Wetland Breaking News - September 2016

                   
                   
   
IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

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Wetland Breaking News - September 2016


All photos by
Jeanne Christie, ASWM

     

Wetland Breaking News - September 2016Dear Friends,

This summer on August 25th, the National Park Service (NPS) turned 100 years old. Established by President Woodrow Wilson in 1916, the NPS now oversees more than 410 parks, monuments and historic sites on approximately 85 million acres across 50 states and territories. Although our national parks are lauded primarily for their magnificent natural beauty, charismatic wildlife and recreational opportunities, they have also provided scientists with unique living laboratories within which to conduct critical scientific research. According to an article in this issue of Wetland Breaking News (Science in the Wild: The Legacy of the U.S. National Park System), scientists are currently working in about 289 of the 412 national park units conducting around 4,000 scientific experiments.

However, the pros and cons of creating national parks have been hotly contested for the last 100 years. One of the challenges currently being raised is the impact of visitors on the parks’ infrastructure. In the Editor’s Choice section of this issue, you will find an article, National Park Service turns 100, and some sites are showing their age, reporting that park visitations for 2016 are expected to top 330 million for the first time – a 23 million increase over last year. However, the NPS does not have adequate funding to maintain visitor services such as restrooms, camp sites, bridges and roads. According to the article, “In a December report, the GAO concluded that Congress’s $3.1 billion appropriation over about a decade amounted to an 8 percent funding drop when adjusted for inflation. Lawmakers who called on the service to create a higher revenue stream overlooked one major obstacle: Congress. It virtually barred the agency from increasing rates and must pass a law to change that.” In fact, the NPS has an estimated $11.93 billion shortfall.

As the climate continues to change the geographical distribution of wildlife habitats, fragmentation is becoming a more significant and pressing issue. Various species of flora and fauna will shift their geographical distribution in order to adapt to changing conditions assuming they can access new habitat. But as human populations continue to grow and develop available land this will become more challenging - thus the NPS will continue to provide critical habitat far into the future even if the species composition may change. Several new reserves and parks have been recently created across the globe that may fill this need (see Obama Creates the World’s Largest Marine Reserve, It’s Official: Obama Declares Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument, and Yosemite recently announced its biggest expansion in 70 years.) Hopefully the funding issue will be resolved soon in order to support the national parks we already have and provide support for current and future expansions.

Happy Fall!


Marla J. Stelk, Editor
Wetland Breaking News


     
                   


Wetland Breaking News - September 2016

The Wetland Campus Research Challenge

The National Wetland Condition Assessment Campus Research Challenge gives graduate students the opportunity to use NWCA data to conduct scientific research and analysis. This challenge is intended to encourage external, innovative research and information development in support of enhanced wetland assessment and management at multiple scales. EPA encourages student applicants to work with their advisors and other faculty; and to consider how this work may also be incorporated into your thesis, a standalone project, journal articles, and/or presentations or posters at conferences. For more information, click here.

What Do the Presidential Candidates Know about Science?

By Christine Gorman – Scientific American – September 13, 2016
This year’s highly unusual presidential election resembles the past two campaigns in at least one way. The candidates of the two major parties— Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump—provided answers to 20 questions about the most important science-based issues the U.S. faces in coming years. Green Party candidate Jill Stein answered the questions as well. (Libertarian Party nominee Gary Johnson has not responded so far.) The questions were developed and refined by dozens of scientific organizations representing more than 10 million scientists and engineers after a crowd-sourcing effort led and coordinated by ScienceDebate.org. Scientific American, as the group’s media partner, plans to grade the candidates’ answers in advance of the September 26 presidential debate. For full story, click here.

National Park Service turns 100, and some sites are showing their age

By Darryl Fears – The Washington Post – August 24, 2016
Interior Secretary Sally Jewell commemorated the National Park Service’s 100th birthday in a speech late Thursday, calling their creation “one of the nation’s most revolutionary ideas — that these lands, our iconic historic sites and our culturally significant places should belong to every American.” Standing on a stage erected near the Roosevelt Arch at the north entrance of Yellowstone National Park near Gardiner, Mont., Jewell said, “I can think of no better place to commemorate this milestone than here, at America’s first national park, under a big sky, on a crisp night, in the shadows of beautiful mountains and on the shoulders of conservation giants who came before us.” For full story, click here.

Science in the Wild: The Legacy of the U.S. National Park System

By Jim Robbins – Environment360 – August 24, 2016
In a small cabin that serves as the Glacier National Park climate change office, Dan Fagre clicks through photos that clearly show the massive glaciers that give this park its name are in a hasty retreat. "There was a hundred square kilometers of ice in 1850," Fagre, a United States Geological Survey researcher who has studied the glaciers of Glacier since 1991, explains. "We are down to 14 to 15 square kilometers, so an 85 to 86 percent loss of ice in the park. There's no doubt they are going to disappear unless some massive cooling happens," he says, which isn't likely. The flows of mountain streams and rivers throughout the park will dwindle as their sources melt. And one species that will dearly miss the ice-cold runoff from the glaciers is the meltwater stonefly, an insect that's only found in a few glacier-fed streams in the park. It will likely disappear when the glaciers vanish, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says. For full story, click here.

 

 

ASWM UPCOMING WEBINARS

 
 

 

ASWM’S Members’ Wetland Webinar: Legal Processes for Wetland Permits – September 28, 2016

The Association of State Wetland Managers Members’ Wetland Webinar Legal Processes for Wetland Permits will be held on Wednesday, September 28, 2016 - 3:00 p.m. ET. Presenter: Janet Brooks, Esq., Attorney at Law. For more information, click here.

Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance Webinar – October 4, 2016

Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar will be hedl on October 4, 2016 at 3:00 p.m. ET.

  • October Federal Update: The FEMA Proposed Rule for FRMS and Update on WRDA presented by Larry Larson, Senior Policy Advisor, Association of State Floodplain Managers
  • Improving the Quantity and Quality of Coastal Wetlands in the U.S. South Atlantic presented by Kristine Cherry, Governors' South Atlantic Alliance (GSAA); Kim Matthews, RTI International; and Jason Doll, Moffatt & Nichol.

For more information, click here.

Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar – October 5, 2016

Wetland Mapping Consortium webinar will be held on October 5, 2016 at 3:00 p.m. ET. Presented by Elijah Ramsey III, U.S. Geological Survey and Amina Rangoonwala, U.S. Geological Survey. For more information and to register, click here.

ASWM Soils Training Webinar #4: Using Field Observations of Soils Onsite in Decision Making – October 12, 2016

The Association of State Wetland Managers Training Webinar Series: Soils Training Webinar #4: Using Field Observations of Soils Onsite in Decision Making will be held on October 12, 2016 at 3:00 p.m. ET. Presented by John Galbraith, Associate Professor, Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech; W. Lee Daniels, Professor of Environmental Soil Science, Virginia Tech; and Bruce Vasilas, Professor of Agronomy and Soil Management in the Plant and Soil Sciences Department at the University of Delaware. For more information and to register, click here.

ASWM’s Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar: Not Lost in Translation: How to Select the Right Wetland Restoration Team – October 18, 2016

The Association of State Wetland Managers Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar: Not Lost in Translation: How to Select the Right Wetland Restoration Team will be held on Tuesday, October 18, 2016 at 3:00 p.m. ET. Presented by Lisa Cowan, PLA, ASLA, Principle, Studioverde; John Bourgeois, Executive Project Manager, South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project; and Matt Schweisberg, Principal, Wetland Strategies and Solutions, LLC. For more information and to register, click here.

 



Wetland Breaking News - September 2016

US, China Formally Join Paris Climate Agreement

By Mike Gaworecki – DESMOG – September 23, 2016
The two biggest greenhouse gas emitters in the world have formally joined the Paris climate agreement. Shortly after China adopted the agreement, U.S. President Barack Obama today made the announcement that the U.S. had followed suit while he was in Hangzhou, China, ahead of this weekend's G20 summit. Together, the U.S. and China are responsible for some 38.76 percent of global emissions. For full blog post, click here.

U.S. Forest Service and Coca-Cola Announce the Restoration of One Billion Liters of Water

Contact: Office of Communications – USDA – September 13, 2016
Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Coca-Cola North America President Sandy Douglas today announced that their partnership to restore and protect damaged watersheds on national forests achieved a milestone of one billion liters of water restored, and that the partnership will commit to double that outcome through 2018. The 13 restoration areas are located on national forest land, which provides drinking water to more than 60 million Americans, and they ensure future generations will have access to fresh water. For full news release, click here.

Playa Lakes Joint Venture Seeks Grant Proposals to Support Bird Habitat Conservation

Playa Lakes Joint Venture – September 11, 2016
Playa Lakes Joint Venture (PLJV) announces the availability of funding, through the ConocoPhillips grant program, for projects that support habitat conservation for wintering, migrating and breeding birds within its region. PLJV boundaries include portions of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. For more information, click here. To download grant RFP and instructions, click here.

More Than $33 Million in Funding Approved to Protect Waterfowl and Other Bird Species

HuntingLife – September 9, 2016
The Migratory Bird Conservation Commission today approved $33.2 million in funding for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners to purchase, lease or otherwise conserve more than 81,000 acres of wetland and associated upland habitats for waterfowl, shorebirds and other birds across the United States. For full story, click here.

U.S. Suspends Construction on Part of North Dakota Pipeline

By Jack Healy and John Schwartz – The New York Times – September 9, 2016
The federal government on Friday temporarily blocked construction on part of a North Dakota oil pipeline, an unusual intervention in a prairie battle that has drawn thousands of Native Americans and activists to camp and demonstrate. In announcing the pause, the government acknowledged complaints from the Standing Rock Sioux and other tribal nations that their concerns had not been fully heard before federal overseers approved a pipeline that the tribe said could damage their water supplies and ancestral cultural sites. The Justice Department and other agencies called for “serious discussion on whether there should be nationwide reform with respect to considering tribes’ views on these types of infrastructure projects.” For full story, click here.

National Academies panel urges overhaul of energy policies

By Christa Marshall – E&E Publishing, LLC – September 8, 2016
The United States needs to put a price on carbon dioxide and other pollutants and overhaul energy policies to help avoid catastrophic climate change and other public health calamities, according to a report released today by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. For full story, click here.

Yosemite announces biggest expansion in 70 years, adding new meadows and forestland

By Louis Sahagun – Los Angeles Times – September 7, 2016
In its biggest expansion in decades, Yosemite National Park on Wednesday broadened its western boundary by adding 400 acres of lush meadowlands edged with cedars and ponderosa pines that provide habitat for some of California’s most threatened wildlife. For full story, click here.

US Clears Way for Cleanup of Colorado Mine After Huge Spill

By Dan Elliott, Associated Press – ABC News – September 7, 2016
A Colorado mine that spewed 3 million gallons of contaminated wastewater into rivers in three Western states was designated a Superfund site Wednesday, clearing the way for a multimillion-dollar federal cleanup. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency added the inactive Gold King Mine and 47 other nearby sites to the Superfund list. It also included nine other sites in eight states and Puerto Rico. The Colorado Superfund designation is the beginning of a years-long effort to clean up the wreckage of a once-booming mining industry in the San Juan Mountains in the southwestern corner of the state. Abandoned mining sites send millions of gallons of acidic wastewater to creeks and rivers every year. For full story, click here.

Service Creates ESA Listing Workplan to Provide Predictability and Encourage Proactive Conservation of Imperiled Wildlife

Contact: Brian Hires – U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service – September 1, 2016
As part of its ongoing efforts to improve the effectiveness and implementation of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and provide the best possible conservation for our nation’s imperiled wildlife, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released today its National Listing Workplan for addressing ESA listing and critical habitat decisions over the next seven years. This announcement comes as Service biologists wrap up work on a previous list of more than 250 species that had been identified as candidates for protection under the ESA. This new workplan will allow the Service to meet its current and future ESA obligations while creating opportunity for partnerships aimed at delivering conservation on the ground to keep working lands working, protect local ways of life and reduce regulatory burdens, saving the ESA’s protection for the species that need it most. For full press release, click here.

USDA announces changes for largest conservation program

U.S. Department of Agriculture – Farm Forum – September 1, 2016
In response to customer and partner input, USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service announced today a significant update to the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP), the nation’s largest conservation program by acreage. Beginning with the new enrollment period planned later this year, the updated CSP will leverage redesigned planning and evaluation tools and an expanded array of new enhancements to provide conservation-minded producers with more options to improve conditions on working lands. For full story, click here.

Thousands of Homes Keep Flooding, Yet They Keep Being Rebuilt Again

By Katherine Bagley – Environment 360 – August 29, 2016
More than 2,100 properties across the U.S. enrolled in the National Flood Insurance Program have flooded and been rebuilt more than 10 times since 1978, according to a new analysis of insurance data by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC). One home in Batchelor, Louisiana has flooded 40 times over the past four decades, receiving $428,379 in insurance payments. More than 30,000 properties in the program, run by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, have flooded multiple times over the years. Those homes, known as “severe repetitive loss properties,” make up just 0.6 percent of federal flood insurance policies. But they account for 10.6 percent of the program’s claims — totaling $5.5 billion in payments. For full story, click here.

Dirt Capital Seeds Financing for Ecological Farms

By Kat Friedrich – Conservation Finance Network – August 24, 2016
Who is there to provide financing when small farmers in the Northeast are trying to secure the futures of ecological farms? Dirt Capital Partners has set up a business model to support its goals by working with 11 mission-oriented investors. It has now purchased and leased nine farms in New England, New York, and New Jersey. “My focus is pretty simple: it's ‘invest in good farmers,’” said Jacob Israelow, founder of Dirt Capital Partners, at The New York Times Food for Tomorrow Conference in 2015. “By ‘good farmers,’ I mean farmers who produce very high quality food, who take care of the ecology of their farms and their communities, and who know how to make money doing it. For full story, click here.

NRCS Announces November 18 Application Deadline for Financial Assistance

USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service
The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) announced November 18 as the first cut-off date to apply for fiscal year 2017 funds through the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP). “EQIP provides a wide range of opportunities to help Missouri farmers, ranchers, and landowners improve the quality of natural resources on their land,” State Conservationist J.R. Flores said. “An extensive variety of problems can be solved through EQIP, and I encourage our customers to visit their local NRCS field offices to explore how we can assist them.” EQIP allows farmers, ranchers, forestland managers and landowners to conserve natural resources by making available financial assistance to improve soil, water, air, plants, animals and related resources. For more information, click here.

Health official warns Zika could spread across U.S. Gulf

By Chris Prentice – Reuters – August 21, 2016
One of the top U.S. public health officials on Sunday warned that the mosquito-borne Zika virus could extend its reach across the U.S. Gulf Coast after officials last week confirmed it as active in the popular tourist destination of Miami Beach. The possibility of transmission in Gulf States such as Louisiana and Texas will likely fuel concerns that the virus, which has been shown to cause the severe birth defect known as microcephaly, could spread across the continental United States, even though officials have played down such an outcome. For full story, click here.

Cruel Summer: Floods, fires and heat

By Andrew Freedman – Mashable.com – August 19, 2016
When it comes to our climate, everything is connected. And there has never been a year, and most especially a summer, that has so prominently and destructively showcased this. Right now, wildfires are blazing across the drought-stricken western United States, overpowering firefighters in California. Earlier this summer, the already scorching Middle East saw all-time record heat. Meanwhile, from huge swaths of China to at least four states in the U.S., devastating flooding has inundated homes and uprooted lives. And we still haven’t arrived at the peak of hurricane season. The extreme weather events we’ve seen — and are still living through — around the world collectively bear the fingerprints of human-caused global warming. So, too, does the bevy of monthly heat records that have fallen so frequently that the news stories announcing them almost write themselves. For full story, click here.

Great Lakes Commission leads fight against web trafficking of aquatic invasive species

Great Lakes Commission – August 17, 2016
The Great Lakes Commission (GLC) announced today that it has completed development and testing of an innovative web data mining tool to find aquatic invasive species for sale on the internet, and is continuing with implementation of the tool. The GLC is receiving $340,000 in Great Lakes Restoration Initiative funding from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to work with invasive species managers to apply the Great Lakes Detector of Invasive Aquatics in Trade (GLDIATR) to shield against this threat. For full story, click here.

Most of the world’s large aquifers at tipping point

By American Farm Bureau Federation – Natural Resource Report – August 12, 2016
To most people in the U.S., water is simply assumed. Without much thought, they turn on the shower, brush their teeth, make coffee or tea, flush the toilet, and grab a full, cold plastic bottle of name-brand water. Taking a bite of food or slipping on a cotton T-shirt does not inspire thoughts of water, its role in agriculture, or challenges to managing the nation’s water supply. But water is the lifeblood of agriculture, and plays an ever-increasing role in food availability, cost, food security, and national security… and competition for it is increasing as supplies decrease. For full story, click here.

How a 1995 firearms case led to Clean Water Act muddle

By Amanda Reilly – E&E Publishing, LLC – August 11, 2016
Court rulings in Clean Water Act cases largely gave federal agencies broad regulatory authority until an unrelated 1995 Supreme Court decision on the possession of firearms in school zones, according to Congress' research arm. In United States v. Lopez, the high court struck down a federal statute for the first time in more than 50 years on the grounds that it exceeded the powers given to Congress by the Commerce Clause. "Lopez set the backdrop" for future rulings limiting federal Clean Water Act jurisdiction, the Congressional Research Service said in a report released Monday. For full story, click here.

Unprecedented federal court ruling elevates environmental justice over demands of industry

By Ari Phillips – Fusion – August 10, 2016
An unprecedented federal court ruling this week validated the way the Obama administration measures the social cost of carbon (SCC), a decision that could have wide-ranging impacts on the future of the energy industry and the way the United States addresses environmental justice. For full story, click here.

NOAA Announces New Partnerships to Restore Habitat in the Great Lakes

NOAA Habitat Conservation – August 9, 2016
NOAA is announcing $8.9 million in funding for three Great Lakes habitat restoration partnerships. Funding for these partnerships is provided by the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, which was launched in 2010 to accelerate efforts to protect and restore the Great Lakes. We are working with the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative to implement habitat restoration projects that will help improve “toxic hotspots” known as Areas of Concern. For full story, click here.

 

Wetland Breaking News - September 2016

Exotic ticks appear to be establishing themselves in Alaska

By Ned Rozell – Alaska Dispatch News – August 27, 2016
While Alaskans have long endured dense mosquitoes and frigid air, we've always had the absence of venomous snakes and dog ticks. But the latter may be establishing themselves here. Ticks that infest red squirrels, snowshoe hares and a variety of birds have always been present in Alaska, but a team of biologists and veterinarians recently found five non-native ticks on Alaska dogs and people. In a recent study published in the Journal of Medical Entomology, researchers identified brown dog ticks, American dog ticks, Rocky Mountain wood ticks, deer ticks and Lone Star ticks in Alaska. A few of those creatures hitchhiked up on animals and humans that had recently visited the Lower 48. But some had not. For full story, click here.

AK: Shishmaref votes to relocate from eroding barrier island to mainland

By Lisa Demer – Alaska Dispatch News – August 18, 2016
Residents of the coastal Alaska village with some of the worst erosion in the state voted this week to relocate rather than stay and protect the land they already have. The advisory vote in the village of Shishmaref was fairly close, with 94 voters who picked relocating to one of two nearby sites on the mainland, and 78 who said they would rather "protect in place." The City Council certified the election results Thursday, said Donna Barr, a council member who serves as secretary. For full story, click here.

CA: Newly discovered beetle decimates trees in Tijuana River Valley

By Nancy Aziz – CW6 News – September 1, 2016
A beetle from Southeast Asia has killed more than 140,000 trees in the Tijuana River Valley in a span of just 9 months, according to scientists, who fear the Kurishio Shot Hole Borer could spread to the rest of the state. "When I look at this I see a disaster. This is devastation I never thought I’d see in my lifetime,” said UC Agriculture and Natural Resources entomologist Dr. John Kabashima as he looked at hundreds of dead trees in the area Thursday. For full story, click here.

CA: Wetlands celebrates 10 years

By Brittany Woolsey and Bradley Zint – Los Angeles Times – August 31, 2016
The Amigos de Bolsa Chica recently celebrated the 10th anniversary of a tidal inlet project for the Bolsa Chica wetlands that allowed ocean waters to flow into the area for the first time in more than 100 years. The inlet, near Pacific Coast Highway and Seapoint Street, opened in the early hours of Aug. 24, 2006, with a Champagne toast. The moment marked an historic occasion for the Amigos, which had been working for more than 30 years to restore the area. For full story, click here.

CA: 1.8 Million Acres of Sierra Nevada Habitat Protected for Imperiled Frogs, Toads

Contact: Jeff Miller – Center for Biological Diversity – August 25, 2016
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced designation of 1,812,164 acres of protected “critical habitat” throughout the Sierra Nevada mountains for several endangered amphibians: the Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog, Yosemite toad and northern population of the mountain yellow-legged frog. The vast majority of the critical habitat for these amphibians is on federal public lands in national forests and national parks. For full press release, click here.

CO: Rocky Flats: A Wildlife Refuge Confronts Its Radioactive Past

By Fred Pearce – Environment 360 – August 16, 2016
A barn owl bursts from the tall prairie grasses. Elk skitter among cottonwood trees near an old stagecoach halt. A shrew crosses a track and hurtles into milkweed, where monarch butterflies feed. Somewhere amid the rare xeric grasses are coyotes, moose, mule deer, a handful of endangered Preble’s meadow jumping mice, and more than 600 plant species. "Welcome," says David Lucas of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, "to Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge." The place is undeniably beautiful, one of the best exurban wildlife reserves in the United States, an oasis of prairie biodiversity on the outskirts of Denver. For full story, click here.

FL: Sign up for Wetland Reserve Easements

Morning Ag Clips – September 12, 2016
Agricultural landowners and Indian tribes can apply for a Wetland Reserve Easement until Nov. 15 for fiscal year 2017 funding. USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) provides financial and technical assistance for landowners to purchase and restore wetlands, protect wildlife habitat and recharge groundwater on their property. Eligible landowners can enroll in a permanent or 30-year easement. Although applications are accepted on a continuous basis, funding selections are typically made once a year. Applications are available online. Contact Roney Gutierrez, 352-338-9502 for questions and submissions. For full story, click here.

FL: Nelson, local leaders question Florida changing water pollution rules

By Erika Pesantes and Andy Reid – Sun Sentinel – August 31, 2016 – Video
With water pollution already fueling toxic algae blooms in Florida, the state shouldn't allow more toxic chemicals to flow into waterways, South Florida officials warned Wednesday. U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson met with local leaders in Fort Lauderdale Wednesday to discuss concerns about the state's plan to ease some limits on potentially cancer-causing chemicals that drain into waterways. For full story and to view video, click here.

HI: Obama Creates the World's Largest Marine Reserve

Environmental News – August 30, 2016
The Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, first named a national monument by President George W. Bush in 2006, is a massively important marine nature reserve. Designated a World Heritage site, the region surrounding the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands teems with more than 7,000 marine and land species — some of which are unique to the area, including endangered whales and sea turtles. As a result, the region has been deemed irreplaceable by scientists. Environmental advocates have repeatedly called for an expansion of the monument’s protections to ensure that the area is safeguarded from commercial operations long into the future. Clearly, President Obama agrees. For full story, click here.

IL: TWI to play key role in seven-year “great leap” restoration at Midewin

The Wetlands Initiative – August 18, 2016
The U.S. Forest Service’s Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie in Will County, Illinois, is big in every sense of the word. At 20,000 acres, it’s the largest prairie restoration effort east of the Mississippi River, as well as the largest public open space in the Chicago metropolitan region. In fall 2015, it got some very big new inhabitants when bison were reintroduced. And starting in 2016, TWI will be part of a major restoration expansion at Midewin that’s bigger than anything ever done there before. For full story, click here.

IL: Report outlines vision for Chicago rivers: more accessible, inviting, cleaner

By Leonar Vivanco – Chicago Tribune – August 17, 2016 – Video
Tourists often take architectural boat tours on the Chicago River alongside kayakers and water taxis. People relax, sip on a cocktail and even fish from the riverwalk. Now imagine swimmers in the water. That's one of the activities envisioned for Chicago-area rivers in a report set to be released Wednesday by the Metropolitan Planning Council. For full story and to view video, click here.

IA: Vilsack: Iowa's economy needs a water quality solution

By Donnelle Eller – The Des Moines Register – August 18, 2016
U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack says he might be getting to the age where he speaks his mind, and he's talking pretty loudly this week: The former Iowa governor is frustrated his home state is unable to find a big answer to water quality problems. The way Vilsack sees it; the answer will be key to the state's ability to recruit companies, attract and retain the state's workers and build its economy. For full story, click here.

IA: Iowa farmers ripped out prairie; now some hope it can save them

By Darryl Fears – The Washington Post – August 7, 2016
There’s a wild presence in Tim Smith’s corn and soybean field that most farmers kill on sight. Smith made his way toward it, hoisting his long legs over row after row of soybean plants under a baking mid-morning sun. “It’s right over there,” he said. He stopped at the edge of a Midwestern prairie, a thicket of tall flowers and grasses more frightening to farmers than any horror movie madman lurking in a barn with a chain saw. Most growers say prairie is a nuisance that can choke crops. But not Smith. He is proud of the three acres he planted in the middle of one of the most productive farms in the county. He was there to show it off, not spray it. This affection for prairie bucks a farming tradition that dates back to when settlers arrived in the Midwest to farm centuries ago and ripped out wild grasses to tame the earth. Over time, prairie was nearly eradicated. Farmers today are still destroying the little that is left. It is a colossal mistake, according to recent studies by researchers at Iowa State University. Not only does prairie, with its deep-rooted plants, soak up farm wastewater that pollutes rivers, it also enriches soil. For full story, click here.

LA: Louisiana flood price tag could hit $15 billion

By Jonathan Berr – CBS News – September 8, 2016
The devastating floods that hit Louisiana and other parts of the Gulf Coast last month likely caused total economic losses of between $10 billion and $15 billion, according to reinsurer AON Benfield. That would make it one of the costliest natural disasters in U.S. history. For full story, click here.

LA: Louisiana’s sinking coast is a $100 billion nightmare for Big Oil

By Catherine Traywick – Bloomberg – August 17, 2016
From 5,000 feet up, it’s difficult to make out where Louisiana’s coastline used to be. But follow the skeletal remains of decades-old oil canals, and you get an idea. Once, these lanes sliced through thick marshland, clearing a path for pipelines or ships. Now they’re surrounded by open water, green borders still visible as the sea swallows up the shore. For full story, click here.

ME: It's Official: Obama Declares Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument

By Susan Sharon – MPBN – August 24, 2016 – Video
Supporters of what’s now known as the Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument are celebrating the addition of 87,500 acres to the National Park System Wednesday night. The property east of Baxter State Park has been at the center of a fierce debate about the future of the Maine Woods for more than a decade. But the property’s former owner, Roxanne Quimby, has seen her dream come true on the eve of the National Park Service’s 100th anniversary. For full story and to view video, click here.

MD: Ellicott City flood prompts call for nine-month freeze on development

By Fatimah Waseem – The Baltimore Sun – September 12, 2016
July's deadly flash flood in historic Ellicott City is prompting Howard County officials to reconsider the impact of development on the area's waterways. The County Council will vote on a measure next month that would temporarily halt commercial and residential development in the Tiber-Hudson watershed for nine months. For full story, click here.

MD: Maryland awarded $800K to restore oysters in Chesapeake Bay

Associated Press – wtop.com – August 30, 2016
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has awarded $800,000 to Maryland to help restore the Chesapeake Bay’s oyster population. Sens. Barbara Mikulski and Ben Cardin announced the award in a news release Tuesday. The award to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources will go to producing and planting 1.5 billion hatchery seeds in three years. For full story, click here.

MA: State Awards Grant For Plymouth Wetland Restoration Project

CapeCod.com – September 1, 2016
A major freshwater wetlands restoration project in Plymouth is in line for some state funding. The Baker Administration has allocated $50,000 for the Tidmarsh Farms restoration project in Manomet, which aims to restore 250 wetland acres and 3 and a half miles of stream in the Beaver Dam Brook watershed. It is the largest freshwater wetland restoration effort to date in Massachusetts. For full story, click here.

MI: No end in sight for Flint; filter use expected to last rest of year

By Matthew Dolan – Detroit Free Press – September 12, 2016
A top EPA official warns Flint should expect to use filters for drinking tap water through at least the end of the year. Officials say they have no time line for return to safe water without filters. It has been 347 days since the City of Flint declared its lead-tainted water unsafe to drink straight from the tap, and 250 days since Gov. Rick Snyder put the city into a state of emergency. But the federal Environmental Protection Agency's top official on the ground in Flint doesn't expect current water restrictions to end anytime soon. For full story, click here.

MI: EPA, Michigan and Local Officials Mark the Restoration of the River Raisin Area of Concern

Contact: Peter Cassell – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – September 7, 2016
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Senior Advisor Cameron Davis joined Michigan Office of the Great Lakes Director Jon Allan, Monroe Mayor Robert Clark and local partners in Monroe, Mich., to mark the near completion of restoration work at the River Raisin Area of Concern. “The River Raisin Area of Concern cleanup is proof positive that Great Lakes Restoration Initiative investments are delivering real, on-the-ground and in-the-water results,” said Davis. “With support from a strong bipartisan alliance of senators, representatives, states, tribes, municipalities, conservation organizations and businesses, the GLRI will keep resuscitating communities and waterways around the Lakes. River Raisin will be the fifth AOC where all cleanup and restoration work has been completed since the start of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative in 2010.” For full news release, click here.

MI: Michigan proposes approval for controversial Upper Peninsula mine near sacred tribal sites

By Brian Bienkowski – Environmental Health News – September 6, 2016
The State of Michigan on Friday announced its intention to approve, over tribal protests, an open pit mine near burial and other culturally important sites in the Upper Peninsula. The mine would provide an economic boost to the region and metals such as gold, zinc, copper and silver that fuel our tech- and gadget-driven lifestyle. But it would come at the expense of land and water that is central to the existence of the Menominee Tribe of Wisconsin. The decision comes as Native Americans across the country are unifying to buck the trend of development on off-reservation land. For full story, click here.

MN: State health officials to review Roundup as possible carcinogen

By Mark Steil – MPR News –September 8, 2016
Minnesota health officials will evaluate the health risks of a highly popular farm herbicide. Glyphosate is the main ingredient in Roundup, which is widely applied to fields growing genetically modified corn and soybeans. The International Agency for Research on Cancer found last year that glyphosate is 'probably carcinogenic to humans'. The state health department's Jim Kelly said the agency will review toxicity studies for the herbicide. For full story, click here.

MN: Do not eat: Researchers seek clues on mercury in St. Louis River estuary fish

By J Myers – Duluth News Tribune – August 28, 2016
If a little kid catches a big walleye on Lake Winnibigoshish, the state of Minnesota says she can safely eat that fish once a week. If she catches the fish out of the upper St. Louis River, say around Brookston, the state suggests just one meal per month. But if the same kid catches a big walleye on the St. Louis River estuary in Duluth, the state warns her not to eat it. Ever. That’s because walleye in the estuary contain very high levels of toxic mercury — among the highest from any lake or river in Minnesota; only the Red River in northwestern Minnesota has higher mercury levels in fish than the St. Louis River estuary. For full story, click here.

MO: USDA Funding Wetland Mitigation Bank in Southeastern Missouri

USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service
Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Chief Jason Weller announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is investing more than $7 million to fund agricultural wetland mitigation banks in 10 Midwest and Northern Great Plain states. One of the mitigation banks will be on land in Missouri’s southeastern “Bootheel” region. For full story, click here.

MT: Fish Deaths in Montana's Yellowstone River Tied to Warming Waters

By Bob Berwyn – InsideClimate News – September 2, 2016
An outbreak of fish-killing disease along a 100-mile stretch of the Yellowstone River in Montana may be the latest sign that mountain stream ecosystems are being disrupted by climate change. Scientists point to warmer, slower rivers as a likely cause of the mass fish mortality. For full story, click here.

NE: Wetland Conditions Across State Variable

By the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission – September 1, 2016
The conditions of wetlands across the state are varied, according to the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission. On Sept. 1, Game and Parks released a report on the status of Rainwater Basin wetlands, as well as pumping plans. While conditions were good in some areas, they were dry in others. “Conditions are generally good throughout much of the Sandhills and along the Platte River,” said Ted LaGrange, wetland program manager for the Commission. “However, the wetland water conditions across much of the Rainwater Basin are not good and many are dry. For full story, click here.

NY: Oysters Are Nearly Extinct in New York Waters. This Team Is Trying to Coax Them Back.

By Samantha Schmidt – The New York Times – September 4, 2016
Torrential rain poured down on the team of scientists and conservationists on Jamaica Bay as their small boat slowly towed about 85 cages packed with 36,000 oysters, a species that once blanketed New York Harbor but is now nearly extinct there. “We are quite the sight,” Casey Stokes, an environmental scientist with HDR, an engineering firm, said on Thursday as he steered the boat to a spot off Kennedy International Airport, where they would leave the oysters to grow, and hopefully, to reproduce. For full story, click here.

NY: DEC says GE's PCB cleanup has been inadequate

By Stephen Williams – The Daily Gazette – August 22, 2016
State Environmental Conservation Commissioner Basil Seggos on Monday called General Electric's cleanup of PCB contamination in the Hudson River inadequate, and said more river dredging may be needed. In speaking out, Seggos added the state's voice to that of environmentalists who for months have said the $1 billion project that removed 1.3 million tons of PCBs from the river-bottom fell short. For full story, click here.

NY: Cleaner Creeks and Bays, But How Will New Yorkers Access the Waters They Own?

By Guglielmo Mattioli – City Limits – August 16, 2016
After decades of neglecting and polluting its network of waterbodies, New York City is slowly reclaiming its creeks, marshes and shorelines. “The last 20 years have been about New York rediscovering the water,” says Robert Pirani, director of NY-NJ Harbor & Estuary Program. Yet ongoing environmental issues and scarce access to the water, which is mostly still treated as something to look at more than experience, is hindering New York from reaching its full potential as a waterfront city. For full story, click here.

NC: Tainted Waters: New Drinking Water Threat Concerns Scientists, Officials By Catherine Clabby

North Carolina Health News – September 12, 2016
When the EPA ordered drinking water systems nationwide to test their water for a long list of unregulated contaminants, North Carolina water systems scored high on tests most systems would wish to fail. Some of the highest levels nationally of a likely cancer-causing chemical 1,4 dioxane were detected in North Carolina water systems in the Cape Fear River Basin, which supplies water to more than 120 public water systems used by 1.5 million residents. For full story, click here.

ND: Dakotas' honeybee habitat shrinking with changing environment

By Patrick Springer – Bismarck Tribune – September 5, 2016
Bob Morlock finds himself driving farther afield to tend his scattered beehives. He travels a circuit of several counties in southeastern North Dakota and Minnesota. The reason for his far-flung bee colonies: Because of changes in farming, it’s getting more difficult to find suitable locations near fields with blossoming plants that provide pollen and nectar for his bees. For full story, click here.

ND: Pilot project takes on ag-friendly wetland preservation

By Jenny Schlecht – Bismarck Tribune – August 21, 2016
Bunches of cattails stick up like an island in the middle of Denny Ova’s stubble field north of Cleveland. Nearby, boggy mud sucks boots into the ground. There’s little in the way of standing water in that part of the field now, but it was there at some point during the growing season. Ova, however, has little concern for whether the wheat that yielded 60 bushel to the acre got drowned out by the seasonal wetland. Ova, since last spring, has been participating in the North Dakota Working Wetlands Pilot Project, which pays farmers not to alter small, seasonal wetlands in the fields they farm. For full story, click here.

OH: Ohio wetland mitigation program gets $350,000

Farm and Dairy – August 22, 2016
A northern Ohio wetland mitigation bank project received $350,000 through the Natural Resources Conservation Service, part of a $7 million effort to help farmers comply with wetland conservation provisions in the last farm bill. NRCS Chief Jason Weller announced Aug. 18 that the U.S. Department of Agriculture is funding agricultural wetland mitigation banks in 10 Midwest and Northern Great Plain states. For full story, click here.

OR: Nothing easy about conservation easements

By Mateusz Perkowski – Capital Press – August 18, 2016
Rancher Roger Ediger has no problem giving up the ability to subdivide his nearly 2,700-acre property near Mount Vernon in Eastern Oregon. Development is the biggest threat to agriculture, wildlife and open space, Ediger believes, which is why he decided to place a conservation easement on the land that will preserve its current condition in perpetuity. “If we don’t look farther than our own lifespan, then we’ll have nothing,” he said. However, Ediger still faces a dilemma. He is reluctant to have an environmentally oriented land trust or similar entity impose conditions on how he operates the ranch in exchange for “holding” the easement. For full story, click here.

RI: Rhode Island Implements Statewide Standards for Wetlands

By Hamza Chaudary – JD Supra – August 16, 2016
Recently, Governor Gina Raimondo signed into law legislation to establish statewide standards to bolster protections for wetlands while streamlining the permitting process during development. Before the new legislation, each municipality in Rhode Island was vested with the authority to draft and enforce their own wetlands regulations in addition to the state mandated standards. This piecemeal system resulted in overlapping and sometimes contradictory state and municipal regulations. Moreover, it allowed for significant differences in wetland regulation and enforcement across the state. For full story, click here.

SC: ‘Like it’s been nuked’: Millions of bees dead after South Carolina sprays for Zika mosquitoes

By Ben Guarino – The Washington Post – September 1, 2016 – Video
On Sunday morning, the South Carolina honey bees began to die in massive numbers. Death came suddenly to Dorchester County, S.C. Stressed insects tried to flee their nests, only to surrender in little clumps at hive entrances. The dead worker bees littering the farms suggested that colony collapse disorder was not the culprit — in that odd phenomenon, workers vanish as though raptured, leaving a living queen and young bees behind. For full story and to view video, click here.

TX: EPA: North Texas Earthquakes Likely Linked to Oil and Gas Drilling

By Jim Malewitz – The Texas Tribune – August 22, 2016
Federal regulators believe “there is a significant possibility” that recent earthquakes in North Texas are linked to oil and gas activity, even if state regulators won’t say so. That’s according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s annual evaluation of how the Texas Railroad Commission oversees thousands of injection and disposal wells that dot state oilfields — underground resting places for millions of gallons of toxic waste from fracking and other drilling activities. For full story, click here.

UT: Utah breaks ground on new wildlife, wetland learning center in Farmington

By Leia Larsen – Standard Examiner – September 8, 2016 – Video
The state of Utah, Davis County and some generous donors are coming together to make sure Utahns learn about the importance of the Great Salt Lake ecosystem. The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources hosted a groundbreaking Thursday, Sept. 8, at the Robert N. Hasenyager Great Salt Lake Nature Reserve for a new, three-building learning center. The building names are quite a mouthful — the George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Wildlife Education Center and L.S. Skaggs Wetland Discovery Classroom — but government and wildlife officials hope they’ll make the intricate workings of the Great Salt Lake a little more accessible to the public. For full story and to view video, click here.

VT: Five Years After Hurricane Irene, Vermont Still Striving for Resilience

By Kendra Pierre-Louis – InsideClimate News – September 1, 2016
Vermont is a shim of a state, the size and shape of a scanty slice of pie, or a narrow wedge of its finest cheddar. With no ocean coastline, Vermont might have seemed an unlikely candidate to be devastated by a hurricane five years ago, and to most, Irene was an entirely forgettable storm. Its memory is eclipsed for many by Sandy, which followed a year later. For full story, click here.

VA: Endangered and Threatened Species Alert: Survey Window for the State-Threatened Wood Turtle Opens Soon

Field Notes – Wetland Studies and Solutions, Inc. – September 7, 2016
If you are planning to develop property in Northern Virginia that has a clear, moderate to fast-flowing perennial stream and a relatively undisturbed floodplain¹, you may need a survey for the wood turtle (Glyptemys insculpta) this winter - or your wetlands permitting may be delayed up to a year! For full story, click here.

VA: The Norfolk of the future will move away from the waterfront

By Eric Hartley – The Virginia – Pilot – August 18, 2016
The future of Norfolk in one word: east. Flooding and rising sea levels threaten the future of the city’s waterfront, including downtown and many neighborhoods. So officials have spent this year developing a strategy for how to thrive into the next century. The first draft of the result, called “Vision 2100,” calls for new businesses, homes and government buildings to be concentrated inland, mainly in the eastern half of the city. For full story, click here.

WA: Five Years Later, The Elwha Reborn

By Amy Souers Kober – American Rivers – September 9, 2016
“It’s a shining light,” he says. “The success on the Elwha shows we can actually fix things.” Now that the dams are gone, Gussman, a resident of Sequim, WA has witnessed what he describes as the “rapid recovery of nature” — the sediment that has moved downriver to restore the beach at the river’s mouth, to the plants and trees reclaiming land once drowned by reservoirs, to the salmon and other fish and wildlife rebounding. For full story, click here.

 



Wetland Breaking News - September 2016

'We can't replace nature': Oilsands wetland reclamation a mixed success

By Bob Weber – CBS News – September 11, 2016
The challenge makes turning bitumen into oil seem like the easy part. Faced with reclaiming open-pit mines that were once thriving wetlands, Suncor and Syncrude have been trying to do what's never been done — rebuilding one of the most complex, diverse and delicate ecosystems in the boreal forest. Three years into the ground-breaking, high-profile projects, early successes are emerging. Suncor's Nikanotee fen and Syncrude's Sandhills fen are staying wet year-round. They're growing some typical fen plants. Even better, they've begun to store carbon in their peaty depths. For full story, click here.

Gene editing might help conserve species. But should it?

By Joseph Dussault – The Christian Science Monitor – September 7, 2016
At the World Conservation Congress, which meets in Honolulu this week, environmental leaders are considering an unusual solution to help endangered animals: planned extinction. Gene drive, a controversial genetic editing technique through which scientists could alter or eliminate entire species, is mostly discussed alongside Zika and malaria fears. But recently, some conservationists have reframed the technique as a way to control invasive species. By slipping genetic disadvantages into the non-native population, they could theoretically protect endemic species. For full story, click here.

The Oceans Can’t Protect Us Anymore—Here’s Why

By Christine Dell'Amore – National Geographic – September 5, 2016
The oceans, which have borne the brunt of most of global warming, have finally hit their limit as dying corals and plummeting fish stocks signal that the seas are at a dangerous tipping point, according to the broadest ever look at the issue. And people are already experiencing direct consequences, such as more extreme weather events, including hurricanes, says the report, released by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. For full story, click here.

Official Web Soil Survey Available - Soil Science Annual Data Refreshes in October

USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service – August 31, 2016
The National Cooperative Soil Survey Program is an endeavor of the United States Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and other federal agencies; state and local governments; and other cooperators. It provides a systematic study of the soils in a given area, including the classification, mapping, and interpretation of the soils. Soil types are classified from physical properties, drawing heavily on the principles of pedology, geology, and geomorphology. For more information, click here.

Sediments control methane release to the ocean

University of Tromso – Science Daily – August 31, 2016
Methane is stored under the sea floor, concentrated in form of hydrates, crystalline ice structures that stay stable under high pressure and in low temperatures. Several studies suggest that as the ocean warms, the hydrates might melt and potentially release methane into the ocean waters and atmosphere. This potent climate gas is profusely leaking from the seafloor in an area offshore western Svalbard, which is close to the gas hydrate stability zone. There, scientists have discovered over 250 methane flares in water depths from 90 to 240 meters. For full article, click here.

The Southern Ocean is getting less salty. Here’s what that could mean for the rest of the world

By Chelsea Harvey – The Washington Post – August 31, 2016
The ocean surrounding Antarctica has become substantially less salty over the past couple of decades — and until now, scientists weren’t really sure why. But because changes in the Southern Ocean’s salinity have the potential to affect all kinds of important processes, including ocean circulation and its transport of heat and nutrients around the world, researchers have been eager to figure it out. For full blog post, click here.

Watersheds Lost Up to 22% of Their Forests in 14 Years. Here’s How it Affects Your Water Supply

By Yiyuan Qin and Todd Gartner – World Resources Institute – August 30, 2016
Drought in Sao Paulo. Flooding in the Himalayas. And pollution in Sumatra. These three distinct water crises have a common cause—degradation in forests. That’s because upstream forests, wetlands and other “natural infrastructure” play a critical role in supplying clean water downstream. They stabilize soil and reduce erosion, regulate water flow to mitigate floods and droughts, and purify water. Yet the world’s watersheds lost 6 percent of their tree cover on average from 2000-2014, putting citizens at risk of losing their water supplies. For full story, click here.

The American 'Fur Ball' Being Threatened by a Warming Climate

By Nicholas Kusnetz – InsideClimate News – August 29, 2016
Scientists have warned for years that a warming climate will threaten many of the world's species. But for one diminutive alpine creature, the threat has already arrived. The American pika is disappearing from much of its mountain habitat across the western United States, with rising temperatures a driving factor, a new study says. The findings, said lead author Erik A. Beever, a research ecologist with the United States Geological Survey, also point to a much larger problem. For full story, click here.

Climate change has less impact on drought than previously expected

University of California - Irvine – ScienceDaily – August 29, 2016
As a multiyear drought grinds on in the Southwestern United States, many wonder about the impact of global climate change on more frequent and longer dry spells. As humans emit more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, how will water supply for people, farms, and forests be affected? For full story, click here.

Mussels disappearing from New England waters, scientists say

By Patrick Whittle – Boston.com – August 28, 2016
New England is running out of mussels. The Gulf of Maine’s once strong population of wild blue mussels is disappearing, scientists say. A study led by marine ecologists at the University of California at Irvine found the numbers along the gulf coastline have declined by more than 60 percent over the last 40 years. Once covering as much as two-thirds of the gulf’s intertidal zone, mussels now cover less than 15 percent. For full story, click here.

Scientists digging up the dirt for clues to disappearing nitrogen

By Rona Kobell – Bay Journal – August 28, 2016
Call it the case of the missing nitrogen. For decades, scientists have wondered what happens to the nitrogen that farmers apply to fields. On the farm, levels of the nutrient are high. But downstream, they’re lower — sometimes only half as much. In an attempt to figure out where it went, scientists have undertaken “mass balance studies” to solve the mystery. For full story, click here.

Biofuels worse for climate change than gas, U-M study says

By Keith Matheny – Detroit Free Press – August 25, 2016
The multi-billion-dollar U.S. biofuels industry — promoted and expanded for more than a decade by the federal government — may be built on a false assumption, according to a University of Michigan study published Thursday that is sure to stir all sides in the contentious debate over the industry. Despite their purported advantages, biofuels — created from crops such as corn or soybeans — cause more emissions of climate change-causing carbon dioxide than gasoline, according to the study from U-M Energy Institute research professor John DeCicco. For full story, click here.

Duck numbers increasing

Ducks Unlimited – The Southern Illinoisan – August 25, 2016
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released its 2016 Trends in Duck Breeding Populations, based on surveys conducted in May and early June by FWS and the Canadian Wildlife Service. Overall duck numbers in the survey area are statistically similar to last year. Total populations were estimated at 48.4 million breeding ducks, which is 38 percent above the 1955-2015 long-term average. Last year's estimate was 49.5 million birds. The projected mallard fall flight index is 13.5 million birds, similar to the 2015 estimate of 13.8 million. The main factor for duck breeding success is wetland and upland habitat conditions in the key breeding landscapes of the prairies and the boreal forest. For full story, click here.

To save its native trout, Yellowstone National Park poisons its rivers

By Rowena Lindsay – The Christian Science Monitor – August 23, 2016
As the cutthroat trout in Yellowstone National Park struggles to survive under the ecological pressure of an invasive species of brook trout, wildlife experts have turned to a chemical poisoning treatment as the solution. After the cutthroat trout are stunned and removed from the river, rotenone, a chemical that clogs the gills of fish, will be distributed throughout parts of the park’s water system, particularly Soda Butte Creek. Once the brook trout are eliminated, the cutthroat trout will be reintroduced to the river. Poisoning an entire river may seem like an extreme solution, but it is the approach that is most likely to get the job done, officials say. For full story, click here.

Climate Change Could Cost Millennials $8.8 Trillion

By Kelsey E. Thomas – Nex City – August 23, 2016
A hotter world could mean less wealth for millennials, according to a new report from environmental advocate NextGen Climate and research center Demos. They found inaction could cost Americans currently in their 20s and 30s $8.8 trillion in potential earnings over their lifetime. For full story, click here.

The Saltmarsh Sparrow Is Creeping Dangerously Close to Extinction

By Hannah Furfaro – Audubon – August 23, 2016
It’s first light, and the sky against the Connecticut coast is silky and pale. Two scientists stand ankle-deep in the marsh, stringing up nets in hopes of catching a ghost. Chris Elphick, a conservation biologist at the University of Connecticut, strides through the coarse grass to meet them. Suddenly, he stops in his tracks. He’s spotted our specter. “There! There’s a bird sitting up on that stick,” he says, motioning to a palm-sized, orange-faced Saltmarsh Sparrow about 50 feet away. Dozens of these birds are probably hiding around us, but the sighting still feels lucky. For full story, click here.

From Grasslands to Forests, Nitrogen Impacts all Ecosystems

By Ashley Mayrianne Jones – It All Starts with Science – EPA Blog – August 22, 2016
Can there be too much of a good thing? That’s the case with nitrogen, an essential element for plant growth that, in overabundance, can also be potentially damaging. Nitrogen moves from the air to the land, soil, and water via a process called nitrogen deposition. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition has increased ten-fold or more since pre-industrial levels due to increased emissions from the burning of fossil fuels, fertilizer use, and other human activities. For full blog post, click here.

Ocean Slime Spreading Quickly Across the Earth

By Craig Welch – National Geographic – August 19, 2016
When sea lions suffered seizures and birds and porpoises started dying on the California coast last year, scientists weren't entirely surprised. Toxic algae is known to harm marine mammals. But when researchers found enormous amounts of toxin in a pelican that had been slurping anchovies, they decided to sample fresh-caught fish. To their surprise, they found toxins at such dangerous levels in anchovy meat that the state urged people to immediately stop eating them. For full story, click here.

Historical Data Shows Arctic Melt of Last Two Decades Is 'Unprecedented'

By Bob Berwyn – InsideClimate News – August 18, 2016
While satellite images of the Arctic clearly show that sea ice in the region has been on a steady decline since those images began in 1979, the relatively short span of that history has been seized on by some climate denialists to discount its significance in concluding humans are warming the planet. Now, scientists have compiled the most detailed study to date of sea ice records going back more than a century and a half. The data shows that the rapid meltdown that satellites have been documenting since 1979 is unprecedented since at least 1850 and coincides with the buildup of heat-trapping greenhouse gases in the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels. For full story, click here.

Mystery of Bizarre Bird Deformities May Be Solved

By Jane Kay – National Geographic – August 16, 2016
Scientists working with sophisticated DNA sequencing technology think they may have solved a 20-year-old mystery of what has caused thousands of Alaska’s wild birds to be afflicted with deformed, twisted beaks. The findings suggest that a newly discovered virus – poecivirus – may be the culprit behind the bizarre beak deformities in chickadees, crows, and other birds. Birds with the defective beaks, which sometimes cross like warped chopsticks, starve to death or die early. The virus may endanger the health of bird populations around the world, particularly sensitive endangered species, says Colleen Handel, a research wildlife biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey in Anchorage. For full story, click here.

Building equity, inclusiveness for low-income communities is key in climate resilience planning

By Shamar Bibbinss – Environmental Justice in Action – EPA Blog – August 16, 2016
As a student organizer, I saw firsthand the lack of engagement with communities of color around key environmental issues. When I began working on climate change years later, I remained guided by a deep passion to ensure that people from historically underrepresented groups were included in efforts to advance climate solutions. Low-income communities have, historically, been largely excluded from the benefits of robust investments in clean energy, green infrastructure, high-quality transit, and other climate-beneficial interventions. Climate policies have failed to address the magnitude of environmental, economic, and social vulnerabilities these communities face. For full blog post, click here.

In U.S. Methane Hot Spot, Researchers Pinpoint Sources of 250 Leaks

By Phil McKenna – InsideClimate News – August 15, 2016
Methane is escaping from more than 250 different oil and gas wells, storage tanks, pipelines, coal mines and other fossil fuel facilities across the Four Corners region of the U.S. Southwest, according to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. For full story, click here.

How Farms Affect the Chesapeake Bay’s Water

Earth Observatory – August 12, 2016
People who track water quality issues in the Chesapeake Bay are accustomed to bad news. But lately some glimmers of hope have begun to emerge amidst the polluted streams, dead zones, fish kills, and algae blooms. In April 2016, the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Sciences published its annual Chesapeake Bay report card and found clearer water, lower levels of algae, and a resurgence of sea grasses. In the same month, the Maryland Department of Environment announced that it had mapped 53,000 acres of submerged aquatic vegetation—a record amount and a clear sign of the ecosystem’s improving health. In July 2016, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources reported that the size of the dead zone in the Bay in late June was the second smallest since 1985. For full story, click here.

EPA's Fracking Finding Misled on Threat to Drinking Water, Scientists Conclude

By Neela Banerjee – InsideClimate News – August 12, 2016
An Environmental Protection Agency panel of independent scientists has recommended the agency revise its conclusions in a major study released last year that minimized the potential hazards hydraulic fracturing poses to drinking water. The panel, known as the Science Advisory Board (SAB), issued on Thursday its nearly yearlong analysis of a June 2015 draft EPA report on fracking and water. For full story, click here.

Warming climate expected to squeeze out Arctic bird habitat

By Yereth Rosen – Alaska Dispatch News – August 7, 2016
Many species of shorebirds that migrate to the Arctic each year to breed their young will lose substantial amounts of their summer habitat to climate change, and the biggest losses in the coming decades will be in Alaska and neighboring parts of Russia, new research concludes. For full story, click here.



Wetland Breaking News - September 2016

Report: Maintaining Sagebrush-Covered Landscapes Keeps Water on the Land for Ranchers and Wildlife

By Justin Fritscher – U.S. Department of Agriculture – August 4, 2016
Removing invading conifer trees improves the health of sagebrush ecosystems, providing better habitat for wildlife and better forage for livestock. And now, new science shows these efforts may also help improve late-season water availability, which is crucial for ecosystems in the arid West. According to the Sage Grouse Initiative (SGI)’s newest Science to Solutions report – which summarized research from USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS) – a sagebrush-dominated watershed holds water in snow drifts an average of nine days longer than one dominated by juniper trees. For full blog post, click here.

Restoring Neighborhood Streams: Planning, Design, and Construction

By Ann L. Riley – Island Press – July 2016
Thirty years ago, the best thinking on urban stream management prescribed cement as the solution to flooding and other problems of people and flowing water forced into close proximity. Urban streams were perceived as little more than flood control devices designed to hurry water through cities and neighborhoods with scant thought for aesthetics or ecological considerations. Stream restoration pioneers like hydrologist Ann Riley thought differently. She and other like-minded field scientists imagined that by restoring ecological function, and with careful management, streams and rivers could be a net benefit to cities, instead of a net liability. In the intervening decades, she has spearheaded numerous urban stream restoration projects and put to rest the long-held misconception that degraded urban streams are beyond help. For more information and to order, click here.

 

Wetland Breaking News - September 2016

Diamond mining companies setting sights on the sea as land dries up in Africa

By Aislinn Laing – The Telegraph – September 12, 2016
Twelve miles off Namibia’s arid southern coastline, 150 metres below rolling ocean waves, diamond miners are hard at work securing a future for the practice of romancing by stone. With the precious gems expected to run out on land in as little as 15 years, diamond company De Beers is building up a naval fleets to protect its interests. For full story, click here.

Three Nations Create Giant Reserves for Ocean Life

By Jane Braxton – Little National Geographic – September 9, 2016
Concern over a worldwide decline in marine life prompted the presidents of Ecuador, Colombia, and Costa Rica to announce agreements Friday to increase protection of some of the most biodiverse ocean waters. The agreements bring the marine reserves off the three nations to 83,600 square miles. Ecuador and Costa Rica also agreed to delineate the boundaries of their national waters, exchanging nautical charts in a step toward protecting the underwater “highways” used by sharks, sea turtles, and other migrating marine life. For full story, click here.

Humans have destroyed a tenth of Earth's wilderness in 25 years – study

By Adam Vaughan – The Guardian – September 8, 2016
Humans have destroyed a tenth of Earth’s remaining wilderness in the last 25 years and there may be none left within a century if trends continue, according to an authoritative new study. Researchers found a vast area the size of two Alaskas – 3.3m square kilometres – had been tarnished by human activities between 1993 and today, which experts said was a “shockingly bad” and “profoundly large number”. For full story, click here.

New coalition launches to scale private conservation investment at IUCN World Conservation Congress

IUCN – September 3, 2016
In an effort to address an estimated US $200-300 billion annual funding gap in conservation, civil society organizations, private and public sector financial institutions and academia joined forces today to launch the Coalition for Private Investment in Conservation (CPIC) during the IUCN World Conservation Congress taking place in Hawaiʻi. The Coalition’s goal is to help preserve the world’s most important ecosystems by creating new opportunities for return-seeking private investment in conservation. For full story, click here.

Campers, oil drillers are neighbors in 'land of many uses'

By Marc Heller – E&E Publishing, LLC – August 23, 2016
For the U.S. Forest Service, this northwest Pennsylvania forest is the "land of many uses," where recreation and oil and gas production have overlapped since the early 1920s. For Laurie Barr, the Allegheny's an accident waiting to happen. On a recent visit, Barr — co-founder of the environmental group Save Our Streams PA — pointed out a mound of spent charcoal just 30 feet from the gray pipe of a gas well poking out of the ground. "People don't know the difference between a clearing for a well and a clearing for a campsite," Barr said. "It just confounds me that the forest hasn't blown up yet." For full story, click here.

Be Thankful for Floodplains

By Roy Schiff and Jessica Louisos – The Northfield News – August 18, 2016
We all should be more thankful for floodplains – the flat areas next to rivers where water spills onto during a flood. We live, eat, shop, and play in our floodplains. They store flood waters to keep us safer. They capture sediment and take up nutrients to protect the water quality of our favorite rivers and lakes. They provide habitat for some of the most unique plants and animals we know of. They grow our food. With all of the “ecosystem services” that we know floodplains provide, we still abuse them. For full story, click here.

Taking a Buyout from the Beach

By Jackie Snow – Hakai Magazine – August 18, 2016
Coastal communities are under threat—from erosion, sea level rise, and, in some cases, increasingly powerful storms and floods. People who live on degrading coastal land face a difficult choice: they can stay and risk increasingly hazardous conditions, or leave and suffer potentially heavy financial losses. In a new paper, lawyer Emily Nellermoe argues that a market-based solution known as transferable development rights, or TDR, could be used to help homeowners vacate coastal properties without overextending government budgets. For full article, click here.

A Reflection on the Gold King Mine Incident

By Mathy Stanislaus – EPA Connect Blog – August 1, 2016
Today, we are releasing a new publication, One Year After the Gold King Mine Incident: A Retrospective of EPA’s Efforts to Restore and Protect Communities. The report details our efforts — including the projects and groups we have funded — to protect the areas around the Gold King Mine (GKM) and prevent another spill like this from happening at other EPA work sites at mines across the country. For full blog post, click here.

Boosting Mill Towns by Busting Dams

By Tim Purinton – Ebb & Flow – July 2016
The term “dam removal” brings to mind the decommissioning of large hydropower facilities in the west and the waging of contentious legal battles to improve wild salmon passage on big, iconic rivers, images of roiling white water, dynamite charges and environmental luminaries like Edward Abbey and Yvon Chouinard come to mind. While these river restoration projects capture the national headlines, in the Northeast, where a myriad of dams dot the landscape like white church spires, dams are being removed for more subtle environmental and social reasons, one of which is the economic revitalization of depressed mill towns. For full story, click here.

'One Water': Concept for the Future?

By John Dyson – WaterWorld
The concept of “one water” has been around for several years in the water and wastewater industry, but what does it mean? I am sure if you gathered top industry professionals together to define the term, it would take days of discussions and still would vary greatly depending on the person. As a general rule, our industry has kept drinking water and wastewater separate. Now, due to water shortages in some areas of North America and throughout the world, we’ve added reuse to the mix, which further complicates the issues. Should we change our entire approach to water use in North America and throughout the world by considering it a single resource? For full story, click here.

Join ASWM

 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

WEBINARS

   

MEETINGS

 

TRAINING

 

SPECIAL EVENTS

 
WEBINARS
       
SEPTEMBER 2016
       
September 28, 2016
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of State Wetland Managers Members’ Wetland Webinar: Legal Processes for Wetland Permits  
       
September 29, 2016
1:00 p.m. EST
  The Swamp School webinar: Wetland Ferns
 
       
OCTOBER 2016
       
October 4, 2016
1:00 p.m. EDT
  USDA Office of Sustainability and Climate Change Webinar: Responding To Drought and Water Challenges
 
       
October 4, 2016
1:00 p.m. EDT
  Webinar is Co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org): Ocean Highlights from the IUCN World Conservation Congress
 
       
October 4, 2016
3:00 p.m. EDT
  Future Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar:
Improving the Quantity and Quality of Coastal Wetlands in the U.S. South Atlantic
 
       
October 5, 2016
1:30 p.m. EDT
  Ohio Department of Transportation, the San Diego Association of Governments, and the Federal Highway Administration: Eco-Logical CoP Webinar - Innovative Mitigation Contracting and Financing
 
       
October 5, 2016
3:00 p.m. EDT
  Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Mapping Coastal Storm Surge Flooding and Marsh Structure
 
       
October 12, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
  Center for Watershed Protection Webcast 5: Retrofitting Revisited: Forward Into the Past
 
       
October 18, 2016
3:00 p.m. EDT
  Association of State Wetland Managers Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar: Not Lost in Translation: How to Select the Right Wetland Restoration Team
 
       
October 25, 2016
2:00 p.m. EDT
  River Network Webinar: Water Scarcity as a Catalyst for Integrated Water Management – Creating Multiple Benefits for Your Community and River
 
       
October 26, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
  American Water Resources Association (AWRA) webinar: Oregon's First Integrated Water Resources Strategy: Lessons Learned Since Implementation  
       
October 26, 2016
1:00 p.m. EDT
  Carpe Diem West Webinar: Navigating the Intersection: Western Water, Climate Change & Public Health
 
       
October 26, 2016
2:00 p.m. EDT
  Forester University Webinar: Specifying Engineered Soils for Sustainable Vegetation
 
       
October 26, 2016
3:00 p.m. EDT
  Association of State Wetland Managers Members' Wetland Webinar: Developing Effective Buffer Protections: State Panelists and Presentation of Findings from a New England Study by the New England Interstate Pollution Control Commission
 
       
NOVEMBER 2016
       
November 15, 2016
3:00 p.m. EST
  Association of State Wetland Managers Hot Topics Webinar:
Wetlands & Climate Change: A Summary of Current Wetland Scientific Findings
 
November 16, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
  Center for Watershed Protection Webcast 6: Non-Traditional MS4s
 
       
November 16, 2016
3:00 p.m. EST
  Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Method for Estimating Potential Wetland Extent by Utilizing Streamflow Statistics and Flood-Inundation Mapping Techniques: Pilot Study for Land Along the Wabash River Near Terre Haute, Indiana
 
       
November 30, 2016
3:00 p.m. EST
  Association of State Wetland Managers Members' Wetland Webinar: State Integration Practices Panel: Stromwater, TMDL and Wetland Management
 
       
MEETINGS
       
SEPTEMBER 2016
       
September 27-30, 2016
Mount Royal University
Alberta, Canada
  Under Western Skies (UWS) Conference: Water: Events, Trends, Analysis
 
       
September 29-30, 2016
Baltimore, MD
  EUCI: 2016 EPA 316(b) Fish and Shellfish Impingement & Entrainment in Power & Industrial Facilities Conference
 
       
September 30-
October 2, 2016

Shepherdstown, WV
  Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay: 2016 Chesapeake Watershed Forum
 
       
OCTOBER 2016
       
October 2-6, 2016
Oklahoma City, OK
  EPA Region 6, in partnership with Texas A&M University in Kingsville, the City of Oklahoma City, Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems (MS4s), and States in R6: 18th Annual Stormwater Conference  
       
October 4-6, 2016
Toronto, Canada
  Great Lakes Public Forum 2016  
       
October 4-7, 2016
Marquette, MI
  16th Annual Great Lakes Beach Association Conference  
       
October 5-6, 2016
West Palm Beach, FL
  8th Annual Southeast Florida Regional Climate Leadership Summit  
       
October 5-6, 2016
Kent, OH
  Fourth Annual Kent State University Water and Land Symposium: Sustainability and Resilience on the land-Water Continuum
 
       
October 5-7, 2016
Las Vegas, NV
  Southern Nevada Water Authority WaterSmart Innovations Conference and Exposition
 
       
October 6-7, 2016
Toronto, Ontario Canada
  Great Lakes Commission 2016 Annual Meeting
 
       
October 8-9, 2016
Knoxville, TN
  National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS): 8th Annual Undergraduate Research Conference  
       
October 9-14, 2016
Scheveningen,
The Netherlands

  Physics of Estuaries and Coastal Seas Conference  
       
October 11, 2016
Syracuse, NY
  U.S. EPA Region 2 and The State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY ESF): Microplastics/Citizen Science Workshop
 
       
October 11-14, 2016
Shepherdstown, WV
  Natural Channel Design Review Checklist Workshop  
       
October 14-15, 2016
University of New Hampshire
Durham, NH
  Society for Ecological Restoration – New England Chapter Conference: Ecological Restoration in a Changing Climate: Ecosystems, Adaptation, Infrastructure and Resiliency
 
       
October 15-16, 2016
Toronto, Canada
  Fifth International Conference on Climate Change Adaptation 2016  
       
October 16-19, 2016
Baton Rouge, LA
  Southeastern Fish & Wildlife Agencies: 70th Annual Conference
 
       
October 17-20, 2016
Boise, IA
  4th Northern Rockies Invasive Plants Council Conference  
       
October 17-21, 2016
Leavenworth, WA
  2016 Mountain Climate Conference: Mountains Without Snow: What are the Consequences?
 
       
October 18-20, 2016
Atlantic City, NJ
  New Jersey Association for Floodplain Management (NJAFM) 12th Annual Conference: Supporting Municipalities to Reduce Flood Risk
 
       
October 18-21, 2016
Davis, CA
  Natural Areas Association: 2016 Natural Areas Conference
 
       
October 18-22, 2016
Latin America
  Ecosystem Services Partnership (ESP) conference: 'Healthy ecosystems for resilient societies'
 
       
October 19-21, 2016
Birmingham, AL
  11th Annual Regional Stormwater Conference: Stormwater Solutions
 
       
October 19-21, 2016
San Diego, CA
  Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum - West Coast
 
       
October 20, 2016
Linthicum, MD
  12th Annual MAFSM Conference  
       
October 20-22, 2016
New York, NY
  Center for Biodiversity and Conservation: Student Conference on Conservation Science – New York (SCCS-NY)  
       
October 24-26, 2016
Valenia, Spain
  World Conference on Climate Change  
       
October 25, 2016
Washington, DC
  Environmental Law Institute: The Paris Agreement & Private Actors: Extra-jurisdictional Considerations of the Climate Agreement (2016 ELI-Miriam Hamilton Keare Policy Forum)  
       
October 25, 2016
Washington, DC
  Environmental Law Institute: The Business of Water (2016 Corporate Forum)  
       
October 28-30, 2016
Fairhope, AL
  Diamondback Terrapin Working Group: 7th Symposium on the Ecology, Status and Conservation of the Diamondback Terrapin
 
       
October 28-30, 2016
Minneapolis, MN
  Land Trust Alliance Rally 2016 National Land Conservation Conference
 
       
October 28-30, 2016
Kansas City, MO
  14th Annual Ecological Genomics Symposium  
       
October 30-November 2, 2016
Phoenix, AZ
  American Water Works Association: Water Infrastructure Conference & Exposition
 
       
October 31-November 4, 2016
Santa Fe, NM
  National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP): 39th Annual Scientific Symposium and Committee Meetings
 
       
NOVEMBER 2016
       
November 1-4, 2016
Banff, Alberta, Canada
  North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) Symposium: Science to Stewardship: Balancing Economic Growth and Lake Sustainability
 
       
November 2, 2016
University of Illinois
  Chicago Wilderness Congress: Celebrating 20 Years: One Home. One Future
 
       
November 3, 2016
Gulfport, FL
  The Environmental Law Institute and Stetson's Institute for Biodiversity Law and Policy: Fourth Annual ELI-Stetson Wetlands Workshop
 
       
November 3-5, 2016
Pensacola Beach, FL
  Gulf Estuarine Research Society (GERS) / Society of Wetland Scientist South Central Chapter Joint Meeting  
       
November 9-11, 2016
Las Vegas, NV
  Society for Ecological Restoration-Southwest Chapter Annual Conference  
       
November 9-11, 2016
Albuquerque, NM
  Quivira Coalition Conference: Lights, Soil, Action!
 
       
November 14-17, 2016
Orlando, FL
  2016 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference
 
       
November 13-17, 2016
Indianapolis, IN
  American Water Works Association: Water Quality Technology Conference® & Exposition
 
       
November 14–15, 2016
Manhattan, KS
  Kansas Water Office: Governor’s Conference: The Future of Water in Kansas
 
       
November 14-16, 2016
Stevenson, WA
  7th Annual Northwest Climate Conference  
       
November 15, 2016
UC Davis Conference Center Davis, CA
  Hosted by University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources, UC Davis, and UC Riverside the 2nd Annual Do No Harm Workshop: Considerations for the Use of Non-local Species in Ecological Restoration
 
       
November 15-16, 2016
Norfolk, VA
  Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway Association: 2016 Annual Meeting
 
       
November 15-17, 2016
Sacramento, CA
  2016 Bay-Delta Science Conference  
       
November 15-17, 2016
Front Royal, VA
  EcoAgriculture Partners Landscape Leadership 3-Day Intensive Workshop  
       
November 18–19, 2016
State College, PA
  Pennsylvania Botany Symposium  
       
November 28-30, 2016
Sanya, China
  International Forum on Water (2016IFW)  
       
DECEMBER 2016
       
December 2, 2016
North Linthicum, MD
  Maryland Water Monitoring Council’s 22nd Annual Conference: A River Runs Through It – Strengthening Networks and Connections
 
       
December 5-9, 2016
Jacksonville, FL
  ACES: A Community on Ecosystem Services conference: Linking Science, Practice, and Decision Making
 
       
December 5-9, 2016
Jacksonville, FL
  Southern Rockies Seed Network 2016 Conference: Ecotypes: Science, Practice, & Policy
 
       
December 10-15, 2016
New Orleans, LA
  8th National Summit: Our Coasts, Our Future, Our Choice and 25th Biennial Meeting of The Coastal Society
 
       
December 12-16, 2016
San Francisco, CA
  AGU Fall Meeting
 
       
JANUARY 2017
       
January 4-6, 2017
Acme, MI
  Northern Michigan Waterways Hazardous Material Spill Planning Committee (No-Spills) 27th Annual No-Spills Conference
 
       
January 4-8, 2017
New Orleans, LA
  Society of Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB) Annual Meeting  
       
FEBRUARY 2017
       
February 6-9, 2017
North Charleston, SC
  Coastal GeoTools 2017  
       
February 6-9, 2017
New Orleans, LA
  Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science Conference  
       
February 7-9, 2017
Fort Collins, CO
  14th Annual Tamarisk Coalition Conference: The Future is Now: Forward-Thinking Restoration, Planning, and Adaptation
 
       
February 13-15, 2017
Denver, CO
  17th Annual International LiDAR Mapping Forum (ILMF)  
       
February 13-16, 2017
Washington, D.C.
  Native Seed Network: 2017 National Native Seed Conference
 
       
February 26-March 3, 2017
Honolulu, HI
  Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) 2017 Conference: “From the Mountains to the Sea”. Abstracts due by October 14, 2016.  
       
February 28–March 2, 2017
Stevens Point, WI
  Wisconsin Wetlands Association's 22nd annual Wetland Science Conference. Abstract deadline November 15, 2016.  
       
MARCH 2017
       
March 1-2, 2017
Toronto, Canada
  50th International Conference: Water Management Modeling. Call for papers deadline is December 31, 2016.  
       
March 1-3, 2017
Chicago, IL
  Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) and The Climate Registry: Climate Leadership Conference: Connecting People, Innovation, and Opportunity
 
       
March 7-9, 2017
New Orleans, LA
  RES/CON. Presentation proposals due by October 7, 2016.  
       
March 16-17, 2017
University of Denver
Denver, CO
  Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law: 26th Annual Western Places/Western Spaces Conference. Additional workshops will be held on March 15, 2017.  
       
March 26-28, 2017
Scottsdale, AZ
  National Flood Determination Association: 20th Annual NFDA Conference
 
       
APRIL 2017
       
April 4, 2017
Online and remote hub locations
  Center for Watershed Protection Association 2017 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference
 
       
April 17-21, 2017
Coral Springs, FL
  Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (GEER 2017) Conference  
       
April 30-May 3, 2017
Snowbird, UT.
  2017 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference: Connecting the Dots: The Emerging Science of Aquatic System Connectivity. Abstract deadline is January 9, 2017.  
       
April 30-May 5, 2017
Kansas City, MO
  2017 ASFPM Conference: "Flood Risk Management in the Heartland"  
       
MAY 2017
       
May 9-12, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  20th Anniversary — National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Invest in the Environment. Call for presentation deadline is October 1, 2016.  
       
May 15-19, 2017
Detroit, MI
  IAGLR's 60th Annual Conference: From Cities to Farms: Shaping Great Lakes Ecosystems. Call for session deadline is October 14, 2016.  
       
May 17-20, 2017
Saint Paul, MN
  Citizen Science Association: CitSci2017
 
       
May 31-June 2, 2017
Detroit, MI
  Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Green Infrastructure Conference: Integrated Stormwater Management from Duluth to Quebec  
JUNE 2017
       
June 5-8, 2017
San Juan, Puerto Rico
  Society of Wetland Scientists’ 2017 Annual Meeting: Celebrating Wetland Diversity Across the Landscape: Mountains to Mangroves
 
       
June 27-29, 2017
New Orleans LA
  US Water Alliance: One Water Summit 2017  
       
AUGUST 2017
       
August 6-11, 2017
Portland, OR
  2017 ESA Annual Meeting: Linking biodiversity, material cycling and ecosystem services in a changing world
 
       
August 21-25, 2017
Beijing, China
  12th International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL 2017 Beijing): Ecology and Civilization in a Changing World
 
       
OCTOBER 2017
       
October 14-17, 2017
Iselin, NJ
  Association of State Floodplain Managers: National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop  
       
TRAINING
       
SEPTEMBER 2016
       
September 27-29, 2016
Pocono Mountains, PA
  The Swamp School Wetland Plants Field ID Workshop  
       
September 28-30, 2016
Bordentown, NJ
  Rutgers University Course: Wetland Construction: Planning and Functional Design
 
       
September 28-29, 2016
Hay, KS
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Woody Plants (Trees, Shrubs, and Vines) Identification – 2016  
       

September 29-30, 2016
Denver, CO

  Urban Watersheds Research Institute Course: 2D Floodplain Delineation using 2D HEC-RAS Model  
       
September 29-October 3, 2016
Front Royal, VA
  George Mason University, Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Watershed Conservation: Riparian Restoration  
       
September 30-October 1, 2016
Pittsburgh, PA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training
 
       
OCTOBER 2016
       
October 3-4, 2016
Tuckerton, NJ
  Rutgers University Course: Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants  
       
October 3-7, 2016
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
 
       
October 5-7, 2016
Asheville, NC
  North Carolina State University Stream Restoration Program is offering a course on Stream Morphology Assessment
 
       
October 7, 2016
St. Paul, MN
  University of Minnesota Course: Hydrology Tools for Minnesota Wetlands  
       
October 11-12, 2016
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species.
 
       
October 14, 2016
Brunswick, NJ
  Rutgers University Course: Understanding Advanced Stormwater Management Techniques  
       
October 18-19, 2016
Charleston, SC
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher - 2016  
       
October 18-21, 2016
San Diego, CA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation Training
 
       
October 20-21, 2016
San Diego, CA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
 
       
October 25-26, 2016
Anchorage, AK
  Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA): Writing the Perfect EA/FONSI, or EIS  
       
October 25-28, 2016
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers University course: Methodology for Delineating Wetlands. Instructors: Ralph Tiner and Mallory N. Gilbert  
       
October 26, 2016
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers University Course: Introduction to Wetland Identification  
       
October 27, 2016
Anchorage, Alaska
  Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: Advanced NEPA-Taking the National Environmental Policy Act to the Next Level  
       
October 31-November 3, 2016
Columbus, OH
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation Training
 
       
NOVEMBER 2016
       
November 2-4, 2016
Raleigh, NC
  North Carolina State University Stream Restoration Program Course: Natural Channel Design Principles  
       
November 8-9, 2016
St. Louis Park, MN
  Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA): Writing the Perfect EA/FONSI, or EIS  
       
November 10, 2016
St. Louis Park, MN
  Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: Advanced NEPA-Taking the National Environmental Policy Act to the Next Level  
       
November 14-15, 2016
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology (Piedmont)
 
       
November 29-December 2, 2016
Tampa, FL
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. ACOE Wetland Delineation, Waters of the US, Regional Supplement and Florida Statewide Wetland 62-340 FAC Wetland Delineation Training
 
       
DECEMBER 2016
       
December 1-2, 2016
Denver, CO
  Urban Watersheds Research Institute Course: Watershed Modeling Using CUHP-SWMM  
       
December 1-2, 2016
University of Phoenix-Arlington Arlington, VA
  Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: Planning and Preparing an Ecological Risk Assessment  
       

December 5-8, 2016
Santa Fe, NM

  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Federal Wetland / Waters Regulatory Policy  
       
December 12-13, 2016
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement (Eastern Mountains/Piedmont)
 
       
December 12-16, 2016
Smithsonian Conservation
Biology Institute

Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Statistical Downscaling of Global Climate Models using SDSM 5.2  
       
December 13-14, 2016
Atlanta, GA
  Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA): Writing the Perfect EA/FONSI, or EIS  
       
SPECIAL EVENTS 2015
       
October 1, 2016
Baltimore, MD
  Celebrate Baltimore Birds Fest is a family friendly fall festival being held in Gwynns Falls Leakin Park to celebrate Baltimore being designated an Urban Bird Treaty City.  
       
October 1-2, 2016
Ridgefield, WA
  Ridgefield Birdfest and Bluegrass  
       
October 6-9, 2016
Cape Charles, VA
  24th Annual Eastern Shore Birding & Wildlife Festival  
       
October 7-9, 2016
Houma, LA
  Voice of the Wetlands (VOW) 13th Annual Voice of the Wetlands Festival  
       
October 16-22, 2016
Sanibel, FL
  Ding Darling Days - J. N. Ding National Wildlife Refuge  
       
October 18-23, 2016
Northeast, NC
  Wings over Water Festival  
       
October 20-24, 2016
Northeast, NC
  New Jersey Audubon: 2016 Cape May Fall Festival  
       
November 2-6, 2016
Harlingen, TX
  Rio Grande Valley Bird Festival. Field trip destinations include Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge and Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge.  
       
November 15-20, 2016
San Antonio, NM
  Festival of the Cranes - Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge
 
       
November 24-27, 2016
Chincoteague, VA
  Assateague Island Waterfowl Weekend  
       
November 26, 2016
Stone Harbor, NJ
  Wetlands Institute: Wetland Wonderland  
       

For more wetland events, meetings, conferences, and courses nationwide, visit the ASWM calendar.

 

Wetland Breaking News - September 2016


INDEX

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • The Wetland Campus Research Challenge
  • What Do the Presidential Candidates Know about Science?
  • National Park Service turns 100, and some sites are showing their age
  • Science in the Wild: The Legacy Of the U.S. National Park System
  • ASWM’S Members’ Wetland Webinar: Legal Processes for Wetland Permits – September 28, 2016
  • Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance Webinar– October 4, 2016
  • Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar – October 5, 2016
  • ASWM Soils Training Webinar #4: Using Field Observations of Soils Onsite in Decision Making – October 12, 2016
  • ASWM’s Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar: Not Lost in Translation: How to Select the Right Wetland Restoration Team – October 18, 2016

NATIONAL NEWS

  • US, China Formally Join Paris Climate Agreement
  • U.S. Forest Service and Coca-Cola Announce the Restoration of One Billion Liters of Water
  • Playa Lakes Joint Venture Seeks Grant Proposals to Support Bird Habitat Conservation
  • More Than $33 Million in Funding Approved to Protect Waterfowl and Other Bird Species
  • U.S. Suspends Construction on Part of North Dakota Pipeline
  • National Academies panel urges overhaul of energy policies
  • Yosemite announces biggest expansion in 70 years, adding new meadows and forestland
  • US Clears Way for Cleanup of Colorado Mine After Huge Spill
  • Service Creates ESA Listing Workplan to Provide Predictability and Encourage Proactive Conservation of Imperiled Wildlife
  • USDA announces changes for largest conservation program
  • Thousands of Homes Keep Flooding, Yet They Keep Being Rebuilt Again
  • Dirt Capital Seeds Financing for Ecological Farms
  • NRCS Announces November 18 Application Deadline for Financial Assistance
  • Health official warns Zika could spread across U.S. Gulf
  • Cruel Summer: Floods, fires and heat
  • $7 million invested in 10 wetland mitigation banks
  • Great Lakes Commission leads fight against web trafficking of aquatic invasive species
  • Most of the world’s large aquifers at tipping point
  • How a 1995 firearms case led to Clean Water Act muddle
  • Unprecedented federal court ruling elevates environmental justice over demands of industry
  • NOAA Announces New Partnerships to Restore Habitat in the Great Lakes

STATE NEWS

  • AK: Exotic ticks appear to be establishing themselves in Alaska
  • AK: Shishmaref votes to relocate from eroding barrier island to mainland
  • CA: Newly discovered beetle decimates trees in Tijuana River Valley
  • CA: Wetlands celebrates 10 years
  • CA: 1.8 Million Acres of Sierra Nevada Habitat Protected for Imperiled Frogs, Toads
  • CO: Rocky Flats: A Wildlife Refuge Confronts Its Radioactive Past
  • FL: Sign up for Wetland Reserve Easements
  • FL: Nelson, local leaders question Florida changing water pollution rules
  • HI: Obama Creates the World's Largest Marine Reserve
  • IL: TWI to play key role in seven-year “great leap” restoration at Midewin
  • IL: Report outlines vision for Chicago rivers: more accessible, inviting, cleaner
  • IA: Vilsack: Iowa's economy needs a water quality solution
  • IA: Iowa farmers ripped out prairie; now some hope it can save them
  • LA: Louisiana flood price tag could hit $15 billion
  • LA: Louisiana’s sinking coast is a $100 billion nightmare for Big Oil
  • ME: It's Official: Obama Declares Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument
  • MD: Ellicott City flood prompts call for nine-month freeze on development
  • MD: Maryland awarded $800K to restore oysters in Chesapeake Bay
  • MA: State Awards Grant For Plymouth Wetland Restoration Project
  • MI: No end in sight for Flint; filter use expected to last rest of year
  • MI: EPA, Michigan and Local Officials Mark the Restoration of the River Raisin Area of Concern
  • MI: Michigan proposes approval for controversial Upper Peninsula mine near sacred tribal sites
  • MN: State health officials to review Roundup as possible carcinogen
  • MN: Do not eat: Researchers seek clues on mercury in St. Louis River estuary fish
  • MO: USDA Funding Wetland Mitigation Bank in Southeastern Missouri
  • MT: Fish Deaths in Montana's Yellowstone River Tied to Warming Waters
  • NE: Wetland Conditions Across State Variable
  • NY: Oysters Are Nearly Extinct in New York Waters. This Team Is Trying to Coax Them Back.
  • NY: DEC says GE's PCB cleanup has been inadequate
  • NY: Cleaner Creeks and Bays, But How Will New Yorkers Access the Waters They Own?
  • NC: Tainted Waters: New Drinking Water Threat Concerns Scientists, Officials By Catherine Clabby
  • ND: Dakotas' honeybee habitat shrinking with changing environment
  • ND: Pilot project takes on ag-friendly wetland preservation
  • OH: Ohio wetland mitigation program gets $350,000
  • OR: Nothing easy about conservation easements
  • RI: Rhode Island Implements Statewide Standards for Wetlands
  • SC: ‘Like it’s been nuked’: Millions of bees dead after South Carolina sprays for Zika mosquitoes
  • TX: EPA: North Texas Earthquakes Likely Linked to Oil and Gas Drilling
  • UT: Utah breaks ground on new wildlife, wetland learning center in Farmington
  • VT: Five Years After Hurricane Irene, Vermont Still Striving for Resilience
  • VA: Endangered and Threatened Species Alert: Survey Window for the State-Threatened Wood Turtle Opens Soon
  • VA: The Norfolk of the future will move away from the waterfront
  • WA: Five Years Later, The Elwha Reborn

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • 'We can't replace nature': Oilsands wetland reclamation a mixed success
  • Gene editing might help conserve species. But should it?
  • The Oceans Can’t Protect Us Anymore—Here’s Why
  • Official Web Soil Survey Available - Soil Science Annual Data Refreshes in October
  • Sediments control methane release to the ocean
  • The Southern Ocean is getting less salty. Here’s what that could mean for the rest of the world
  • Watersheds Lost Up to 22% of Their Forests in 14 Years. Here’s How it Affects Your Water Supply
  • The American 'Fur Ball' Being Threatened by a Warming Climate
  • Climate change has less impact on drought than previously expected
  • Mussels disappearing from New England waters, scientists say
  • Scientists digging up the dirt for clues to disappearing nitrogen
  • Biofuels worse for climate change than gas, U-M study says
  • Duck numbers increasing
  • To save its native trout, Yellowstone National Park poisons its rivers
  • Climate Change Could Cost Millennials $8.8 Trillion
  • The Saltmarsh Sparrow Is Creeping Dangerously Close to Extinction
  • From Grasslands to Forests, Nitrogen Impacts all Ecosystems
  • Ocean Slime Spreading Quickly Across the Earth
  • Historical Data Shows Arctic Melt of Last Two Decades Is 'Unprecedented'
  • Mystery of Bizarre Bird Deformities May Be Solved
  • Building equity, inclusiveness for low-income communities is key in climate resilience planning
  • In U.S. Methane Hot Spot, Researchers Pinpoint Sources of 250 Leaks
  • How Farms Affect the Chesapeake Bay’s Water
  • EPA's Fracking Finding Misled on Threat to Drinking Water, Scientists Conclude
  • Warming climate expected to squeeze out Arctic bird habitat

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • Report: Maintaining Sagebrush-Covered Landscapes Keeps Water on the Land for Ranchers and Wildlife
  • Restoring Neighborhood Streams: Planning, Design, and Construction

POTPOURRI

  • Diamond mining companies setting sights on the sea as land dries up in Africa
  • Three Nations Create Giant Reserves for Ocean Life
  • Humans have destroyed a tenth of Earth's wilderness in 25 years – study
  • New coalition launches to scale private conservation investment at IUCN World Conservation Congress
  • Campers, oil drillers are neighbors in 'land of many uses'
  • Be Thankful for Floodplains
  • Taking a Buyout from the Beach
  • A Reflection on the Gold King Mine Incident
  • Boosting Mill Towns by Busting Dams
  • 'One Water': Concept for the Future?

WEBINARS, MEETINGS, TRAINING

  • Association of State Wetland Managers Members’ Wetland Webinar: Legal Processes for Wetland Permits
  • The Swamp School webinar: Wetland Ferns
  • USDA Office of Sustainability and Climate Change Webinar: Responding To Drought and Water Challenges
  • Ocean Highlights from the IUCN World Conservation Congress
  • Future Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar: Improving the Quantity and Quality of Coastal Wetlands in the U.S. South Atlantic
  • Webinar - Innovative Mitigation Contracting and Financing
  • Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Mapping Coastal Storm Surge Flooding and Marsh Structure
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webcast 5: Retrofitting Revisited: Forward Into the Past
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar: Not Lost in Translation: How to Select the Right Wetland Restoration Team
  • River Network Webinar: Water Scarcity as a Catalyst for Integrated Water Management – Creating Multiple Benefits for Your Community and River
  • American Water Resources Association (AWRA) webinar: Oregon's First Integrated Water Resources Strategy: Lessons Learned Since Implementation
  • Carpe Diem West Webinar: Navigating the Intersection: Western Water, Climate Change & Public Health
  • Forester University Webinar: Specifying Engineered Soils for Sustainable Vegetation
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Members' Wetland Webinar: Developing Effective Buffer Protections: State Panelists and Presentation of Findings from a New England Study by the New England Interstate Pollution Control Commission
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Hot Topics Webinar: Wetlands & Climate Change: A Summary of Current Wetland Scientific Findings
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webcast 6: Non-Traditional MS4s
  • Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Method for Estimating Potential Wetland Extent by Utilizing Streamflow Statistics and Flood-Inundation Mapping Techniques: Pilot Study for Land Along the Wabash River Near Terre Haute, Indiana
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Members' Wetland Webinar: State Integration Practices Panel: Stromwater, TMDL and Wetland Management

Meetings

  • Under Western Skies (UWS) Conference: Water: Events, Trends, Analysis
  • EUCI: 2016 EPA 316(b) Fish and Shellfish Impingement & Entrainment in Power & Industrial Facilities Conference
  • Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay: 2016 Chesapeake Watershed Forum
  • 18th Annual Stormwater Conference
  • Great Lakes Public Forum 2016
  • 16th Annual Great Lakes Beach Association Conference
  • 8th Annual Southeast Florida Regional Climate Leadership Summit
  • Fourth Annual Kent State University Water and Land Symposium: Sustainability and Resilience on the land-Water Continuum
  • Southern Nevada Water Authority WaterSmart Innovations Conference and Exposition
  • Great Lakes Commission 2016 Annual Meeting
  • 8th Annual Undergraduate Research Conference
  • Physics of Estuaries and Coastal Seas Conference
  • Microplastics/Citizen Science Workshop
  • Natural Channel Design Review Checklist Workshop
  • Ecological Restoration in a Changing Climate: Ecosystems, Adaptation, Infrastructure and Resiliency
  • Fifth International Conference on Climate Change Adaptation 2016
  • Southeastern Fish & Wildlife Agencies: 70th Annual Conference
  • 4th Northern Rockies Invasive Plants Council Conference
  • 2016 Mountain Climate Conference: Mountains Without Snow: What are the Consequences?
  • New Jersey Association for Floodplain Management (NJAFM) 12th Annual Conference: Supporting Municipalities to Reduce Flood Risk
  • Natural Areas Association 2016 Natural Areas Conference
  • Ecosystem Services Partnership (ESP) conference: 'Healthy ecosystems for resilient societies'
  • 11th Annual Regional Stormwater Conference: Stormwater Solutions
  • Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum - West Coast
  • 12th Annual MAFSM Conference
  • Student Conference on Conservation Science – New York (SCCS-NY)
  • World Conference on Climate Change
  • The Paris Agreement & Private Actors: Extra-jurisdictional Considerations of the Climate Agreement (2016 ELI-Miriam Hamilton Keare Policy Forum)
  • Environmental Law Institute: The Business of Water (2016 Corporate Forum)
  • 7th Symposium on the Ecology, Status and Conservation of the Diamondback Terrapin
  • Land Trust Alliance Rally 2016 National Land Conservation Conference
  • 14th Annual Ecological Genomics Symposium
  • American Water Works Association: Water Infrastructure Conference & Exposition
  • National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP): 39th Annual Scientific Symposium and Committee Meetings
  • North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) Symposium: Science to Stewardship: Balancing Economic Growth and Lake Sustainability
  • The Chicago Wilderness Congress: Celebrating 20 Years: One Home. One Future
  • The Environmental Law Institute and Stetson's Institute for Biodiversity Law and Policy: Fourth Annual ELI-Stetson Wetlands Workshop
  • Gulf Estuarine Research Society (GERS) / Society of Wetland Scientist South Central Chapter Joint Meeting
  • Society for Ecological Restoration-Southwest Chapter Annual Conference
  • Quivira Coalition Conference: Lights, Soil, Action!
  • 2016 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference
  • American Water Works Association: Water Quality Technology Conference® & Exposition
  • Kansas Water Office: Governor’s Conference: The Future of Water in Kansas
  • 7th Annual Northwest Climate Conference
  • 2nd Annual Do No Harm Workshop: Considerations for the Use of Non-local Species in Ecological Restoration
  • Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway Association: 2016 Annual Meeting
  • 2016 Bay-Delta Science Conference
  • EcoAgriculture Partners Landscape Leadership 3-Day Intensive Workshop
  • Pennsylvania Botany Symposium
  • International Forum on Water (2016IFW)
  • Maryland Water Monitoring Council’s 22nd Annual Conference: A River Runs Through It – Strengthening Networks and Connections
  • ACES: A Community on Ecosystem Services conference: Linking Science, Practice, and Decision Making
  • Southern Rockies Seed Network 2016 Conference: Ecotypes: Science, Practice, & Policy
  • 8th National Summit: Our Coasts, Our Future, Our Choice and 25th Biennial Meeting of The Coastal Society
  • AGU Fall Meeting
  • Northern Michigan Waterways Hazardous Material Spill Planning Committee (No-Spills) 27th Annual No-Spills Conference
  • Society of Integrative and Comparative Biology (SICB) Annual Meeting
  • Coastal GeoTools 2017
  • Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science Conference
  • 14th Annual Tamarisk Coalition Conference: The Future is Now: Forward-Thinking Restoration, Planning, and Adaptation
  • 17th Annual International LiDAR Mapping Forum (ILMF)
  • Native Seed Network: 2017 National Native Seed Conference
  • Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) 2017 Conference: “From the Mountains to the Sea”
  • Wisconsin Wetlands Association's 22nd annual Wetland Science Conference
  • 50th International Conference: Water Management Modeling
  • Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) and The Climate Registry: Climate Leadership Conference: Connecting People, Innovation, and Opportunity
  • RES/CON
  • 26th Annual Western Places/Western Spaces Conference
  • National Flood Determination Association: 20th Annual NFDA Conference
  • Center for Watershed Protection Association 2017 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference
  • Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (GEER 2017) Conference
  • 2017 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference: Connecting the Dots: The Emerging Science of Aquatic System Connectivity
  • 2017 ASFPM Conference: "Flood Risk Management in the Heartland"
  • National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference
  • IAGLR's 60th Annual Conference: From Cities to Farms: Shaping Great Lakes Ecosystems
  • Citizen Science Association: CitSci2017
  • Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Green Infrastructure Conference: Integrated Stormwater Management from Duluth to Quebec
  • Society of Wetland Scientists’ 2017 Annual Meeting: Celebrating Wetland Diversity Across the Landscape: Mountains to Mangroves
  • US Water Alliance: One Water Summit 2017
  • 2017 ESA Annual Meeting: Linking biodiversity, material cycling and ecosystem services in a changing world
  • 12th International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL 2017 Beijing): Ecology and Civilization in a Changing World
  • Association of State Floodplain Managers: National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop

Training

  • The Swamp School Wetland Plants Field ID Workshop
  • Rutgers University Course: Wetland Construction: Planning and Functional Design
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Woody Plants (Trees, Shrubs, and Vines) Identification – 2016
  • 2D Floodplain Delineation using 2D HEC-RAS Model
  • George Mason University, Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation course: Watershed Conservation: Riparian Restoration
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training
  • Rutgers University course: Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • North Carolina State University Stream Restoration Program Course: Stream Morphology Assessment
  • University of Minnesota course: Hydrology Tools for Minnesota Wetlands
  • Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
  • Rutgers University course: Understanding Advanced Stormwater Management Techniques
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher - 2016
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) course: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA): Writing the Perfect EA/FONSI, or EIS
  • Rutgers University Course: Methodology for Delineating Wetlands
  • Rutgers University Course: Introduction to Wetland Identification
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: Advanced NEPA-Taking the National Environmental Policy Act to the Next Level
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • Natural Channel Design Principles
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA): Writing the Perfect EA/FONSI, or EIS
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: Advanced NEPA-Taking the National Environmental Policy Act to the Next Level
  • Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology (Piedmont)
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. ACOE Wetland Delineation, Waters of the US, Regional Supplement and Florida Statewide Wetland 62-340 FAC Wetland Delineation Training
  • Urban Watersheds Research Institute Course: Watershed Modeling Using CUHP-SWMM
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: Planning and Preparing an Ecological Risk Assessment
  • Federal Wetland / Waters Regulatory Policy
  • Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement (Eastern Mountains/Piedmont)
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Statistical Downscaling of Global Climate Models using SDSM 5.2
  • National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA): Writing the Perfect EA/FONSI, or EIS

SPECIAL EVENTS

  • Celebrate Baltimore Birds Fest
  • Ridgefield Birdfest and Bluegrass
  • 24th Annual Eastern Shore Birding & Wildlife Festival
  • Voice of the Wetlands (VOW) 13th Annual Voice of the Wetlands Festival
  • Ding Darling Days
  • Wings over Water Festival
  • New Jersey Audubon: 2016 Cape May Fall Festival
  • Rio Grande Valley Bird Festival
  • Festival of the Cranes
  • Assateague Island Waterfowl Weekend
  • Wetlands Institute: Wetland Wonderland

 

 

Wetland Breaking News - December 2015

Wetland Breaking News - March 2016


The Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News (WBN)
is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those Wetland Breaking News - April 2016working in water resources and related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published for over fifteen years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.

The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to .

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled and Edited by Marla Stelk, Editor; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors. Executive Director: Jeanne Christie. Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399 Fax: 207-892-3089

All photos by Jeanne Christie, ASWM


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