales, Crossing Borders; Global Approaches to Complex Challenges
  • Rocky Mountain Stream Restoration Conference
  • Quaternary Perspectives on Climate Change, Natural Hazards and Civilization
  • Ecological Science at the Frontier: Celebrating ESA's Centennial
  • 4th Biennial Symposium of the International Society for River Science
  • Mid-Atlantic Stream Restoration Conference

Training 

  • Climate-Smart Conservation and Models
  • Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species (Section 7)
  • ArcGIS Editing & Data Development
  • Wetland Permitting Training
  • Using Fluvial Geomorphology in Watershed Assessment and Stream Restoration
  • Wetland Delineation Training
  • Problem and Atypical Wetland Delineation - Piedmont
  • Winter Woody Plant ID
  • Endangered Species Act Overview
  • Vegetation Identification for Wetland Delineation: Winter
  • Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Treatment Wetlands

 

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Wetland Breaking NewsThe Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those working in water resources and related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published for over ten years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.  

Wetland Breaking News - September 2014The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to news@aswm.org.

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled and Edited by Alan Grant and Marla Stelk, Editors; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors. Executive Director: Jeanne Christie.  Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399 Fax: 207-892-3089

 

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