Wetland Breaking News - August 2016

                   
                   
   
IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES &
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POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

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Wetland Breaking News - August 2016

All photos by
Jeanne Christie, ASWM

     

Wetland Breaking News - August 2016Dear Friends,

Like many other people, I correlate the seasons of the year with food. Summertime, for instance, has always been associated with cookouts and seafood. I love sitting outside at a seafood shack on the coast and eating some sort of yummy fresh catch while enjoying the ocean breeze and views. We’re really lucky in Maine to have a thriving seafood industry – much of which is a result of the many bays (aka “estuaries”) we have along our jagged and rocky coastline. As most of you are aware, however, fishing and seafood industries across the nation are struggling to survive – for a host of different reasons.

I was thrilled to read a recent article about a comeback for the Chesapeake Bay Scallop. As a child I was not a fan of seafood, but I still remember eating my first Bay Scallop and thinking – I could get used to this. They have a soft, sweet, buttery-ness to them that is different than their open-ocean cousins and they’re small enough to just pop right into your mouth like popcorn – I just love them. But they’ve been really hard to find over the last decade or two. Their numbers along the eastern seaboard started to drastically decrease in the 1980s with many commercial bay scallop fisheries closing by the 2000’s. For the Chesapeake Bay, the loss of bay scallops dates all the way back to 1933 when a category-4 hurricane washed away all the Bay’s eelgrass –habitat necessary for bay scallop development.

Our nation’s beautiful, productive bays are under a tremendous amount of pressure caused by storms, pollution, marine traffic, warming temperatures and overfishing. According to NOAA, “In 2010, 123.3 million people, or 39 percent of the nation's population lived in counties directly on the shoreline. This population is expected to increase by 8% from 2010 to 2020.” Millions more visit them as tourists each year to enjoy recreational opportunities and yes, all the wonderful fresh fish and seafood. So since National Estuaries Week is coming up soon (September 17-24), I decided to highlight some interesting stories about various bays/estuaries in the U.S. In Editor’s Choice you’ll find interesting stories about the comeback of the Chesapeake Bay Scallop, a new study showing pharmaceuticals and other micropollutants in the Hudson Estuary, and about efforts in Washington State to win federal protection for Puget Sound. Under National News, you’ll find a couple of stories about what scientists are doing to predict dead zones, improve restoration outcomes and understand the complex dynamics between air quality and bay health. You’ll also find a story in State News about issues with drinking water in communities along Cape Cod Bay.

I know I’ll be celebrating National Estuaries Week by enjoying some tasty local seafood and doing what I can to help protect and restore these national treasures. I hope you will join me!

Best regards,

Marla J. Stelk, Editor
Wetland Breaking News

     
                   


Wetland Breaking News - August 2016

National Estuaries Week is September 17-24!

Restore America’s Estuaries
Since 1988, National Estuaries Week has celebrated the many ways we benefit from healthy, thriving coastal ecosystems. All throughout the country, local organizations including Restore America’s Estuaries member groups, National Estuarine Research Reserves and National Estuary Programs organize special events, like beach clean-ups, hikes, canoe and kayak trips, workshops and more to recognize the special role these places play in our everyday lives. National Estuaries Week is a terrific opportunity to learn more about estuaries and the perfect excuse to spend time on your local bay! For more information, click here.

The Return of Chesapeake Bay Scallops

By Jane Black – Garden & Gun – August/September 2016
Once wiped out from the Chesapeake, bay scallops are returning to area waters—and dinner plates. On August 23, 1933, a category-4 hurricane swept up the Eastern Seaboard. Eighty-two-mile-per-hour winds battered Cape Henry, Virginia, and a record high tide put Norfolk’s downtown under five feet of water. The storm was so powerful that it carved out a new inlet on the Maryland coast that now anchors Ocean City. There was no official system for naming hurricanes back then, but this one was dubbed the Storm King, and it set records that remained in place for eighty years. It also had another lasting, though less well known, impact: It washed away all the Chesapeake Bay’s eelgrass, a marine plant that thrived in salty bays and coves. And with the grass went the entire local population of wild bay scallops. For full story, click here.

Study Finds Pharmaceuticals, Other Micropollutants In Hudson Estuary

By Allison Dunne – WAMC Northeast Public Radio – July 15, 2016
A first-of-its-kind study released Friday points to a long and varied list of micropollutants in the Hudson River estuary. Dozens of products were detected, from pesticides to pharmaceuticals. Two scientists from the Cornell University School of Civil and Environmental Engineering conducted the study in partnership with Riverkeeper, analyzing 24 water samples drawn from eight locations between the Mohawk River’s confluence with the Hudson and the Tappan Zee Bridge. The samples were collected in June, July, September and October of 2015. Dr. Damian Helbling is assistant professor at Cornell University’s School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. For full story, click here.

Washington seeks federal protection for Puget Sound

Washington Department of Ecology – July 21, 2016
The Department of Ecology, with support from other state agencies, today formally requested that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) protect Puget Sound by making it a no-discharge zone for vessel sewage. The move would prohibit commercial and recreational vessels from releasing sewage into Puget Sound. The Sound’s shellfish beds, swimming beaches and protected areas are especially vulnerable to vessel sewage. The sewage discharged contains relatively high concentrations of bacteria and viruses that can remain active even several miles or hours after entering the water. For full news release, click here.

Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance Webinar: Funding for Floodplain Restoration: Breaking Down Incentives to Develop Floodplains & Recent FEMA Policy Updates – September 1, 2016

Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar: Funding for Floodplain Restoration: Breaking Down Incentives to Develop Floodplains & Recent FEMA Policy Updates will be held on September 1, 2016 at 3:00 p.m. ET. Presenter: Zachary Christin, Project Director, Earth Economics. For more information, click here.

ASWM Soils Training Webinar #3: Landforms and Landscapes – September 14, 2016

The Association of State Wetland Managers Training Webinar Series: Soils Training Webinar #3: Landforms and Landscapes will be held on September 14, 2016 at 3:00 p.m. ET. For more information and to register, click here.

ASWM’S Members’ Wetland Webinar: Legal Processes for Wetland Permits – September 28, 2016

The Association of State Wetland Managers Members’ Wetland Webinar Legal Processes for Wetland Permits will be held on Wednesday, September 28, 2016 - 3:00 p.m. ET. Presenter: Janet Brooks, Esq., Attorney at Law. For more information, click here.

Stetson University's Biodiverstiy institute



Wetland Breaking News - August 2016

EPA and USDA Pledge Actions to Support America’s Growing Water Quality Trading Markets

By Ann Mills, USDA Deputy Under Secretary for Natural Resources and Environment and Ellen Gilinsky, EPA Office of Water Senior Policy Advisor – US Department of Agriculture – August 2, 2016
In September of 2015, EPA and USDA sponsored a three-day national workshop at the Robert B. Daugherty Water for Food Institute in Lincoln, Nebraska that brought together more than 200 experts and leaders representing the agricultural community, utilities, environmental NGOs, private investors, states, cities, and tribes to discuss how to expand the country’s small but growing water quality trading markets. Recently we released a report that summarizes the workshop’s key discussions and outlines new actions that we and others will take to further promote the use of market-based tools to advance water quality improvements. For full blog post, click here.

Researchers issue real-time forecasts of Chesapeake Bay dead zone

By David Malmquist – William & Mary – August 8, 2016
An experimental forecast from William & Mary’s Virginia Institute of Marine Science will soon help Chesapeake Bay anglers better plan for the appearance of low-oxygen “dead zones.” Dead zones form when excess nitrogen from fertilizers, wastewater, and other sources enters coastal waters and fuels short-lived blooms of algae. Bacteria then eat the dead, sinking algae, consuming dissolved oxygen from surrounding waters. For full story, click here.

Complimentary Bay restoration plan in works

By Josh Bollinger – The Star Democrat – August 9, 2016
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is teaming up with the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) and other partners to assess the Chesapeake Bay’s 64,000-square-mile watershed and identify potential restoration activities. The result of the study will be a plan meant to complement existing watershed pollution reduction efforts being executed by states and local jurisdictions in the Bay watershed — Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, New York and the District of Columbia — and the Chesapeake Bay Program. For full story, click here.

EPA provides $602,000 to Navajo Nation Government for Gold King Mine response costs

Contact: Margot Perez-Sullivan – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – August 5, 2016
Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is awarding more than $445,000 to reimburse the Navajo Nation for response costs for actions associated with the August 5, 2015 Gold King Mine release near Silverton, Colo. This is in addition to $157,000 awarded in March. These funds include costs incurred for various activities associated with the release response, including field evaluations, water quality sampling, laboratory analyses, and personnel. EPA continues to evaluate state, tribal and local response costs and has reimbursed approximately $3 million to date through cooperative agreements established with partners. Today’s announcement is part of EPA’s ongoing evaluation of costs consistent with the Agency’s authorities and the requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. For full news release, click here.

Announcement of 2016-2017 Campus RainWorks Challenge

U.S. Department of Education – August 2, 2016
EPA is announcing the fifth annual Campus RainWorks Challenge prize competition that asks student teams to design green infrastructure for their campus. This year, teams will incorporate climate resiliency and consider community engagement in their stormwater management designs. EPA is calling for college and university students to form teams with a faculty advisor to participate in the competition. EPA encourages teams to be multidisciplinary (comprised of planners, engineers, designers, scientists, and more). Teams will be able to submit in either the master plan or demonstration project categories. Registration for this year’s competition will be open from September 1-30, 2016. Submissions for this year’s competition will be due December 16, 2016 and winners will be announced in Spring 2017. For full story, click here.

White House directs federal agencies to consider climate change

By Valerie Volcovici – Reuters – August 2, 2016
U.S. federal agencies should disclose whether their actions and decisions will have an impact on climate change, the White House announced on Tuesday. The White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) finalized an update after nearly six years of consultations of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), a Nixon-era statute that called on officials to weigh the environmental effects of projects such as highways, dams or oil drilling. The update takes NEPA a step further by requiring agencies such as the Interior Department to the Army Corps of Engineers to quantify greenhouse gas emissions in NEPA project reviews and to describe the potential climate change impacts. For full story, click here.

What is a "Good" Project? Breaking Down Our Survey Results on Gulf Restoration Priorities

By Teresa Chan – Vibrant Environment Blog – July 28, 2016
In June, the ELI Gulf Team released a survey on priorities for Gulf restoration in the wake of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. It was designed to understand what elements our partners and collaborators think are most important to good restoration projects. For full blog post, click here.

USFWS Announces Final Methodology for Prioritizing and Addressing ESA Status Reviews

By Justin Stakes – Ammoland – July 28, 2016
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced its final methodology for improving the way it identifies and prioritizes pending Endangered Species Act (ESA) status reviews, the scientifically rigorous process the agency uses to determine whether a species warrants federal protection. The new approach will allow the Service to be more strategic in how it addresses pending status reviews, to be more transparent in how it establishes workload priorities, and to work better with partners to conserve America’s most imperiled plants and wildlife. For full story, click here.

Federal coal ash case could impact cleanups beyond Virginia

By Whitney Pipkin – Bay Journal – July 27, 2016
A federal judge in Virginia could soon decide a potentially landmark case determining whether power plants can be held accountable for contaminating surface waters with toxic chemicals that leached into the ground from coal ash pits. U.S. District Court Judge James Gibney Jr. heard four days of testimony last month in a lawsuit brought by the Sierra Club accusing Dominion Virginia Power of fouling the Elizabeth River with arsenic that seeped via ground water from coal ash pits at the company’s now-closed Chesapeake Energy Center in Chesapeake, VA. For full article, click here.

New Study Finds US Coastal Military Installations Will Lose Land to Sea Level Rise in Decades Ahead

Union of Concerned Citizens – July 27, 2016
US East and Gulf Coast military installations are at risk of losing land—where vital training and testing grounds, infrastructure and housing now exists—as sea level rise moves the high tide line inland in decades to come, according to a Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) analysis released today. The analysis, “The US Military on the Front Lines of Rising Seas,” found that coastal installations will experience more extensive tidal flooding and when hurricanes strike, deeper and more extensive storm surge flooding. For full press release, click here.

$2.2 Million in Conservation Grants Announced by Five Star and Urban Waters Restoration Program

EIN News – July 26, 2016
The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) today announced at the Urban Waters National Training Workshop that 58 community-led wetland, stream and coastal restoration projects across the nation have been awarded approximately $2.2 million in grants. The grantees have committed an additional $5.2 million in local project support, creating a total conservation investment of more than $7.4 million in projects that will restore wildlife habitat and urban waters. These projects will engage thousands of volunteers, students and local residents in community-based conservation projects. For full story, click here.

Cleaner air may be driving water quality in Chesapeake Bay

PHYS.org – July 26, 2016
A new study suggests that improvements in air quality over the Potomac watershed, including the Washington, D.C., metro area, may be responsible for recent progress on water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. Scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science have linked improving water quality in streams and rivers of the Upper Potomac River Basin to reductions in nitrogen pollution onto the land and streams due to enforcement of the Clean Air Act. For full story, click here.

A new report rated countries on ‘sustainable development.’ The U.S. did horribly

By Chris Mooney – The Washington Post – July 21, 2016
Last September, urged on by Pope Francis, the United Nations and its 193 member states embraced the most sweeping quest yet to, basically, save the world and everyone in it — dubbed the Sustainable Development Goals. It’s a global agenda to fix climate change, stop hunger, end poverty, extend health and access to jobs, and vastly more — all by 2030. For full story, click here.

Krohn to lead Rainwater Basin Wetland district

The Grand Island Independent – July 21, 2016
Brad Krohn of Kearney has been selected as the new project leader of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Rainwater Basin Wetland Management District near Funk. According to a USFWS press release, Krohn has worked 17 years with the USFWS National Wildlife Refuge System, spending time working throughout the Midwest and the regional office in Denver. Most recently, he served as refuge manager and federal wildlife officer at Kirwin National Wildlife Refuge in Kirwin, Kan. In May, Krohn was named to succeed Ronnie Sanchez, who recently accepted another USFWS position in Alaska. For full story, click here.

Our Dangerous Conservation Crisis

By Dan Ashe – Field & Stream – July 20, 2016
Editor’s note: At the TRCP’s presidential campaign forum in Colorado last month, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe gave a speech that stunned those in attendance. A version of the speech that Ashe had originally delivered at this year’s North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Management Conference, it wasn’t just another recounting of the uncertain state of fish and wildlife these days. Instead, it was a literal, and moving, demand to take action. Ashe pointed out that unless hunters and fishermen conscientiously work to get new people involved in our pursuits, fish and wildlife will soon become irrelevant to America. For full blog post, click here.

United States, Enbridge Reach $177 Million Settlement After 2010 Oil Spills in Michigan and Illinois

U.S. Department of Justice – July 20, 2016
The Department of Justice and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced a settlement with Enbridge Energy Limited Partnership and several related Enbridge companies to resolve claims stemming from its 2010 oil spills in Marshall, Michigan, and Romeoville, Illinois. Enbridge has agreed to spend at least $110 million on a series of measures to prevent spills and improve operations across nearly 2,000 miles of its pipeline system in the Great Lakes region. Enbridge will also pay civil penalties totaling $62 million for Clean Water Act violations -- $61 million for discharging at least 20,082 barrels of oil in Marshall and $1 million for discharging at least 6,427 barrels of oil in Romeoville. For full news release, click here.

House passes Interior, EPA spending bill

By Devin Henry – The Hill – July 14, 2016
The House passed a $32.1 billion bill funding the Interior Department and environmental programs next year, the first time the legislation has cleared the House since 2009. The bill would cut spending for Interior, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other programs by $64 billion over current levels, and is $1 billion less than what President Obama requested in his budget. For full story, click here.

The diversity of life across much of Earth has plunged below ‘safe’ levels

By Chris Mooney – The Washington Post – July 14, 2016
In an ambitious study that represents the latest merger between big data approaches and the quest to conserve the planet, scientists have found that across a majority of the Earth’s land surface — including some of its most important types of terrain and its most populous regions — the abundance or overall number of animals and plants of different species has fallen below a “safe” level identified by biologists. For full story, click here.

Senate Democrats push carbon capture tax credits

By Devin Henry – The Hill – July 13, 2016
Senate Democrats have introduced a bill to bolster carbon capture technology for fossil fuel power plants. The bill, released on Wednesday by Sens. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.) and Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.), would expand a federal research tax credit for carbon capture and sequestration technology at power plants. The technology would see power plants capture the greenhouse gas emissions released by burning fossil fuels and either store them or use them for other purposes, such as oil recovery. For full story, click here.

Service Proposes Expansion of Hunting and Fishing Opportunities on National Wildlife Refuges

Contact: Vanessa Kauffman – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – July 13, 2016
The value to Americans provided by national wildlife refuges was highlighted today when U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe announced the agency is proposing to expand hunting and fishing opportunities at 13 national wildlife refuges across the United States. This includes migratory bird, upland game, big game hunting and sport fishing. For full press release, click here.

U.S. Experienced At Least 8 Billion-Dollar in Disasters So Far this Year

NOAA – July 7, 2016
We’re only halfway through 2016 and the U.S. has already seen eight weather and climate-related disasters* that have each met or exceeded $1 billion in damages. These eight disasters resulted in the loss of 30 lives, and caused at least $13.1 billion, according to an analysis by NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). A high number of these events impacted Texas throughout the Spring - most notably - several intense hail storms over densely populated cities and the April 17 Houston flood event. For full story, click here.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife and Girls Inc. Inaugurate Girls in Nature

By Megan Moosetrack – Montana Outdoor Radio Show – July 1, 2016
Seeking to expand opportunities for young girls nationwide to experience nature and explore careers in wildlife conservation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Girls Inc. has signed a historic partnership agreement. The agreement commits the two organizations to work together to help girls, particularly those from communities of color and urban areas traditionally underrepresented in natural resource conservation fields, to explore conservation and natural resource management. For full story, click here.

 

Wetland Breaking News - August 2016

AK: What's behind the seeming disappearance of an Alaska tern? Scientists try to find out.

By Margaret Thomas – Alaska Dispatch News – July 17, 2016
For a few days in early summer, pairs of biologists tiptoe through minefields of camouflaged nests to flush and count midair Alaska's largest population of breeding Aleutian terns. "It is very challenging," said U.S. Forest Service biologist Susan Oehlers, just back from a counting trip near this Southeast town. "It's not perfect — it gives you just a rough estimate." Challenges include sorting Aleutian terns, with their melodic whistle, from their intermingled and nearly identical cousins, the more aggressive Arctic tern. Both are aerial acrobats, wheeling, hovering and plunging up to 30 miles per hour to snatch small fish. Recently, another cousin has moved in, the larger Caspian tern, which typically nests farther south in Icy Bay. "We never used to see them at all," said Oehlers, who counted six on a recent trip. The annual bird count is part of a multiagency effort to learn more about the Aleutian tern, which seems to be disappearing from its Alaska breeding grounds. For full story, click here.

CA: Suit: California failed to study oil well impact on water

By Brian Melley – Yuma Sun – August 3, 2016
Environmentalists sued state agencies Wednesday to halt oil well injections into a federally protected aquifer near California's Central Coast. California oil and gas regulators failed to assess environmental consequences before forwarding a so-called aquifer exemption to federal officials for final approval, the Center for Biological Diversity said in the lawsuit filed in San Luis Obispo Superior Court. The Department of Conservation's Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources in February signed off on granting the exemption to Freeport-McMoRan Inc. that would allow the oil company to inject steam and oil production wastewater into an aquifer beneath rolling hills that are also home to vineyards and homes a few miles outside Pismo Beach. The exemption is the first the state has supported since regulators acknowledged lax oversight had allowed thousands of wells to pump oilfield fluids into protected aquifers. The wells inject steam and acid to loosen oil deposits or dispose of massive amounts of briny fluid and other waste, including chemicals, that comes out of oil production wells. For full story, click here.

CA: California may have a huge groundwater reserve that nobody knew about

By Chris Mooney – The Washington Post – June 27, 2016
In a surprising new study, Stanford researchers have found that drought-ravaged California is sitting on top of a vast and previously unrecognized water resource, in the form of deep groundwater, residing at depths between 1,000 and nearly 10,000 feet below the surface of the state’s always thirsty Central Valley. The resource amounts to 2,700 billion tons of freshwater, mostly less than about 3,250 feet deep, according to the paper published Monday in the influential Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. And there is even more fresh or moderately salty water at more extreme depths than this that could potentially be retrieved and desalinized someday for drinking water, or for use in agriculture. For full story, click here.

CO: Criminal investigation into Gold King spill confirmed; EPA’s tab reaches $29M

By Jesse Paul – The Denver Post – August 1, 2016 – Video
Federal authorities have confirmed for the first time that a criminal investigation into the 2015 Gold King Mine spill is underway, saying their probe involves the U.S. Attorney’s Office and came at the request of members of Congress. The announcement Monday came from the Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Inspector General (OIG) as it released letters sent to lawmakers about the status of its work to analyze the disaster. Documents reviewed by The Denver Post on Monday indicate the probe has been in progress for nearly a year. For full story and to view videos, click here.

DE: DNREC honors Delaware’s 2016 Wetland Warriors at State Fair

Delaware.Gov – July 28, 2016
Today at the Delaware State Fair, Governor Jack Markell and DNREC Secretary David Small honored wetland professional and geologist Bartholomew Wilson and teachers Robin Moxley and Patricia Bear as Delaware’s 2016 Wetland Warriors for their efforts to conserve and restore wetlands and to educate young Delawareans about the importance of these vital areas. “Wetlands are one of Delaware’s most important natural resources, buffering our land and communities against coastal storms, absorbing and filtering water on its way to the Delaware River, Bay and ocean or the Chesapeake Bay, and providing precious habitat for our wildlife,” said DNREC Secretary David Small. “Today, we are recognizing and thanking three Delaware Wetland Warriors who have dedicated their careers to wetlands protection, conservation and education.” For full story, click here.

FL: Florida updates regulations, permitting more toxic chemicals in water

By Roya Sabri – The Christian Science Monitor – July 27, 2016
Proposed chemical regulations mandated under the Clean Water Act could make Florida’s surface waters more – or less – potable depending on who you talk to. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) recently proposed new standards for surface water pollutants, 24 years after they were last updated. For full story, click here.

FL: Algae fix could come from $10 million Everglades clean-up contest

By Andy Reid – Sun Sentinel – July 21, 2016 – Video
As toxic algae blooms foul Florida waterways, Everglades advocates Thursday started accepting contestants for a $10 million prize for solving water pollution woes. The Everglades Foundation two years ago announced it would create a cash incentive for scientists and entrepreneurs to come up with a cost-effective way to clean polluting phosphorus out of lakes, rivers and other freshwater bodies worldwide, including Florida's famed River of Grass. Now as Florida coastal communities struggle with a toxic algae outbreak fueled by phosphorus-laden water draining out of Lake Okeechobee, the Everglades Foundation is ready to start fielding proposed solutions. For full story and to view video, click here.

FL: Manatee die-off in polluted Indian River Lagoon begins anew

By Craig Pittman – Tampa Bay Times – July 14, 2016
The manatees are dying again. Between 2012 to 2015, state officials said 158 manatees died in Florida’s Indian River Lagoon, once known as the most diverse ecosystem in America. They weren’t alone — pelicans and dolphins died by the score in the polluted lagoon too. The manatee die-off sputtered out last summer. But now, according to St. Petersburg’s Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, it has begun anew. For full story, click here.

IA: Groundbreaking for new CREP wetland

By Kacey Ginn – The Wright County Monitor – August 13, 2016
On July 27, a group of local and state conservation workers gathered for a groundbreaking ceremony celebrating the establishment of a CREP (Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program) wetland in Wright County. The new wetland, which will be located in section 34 of Norway Township, is set to start construction in August and be finished by the end of the year. Drainage in the area won’t be negatively affected, and Bruce Voigts, coordinator for the Eagle Creek nutrient reduction strategy, was even hopeful that it might improve. For full story, click here.

IA: Iowa is losing millions of trees — and it's hurting water quality, experts say

By Donnelle Eller – The Des Moines Register – July 18, 2016 – Video
Iowa's thirst for new farmland helped drive the loss of 97,000 acres of woodlands in just five years, a new federal report shows. It's the first time in nearly 40 years that the state has seen a net loss of forested land, a disturbing development that experts fear is contributing to Iowa's problems with farm runoff and poor water quality. For full story and to view video, click here.

IL: Spills of pig waste kill hundreds of thousands of fish in Illinois

By David Jackson and Gary Marx – Chicago Tribune – August 5, 2016 – Video
Walking the Iroquois County streams his family had fished for decades, Leland Ponton was nearly brought to his knees by the stench of Beaver Creek. "It looked like ink, the water. It had fish all over the place, dead. It wasn't fit for nothing. Not even a wild animal could drink out of it," said the 75-year-old retired farmer. Government officials quickly assigned culpability for the deadly discharge: a waste spill from Hopkins Ridge Farms, a hog confinement operation where more than 8,000 pigs are raised to market weight before being trucked to slaughter. For full story and to view video, click here.

IL: Volo Bog State Natural Area celebrates unique wetland

By Frank S. Abderholden – Chicago Tribune – July 24, 2016
In less than an hour, visitors touring Volo Bog State Natural Area can see geological formations from when glaciers rose a mile high and fossils of plants that existed during the dinosaur era. The area is a state park in part because it is a "bog," a type of wetland with plants over the open water. The park celebrated International Bog Day Sunday with a bog art auction, music and tours. For full story, click here.

KS: Kansas leaders tackle aquifer conservation

By Morgan Chilson – The Topeka Capital-Journal – July 23, 2016
The depletion of Kansas groundwater isn’t a new story, and leaders throughout the state are actively pushing for increased water management resources to protect this critical asset. The state completed a 50-year water plan in 2014 dedicated to managing the water supply in an effort to meet both agricultural and drinking water needs. For full story, click here.

KS: EPA, Goodrum Farm CR314, LLC Reach Settlement on Clean Water Act Violations

Contact: Mark Hanson – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – July 18, 2016
EPA Region 7 has reached a proposed administrative settlement with Goodrum Farm CR314, LLC, in Butler County, Mo., to resolve violations of Section 404 of the Clean Water Act (CWA). As part of the settlement, the company has agreed to pay a civil penalty of $15,000. During a July 16, 2014, inspection, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) inspectors found the company had placed dredged and fill material into forested wetlands, in an effort to convert the wetlands to agricultural cropland. This resulted in the unauthorized impact of approximately 9.46 acres of wetlands adjacent to a designated “water of the United States.” For full news release, click here.

LA: Louisiana pols go to court blaming Big Oil for coastal ruin

By Cain Burdeau – Associated Press – August 5, 2016
The oil industry has left a big footprint along the Gulf Coast, where a Delaware-sized stretch of Louisiana has disappeared. But few politicians would blame Big Oil for ecosystem abuse in a state where the industry employs up to 300,000 people and injects $73 billion into the economy. Until now. Following the lead of Gov. John Bel Edwards, Louisiana political orthodoxy is being turned upside-down as prominent leaders of both parties join lawsuits seeking billions of dollars for environmental improvement projects. For full story, click here.

ME: Land trust receives state grant for wetland restoration

Village Soup – July 20, 2016
Maine DEP recently awarded over $195,000 dollars in grant money for projects in Fort Fairfield, Falmouth and Owls Head, including one proposed by Topsham-based Maine Coast Heritage Trust, which owns Aldermere Farm in Rockport. For full story, click here.

MD: Some pause over rebuilding Ellicott City, cite flood history

By Jayne Miller – WBAL TV – August 2, 2016 – Video
As bad as Saturday's flooding was, it's not without precedence as Ellicott City has a history of flooding. Some are now suggesting that history should be taken into account before rebuilding begins. The history is so well known, that Howard County commissioned a study after the last round of flooding to figure out how to protect the historic town. But the question is, "Is that even possible?" For full story and to view video, click here.

MD: Maryland oysters see gains in sanctuaries, losses elsewhere, report finds

By Scott Dance – The Baltimore Sun – August 1, 2016 – Video
Oysters are thriving in sanctuaries that Maryland has created across the Chesapeake Bay, but their numbers are waning in areas open to harvest, according to a highly anticipated state report. The findings could significantly influence debate over whether the state should change course in its efforts to restore oyster populations. The Hogan administration has suggested that some sanctuaries could be opened up to watermen, either temporarily or permanently. For full story and to view video, click here.

MD: New report finds ample oyster growth on restored Eastern Shore reefs

By Timothy B. Wheeler – Bay Journal – July 27, 2016
With the Hogan administration still on the fence about resuming federally funded oyster reef restoration in Maryland’s Tred Avon River, a new report says large-scale restoration work completed on a nearby Eastern Shore waterway is doing well so far. The report, released Wednesday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, concludes that a dozen restored oyster reefs checked last fall in Harris Creek show “healthy restoration,” despite indications some of its oysters have been poached. For full article, click here. To view report, Analysis of Monitoring Data from Harris Creek Sanctuary Oyster Reefs: Data on the First 102 Acres/12 Reefs Restored, click here.

MA: Cape Cod’s big drinking water problem

By Barbara Moran – Boston Globe – August 2, 2016
On an overcast July morning, Diane Carlson wades calf-deep into Cape Cod Bay to harvest her oysters, which grow 900 feet off the Brewster shore. She leans over a metal cage just revealed by the rapidly receding tide and flips open the lid. All chitchat ceases. “I have to count now,” she says. “I can’t talk when I’m counting.” Carlson counts out five dozen, scraping tiny baby mussels off the shells as she goes, piling the oysters in a plastic bucket. Behind her a blue-gray sky meets a gray horizon, which smudges into the gray-green water: a snapshot of Cape Cod idyll. What the Cape is, sometimes; what we long for it to be, always. Fifteen miles up Cape from Carlson’s oyster farm, the scene merges to the urban face of Cape Cod — the town of Barnstable. Sightseeing boats and commercial fishing vessels, all winches and rust, and the hulking ferries to the islands crowd the harbor off the village of Hyannis. Tourists throng the promenade: teenagers snapping selfies, a mom pulling two toddlers in a wagon, a middle-aged couple clutching maps and bottled water. Barnstable is the Cape’s hub of transportation, commerce, and tourism, with a year-round population of just under 50,000 that swells to 150,000 in the summer. And in May, just before vacation season kicked into high gear, town officials said there was something wrong with the drinking water. For full article, click here.

MA: As much as 90 percent of ground water in Mass. may be corrosive

By David Abel – Boston Globe – July 24, 2016
Massachusetts is at greater risk than all but five other states from ground water that’s potentially corrosive enough to cause toxic metals in household pipes to leach into drinking water, according to a new report by the US Geological Survey. As much as 90 percent of the state’s ground water is potentially corrosive, but the dangers are mainly for 534,000 Massachusetts residents who draw their water from private wells, the report found. Unlike public water systems, wells are not subject to state and federal testing and treatment requirements. For full story, click here.

MI: Great Lakes Commission awarded $7.9 million to restore Muskegon Lake as part of $40 million regional partnership

Great Lakes Commission – August 10, 2016
The Great Lakes Commission (GLC) announced today it has received $7.9 million to restore Michigan’s Muskegon Lake, as part of a new $40 million regional partnership the GLC is leading to clean up several Great Lakes Areas of Concern. The work funded will likely be the final habitat restoration project necessary for formal removal of Muskegon Lake from the list of Areas of Concern, the worst “toxic hotspots” in the region. For full story, click here.

MI: EPA winding up internal investigation into Flint water crisis

By Ron Fonger – Michigan Live – August 2, 2016
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says it has completed an internal preliminary investigation into the Flint water crisis and is evaluating whether more fieldwork still needs to be done. The review, designed to evaluate how the federal government handled the city's water emergency, started in April with interviews of residents who filed complaints while the city used the Flint River as its water source and lead levels spiked from April 2014 until October 2015. For full story, click here.

MN: Back to the drawing board for wetland sanctuary trail

By Eric Hagen – ABC Newspapers – August 7, 2016
Blaine residents will have to wait a little bit longer to walk through more of the Blaine Wetland Sanctuary. After bids came in well over the city’s estimate, the Blaine City Council July 14 concurred with city staff’s recommendation to reject the bids and reconsider the scope of a trail project. For full story, click here.

MT: Crow Tribe celebrates end of long water fight

By Douglas Fischer – Last Best News – July 23, 2016
The old saw holds that whiskey’s for drinking, water’s for fightin’ over. In June the historic Crow Tribe Water Rights Settlement went into full effect, setting for the first time how much water the tribe owns under its treaty and giving the tribe $460 million to develop irrigation facilities, a hydropower energy plant and a reservation-wide municipal water system. For full story, click here.

NC: State toxicologist: Claim that NC well water was safe was 'scientifically untrue'

By Bertrand M. Gutiérrez – Winston-Salem Journal – July 31, 2016
Emails obtained through public-records requests by a conservation group show that State Toxicologist Ken Rudo forcefully resisted the McCrory administration last year as it moved to alter the do-not-drink letters sent to hundreds of well owners near coal-ash pits owned by Duke Energy. In March 2015, after Rudo had drafted the letters advising well owners — many of whom had elevated levels of the carcinogen hexavalent chromium — against using their water for drinking or cooking, department administrators pushed Duke Energy’s position that the water would generally be considered safe to drink under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act. For full story, click here.

NC: Duke Energy wants to keep state scientist testimony in coal ash case secret

By Tyler Dukes – WRAL.com – July 19, 2016
Duke Energy is asking a federal judge to make the sworn statements of a state environmental toxicologist off-limits to the public amid an ongoing lawsuit between environmentalists and the energy company over coal ash. For full story, click here.

ND: Native Youth Run 2,000 Miles to Washington DC to Protest Dakota Access Pipeline

Indian Country Today Media Network – August 4, 2016
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ recent approval of the Dakota Access oil pipeline without a comprehensive environmental review has drawn ire from three federal agencies, the Standing Rock Sioux and other tribes, and Native youth, to name just a few entities opposing the move. Native youth took to the streets with their feet in response, first running 500 miles from Cannonball, North Dakota to the district office of the United States Army Corps of Engineers in Omaha, Nebraska. But the pipeline was still approved, so the youth are now running 2,000 miles, all the way from North Dakota straight to the Army Corps’ doorstep in Washington, D.C. There, they plan to hold a rally on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court before heading over to meet with “high-level government officials in hopes to halt the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline,” the Oceti Sakowin Youth said in a statement. Construction has already begun in all four states it is slated to pass through. For full story, click here.

NV: EPA, NV DEP require Nevada Department of Transportation to protect local waters

Contact: Margot Perez-Sullivan – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – July 28, 2016
The U.S. Department of Justice, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection (NDEP) have reached an agreement with the Nevada Department of Transportation (NDOT) to resolve alleged violations of NDOT’s stormwater permit. The agreement requires NDOT to establish a stormwater management program to control pollutants entering waters, spend $200,000 on an environmental project that will provide real-time water quality data to the public and pay $60,000 each to EPA and NDEP. For full news release, click here.

OH: Outdoors notebook | Grant to help upgrade Ohio wetland

By Dave Golowenski – The Columbus Dispatch – August 7, 2016
The Great Black Swamp, an enormous wetland that stretched about 1,500 square miles across the Maumee and Portage river watersheds in northwest Ohio, hasn’t been great for quite some time. After resisting settlement because of its vastness and the malaria-carrying mosquitoes that bred there, the swamp began its transformation to farmland as government policy starting in the 1850s. The bulk of the swamp having since been drained and diked, only vestiges remain. For full story, click here.

OH: City seeks EPA funding for wetland revamp

By Patrick Pfanner – Sandusky Register – July 28, 2016
The city will move forward in its search for wetlands restoration funding. City officials need additional dollars to revamp the wetlands nestled between Waterworks Park and the city beach along East Perry Street in Port Clinton. Invasive species, deterioration and other issues have plagued the wetlands for years. For full story, click here.

PA: DEP Lists Susquehanna River as Impaired for Multiple Uses, Develops New Analytic Methods for Semiannual Impaired Waterways Report

Contact Neil Shader – PA Department of Environmental Protection – August 1, 2016
A new report from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) lists four miles of the Susquehanna River as impaired for recreation. The recreation impairment listing joins an impairment for fish consumption for the Susquehanna River, though the listings are not related to smallmouth bass populations in the river. The report also sets forth a groundbreaking protocol to scientifically assess a large river system. For full news release, click here.

PA: Flight 93 Memorial wetland project credited with protecting waterway from mine drainage

By Jeff Himler – TRIB Live – July 20, 2016
Stocked trout brought renewed life last year to Lamberts Run, a Somerset County tributary of the Stonycreek River. One of the primary factors supporting the revitalized fish habitat is an engineered wetland developed upstream to treat mine drainage at the National Park Service's Flight 93 National Memorial site. Joe Pehur of AMD Industries, a company hired by the state to operate and maintain the wetland, on Wednesday showed members of the Mining and Reclamation Advisory Board the last in a series of cattail-filled ponds where iron and manganese gradually precipitate from the mine drainage. For full story, click here.

PA: Environmental Council’s Interactive Water Resource Mapping System Now Online

PA Environment Digest Blog – July 19, 2016
The PA Environmental Council Tuesday unveiled a new website-- WaterResourcespa.org-- that allows the public to identify water quality impaired streams, illegal dumpsites, areas covered by stormwater management plans and much more. PEC staff works with numerous partners across the state to help build local stewards for Pennsylvania’s varied natural resources including land and water trails, forests, and watersheds. Through these efforts, PEC has developed user-friendly tools to help residents and local organizations learn about and understand the ways in which they can interact and have access to these special places, while understanding how to best protect them at the same time. For full blog post, click here.

TN: Environmentalists blast TVA plan to leave coal ash at power plants

By Dave Flessner – Times Free Press – July 30, 2016
TVA will close and cap 10 coal ash ponds at power plants across the Valley, but the federal utility will not dig up and remove the toxic coal residues as many environmentalists urged to limit future groundwater and soil pollution. TVA on Friday issued its record of decision, affirming its plans to keep the coal ash at six fossil plants where the ash was dumped in ponds over the past half century. After more than a year of study and hearings, TVA said the best, fastest and least- cost method of disposing and cleaning up its coal ash ponds is to dewater those facilities, close the ponds and put a cap on the wastes to prevent any leakage. For full story, click here.

TN: Former cleanup workers blame illnesses on toxic coal ash exposures

By Kristen Lombardi – The Center for Public Integrity – July 20, 2016
It was April 28, 2014, five years after Craig Wilkinson’s 12-month stint as a backhoe operator at a massive coal-ash spill in Tennessee. Wilkinson was desperate for answers. Bearing a list of metals — arsenic, lead, mercury and others concentrated in coal ash — he arrived at a clinic specializing in toxic exposures. Maybe someone there could tell him what was coursing through his body. Wilkinson, then 56, adopted a “weather-through-it” mentality on the job. But his body had betrayed him since he had signed on as a cleanup worker following a dike failure that unleashed a billion gallons of ash from a Tennessee Valley Authority power plant. For full story, click here.

TX: In Texas, wastewater spills get less scrutiny

By Mike Soraghan – E&E Publishing, LLC – August 2, 2016
In Texas, there were more than 2,700 spills at oil and gas sites last year. But the state tracked only about half of those. Unlike other states, Texas doesn't track spills of wastewater. The Texas Railroad Commission (RRC), which regulates oil and gas, tracks only spills of petroleum products -- primarily crude oil. The difference in scrutiny makes no sense to Kerry Sublette, a chemical engineering professor at the University of Tulsa who says wastewater spills are more damaging. For full story, click here.

UT: Utah assessing how much Rocky Mountain Power coal waste washed into Price River

By Brian Maffly and Emma Penrod – The Sal Lake Tribune – August 8, 2016
A flash flood Thursday afternoon cut through a massive repository of coal ash outside Helper and pushed unknown quantities of the waste into the Price River. Over the past six decades, Rocky Mountain Power has filled a side canyon to Price Canyon, just downstream of its Carbon Power Plant, with the plant's ash. The plant was retired in April 2015, and the power company has been in the process of grading and capping the ash pile for permanent closure. But a cloudburst Thursday sent floodwaters down Panther Canyon, overwhelming stormwater systems. Paul Murphy, a spokesman for Rocky Mountain Power (RMP), said the company is installing landfill safeguards — construction crews were on site when the flood hit — designed to withstand a storm so big that, statistically, it only happens once every 100 years. For full story, click here.

UT: Toxic algae bloom closes Utah lake, sickens more than 100 people

Fox News – Associated Press – July 23, 2016
A huge toxic algae bloom in Utah has closed one of the largest freshwater lakes west of the Mississippi River, sickening more than 100 people and leaving farmers scrambling for clean water for days during the hottest part of the year. The bacteria commonly known as blue-green algae has spread rapidly to cover almost all of 150-square-mile Utah Lake, turning the water bright, anti-freeze green with a pea soup texture and leaving scummy foam along the shore. For full story, click here.

VA: Citizens voice concerns over wetlands destruction

By Jim McConnell – Chesterfield Observer – July 20, 2016
Environmentalists want state officials to prevent the county’s economic development office from destroying a nearly 10-acre swath of wetlands at a Chester industrial park. The Timmons Group, a local engineering firm, has applied for a permit from the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality on behalf of Chesterfield Economic Development, which is supporting construction of a new industrial facility on a 62-acre parcel it owns in the Meadowville Technology Park. For full story, click here.

VT: Small Vermont Farmers Wrestle With New Water Quality Rules

By Nora Doyle-Burr – Valley News – July 24, 2016
Boys, large and small, can be found playing in the dirt near the Chapman family’s dairy barn on Belknap Brook Road this summer. Corey Chapman and his wife, Ann, are digging a new manure pit to improve drainage in the barnyard and expand manure storage for the farm, which they purchased last September. A Tunbridge friend, Matt Loftus, is digging the hole and Corey Chapman plans to pour the concrete himself. His young sons enjoy playing in the soil, as do his friends and neighbors, many of whom have offered a helping hand. “It’s like a great big sandbox out there,” Corey Chapman said in a telephone interview on Thursday. Dairy cows producing organic milk are required to spend time outside every day regardless of the weather, and last winter — the Chapmans’ first on their own farm — Corey Chapman noticed his Holsteins were developing foot problems from walking in the muddy barnyard. The pit, which Chapman expects will be completed in 90 days, will hold manure from the barnyard and barn, as well as milkhouse waste, preventing feces from the farm’s 50 cows from leaching into the nearby First Branch of the White River. For full story, click here.

WA: The Plan to Ship Oil Through the “Graveyard of the Pacific”

By Julia Rosen – Hakai Magazine – August 2, 2016
A proposal to build the United States’ largest oil-by-rail terminal in Vancouver, Washington, could transform the Columbia River into a major conduit for fossil fuel. The facility would accept trainloads of crude oil from the Bakken region of North Dakota, and transfer it to ships bound for West Coast refineries. In the process, it would more than double the number of oil tankers and barges traveling through the Columbia River and into the ocean across the Columbia River Bar, a treacherous patch of sea known to sailors as the Graveyard of the Pacific. For full article, click here.

WI: DNR Tracking Spread Of Wetland Invasive

By Raymond Neupert – WHBL – August 3, 2016
The Department of natural Resources is asking for your help in spotting an invasive wetland plant.
It's called the tall manna grass, and while it may look like a regular cat-tail or reed at first glance, the plant can grow so fast and large that it chokes out rivers and streams. "It can slow water enough so that animals won't drink from it. That includes animals that are in our dairy industry. It can cause siltation; it can cause flooding problems in our low-lying areas." DNR water quality expert Jason Granberg says the plant can also poison or sicken cattle and other livestock in the early parts of the year when it's still sprouting. For full story, click here.

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Wetland Breaking News - August 2016

Plastic hurting Canada’s loons, ducks and geese

By Brian Bienkowski – Environmental Health News – August 5, 2016
Bottle caps, coffee cup lids, packing tape wire, foil, Styrofoam pellets—sounds like the ingredients for a MacGyver prison camp break out, right? Not quite—this is what Canadian researchers are finding in the stomachs of freshwater birds across the country, including birds like long-tailed ducks and loons, which prefer more remote, wild areas. The new research suggests Canada’s freshwater birds, just like their ocean-dwelling counterparts, are at risk from our plastic-saturated lifestyles. For full story, click here.

Scientists Tease Out Climate Change’s Role in Zika Spread

By John Upton Climate Central – August 4, 2016
Athletes and tourists converging on Brazil this week are crowding into a country where rapid environmental change and natural weather fluctuations nurtured a viral epidemic that has gone global. The Zika virus has exploded throughout South America, up through Mexico and Puerto Rico and into Florida, but the conditions it needed to fester in northern Brazil were rooted in urbanization and poverty. The initial Brazilian outbreak appears to have been aided by a drought driven by El Niño, and by higher temperatures caused by longer-term weather cycles and by rising levels of greenhouse gas pollution. For full story, click here.

Trading farmland for nitrogen protection

Eurek Alert – August 3, 2016
Excess nitrogen from agricultural runoff can enter surface waters with devastating effects. Algal blooms and fish kills are a just a couple of possible consequences. But riparian buffer zones - areas of grasses, perennials, or trees - between farmlands and streams or rivers can help. "Riparian buffer zones are nature's hydraulic shock absorbers," says Deanna Osmond, a soil scientist at North Carolina State University. They can reduce pollution and provide habitat for wildlife. Trees can hold stream banks together and provide food for animals. These buffer zones can also dampen the flow of agricultural runoff. This can lead to lower amounts of nitrogen reaching streams and rivers. But what kind of vegetation makes buffer zones most efficient at removing nitrogen from runoff? That is the question that Osmond and her colleagues set out to answer. For full story, click here.

Anthrax Outbreak In Russia Thought To Be Result Of Thawing Permafrost

By Michaeleen Doucleff – NPR – August 3, 2016
Russia is fighting a mysterious anthrax outbreak in a remote corner of Siberia. Dozens of people have been hospitalized; one child has died. The government airlifted some families out because more than 2,000 reindeer have been infected. Officials don't know exactly how the outbreak started, but the current hypothesis is almost unbelievable: A heat wave has thawed the frozen soil there and with it, a reindeer carcass infected with anthrax decades ago. Some scientists think this incident could be an example of what climate change may increasingly surface in the tundra. For full story, click here.

EPA Report Tracks our Changing Climate

Contact: Enesta Jones – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – August 2, 2016
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today released a report that shows compelling and clear evidence of long-term changes to our climate, and highlights impacts on human health and the environment in the United States and around the world. The report, Climate Change Indicators in the United States, features observed trend data on 37 climate indicators, including U.S and global temperatures, ocean acidity, sea level, river flooding, droughts and wildfires. For full news release, click here.

Naturalists Grow Wildlife, Pollinator Habitat

Contact: Jeff Woods – USDA NRCS – FL – August 1, 2016
Billy and Marcia Boothe are naturalists, having spent a lifetime observing, documenting, photographing and teaching about Florida’s plants, insects and wildlife. So when they bought their land in the late 90s, it was to restore the land and preserve its plants, which include the Torreya tree, a very rare conifer that grows only in the bluffs and ravines in Gadsden and Liberty counties and an adjacent county in Georgia. Discovering a robust population of endangered gopher tortoises with 40 burrows scattered throughout the property was a plus. Located between Torreya State Park and Greensboro, Fla., they named Crooked Creek Preserve after the creek running through their land to the Apalachicola River. For full news release, click here.

How purple bacteria could help save amphibians in the Rockies

By Krista Langlois – High Country News – August 1, 2016
Browns Creek slips out of the Collegiate Peaks near the central Colorado towns of Salida and Buena Vista. Bordered by conifer forests and alpine wetlands, the waterway offers perfect habitat for an obscure amphibian called the boreal toad, a warty, mottled creature about the size of a human palm. Historically, boreal toads abounded in Rocky Mountain streams above 7,000 feet, but in the past several decades, populations have plummeted. For full story, click here.

What Happens to the U.S. Midwest When the Water's Gone?

By Laura Parker – National Geographic – August 2016
"Whoa," yells Brownie Wilson, as the steel measuring tape I am feeding down the throat of an irrigation well on the Kansas prairie gets away from me and unspools rapidly into the depths below. The well, wide enough to fall into, taps into the Ogallala aquifer, the immense underground freshwater basin that makes modern life possible in the dry states of Middle America. We have come to assess the aquifer’s health. The weighted tip hits the water at 195 feet, a foot lower than a year ago. Dropping at this pace, it is nearing the end of its life. “Already this well does not have enough water left to irrigate for an entire summer,” Wilson says. For full article, click here.

Climate Change Fingerprints Are All over California Wildfires

By Bobby Magill – Climate Central Scientific America – July 29, 2016
Reports this week from the front lines of the Sand Fire in Southern California painted the scene as apocalyptic. The drought-fueled blaze was explosive, fast-moving and devastating, burning through 38,000 acres in the Santa Clarita Valley and forcing the evacuation of more than 10,000 homes. If the state’s wildfire season holds true to forecasts, the Sand Fire will be one of many catastrophic wildfires to scorch drought-stricken forests and shrublands across California this year. So far, only one wildfire has been larger — the 48,019-acre Erskine Fire, which started in June in the Sierra Nevada Mountains and destroyed 250 homes and buildings. None of the fires have been among the worst or largest wildfires the state has seen in recent years, but they’re part of a dire global warming-fueled trend toward larger, more frequent and intense wildfires. For full article, click here.

What we’re doing to the environment may be costing us our drinking water

By Chelsea Harvey – The Washington Post – July 26, 2016
The human footprint on the environment may have affected one of the Earth’s most precious resources — our drinking water — in a major way throughout the last century, according to new research. A study published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests that population growth and land use changes since the year 1900 have increased pollution in urban watersheds around the world and driven up the cost of water treatment in the process. For full story, click here.

Look to the Soil for Water Supply Answers

By Matt Weiser – Water Deeply – July 26, 2016
Throughout the ongoing drought, millions of Californians have lifted eyes skyward, yearning for rain. But Judith Schwartz believes we should spend just as much energy puzzling over the ground at our feet. In her new book, “Water in Plain Sight,” Schwartz argues that the amount of rain that falls is less important than what happens to the rain, how fast it moves across the land and where it goes. Soil health, land management and wildlife diversity all figure into the results. For full story, click here.

‘We’ve primed the system': Why disgusting toxic blue-green algae blooms seem increasingly common

By Ben Guarino – The Washington Post – July 25, 2016
It is the summer of algae. Across the United States, bodies of water teem with microscopic organisms, warmed by the sun and growing fat on stirred-up nutrients. Such microscopic explosions, called blooms, come at the expense of nearly everything else in the contaminated rivers and lakes. Their shores sport colors better suited to Gatorade factory rejects. What was once crystal or blue becomes scummy browns or dull reds — and, perhaps most significantly, a noxious snotty green. In places, the microbes are so numerous the water thickens to a soup. For full story, click here.

A Fish Outlived the Dinosaurs. Can It Outlast a Dam?

By Joanna Klein – The New York Times – July 25, 2016
What has no teeth, no rib cage, is covered in bony scales and managed to outlive the dinosaurs? The answer is the pallid sturgeon. But after millions of years of survival, only about 125 of these wild “dinosaur fish” remain. And if something isn’t done to save this endangered species, it could vanish forever — all because of what’s going on at a single dam in Montana. For full story, click here.

Why scientists are trying to rebuild oyster colonies

By Gretel Kauffman – The Christian Science Monitor – July 24, 2016
A series of small-scale restoration efforts are underway for a species that most Americans don't even realize needs saving: oysters. A 2011 study published in the journal BioScience declared wild oysters "functionally extinct," as "oyster reefs are at less than 10 percent of their prior abundance in most bays ... and ecoregions" and "lack any significant ecosystem role." In past centuries, that ecosystem role has been a significant one: besides tasting good, oysters also improve water quality – a single oyster can filter up to 50 gallons of water a day – and protect coastlines by functioning as speed bumps to thwart waves during storms. For full story, click here.

China tried to drive a furry mammal to extinction. Maybe that wasn’t such a good idea.

By Simon Denyer – The Washington Post – July 22, 2016
As he gazes out across the rolling grasslands of the Tibetan plateau, where hundreds of his yaks are grazing, 70-year-old Awang Chumpey is less than happy. The land he shares with his neighbors is dotted with thousands of tiny burrows, home to a colony of plateau pika that he blames for eating his animals’ grass. A smaller relative of the rabbit, the plateau pika occupies an almost identical ecological niche to the United States’ prairie dog. And it is equally unpopular in many rural communities. For full story, click here.

Wildflowers planted to aid bees may be crippling them

By Dan Gunderson – MPR News – July 22, 2016
Swaths of Midwestern wildflowers planted by well-meaning governments and nonprofits to attract bees may be inadvertently harming them. That's the surprising finding of a new scientific study that concludes a bee-killing pesticide carried by wind or water from nearby farms is landing on the wildflowers, putting pollinators at risk. For full story, click here.

Lichen is a famous biological partnership — but it might actually be a threesome

By Rachel Feltman – The Washington Post – July 22, 2016
Traditionally, scientists have likened lichen to a married couple: The crusty growths found on trees and rocks are actually composite organisms, formed by the symbiotic partnership between an algae and a single fungus. But a new study throws a wrench into that 150-year-old belief, suggesting that a third partner has been lurking in the mix. A second fungus — this one a type of yeast — makes the synergy possible. For full story, click here.

Blazing Hot First Half of 2016 Sends Climate Records Tumbling

By Zahra Hirji – InsideClimate News – July 21, 2016
Halfway through, 2016 has been an exceptional year for climate records, scientists say. Scientists at NASA released their first-ever mid-year analysis of climate trends on Tuesday, which revealed that every month between January and June had the warmest average temperature on record for that month. NASA researchers did this new analysis "mainly because the average temperatures for the first half of this year are so in excess of any first part of the year that we've seen," said Gavin Schmidt, director of NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies. "It's somewhat worthy of note." For full story, click here.

Knowledge of soil health: NRCS has developed 17 indicators for soil quality

By Erin Beck – The Daily Republic – July 16, 2016
Soil health: it's the latest buzzword steamrolling its way through agriculture. While soil scientist Anthony Bly understands attraction to new fads, he hopes interest in soil health doesn't fall by the wayside. "So many things come and go, and this one doesn't need to go," Bly said. "The reason why it's so important and why it can't die is that societies are built on their resources. Food resources are a huge part of that. Without a good soil resource, that falls apart." For full story, click here.

The Oil Spill Cleanup Illusion

By Andrew Nikiforuk – Hakai Magazine – July 12, 2016
When the Deepwater Horizon well operated by BP (formerly British Petroleum) exploded and contaminated the Gulf of Mexico with at least 650 million liters of crude oil in 2010, blue-smocked animal rescuers quickly appeared on television screens. Looking like scrub nurses, the responders treated oil-coated birds with charcoal solutions, antibiotics, and dish soap. They also forced the birds to swallow Pepto-Bismol, which helps absorb hydrocarbons. The familiar, if not outlandish, images suggested that something was being cleaned up. For full article, click here.

Climate change is apparently shifting clouds towards the poles

Environmental News Network – July 12, 2016
The way clouds cover the Earth may be changing because of global warming, according to a study published Monday that used satellite data to track cloud patterns across about two decades, starting in the 1980s. Clouds in the mid-latitudes shifted toward the poles during that period, as the subtropical dry zones expanded and the highest cloud-tops got higher. These changes are predicted by most climate models of global warming, even though those models disagree on a lot of other things related to clouds, says Joel Norris, a climate scientist at the University of California, San Diego. For full story, click here.

In Hot Water: Climate Change is Affecting North American Fish

U.S. Geological Survey – June 30, 2016
Climate change is already affecting inland fish across North America -- including some fish that are popular with anglers. Scientists are seeing a variety of changes in how inland fish reproduce, grow and where they can live, according to four new studies published today in a special issue of Fisheries magazine. Fish that have the most documented risk include those living in arid environments and coldwater species such as sockeye salmon, lake trout, walleye, and prey fish that larger species depend on for food. Climate change can cause suboptimal habitat for some fish; warmer water, for example, can stress coldwater fish. When stressed, fish tend to eat less and grow less. For other fish, climate change is creating more suitable habitat; smallmouth bass populations, for example, are expanding. For full story, click here.



Wetland Breaking News - August 2016

Climate Ready Estuaries Program Adds Sea Level Rise Resources to Website

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – August 5, 2016
The Climate Ready Estuaries program (CRE) works with the National Estuary Programs and the coastal management community to assess climate change vulnerabilities, develop and implement adaptation strategies, and engage and educate stakeholders. Recently added resources to the CRE website address how much the sea has risen, how much it might rise, and what the impacts might be. Resources for overall climate change adaptation planning, including resources for adaptation options, planning frameworks and more, can be found on the Coastal Adaptation Toolkit page on the website. Check Out the New Page.

NOAA Releases 2015 State of the Climate Report

NOAA
A new State of the Climate report confirmed that 2015 surpassed 2014 as the warmest year since at least the mid-to-late 19th century. Last year’s record heat resulted from the combined influence of long-term global warming and one of the strongest El Niño events the globe has experienced since at least 1950. The report found that most indicators of climate change continued to reflect trends consistent with a warming planet. Several markers such as land and ocean temperatures, sea levels and greenhouse gases broke records set just one year prior. These key findings and others are available from the State of the Climate in 2015 report released online today by the American Meteorological Society (AMS). For more information and to download the report, click here.

NOAA Develops Guide for Considering Climate Change in Coastal Conservation

NOAA
This guide from NOAA's Office for Coastal Management provides a step-by-step approach for incorporating climate change information into new or existing conservation plans. The six steps draw from existing strategic conservation planning frameworks, but focus on climate considerations and key resources specifically relevant to the coastal environment, including coastal watersheds. View the Guide.

Restoring Natural Defenses to Help Communities in Coastal Floodplains Adapt to Climate Change

Shannon E. Cunniff with Environmental Defense Fund – Association of State Floodplain Managers – July 13, 2016
Oyster and coral reefs, dunes and mangroves act as speed bumps and shock absorbers to reduce the impacts of rising seas and coastal storms. These natural defenses are cost effective and provide myriad benefits to coastal communities. Natural defenses can complement traditional approaches to floodplain management, such as building and zoning codes and hardened engineered solutions, to create multiple lines of defense against storms. Expanding engineering design literacy for natural defenses will hasten their acceptance as key features for building coastal community resilience. To download this report, click here.

Reconnecting Rivers to Floodplains: Returning Natural Functions to Restore Rivers and Benefit Communities

By Jonathon Loos and Eileen Shader – American Rivers – 2016
This report synthesizes the existing science on riverine floodplains to provide a single report that clearly defines what riverine floodplains are, why they’re important to healthy rivers, and how they can be restored. This report is intended to aid restoration practitioners, floodplain managers, river conservationists and others interested in laying a foundation for successful floodplain restoration efforts in their community and across the nation. To view report, click here.

Natural Defenses in Action: Harnessing Nature to Protect our Communities

Stacy L. Small-Lorenz, Bruce A. Stein, Karl Schrass, D. Nicole Holstein, and Avalon V. Mehta – National Wildlife Federation – 2016
Natural Defenses in Action highlights the important role that natural and nature-based approaches can play in reducing the mounting risks to our communities from weather and climate-related natural hazards. The report highlights how properly managed ecosystems and well-designed policies can help reduce disaster risk in ways that are good for both people and nature. Natural Defenses in Action profiles a dozen case studies that highlight best-in-class examples of how natural defenses are being put to use to avoid or reduce risks from flooding, coastal storms, erosion, and wildfire. It illustrates that harnessing nature to protect people and property is not just a good idea—it already is being done across the country! To download this report, click here.

Wetland Breaking News - August 2016

"You Can't Handle the Truth!”

Post Carbon Institute – August 1, 2016
Movie buffs will recognize this title as the most memorable line from “A Few Good Men” (1992), spoken by the character Colonel Jessep, played by Jack Nicholson (“You can’t handle the truth!” is #29 in the American Film Institute’s list of 100 top movie quotes). I hereby propose it as the subtext of the recently concluded Republican and Democratic national conventions. At this point most people appear to know that something is terribly, terribly wrong in the United States of America. But like the proverbial blind man describing the elephant, Americans tend to characterize the problem according to their economic status, their education and interests, and the way that the problem is impacting their peer group. For full story, click here.

The Sticky Truth about Economic Growth and Climate Change

By Tali Trigg – Scientific American – July 31, 2016
That averting climate change will save us money should be a tautology, but for reasons including entrenched interests, it is not. The pre-cautionary principle alone would tell us that we do not want to learn what costs climate change will incur, so better to pay a small premium to avoid the risk at all. Instead, calculated estimates pin the cost of avoiding catastrophic effects from climate change at something like 1% of global GDP. So who will pay for it, and who loses from a more sustainable economy? For full blog post, click here.

Still waters: U.S. to crack down on ocean noise that harms fish

By Ian Simpson – REUTERS – July 30, 2016
The ocean has gotten noisier for decades, with man-made racket from oil drilling, shipping and construction linked to signs of stress in marine life that include beached whales and baby crabs with scrambled navigational signals. The United States aims to change that as a federal agency prepares a plan that could force reductions in noise-making activities, including oil exploration, dredging and shipping off the nation's coast. For full story, click here.

Scientists call for increased federal investment in sustainable agriculture

Science Daily – July 28, 2016
Based on a new analysis of federal funding from the US Department of Agriculture, researchers say there is an urgent need for increased investment in research and development aimed at making sustainable food production more effective. The article published in Environmental Science & Policy has been selected for the Elsevier Atlas Award of June 2016. For full story, click here.

Citing climate change, EPA moves to regulate pollution from airliners

By Michael Biesecker – The Associated Press – The Salt Lake Tribune – July 25, 2016
Jet engine exhaust from airliners endangers human health and adds to climate change, the government found Monday in taking the first step toward regulating those emissions. The Environmental Protection Agency said it will use its authority under the Clean Air Act to impose limits on aircraft emissions. Jet engines spew significant amounts of greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide and methane, into the upper atmosphere where they trap heat from the sun. But proposed rules such as imposing fuel-efficiency standards have faced stiff opposition from aircraft makers and commercial airlines. Aircraft emissions were not addressed as part of the landmark global climate accord agreed to in Paris in December. For full story, click here.

Human Consumption of Earth's Natural Resources Has Tripled in 40 Years

By Alex Kirby – EcoWatch – July 25, 2016
Humans' appetite for gnawing away at the fabric of the Earth itself is growing prodigiously. According to a new UN report, the amount of the planet's natural resources extracted for human use has tripled in 40 years. A report produced by the International Resource Panel (IRP), part of the UN Environment Programme, says rising consumption driven by a growing middle class has seen resources extraction increase from 22 billion tons in 1970 to 70 billion tons in 2010. It refers to natural resources as primary materials and includes under this heading biomass, fossil fuels, metal ores and non-metallic minerals. The increase in their use, the report warns, will ultimately deplete the availability of natural resources—causing serious shortages of critical materials and risking conflict. For full story, click here.

What does climate change mean for America’s $73 billion angling industry?

By Mary Hoff – Ensia – July 15, 2016
Inland fish play critical roles in North American ecosystems and economics: In the U.S. alone in 2011, freshwater anglers spent more than $30 billion on their hobby, generating $73 billion in economic output. And fish are important parts of healthy ecosystems, feeding on aquatic plants and animals and in turn providing sustenance to iconic species such as eagles, bears and osprey. It’s no surprise, then, that as climate changes, 30 experts gathered last year in Bozeman, Montana, to explore implications for the well-being of North American fish populations. For full story, click here.

What You Need to Know About the World's Water Wars

By Laura Parker – National Geographic – July 14, 2016
Beijing is sinking. In some neighborhoods, the ground is giving way at a rate of four inches a year as water in the giant aquifer below it is pumped. The groundwater has been so depleted that China’s capital city, home to more than 20 million people, could face serious disruptions in its rail system, roadways, and building foundations, an international team of scientists concluded earlier this year. Beijing, despite tapping into the gigantic North China Plain aquifer, is the world’s fifth most water-stressed city and its water problems are likely to get even worse. For full story, click here.

The Time to Invest in America’s Water Infrastructure is Now

By Jim Gebhardt, CFA – EPA Blog – Our Planet, Our Home – July 12, 2016
Communities across the country are facing the immediate challenges of aging and inadequate drinking water and wastewater infrastructure. Most of our country’s underground water infrastructure was built 50 or more years ago, and in some older cities, water mains are a century old. The implications of deteriorating infrastructure can be felt nationwide— each year our country experiences about 240,000 water main breaks, $2.6 billion is lost as our water mains leak trillions of gallons of treated drinking water, and billions of gallons of raw sewage are discharged into local surface waters from aging sewer overflows. For full blog post, click here.



CALENDAR OF EVENTS

WEBINARS

   

MEETINGS

 

TRAINING

 

SPECIAL EVENTS

 
WEBINARS
       
AUGUST 2016      
       
August 19, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
  Association of State Floodplain Managers Webinar: Implementation and Impacts of Flood Insurance Reform Legislation
 
       
August 23, 2016
9:00 a.m. ET
  EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org), the MPA Action Agenda, and MPA News webinar: Geographic Information Tools for Ocean Advocacy
 
       
August 24, 2016
2:00 p.m. ET
  River Network Webinar: Integrated Water Management – What Is It and How Can It Benefit Your Community and River?
 
       
August 30, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
  Webinar co-sponsored by the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org) and MEAM: Integrated Land-Sea Planning in Puerto Rico
 
       
August 30, 2016
12:00 p.m. ET
  Utah State University Extension Webinar: Climate, wildfire, and erosion ensemble foretells more sediment in western USA watersheds
 
       
August 30, 2016
1:00 p.m. E
  NOAA's Office of Coastal Management Webinar: Seven Best Practices for Risk Communication  
       
August 31, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
  Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Safe Waters, Healthy Waters: A Guide for Citizen Groups on Bacteria Monitoring in Local Waterways  
August 31, 2016
2:00 p.m. ET
  Forest University Webinar: Get the Dirt: Engineering Solutions for Sustainable Vegetation
 
       
August 31, 2016
2:00 p.m. ET
  National Water Quality Monitoring Council Webinar: Exploring the Worlds of Citizen Science and Volunteer Monitoring
 
       
SEPTEMBER 2016
       
September 1, 2016
3:00 p.m. ET
  Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance Webinar: Funding for Floodplain Restoration: Breaking Down Incentives to Develop Floodplains & Recent FEMA Policy Updates
 
       
September 6 and 8, 2016
2:00 p.m. ET
  Forest University Webinar: Streambank Protection Design: Hard & Soft Techniques & Applications
 
       
September 14, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
  American Water Resources Association (AWRA) webinar: Scenarios, Simulations and Sustainability Science: Future Planning for Complex Systems  
       
September 14, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
  Center for Water Protection Webcast 4: Incentivizing BMP Installation in Communities with Stormwater Utilities  
       
September 14, 2016
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of State Wetland Managers Training Webinar Series: Soils Training Webinar #3: Landforms and Landscapes
 
       
September 20, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
  Webinar Co-sponsored by the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org) and MEAM: Decision-support tool for coastal area management based on results of the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM)
 
       
September 28, 2016
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of State Wetland Managers Members’ Wetland Webinar: Legal Processes for Wetland Permits
 
       
OCTOBER 2016
       
October 4, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
  Webinar is Co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org): Ocean Highlights from the IUCN World Conservation Congress  
       
October 12, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
  Center for Watershed Protection Webcast 5: Retrofitting Revisited: Forward Into the Past  
       
October 26, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
  American Water Resources Association (AWRA) webinar: Oregon's First Integrated Water Resources Strategy: Lessons Learned Since Implementation  
       
NOVEMBER 2016
       
November 16, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
  Center for Watershed Protection Webcast 6: Non-Traditional MS4s  
       
MEETINGS
       
AUGUST 2016
       
August 21-25, 2016
Kansas City, MO
  American Fisheries Society 146th Annual Meeting: Fisheries Conservation and Management: Making Connections and Building Partnerships  
       
August 22-25, 2016
Indianapolis, IN
  StormCon: Designing the Future of Stormwater  
       
August 22-25, 2016
Gilbertsville, KY
  2016 Annual KAMM Conference: The Changing Climate of Mitigation
 
       
August 22-25, 2016
Asheville, NC
  NC State University EcoStream - Stream Ecology and Restoration Conference  
       
August 22-26, 2016
Freising, Germany
  Society of Ecological Restoration Europe conference 2016: Best Practice in Restoration  
       
August 23, 2016
San Diego, CA
  Floodplain Management Association Luncheon: Offsite Storm Water Alternative Compliance Program  
       
August 23-25, 2016
Cincinnati, OH
  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development/National Risk Management Research Laboratory and Office of Water/Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water, in cooperation with the Association of State Drinking Water Administrators (ASDWA: 13th annual workshop: Small Drinking Water System Challenges and Solutions
 
       
August 23-25, 2016
Salt Lake City, UT
  22nd National Nonpoint Source (NPS) Monitoring Workshop  
       
August 24-26, 2016
Corum, Montpellier, France
  ScenNet International Conference: Scenarios and Models of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Support of Decision Making  
       
August 27-September 2, 2016
Chillwack and Mission, BC
  British Columbia Wildlife Federation Workshop: Lower Mainland Wetlands Institute-2016
 
       
August 27-
September 2, 2016

Stockholm, Sweden
  2016 World Water Week  
       
August 29-September 1, 2016 Melbourne, Australia   Coast to Coast Conference  
       
August 29-September 1, 2016
Montpellier, France
  5th International EcoSummit Congress, EcoSummit 2016 - Ecological Sustainability: Engineering Change  
       
August 30-31, 2016
Denver, CO
  Water Finance Conference: Funding a Sustainable Future  
       
SEPTEMBER 2016
       
September 1-10, 2016
Waikiki, HI
  IUCN World Conservation Congress: Planet at the crossroads  
       
September 6-9, 2016
Sacramento, CA
  2016 Floodplain Management Association Annual Conference  
       
September 8-9, 2016
Portland, OR
  National Groundwater Association Conference: Connecting the Dots...Groundwater, Surface Water, and Climate Connections in the Northwest  
       
September 8-10, 2016
Tulcea, Romania
  Romanian Limnogeographical Association (RLA): 3rd International Conference “Water resources and wetlands"  
       
September 9, 2016
Maidstone & Lemington, VT
  New England Chapter of the Society of Wetland Scientists Field Trip: Hydrologic Considerations Wetland Restoration
 
       
September 10, 2016
Richfield, OH
  Ohio Wetlands Association: 2016 Wetlands Summit: "Life on the Edge: Where Humans Meet Wetlands.”
 
       
September 11-14, 2016
Tampa, FL
  31st Annual WateReuse Symposium: Increasing Safe and Reliable Water Supplies  
       
September 11-15, 2016
Philadelphia, PA
  Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies 106th Annual Meeting  
       
September 11-16, 2016
Boston, MA
  6th International Symposium on Deep-Sea Corals  
       
September 12-14, 2016
San Diego, CA
  California Stormwater Quality Association 12th Annual Conference: Stormwater Evolution: Source to Resource  
       
September 12-14, 2016
Halifax NS Canada
  Halifax Regional Municipality in partnership with the Partners for Action Network and ICLEI Canada: Livable Cities Forum: Changing Climate, Changing Communities  
       
September 15, 2016   Value of Water Coalition: Imagine a Day Without Water  
       
September 15, 2016
Bellaire, MI
  LIAA: Michigan’s 2016 State Water Trail Summit  
       
September 15, 2016
Toledo, OH
  Ohio Sea Grant Conference: Understanding Algal Blooms: State of the Science  
       
September 15-16, 2016
London, UK
  Greenwich Maritime Centre (GMC conference: 'Society and the Sea'
 
       
September 16-18, 2016
Gothic, CO
  Guild of Rocky Mountain Ecologists and Evolutionary Biologists (GREEBs) meeting  
       
September 17-18, 2016
Stone Harbor, NJ
  Wetlands Institute: Fall Migration Festival
 
       
September 17-24, 2016

  Restore America's Estuaries: National Estuaries Week. Find an event here.  
       
September 19-22, 2016
Stuttgart, Germany
  13th International Symposium on River Sedimentation  
       
September 19-24, 2016
Changshu, China
  INTECOL Wetland Working Group, People’s Government of Changshu, Nanjing University: 10th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference  
       
September 19-25, 2016
New York, NY
  The Climate Group will host the 8th Annual Climate Week  
       
September 20–22, 2016
Sandusky, OH
  Healing Our Waters® – Great Lakes Coalition: 12th Annual Great Lakes Restoration Conference
 
       
September 21–22, 2016
New York, NY
  International Conference on Sustainable Developent (ICSD)  
       
September 22–24, 2016
New Brunswick, NJ
  Rutgers University Symposium: Crossroads in the Concrete Jungle: Experiences and Explorations of Urban Plants and People
 
       
September 23–24, 2016
Lake Ariel, PA
  Lacawac Sanctuary and Biological Field Station: 5th Annual Lacawac Ecology Conference
 
       
September 27-30, 2016
Mount Royal University
Alberta, Canada
  Under Western Skies (UWS) conference: Water: Events, Trends, Analysis  
       
September 29-30, 2016
Baltimore, MD
  EUCI: 2016 EPA 316(b) Fish and Shellfish Impingement & Entrainment in Power & Industrial Facilities Conference
 
       
September 30-
October 2, 2016

Shepherdstown, WV
  Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay: 2016 Chesapeake Watershed Forum
 
       
OCTOBER 2016
       
October 1-2, 2016
Ridgefield, WA
  Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge: Birdfest and Bluegrass
 
       
October 2-6, 2016
Oklahoma City, OK
  EPA Region 6, in partnership with Texas A&M University in Kingsville, the City of Oklahoma City, Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems (MS4s), and States in R6: 18th Annual Stormwater Conference.  
       
October 4-6,2016
Toronto, Canada
  Great Lakes Public Forum 2016  
       
October 4-7, 2016
Marquette, MI
  16th Annual Great Lakes Beach Association Conference  
       
October 5-7, 2016
Las Vegas, NV
  Southern Nevada Water Authority WaterSmart Innovations Conference and Exposition  
       
October 6-7, 2016
Toronto, Ontario Canada
  Great Lakes Commission 2016 Annual Meeting
 
       
October 8-9, 2016
Knoxville, TN
  National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS): 8th Annual Undergraduate Research Conference  
       
October 9-14, 2016
Scheveningen,
The Netherlands

  Physics of Estuaries and Coastal Seas Conference  
       
October 11-14, 2016
Shepherdstown, WV
  Natural Channel Design Review Checklist Workshop  
       
October 16-19, 2016
Baton Rouge, LA
  Southeastern Fish & Wildlife Agencies: 70th Annual Conference
 
       
October 16-22, 2016
Sanibel, FL
  Ding Darling Days. Enjoy a week of fun-filled and informative programs, bird walks, tours, paddling and family activities at J. N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge.  
       
October 17-20, 2016
Boise, IA
  4th Northern Rockies Invasive Plants Council Conference  
       
October 17-21, 2016
Leavenworth, WA
  2016 Mountain Climate Conference: Mountains Without Snow: What are the Consequences?
 
       
October 18-20, 2016
Atlantic City, NJ
  New Jersey Association for Floodplain Management (NJAFM) 12th Annual Conference: Supporting Municipalities to Reduce Flood Risk
 
       
October 18-21, 2016
Davis, CA
  The Natural Areas Association: 2016 Natural Areas Conference  
       
October 18-22, 2016
Latin America
  Ecosystem Services Partnership (ESP) conference: 'Healthy ecosystems for resilient societies'  
       
October 19-21, 2016
Birmingham, AL
  11th Annual Regional Stormwater Conference: Stormwater Solutions  
       
October 19-21, 2016
San Diego, CA
  Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum - West Coast  
       
October 20, 2016
Linthicum, MD
  12th Annual MAFSM Conference
 
       
October 20-22, 2016
American Museum of
Natural History

New York, NY
  Center for Biodiversity and Conservation and its partners invite graduate students, post-docs, and early-career professionals to take part in the seventh annual Student Conference on Conservation Science – New York (SCCS-NY)
 
       
October 28-30, 2016
Fairhope, AL
  Diamondback Terrapin Working Group: 7th Symposium on the Ecology, Status and Conservation of the Diamondback Terrapin. Abstract deadline is August 31, 2016.  
       
October 28-30, 2016
Minneapolis, MN
  Land Trust Alliance Rally 2016 National Land Conservation Conference  
       
October 28-30, 2016
Kansas City, MO
  14th Annual Ecological Genomics Symposium. Submit an abstract by September 16, 2016.  
       
October 30-November 2, 2016
Phoenix, AZ
  American Water Works Association: Water Infrastructure Conference & Exposition  
       
October 31-November 4, 2016
Santa Fe, NM
  National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP): 39th Annual Scientific Symposium and Committee Meetings  
       
NOVEMBER 2016
       
November 1-4, 2016
Banff, Alberta, Canada
  North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) Symposium: Science to Stewardship: Balancing Economic Growth and Lake Sustainability  
       
November 2, 2016
University of Illinois
  Chicago Wilderness Congress: Celebrating 20 Years: One Home. One Future. The deadline for proposal submissions is July 22, 2016.  
       
November 14-17, 2016
Orlando, FL
  2016 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference  
       
November 13-17, 2016
Indianapolis, IN
  American Water Works Association: Water Quality Technology Conference® & Exposition  
       
November 15, 2016
UC Davis Conference Center Davis, CA
  Hosted by University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources, UC Davis, and UC Riverside the 2nd Annual Do No Harm Workshop: Considerations for the Use of Non-local Species in Ecological Restoration  
       
November 15-16, 2016
Norfolk, VA
  Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway Association: 2016 Annual Meeting  
       
November 15-17, 2016
Sacramento, CA
  2016 Bay-Delta Science Conference  
       
DECEMBER 2016
       
December 5-9, 2016
Jacksonville, FL
  ACES: A Community on Ecosystem Services conference: Linking Science, Practice, and Decision Making  
       
December 10-15, 2016
New Orleans, LA
  8th National Summit: Our Coasts, Our Future, Our Choice and 25th Biennial Meeting of The Coastal Society  
       
December 12-16, 2016
San Francisco, CA
  AGU Fall Meeting
 
       
TRAINING
       
AUGUST 2016
       
August 21-27, 2016
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Course: Polypores and Other Wood-inhabiting Fungi. For a list of other courses, click here.  
       

August 21-27, 2016
Steuben, ME

  Eagle Hill Institute Course: Field Methods for Studying Avian Migration. For a list of other courses, click here.  
       
August 22-25, 2016
Auburn, NY
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
 
       
August 25-26, 2016
Denver, CO
  Water Rights Engineering Including Case Studies  
       

August 28-September 3, 2016
Steuben, ME

  Eagle Hill Institute summer field Course: Introduction to Coastal Maine Birds: Identification, Taxonomy, Ecology. For a list of other courses, go here.  
       
August 28-September 3, 2016
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute summer field Course: Marine Benthic Macroinvertebrates, Communities, and Habitats. For a list of other courses, click here.  
       
SEPTEMBER 2016
       

September 4-10, 2016
Steuben, ME

  Eagle Hill Institute summer field course: Exploring Medicinal Plants of Maine (and beyond), For a list of other courses, go here.  
       

September 4-10, 2016
Steuben, ME

  Eagle Hill Institute summer field course: Field Ornithology: Shorebirds & Seabirds of Downeast Maine. For a list of other courses, go here.  
       
September 6-November 4, 2016
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design  
       
September 7, 2016
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Land Use and Natural Resources Information Session
 
       
September 12-13, 2016
Charleston, SC
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes  
       

September 12-16, 2016
Covington, LA

  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
September 12-17, 2016
Whitefish, MT
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation with Emphasis on Soils and Hydrology – 2016  
       
September 12-30, 2016 Online   The Swamp School Course: Habitat Conservation Plans
 
       
September 12-December 4, 2016
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
 
       
September 13-16, 2016
Pisgah Forest, NC
  Staff of Moffatt & Nichol (John Dorney), Axiom Environmental (Sandy Smith), and the NC Department of Transportation (LeiLani Paugh) 4-day course organized by the NC Association of Environmental Professionals (NC AEP) on the latest version (Version 5) of the North Carolina Wetland Assessment Method (NC WAM) for determining the condition of wetlands  
       

September 15-16, 2016
Millville, NJ

  Rutgers University Course: Vegetation Identification for Wetland Delineation: South
 
       

September 15-18, 2016
San Diego, CA

  Wetland Training Institute Course: Riparian Habitat Restoration in the Arid Southwest  
       
September 19-20, 2016
Atlanta, GA
  EUCI Course: In-Depth Coal Ash Impoundment Closure  
       
September 19-22, 2016
Pittsburgh, PA
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training  
       
September 23, 2016
Pittsburgh, PA
  The Swamp School: Point Intercept Method for Determining Hydrophytic Vegetation
 
       
September 26-30, 2016
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       

September 26-
October 7, 2016
Front Royal, VA

 

Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Spatial Ecology, Geospatial Analysis and Remote Sensing for Conservation

 
       
September 27, 2016
Atlanta, Ga
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Endangered Species Act Overview  
       
September 27-29, 2016
Pocono Mountains, PA
  The Swamp School Wetland Plants Field ID Workshop  
       
September 28-30, 2016
Bordentown, NJ
  Rutgers University Course: Wetland Construction: Planning and Functional Design
 
       
September 28-29, 2016
Hay, KS
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Woody Plants (Trees, Shrubs, and Vines) Identification – 2016  
       

September 29-30, 2016
Denver, CO

  Urban Watersheds Research Institute Course: 2D Floodplain Delineation using 2D HEC-RAS Model  
       
September 29-October 3, 2016
Front Royal, VA
  George Mason University, Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Watershed Conservation: Riparian Restoration  
       
OCTOBER 2016
       
October 3-4, 2016
Tuckerton, NJ
  Rutgers University Course: Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants  
       
October 3-7, 2016
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Basic Wetland Delineation. Also on June 6-10, 2016 in Charleston, SC  
       
October 5-7, 2016
Asheville, NC
  North Carolina State University Stream Restoration Program is offering a course on Stream Morphology Assessment
 
       
October 7, 2016
St. Paul, MN
  University of Minnesota Course: Hydrology Tools for Minnesota Wetlands  
       
October 11-12, 2016
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species.
 
       
October 14, 2016
Brunswick, NJ
  Rutgers University Course: Understanding Advanced Stormwater Management Techniques  
       
October 18-19, 2016
Charleston, SC
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher - 2016  
       
October 25-26, 2016
Anchorage, AK
  Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA): Writing the Perfect EA/FONSI, or EIS  
       
October 25-28, 2016
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers University course: Methodology for Delineating Wetlands. Instructors: Ralph Tiner and Mallory N. Gilbert  
       
October 26, 2016
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers University Course: Introduction to Wetland Identification  
       
October 27, 2016
Anchorage, Alaska
  Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: Advanced NEPA-Taking the National Environmental Policy Act to the Next Level  
       
NOVEMBER 2016
       
November 2-4, 2016
Raleigh, NC
  North Carolina State University Stream Restoration Program Course: Natural Channel Design Principles  
       
November 8-9, 2016
St. Louis Park, MN
  Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA): Writing the Perfect EA/FONSI, or EIS  
       
November 10, 2016
St. Louis Park, MN
  Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: Advanced NEPA-Taking the National Environmental Policy Act to the Next Level  
       
November 14-15, 2016
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology (Piedmont)
 
       
DECEMBER 2016
       
December 1-2, 2016
Denver, CO
  Urban Watersheds Research Institute Course: Watershed Modeling Using CUHP-SWMM  
       
December 1-2, 2016
University of Phoenix-Arlington Arlington, VA
  Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: Planning and Preparing an Ecological Risk Assessment  
       

December 5-8, 2016
Santa Fe, NM

  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Federal Wetland / Waters Regulatory Policy  
       
December 12-13, 2016
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement (Eastern Mountains/Piedmont)
 
       
December 12-16, 2016
Smithsonian Conservation
Biology Institute

Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Statistical Downscaling of Global Climate Models using SDSM 5.2  
       
December 13-14, 2016
Atlanta, GA
  Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA): Writing the Perfect EA/FONSI, or EIS  
       
SPECIAL EVENTS 2015
       
September 13-16, 2016
Bloomfield Hills, MI
  Rouge River Water Festival. If you are interested in presenting, click here.  
       
September 17-18, 2016
Brownstown, MI
  Pointe Mouillee Waterfowl Festival  
       
September 17-18, 2016
Stone Harbor, NJ
  Wetlands Institute: Fall Migration Festival  
       
October 7-9, 2016
Houma, LA
  Voice of the Wetlands (VOW) 13th Annual Voice of the Wetlands Festival  
       
October 18-23, 2016
Northeast, NC
  Wings over Water Festival  
       
October 20-24, 2016
Northeast, NC
  New Jersey Audubon: 2016 Cape May Fall Festival  
       
November 2-6, 2016
Harlingen, TX
  Rio Grande Valley Bird Festival. Field trip destinations include Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge and Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge.  
       
November 15-20, 2016
Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge
San Antonio, NM
  Festival of the Cranes - see wintering sandhill cranes and snow geese by the thousands at this scenic refuge outside of Socorro. Enjoy workshops, tours and other events at one of the most celebrated bird festivals in the country.
 
       
November 24-27, 2016
Chincoteague, VA
  Assateague Island Waterfowl Weekend  
       
November 26, 2016
Stone Harbor, NJ
  Wetlands Institute: Wetland Wonderland  
       

For more wetland events, meetings, conferences, and courses nationwide, visit the ASWM calendar.

 

Wetland Breaking News - August 2016


INDEX

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • National Estuaries Week is September 17-24!
  • The Return of Chesapeake Bay Scallops
  • Study Finds Pharmaceuticals, Other Micropollutants In Hudson Estuary
  • Washington seeks federal protection for Puget Sound
  • Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance Webinar: Funding for Floodplain Restoration: Breaking Down Incentives to Develop Floodplains & Recent FEMA Policy Updates – September 1, 2016
  • ASWM Soils Training Webinar #3: Landforms and Landscapes – September 14, 2016
  • ASWM’S Members’ Wetland Webinar: Legal Processes for Wetland Permits – September 28, 2016

NATIONAL NEWS

  • EPA and USDA Pledge Actions to Support America’s Growing Water Quality Trading Markets
  • Researchers issue real-time forecasts of Chesapeake Bay dead zone
  • Complimentary Bay restoration plan in works
  • EPA provides $602,000 to Navajo Nation Government for Gold King Mine response costs
  • Announcement of 2016-2017 Campus RainWorks Challenge
  • White House directs federal agencies to consider climate change
  • What is a "Good" Project? Breaking Down Our Survey Results on Gulf Restoration Priorities
  • USFWS Announces Final Methodology for Prioritizing and Addressing ESA Status Reviews
  • Federal coal ash case could impact cleanups beyond Virginia
  • New Study Finds US Coastal Military Installations Will Lose Land to Sea Level Rise in Decades Ahead
  • $2.2 Million in Conservation Grants Announced by Five Star and Urban Waters Restoration Program
  • Cleaner air may be driving water quality in Chesapeake Bay
  • A new report rated countries on ‘sustainable development.’ The U.S. did horribly
  • Krohn to lead Rainwater Basin Wetland district
  • Our Dangerous Conservation Crisis
  • United States, Enbridge Reach $177 Million Settlement After 2010 Oil Spills in Michigan and Illinois
  • House passes Interior, EPA spending bill
  • The diversity of life across much of Earth has plunged below ‘safe’ levels
  • Senate Democrats push carbon capture tax credits
  • Service Proposes Expansion of Hunting and Fishing Opportunities on National Wildlife Refuges
  • U.S. Experienced At Least 8 Billion-Dollar in Disasters So Far this Year
  • U.S. Fish & Wildlife and Girls Inc. Inaugurate Girls in Nature

STATE NEWS

  • AK: What's behind the seeming disappearance of an Alaska tern? Scientists try to find out
  • CA: Suit: California failed to study oil well impact on water
  • CA: California may have a huge groundwater reserve that nobody knew about
  • CO: Criminal investigation into Gold King spill confirmed; EPA’s tab reaches $29M
  • DE: DNREC honors Delaware’s 2016 Wetland Warriors at State Fair
  • FL: Florida updates regulations, permitting more toxic chemicals in water
  • FL: Algae fix could come from $10 million Everglades clean-up contest
  • FL: Manatee die-off in polluted Indian River Lagoon begins anew
  • IA: Groundbreaking for new CREP wetland
  • IA: Iowa is losing millions of trees — and it's hurting water quality, experts say
  • IL: Spills of pig waste kill hundreds of thousands of fish in Illinois
  • IL: Volo Bog State Natural Area celebrates unique wetland
  • KS: Kansas leaders tackle aquifer conservation
  • KS: EPA, Goodrum Farm CR314, LLC Reach Settlement on Clean Water Act Violations
  • LA: Louisiana pols go to court blaming Big Oil for coastal ruin
  • ME: Land trust receives state grant for wetland restoration
  • MD: Some pause over rebuilding Ellicott City, cite flood history
  • MD: Maryland oysters see gains in sanctuaries, losses elsewhere, report finds
  • MD: New report finds ample oyster growth on restored Eastern Shore reefs
  • MA: Cape Cod’s big drinking water problem
  • MA: As much as 90 percent of ground water in Mass. may be corrosive
  • MI: Great Lakes Commission awarded $7.9 million to restore Muskegon Lake as part of $40 million regional partnership
  • MI: EPA winding up internal investigation into Flint water crisis
  • MN: Back to the drawing board for wetland sanctuary trail
  • MT: Crow Tribe celebrates end of long water fight
  • NC: State toxicologist: Claim that NC well water was safe was 'scientifically untrue'
  • NC: Duke Energy wants to keep state scientist testimony in coal ash case secret
  • ND: Native Youth Run 2,000 Miles to Washington DC to Protest Dakota Access Pipeline
  • NV: EPA, NV DEP require Nevada Department of Transportation to protect local waters
  • OH: Outdoors notebook | Grant to help upgrade Ohio wetland
  • OH: City seeks EPA funding for wetland revamp
  • PA: DEP Lists Susquehanna River as Impaired for Multiple Uses, Develops New Analytic Methods for Semiannual Impaired Waterways Report
  • PA: Flight 93 Memorial wetland project credited with protecting waterway from mine drainage
  • PA: Environmental Council’s Interactive Water Resource Mapping System Now Online
  • TN: Environmentalists blast TVA plan to leave coal ash at power plants
  • TN: Former cleanup workers blame illnesses on toxic coal ash exposures
  • TX: In Texas, wastewater spills get less scrutiny
  • UT: Utah assessing how much Rocky Mountain Power coal waste washed into Price River
  • UT: Toxic algae bloom closes Utah lake, sickens more than 100 people
  • VA: Citizens voice concerns over wetlands destruction
  • VT: Small Vermont Farmers Wrestle With New Water Quality Rules
  • WA: The Plan to Ship Oil Through the “Graveyard of the Pacific”
  • WI: DNR Tracking Spread of Wetland Invasive

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • Plastic hurting Canada’s loons, ducks and geese
  • Scientists Tease Out Climate Change’s Role in Zika Spread
  • Trading farmland for nitrogen protection
  • Anthrax Outbreak In Russia Thought To Be Result Of Thawing Permafrost
  • EPA Report Tracks our Changing Climate
  • Naturalists Grow Wildlife, Pollinator Habitat
  • How purple bacteria could help save amphibians in the Rockies
  • What Happens to the U.S. Midwest When the Water's Gone?
  • Climate Change Fingerprints Are All over California Wildfires
  • What we’re doing to the environment may be costing us our drinking water
  • Look to the Soil for Water Supply Answers
  • ‘We’ve primed the system': Why disgusting toxic blue-green algae blooms seem increasingly common
  • A Fish Outlived the Dinosaurs. Can It Outlast a Dam?
  • Why scientists are trying to rebuild oyster colonies
  • China tried to drive a furry mammal to extinction. Maybe that wasn’t such a good idea.
  • Wildflowers planted to aid bees may be crippling them
  • Lichen is a famous biological partnership — but it might actually be a threesome
  • Blazing Hot First Half of 2016 Sends Climate Records Tumbling
  • Knowledge of soil health: NRCS has developed 17 indicators for soil quality
  • The Oil Spill Cleanup Illusion
  • Climate change is apparently shifting clouds towards the poles
  • In Hot Water: Climate Change is Affecting North American Fish

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • Climate Ready Estuaries Program Adds Sea Level Rise Resources to Website
  • NOAA Releases 2015 State of the Climate Report
  • NOAA Develops Guide for Considering Climate Change in Coastal Conservation
  • Restoring Natural Defenses to Help Communities in Coastal Floodplains Adapt to Climate Change
  • Reconnecting Rivers to Floodplains: Returning Natural Functions to Restore Rivers and Benefit Communities
  • Natural Defenses in Action: Harnessing Nature to Protect our Communities

POTPOURRI

  • “You Can’t Handle the Truth!”
  • The Sticky Truth about Economic Growth and Climate Change
  • Still waters: U.S. to crack down on ocean noise that harms fish
  • Scientists call for increased federal investment in sustainable agriculture
  • Citing climate change, EPA moves to regulate pollution from airliners
  • Human Consumption of Earth's Natural Resources Has Tripled in 40 Years
  • What does climate change mean for America’s $73 billion angling industry?
  • What You Need to Know About the World's Water Wars
  • The Time to Invest in America’s Water Infrastructure is Now

WEBINARS, MEETINGS, TRAINING

  • Implementation and Impacts of Flood Insurance Reform Legislation
  • Geographic Information Tools for Ocean Advocacy
  • Integrated Water Management – What Is It and How Can It Benefit Your Community and River?
  • Integrated Land-Sea Planning in Puerto Rico
  • Climate, wildfire, and erosion ensemble foretells more sediment in western USA watersheds
  • NOAA's Office of Coastal Management Webinar: Seven Best Practices for Risk Communication
  • Safe Waters, Healthy Waters: A Guide for Citizen Groups on Bacteria Monitoring in Local WaterwaysGet the Dirt: Engineering Solutions for Sustainable Vegetation
  • National Water Quality Monitoring Council Webinar: Exploring the Worlds of Citizen Science and Volunteer Monitoring
  • Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance Webinar: Funding for Floodplain Restoration: Breaking Down Incentives to Develop Floodplains & Recent FEMA Policy Updates
  • Streambank Protection Design: Hard & Soft Techniques & Applications
  • Scenarios, Simulations and Sustainability Science: Future Planning for Complex Systems
  • Incentivizing BMP Installation in Communities with Stormwater Utilities
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Training Webinar Series: Soils Training Webinar #3: Landforms and Landscapes
  • Decision-support tool for coastal area management based on results of the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM)
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Members’ Wetland Webinar: Legal Processes for Wetland Permits
  • Ocean Highlights from the IUCN World Conservation Congress
  • Retrofitting Revisited: Forward Into the Past
  • American Water Resources Association (AWRA) webinar: Oregon's First Integrated Water Resources Strategy: Lessons Learned Since Implementation
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webcast 6: Non-Traditional MS4s

Meetings

  • American Fisheries Society 146th Annual Meeting: Fisheries Conservation and Management: Making Connections and Building Partnerships
  • StormCon: Designing the Future of Stormwater
  • 2016 Annual KAMM Conference: The Changing Climate of Mitigation
  • NC State University EcoStream - Stream Ecology and Restoration Conference
  • Society of Ecological Restoration Europe conference 2016: Best Practice in Restoration
  • Floodplain Management Association Luncheon: Offsite Storm Water Alternative Compliance Program
  • Small Drinking Water System Challenges and Solutions
  • 22nd National Nonpoint Source (NPS) Monitoring Workshop
  • ScenNet International Conference: Scenarios and Models of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Support of Decision Making
  • British Columbia Wildlife Federation Workshop: Lower Mainland Wetlands Institute-2016
  • 2016 World Water Week
  • Coast to Coast Conference
  • 5th International EcoSummit Congress, EcoSummit 2016 - Ecological Sustainability: Engineering Change
  • Water Finance Conference: Funding a Sustainable Future
  • IUCN World Conservation Congress: Planet at the crossroads
  • 2016 Floodplain Management Association Annual Conference
  • Connecting the Dots...Groundwater, Surface Water, and Climate Connections in the Northwest
  • 3rd International Conference “Water resources and wetlands”
  • New England Chapter of the Society of Wetland Scientists Field Trip on Hydrologic Considerations Wetland Restoration
  • Ohio Wetlands Association: 2016 Wetlands Summit: "Life on the Edge: Where Humans Meet Wetlands.”
  • 31st Annual WateReuse Symposium: Increasing Safe and Reliable Water Supplies
  • Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies 106th Annual Meeting
  • 6th International Symposium on Deep-Sea Corals
  • California Stormwater Quality Association 12th Annual Conference: Stormwater Evolution: Source to Resource
  • Livable Cities Forum: Changing Climate, Changing Communities
  • Value of Water Coalition: Imagine a Day Without Water
  • LIAA: Michigan’s 2016 State Water Trail Summit
  • Ohio Sea Grant Conference: Understanding Algal Blooms: State of the Science
  • Greenwich Maritime Centre (GMC conference: 'Society and the Sea'
  • Guild of Rocky Mountain Ecologists and Evolutionary Biologists (GREEBs) meeting
  • Wetlands Institute: Fall Migration Festival
  • Restore America's Estuaries: National Estuaries Week
  • 13th International Symposium on River Sedimentation
  • 10th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference
  • The Climate Group will host the 8th Annual Climate Week
  • Healing Our Waters®– Great Lakes Coalition: 12th Annual Great Lakes Restoration Conference
  • International Conference on Sustainable Development (ICSD)
  • Crossroads in the Concrete Jungle: Experiences and Explorations of Urban Plants and People
  • Lacawac Sanctuary and Biological Field Station: 5th Annual Lacawac Ecology Conference
  • Under Western Skies (UWS) conference: Water: Events, Trends, Analysis
  • EUCI: 2016 EPA 316(b) Fish and Shellfish Impingement & Entrainment in Power & Industrial Facilities Conference
  • Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay: 2016 Chesapeake Watershed Forum
  • Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge: Birdfest and Bluegrass
  • 18th Annual Stormwater Conference
  • Great Lakes Public Forum 2016
  • 16th Annual Great Lakes Beach Association Conference
  • Southern Nevada Water Authority WaterSmart Innovations Conference and Exposition
  • Great Lakes Commission 2016 Annual Meeting
  • 8th Annual Undergraduate Research Conference
  • Physics of Estuaries and Coastal Seas Conference
  • Natural Channel Design Review Checklist Workshop
  • Southeastern Fish & Wildlife Agencies: 70th Annual Conference
  • Ding Darling Days
  • 4th Northern Rockies Invasive Plants Council Conference
  • 2016 Mountain Climate Conference: Mountains Without Snow: What are the Consequences?
  • New Jersey Association for Floodplain Management (NJAFM) 12th Annual Conference: Supporting Municipalities to Reduce Flood Risk
  • Natural Areas Association 2016 Natural Areas Conference
  • Ecosystem Services Partnership (ESP) conference: 'Healthy ecosystems for resilient societies'
  • 11th Annual Regional Stormwater Conference: Stormwater Solutions
  • Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum - West Coast
  • 12th Annual MAFSM Conference
  • Student Conference on Conservation Science – New York (SCCS-NY)
  • 7th Symposium on the Ecology, Status and Conservation of the Diamondback Terrapin
  • Land Trust Alliance Rally 2016 National Land Conservation Conference
  • 14th Annual Ecological Genomics Symposium
  • American Water Works Association: Water Infrastructure Conference & Exposition
  • National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP): 39th Annual Scientific Symposium and Committee Meetings
  • North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) Symposium: Science to Stewardship: Balancing Economic Growth and Lake Sustainability
  • The Chicago Wilderness Congress: Celebrating 20 Years: One Home. One Future
  • 2016 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference
  • American Water Works Association: Water Quality Technology Conference® & Exposition
  • Considerations for the Use of Non-local Species in Ecological Restoration
  • Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway Association: 2016 Annual Meeting
  • 2016 Bay-Delta Science Conference
  • ACES: A Community on Ecosystem Services conference: Linking Science, Practice, and Decision Making
  • 8th National Summit: Our Coasts, Our Future, Our Choice and 25th Biennial Meeting of The Coastal Society
  • AGU Fall Meeting

Training

  • Polypores and Other Wood-inhabiting Fungi
  • Field Methods for Studying Avian Migration
  • The Swamp School course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • Water Rights Engineering Including Case Studies
  • Introduction to Coastal Maine Birds: Identification, Taxonomy, Ecology
  • Marine Benthic Macroinvertebrates, Communities, and Habitats
  • Exploring Medicinal Plants of Maine (and beyond)
  • Field Ornithology: Shorebirds & Seabirds of Downeast Maine
  • The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Land Use and Natural Resources Information Session
  • Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation with Emphasis on Soils and Hydrology – 2016
  • The Swamp School Course: Habitat Conservation Plans
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • North Carolina Wetland Assessment Method (NC WAM) for determining the condition of wetlands
  • Rutgers University Course: Vegetation Identification for Wetland Delineation: South
  • Riparian Habitat Restoration in the Arid Southwest
  • EUCI Course: In-Depth Coal Ash Impoundment Closure
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School: Point Intercept Method for Determining Hydrophytic Vegetation
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Spatial Ecology, Geospatial Analysis and Remote Sensing for Conservation
  • Endangered Species Act Overview
  • The Swamp School Wetland Plants Field ID Workshop
  • Rutgers University Course: Wetland Construction: Planning and Functional Design
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Woody Plants (Trees, Shrubs, and Vines) Identification – 2016
  • 2D Floodplain Delineation using 2D HEC-RAS Model
  • George Mason University, Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation course: Watershed Conservation: Riparian Restoration
  • Rutgers University Course: Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • North Carolina State University Stream Restoration Program Course: Stream Morphology Assessment
  • University of Minnesota course: Hydrology Tools for Minnesota Wetlands
  • Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
  • Rutgers University course: Understanding Advanced Stormwater Management Techniques
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher - 2016
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) course: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA): Writing the Perfect EA/FONSI, or EIS
  • Rutgers University Course: Methodology for Delineating Wetlands
  • Rutgers University Course: Introduction to Wetland Identification
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) course: Advanced NEPA-Taking the National Environmental Policy Act to the Next Level
  • Natural Channel Design Principles
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA): Writing the Perfect EA/FONSI, or EIS
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: Advanced NEPA-Taking the National Environmental Policy Act to the Next Level
  • Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology (Piedmont)
  • Urban Watersheds Research Institute Course: Watershed Modeling Using CUHP-SWMM
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: Planning and Preparing an Ecological Risk Assessment
  • Federal Wetland / Waters Regulatory Policy
  • Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement (Eastern Mountains/Piedmont)
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Statistical Downscaling of Global Climate Models using SDSM 5.2
  • National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA): Writing the Perfect EA/FONSI, or EIS

SPECIAL EVENTS

  • Rouge River Water Festival
  • Pointe Mouillee Waterfowl Festival
  • Wetlands Institute: Fall Migration Festival
  • Voice of the Wetlands (VOW) 13th Annual Voice of the Wetlands Festival
  • Wings over Water Festival
  • New Jersey Audubon: 2016 Cape May Fall Festival
  • Rio Grande Valley Bird Festival
  • Festival of the Cranes
  • Assateague Island Waterfowl Weekend
  • Wetlands Institute: Wetland Wonderland

 

Wetland Breaking News - August 2016

Wetland Breaking News - December 2015

Wetland Breaking News - March 2016


The Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News (WBN)
is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those Wetland Breaking News - April 2016working in water resources and related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published for over fifteen years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.

The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to .

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled and Edited by Marla Stelk, Editor; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors. Executive Director: Jeanne Christie. Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399 Fax: 207-892-3089

All photos by Jeanne Christie, ASWM


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