Wetland Breaking News - July 2016

                   
                   
   
IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES &
PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

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Wetland Breaking News - July 2016

All photos by
Jeanne Christie, ASWM

     

Wetland Breaking News - July 2016Dear Friends,

Technology is a wonderful thing, and it can certainly make our lives easier, improve our ability to do our job efficiently and provide a greater degree of accuracy to analyses. In many ways, technology has also improved our ability to lighten our impact on the environment by reducing paper waste and the need for transportation – now we can develop newsletters like Wetland Breaking News on our computers and deliver it to you through the internet. The digital revolution still boggles my mind when I consider the immense amount of information that can be accessed and shared instantaneously.

I find, however, that at times we rely too heavily on our software and gadgets and I worry that we are losing our traditional knowledge of how to interpret our environment directly through our senses and our physical interactions. Although the importance and utility of indigenous knowledge has been appreciated for many years, it concerns me that we are rapidly forgetting its significance. Fortunately, I have recently seen a resurgence of interest in indigenous culture and knowledge. And one of our regular webinar participants has made an effort over the last year to consistently raise questions during the Q&A sessions about if and how various approaches to wetland management have incorporated indigenous practices.

In my Editor’s Choice section this month, you’ll find some interesting articles about new efforts to integrate traditional natural resource practices into solutions for various problems, such as using Native American oyster practices to rejuvenate the Chesapeake Bay and how a 700-year-old West African soil technique could help mitigate climate change. These stories are inspiring and prove to me that we can marry traditional indigenous practices with new science and technology to solve some of our most pressing modern challenges.

As we work with indigenous communities, however, we must recognize that many have been marginalized for hundreds of years – and have suffered many environmental injustices. Take, for example, the story in Editor’s Choice about the Uru-Murato people in Bolivia who have lived off Lake Poopo for millennia and who now have to abandon their traditional way of life due to climate change, unsustainable water diversion practices and cyclical El Nino droughts.

Today, more than ever, it is essential to listen and integrate the wisdom of other cultures, including ways of perceiving and interacting with the natural world. The environmental community has historically been very white and western in its philosophy. But I have faith that we are making progress in how we view and work with indigenous cultures and communities of color. We can accomplish great things when we work together.

Best regards,

Marla J. Stelk, Editor
Wetland Breaking News

     
                   


Wetland Breaking News - July 2016

Can Native American Oyster Practices Rejuvenate the Chesapeake Bay?

By Kastalia Medrano – Pacific Standard Magazine – June 16, 2016
Estuary systems are in decline around the world. Polluted waters, overfishing, and sea levels rising as a result of climate change have left many marine ecosystems a mess. And the Chesapeake Bay, after a century of overfishing and deteriorating water quality, is in trouble. In the ongoing search for ways to restore the Chesapeake, an interdisciplinary team of scientists from the Smithsonian Institution — including biologists, resource managers, archaeologists, anthropologists, even a paleontologist — may have found the key in one of the watershed’s most vital and iconic symbols: the oyster. For full article, click here.

700-year-old West African soil technique could help mitigate climate change

Environmental News Network – June 16, 2016
A farming technique practiced for centuries by villagers in West Africa, which converts nutrient-poor rainforest soil into fertile farmland, could be the answer to mitigating climate change and revolutionizing farming across Africa. A global study, led by the University of Sussex, which included anthropologists and soil scientists from Cornell, Accra, and Aarhus Universities and the Institute of Development Studies, has for the first-time identified and analyzed rich fertile soils found in Liberia and Ghana. For full story, click here.

Gone: Global Warming Claims a Lake - and a Way of Life

By Susan Lehman – The New York Tiimes – July 8, 2016 – Podcast
There used to be a lake in Bolivia. Lake Poopó. Then it disappeared — along with most of the villagers who depended on the lake, for generations. The Andes bureau chief, Nicholas Casey, went with the Times photographer Josh Haner to Llapallapani, Bolivia, and wrote what is a cautionary tale about climate change and its consequences. For full story and to listen to the podcast, click here.

Gulf Coast Activists Tell 'Big Green' to Quit Exploiting Their Disasters for Financial Gain

By Yessenia Funes – Colorlines.com – June 30, 2016
In a new open letter, a group of 11 Gulf Coast environmental justice activists are demanding "respect and solidarity" from national "Big Green" organizations that they accuse of exploiting their local disasters for financial gain and treating poor people of color as "poster children for environmental injustice." The activists, who hail from EJ groups including 350 Louisiana, Houstonians Against Tar Sands and Radical Arts & Healing Collective, published the letter on a New Orleans website June 27 and sent it to Colorlines yesterday. While the statement does not name any groups or funders, "Big Green" is a term critics use to describe the largest environmental organizations in the United States, including the Natural Resources Defense Council, Greenpeace and the Sierra Club. For full story, click here.

It's Not Just Crimes Against Nature, It's Crimes Against People

By Terry Odendahl – EcoWatch – June 22, 2016
Many of us who have dedicated our lives to environmental protection believe that all crimes against nature are also crimes against people. After all, nature is the life source for the human species. But unfortunately, not all members of the public agree with us. Some people care more about saving animals, a wetland or a forest. None of these matters are of much interest to the media, government or funding organizations. However, when people are also involved and directly harmed by the crime against nature, it can help draw attention to efforts to protect the health and life of people as well as the environment. For full story, click here.

ASWM’S Members’ Wetland Webinar: Long Term Financial Assurances for Wetland Mitigation and Voluntary Restoration – July 27, 2016

The Association of State Wetland Managers Members’ Wetland Webinar on Long Term Financial Assurances for Wetland Mitigation and Voluntary Mitigation will be held on Wednesday, July 27, 2016 - 3:00 p.m. EDT. Introducing TNCs Long Term Stewardship Calculator. Presented by Angela Sturdevant, The Nature Conservancy’s Indiana Chapter and Palmer Hough, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds. For more information, click here.

ASWM Soils Training Webinar #2: Hydric Soil Processess – August 10, 2016

The Association of State Wetland Managers Training Webinar Series: Soils Training Webinar #2: Hydric Soil Process will be held on August 10, 2016 at 3:00 p.m. ET. Presenters: W. Lee Daniels, Professor of Environmental Soil Science at Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia; Bruce Vasilas, Professor of Agronomy and Soil Management in the Plant and Soil Sciences Department at the University of Delaware; Lenore Vasilas, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Soil Scientist on the Soil Science Division Technical Soil Services Staff. For more information and to register, click here.

 



Wetland Breaking News - July 2016

UM researchers find lack of government accountability on widespread herbicide use on public land

By David Erickson – Missoulian – July 7, 2016
Herbicides have been widely used on public lands in North America to kill non-native and invasive plants for decades. But a new report raises serious questions about whether taxpayers are footing a significant bill for a widespread but not widely known land management practice that may be causing more harm than good. A pair of researchers at the University of Montana recently contributed to a new study that has found a lack of government data and accountability on whether this method is actually destroying “non-target” species and ecosystems and possibly allowing more destructive invasive species to take root. For full story, click here.

USDA Announces $49 Million Public-Private Investment to Improve Critical Wetlands in 12 States

Contact: Office of Communications – USDA Department of Agriculture – July 7, 2016
Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced that USDA is awarding $44.6 million through its Wetland Reserve Enhancement Partnership to support 10 wetland enhancement projects on private and tribal agricultural lands in 12 States. Recipients for each project are providing more than $4.3 million in matching funds, bringing the total investment to approximately $49 million. In total, the projects will help to protect, restore or enhance 15,000 wetland acres in critical watersheds across the United States. For full story, click here.

"Living Shorelines" Will Get Fast Track to Combat Sea Level Rise

By Erika Bolstad, ClimateWire – Scientific American – July 6, 2016
As sea levels rise along U.S. coasts, it may soon get easier for people and local governments to obtain federal permits to build what are known as “living shorelines,” natural or nature-based structures designed to protect communities and infrastructure from extreme storms and flooding even as they protect habitat. The Army Corps of Engineers is considering a new category to its nationwide permits that would allow speedier approval of living shorelines, which include wetlands with sea and marsh grasses, sand dunes, mangroves, and coral reefs. For full story, click here.

How can industrial-scale agriculture reduce its environmental footprint?

By Jason Thomson – The Christian Science Monitor – July 1, 2016 – Video
Rivers, streams, lakes, and coastal waters of the United States face various threats through human activities, not least of which is the bane of pollution. One of the major sources of contaminants that can upset the natural balance is industrial output, including large-scale agriculture, particularly if the processes and discharge are poorly managed, according to a new report from Environment America.
For full story and to view video, click here.

EPA removes underground tanks on Navajo Nation to protect local water

Newsroom America – June 30, 2016
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency located and removed two underground storage tanks at the former Smith Lake Trading Post in McKinley County, New Mex. last month. The thousand-gallon tanks may have been buried for over 70 years. The trading post burned down in 1995 and was abandoned. The Navajo Nation EPA identified this site as one of many abandoned gas stations throughout the reservation. The two underground storage tanks at the site are thought to have been taken out of service in 1981. At that time, the tanks were not checked to see if petroleum product remained. This work is part of EPA’s ongoing efforts to identify and remove abandoned underground storage tanks that have the potential to contaminate groundwater throughout the Navajo Nation. For full story, click here.

Water Systems Violate Lead Rules Nationwide, Advocacy Group Finds

By Maggie – Fox NBC News – June 28, 2016 – Video
More than 5,000 water systems across the country are violating rules meant to keep lead out of drinking water, advocates said Tuesday. While the case in Flint, Michigan has dominated headlines, cities and towns across the U.S. are in similar danger, the Natural Resources Defense Council found in a report. For full story and to view video, click here.

Court strikes down Obama fracking rules for public lands

By David Bailey and Ernest Scheyder – Reuters – June 22, 2016
A federal judge has struck down the Obama administration's rules for hydraulic fracturing on public lands, a victory for oil and gas producers and state regulators who opposed the rules as an egregious overreach. The ruling, which the White House vowed to appeal, halts the administration's efforts to address what it sees as safety concerns in the industry and reverses what producers had seen as a first step toward full federal regulation of all fracking activity. For full story, click here.

Study finds surprising source of Colorado River water supply

By Sarah Tory – High Country News – June 20, 2016
Every spring, snow begins to melt throughout the Rocky Mountains, flowing down from high peaks and into the streams and rivers that form the mighty Colorado River Basin, sustaining entire cities and ecosystems from Wyoming to Arizona. But as spring becomes summer, the melting snow slows to a trickle and, as summer turns to fall, all but stops. Scientists have known for a long time that flow in rivers is sustained by contributions from both snowmelt runoff and groundwater. The groundwater is composed of rivulets of water hidden below ground —some thousands of years old — that are particularly important for sustaining a river’s flow after the spring snowmelt has subsided. Less clear, however, was exactly how much of the flow in rivers came from groundwater, a critical source of much of the West’s water supply. Now, a new study, released last month by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), helps quantify just how much: more than half the flow of rivers in the upper part of the Colorado River Basin is sustained by groundwater. That finding, say experts, highlights the need to better protect a resource threatened by overuse and climate change. For full story, click here.

The Nature Conservancy and The Fertilizer Institute join forces

By The Fertilizer Institute – AG Professional – June 16, 2016
The Nature Conservancy and The Fertilizer Institute (TFI) announced a new partnership in support of farm practices that result in clean water. The two organizations signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) aimed at ensuring American agriculture has access to tools to use fertilizer with maximum environmental and economic efficiency. For full story, click here.

Gulf of Mexico Alliance Releases Third Governors' Action Plan for Healthy and Resilient Coasts

Gulf of Mexico Alliance – June 2016
The Gulf of Mexico Alliance (Alliance) released the Governors’ Action Plan III For Healthy and Resilient Coasts today. This is the third major effort by the Alliance, approved by all five U.S. Gulf Coast State governors. The states of Alabama and Mississippi issued proclamations, declaring support for the plan and emphasizing the vision to improve the health and sustainability of our coastal areas. They noted millions of people depend on it – to live, work, and vacation. In the plan, the Alliance addresses six major regional issues: coastal resilience; data and monitoring; education and engagement; habitat resources; water resources; and wildlife and fisheries. For full story and to download the Action Plan, click here.

Wetland Breaking News - July 2016

AL: TVA will cap coal ash impoundment

By Russ Corey – Times Daily – June 20, 2016
The Tennessee Valley Authority has determined that capping the coal ash impoundment at the Colbert Fossil Plant is the most economically feasible option, a decision that does not sit well with some environmentalists. TVA announced last week in its final environmental impact statement that it will cap and close 10 coal ash impoundments at six different coal-fired power plants, including its Barton facility in Colbert County. In the study, TVA said it plans to spend $280 million to clean up the sites. TVA said it could take 10 times that much money to close and remove the coal ash from the sites and properly dispose of it. For full story, click here.


AL: Study: Plastic waste pervasive in Mobile Bay, Gulf of Mexico shorelines


By Lawrence Specker – AL.com – June 10, 2016 – Video
When the subject of plastic waste in the ocean comes up, many peoples' thoughts turn to the so-called Great Pacific Garbage Patch, a vast swath of water soupy with tiny bits of broken-down plastic. It seems like a faraway problem. But the same plastic residue is pervasive on the shorelines of Mobile Bay and the northern Gulf of Mexico, according to a newly published study conducted by scientists from the Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the University of South Alabama. For full story and to view video, click here.

AK: Building in a wetland is never easy. In Bethel, it just got harder

By Adrian Wagner – KTOO Public Media – June 21, 2016
Construction in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta has never been easy. It’s hard to build things in a wetland, and the construction season is short. For some, that season just got shorter. A federal change could mean waiting months to get a construction permit that used to take only days. Whether you realize it or not, every time you do any new construction in Bethel, you have to get the permission of the federal government — the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, to be exact. “We’re in a wetland everywhere here, and so any new construction you do is most likely in a wetland,” Ted Meyer, director of Bethel city planning, said. Meyer said this permitting process is one way the federal government protects wetlands. But with that protection comes red tape that Bethel residents are now going to have to cut through themselves. For full story, click here.

CA: U.S. EPA Proposes Greater Protection from Selenium in San Francisco Bay and Delta

Contact: Michele Huitric – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – July 1, 2016
Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed a federal Clean Water Act rule to tighten the current selenium water quality criteria for the waters of San Francisco Bay and Delta. The proposed change would better protect aquatic species, including salmon, smelt, and diving ducks, that are dependent on the Bay and Delta ecosystem, from harmful exposure to elevated levels of selenium. “Reducing selenium in the San Francisco Bay and Delta will benefit the wildlife that are part of this critical ecosystem,” said Alexis Strauss, EPA’s Acting Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “This proposal is based on years of scientific study, and will accelerate the restoration of the Bay and Delta.” For full news release, click here.

CA: In California, Study Finds Drilling and Fracking into Freshwater Formations

By Neela Banerjee – Inside Climate News – June 27, 2016
In California's farming heartland, as many as one of every five oil and gas projects occurs in underground sources of fresh water, according to a new study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study by Stanford scientists assessed the amount of groundwater that could be used for irrigation and drinking supplies in five counties of California's agricultural Central Valley, as well as the three coastal counties encompassing Los Angeles, Santa Barbara and Ventura. The study estimated that water-scarce California could have almost three times as much fresh groundwater as previously thought. For full story, click here.

CA: California Proposes Adopting New Permitting Program for Wetlands and Waters of the State

By Keith Garner – Lexology – June 20, 2016
On June 17, 2016, the State Water Resources Control Board (State Board) published proposed amendments to the Ocean Plan and the water quality control plan for Inland Surface Waters and Enclosed Bays and Estuaries and Ocean Waters of California to adopt procedures for discharges of dredged or fill material to waters of the state that are not protected by the federal Clean Water Act (CWA). In addition to the proposed amendments, the State Board also published a detailed staff report and a separate comparison of the new “State Supplemental Dredged or Fill Guidelines” to the CWA’s Section 404(b)(1) Guidelines, which requires sequencing of impacts to avoid, minimize, and mitigate impacts to waters. Two workshops and a public hearing are scheduled in June and July, with the public comment period ending on August 4, 2016. The proposal is tentatively scheduled to be considered by the State Board in the fall of 2016. For full story, click here.

FL: Fighting Zika in the US: The Battle Over GMO Mosquitoes

By Gillian Mohney and Justine Quart – ABC News – July 12, 2016 – Video
Zika, a mosquito-borne virus linked to devastating birth defects, is expanding throughout Central and South America and creeping north toward the U.S., in what the World Health Organization has called a “global health emergency.” The sleepy community of Key Haven has been identified by one company as the perfect spot to experiment with a controversial method of combating Zika before it reaches U.S. shores — a method that has divided neighbors and could have broad implications across the country. What’s dividing members of the community: releasing genetically modified mosquitoes, with Key Haven as the possible testing ground. For full story and to view video, click here.

FL: Toxic algae bloom crisis hits Florida, drives away tourists

By Craig Pittman – Tampa Bay Times – July 1, 2016 – Video
It's going to be a long, stinky Fourth of July weekend on Jensen Beach. Instead of red, white and blue, the color of the day is green. Thick, putrid layers of toxic blue-green algae are lapping at the sand, forcing Martin County officials to close the beach as a health hazard. "I've seen Jensen Beach closed for sharks," said Irene Gomes, whose family has run the Driftwood Motel since 1958. "I've never seen it closed for an algae bloom before." As bad as it looks, the stench is far worse, driving away Gomes' motel customers, chasing off paddleboard and kayak renters and forcing residents to stay indoors. For full story and to view video, click here.

FL: Controversial Everglades oil well plan moving forward

By David Fleshler – Sun Sentinel – June 19, 2016 – Video
After generating an uproar last summer over plans to drill for oil in the Everglades near Miramar, the Kanter family of Miami has submitted paperwork for state permits that could result in decisions by late summer or early fall. The family has proposed a single exploratory well about six miles outside Miramar, in hopes of adding to the modest group of oil fields that have been operating in South Florida since World War II. Environmentalists have denounced the proposal, and city commissions throughout Broward County adopted resolutions in opposition. Members of the Broward County Commission, from which the family would need to obtain a zoning change, have said they would never support it. For full story and to view video, click here.

GA: Ga. Power Finds Contaminants Near Coal Ash Ponds At 3 Plants

By Molly Samuel – WABE – June 28, 2016
Georgia Power has found evidence that chemicals have leaked into groundwater at three of its coal-fired power plants. The utility found arsenic at plants near Rome and on the Savannah River, and it found beryllium and selenium at a plant near Newnan. The results are from a groundwater monitoring program required by federal coal ash rules. Georgia Power installed more than 130 groundwater monitoring wells at six different power plants. Four of the monitoring wells – one each at Plant Hammond and Plant McIntosh, and two at Plant Yates – showed levels of contaminants that exceed state standards. For full story, click here.

MD: Panel to study how to reduce bay pollution at Conowingo Dam

By The Associated Press – WTOP – July 8, 2016
A Maryland panel has been formed to study ways to reduce Chesapeake Bay pollution that comes by way of the Conowingo Dam. Gov. Larry Hogan announced the multi-agency work group Thursday. The Hogan administration announced it will be looking to determine whether dredging the dam and re-use of dredged materials can be done efficiently. For full story, click here.

MD: As climate changes, Assateague Island's caregivers may give nature the final say on seashore's future

By Scott Dance – The Baltimore Sun – July 2, 2016 – Video
Nature wrought the inlet that separates this narrow strip of dunes and brush from Ocean City just to the north, but humans have sought to control the shifting sands ever since. If not for routine dredging, the gap cut during a 1933 hurricane might have filled in decades ago. In the meantime, millions of dollars have been spent to move around massive piles of sand on both sides of the inlet. As sand erodes from Ocean City beaches, man-made jetties block it from naturally reaching northern Assateague. For full story and to view video, click here.

MD: Blue crab population in Chesapeake Bay grows, but doesn't reach goals

By Lauren Young – The Virginian Pilot – June 30, 2016
A new report from the Chesapeake Bay Stock Assessment Committee shows the blue crab population in the bay has grown over the past year, however, the increasing numbers still haven't reached the set target levels. The 2016 Chesapeake Bay Blue Crab Advisory Report found that the overall population of blue crabs in the bay have grown from 411 million in 2015 to 533 million this year. In past years, the amount of female blue crabs has dipped, most recently in 2014. This year, there were 194 million spawning-age female crabs in the bay at the beginning of the crabbing season compared to 101 million in 2015, however, the target for 2016 was 215 million. For full story, click here.

MA: How Western Mass. Handles Contamination Left By GE In Its Waterways

By Meghna Chakrabarti and Jamie Bologna – WBUR Radio Boston – June 30, 2016
General Electric operated massive transformer manufacturing plants in Pittsfield for more than 80 years. In Part 1, we heard from former plant employees about the surprising combination of deep love and frustration they feel for the company. Now, we're exploring how GE's legacy carries forward in the region. Specifically, how western Massachusetts is dealing with the major chemical contamination GE operations left in the waterways. For full story and to listen to Part 1, click here.

MI: After decades of planning, work begins on key St. Marys River restoration project

Great Lakes Commission – June 28 2016
A key project to restore the Little Rapids portion of the St. Marys River kicked off today after decades of planning by local, state, federal and tribal partners. The Little Rapids Restoration Project will construct a new bridge to replace two undersized causeway culverts between Sault Ste. Marie and Sugar Island, which will result in reconnected water flow, improved habitat for native fish populations, revitalized tourism and sport fishing opportunities on the river, and better community access for fishing, bird watching, and recreation via a new pedestrian walkway. For full story, click here.

MI: Waukesha gets permission to draw water from Lake Michigan

By Keith Matheny – Detroit Free Press – June 21, 2016
The governors of the eight U.S. states surrounding the Great Lakes, including Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, today in Chicago unanimously approved diverting Lake Michigan water to supply a Wisconsin community just outside the Great Lakes basin — but only with conditions, including that water withdrawn must be treated and returned to the basin. The controversial decision to allow Waukesha, Wis., access to Lake Michigan water marks the first test case of the Great Lakes Compact, an agreement ratified by the lake states in 2008 to protect the Great Lakes from large-scale water diversions out of the Great Lakes basin. For full story, click here.

NY: As sea level rises, Hudson River wetlands may expand

Cornell University – Science Daily – June 29, 2016
In the face of climate change impact and inevitable sea level rise, Cornell and Scenic Hudson scientists studying New York's Hudson River estuary have forecast new intertidal wetlands, comprising perhaps 33 percent more wetland area by the year 2100. "In other parts of the world, sea level rise has led to net losses of tidal wetland and to permanent inundation," said Magdeline Laba, Cornell senior research associate in soil and crop sciences. In terms of population, the Hudson River valley is one of the fastest growing regions in the state, she explained, as the transportation network and industry border both sides of the river. "Taking this into account, it is quite surprising that wetlands have any area at all to expand into," Laba said. "There will be a net increase in total wetlands, instead of a decrease, which is really amazing." For full story, click here.

NY: $2.5M Restoration Project Brings Natural Wetland to Meadow Lake

By Katie Honan – DNA Info – June 23, 2016
The shoreline of Meadow Lake at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park has been strengthened and turned into a tranquil wildlife refuge through a $2.5 million project, officials said. The manmade lake now has nearly two dozen plants surrounding it, creating a natural wetland that will attract more birds and butterflies and naturally clean the lake. For full story, click here.

NY: Study: Jamaica Bay wetland islands may be 200 years old

By Associated Press – The Washington Times – June 17, 2016
A Wildlife Conservation Society expert says the wetland islands in New York’s Jamaica Bay may be 200 to 230 years old - much younger than originally thought. Senior conservation ecologist Eric Sanderson reached his conclusion by studying the changing shape of the bay using historical Dutch, English, French and American maps. The WCS says there had been assumptions that the islands of Jamaica Bay were thousands of years old. Recent restoration efforts have been rebuilding the marsh islands by adding sediment and planting grasses. For full story, click here.

NC: North Carolina's Factory Farms Produce 15,000 Olympic Pools Worth of Waste Each Year

By Christina Cooke – Civil Eats – June 28, 2016
Elsie Herring stays indoors on the days the industrial hog farm next door sprays manure from a lagoon-like holding pit across the field that ends eight feet from her kitchen window. Because a filthy mist coats her property if the wind is blowing from the west, Herring has learned to avoid activities like sitting on her porch, grilling outside, hanging laundry on the line, opening windows, and drinking water from the well. Herring lives in Duplin County, North Carolina, on a plot of land her family has owned for more than a century. Located in the eastern part of the state, Duplin contains more than 18.5 million confined animals, including 2.3 million hogs. In Herring’s part of the state, pigs outnumber people almost 40 to one. For full story, click here.

OH: Algae 2016: Only a mild bloom for western Lake Erie if current weather patterns hold

By Tom Henry – The Blade – June 10, 2016
Don't look now, but western Lake Erie's 2016 algal bloom may not be so bad. In their latest HAB (Harmful Algal Bloom) bulletin, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Heidelberg University's National Center for Water Quality Research said drier conditions are expected for the next six weeks. If that happens, there won't be nearly as much rain pushing farm fertilizers, animal manure, and raw sewage into area rivers and streams, which means there could be far less algae than we've seen in recent summers except for the drought year of 2012, when the lake was clearer than it'd been for years. The amount of algae is directly related to the amount of farm runoff and, to a lesser extent, sewage overflows. Those are directly related to how much rain we get. For full story, click here.

PA: Green City, Clean Waters Blows Past Year Five Targets

Philadelphia Watersheds Blog – June 20, 2016
The City of Philadelphia announced a major achievement accomplished through the Green City, Clean Waters program at a June 16 celebration marking the five-year anniversary of the Green Stormwater Infrastructure plan’s adoption. As of June 1, 2016, more than 837 “Greened Acres” have been established in the city, representing a more than 1.5 billion gallon reduction in stormwater runoff and combined sewer overflows during a typical year of rainfall. Under the 2011 agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency and the Pa. Dept. of Environmental Protection (EPA), the City was required to create 744 Greened Acres, representing a 600 million gallon per-year reduction in runoff and overflows, by June 2016. For full blog post, click here.

TX: TCEQ: Contested Coal Mine Can Release Wastewater Into Drinking Supply

By Naveena Sadasivam – Texas Observer – July 6, 2016
The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality approved expanding a wastewater permit for a South Texas coal mine over vocal opposition from locals Wednesday. The permit amendment allows Dos Republicas Coal Partnership, which operates a 6,300-acre mine near Eagle Pass, to discharge waste-polluted stormwater and mine seepage into nearby Elm Creek, which feeds the Rio Grande — the source of drinking water for many Maverick County residents — and Hediondo Creek, a recreational fishing stream. For full story, click here.

UT: Utah Family Land Donation Establishes Bear River Watershed Conservation Area

Intermountain West Joint Venture – June 28, 2016
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service accepted a 30-acre conservation easement donation west of Brigham City, Utah, from the Ferry Ranch and Farm family. Their contribution formally establishes the Bear River Watershed Conservation Area as the 565th national wildlife refuge. The Ferry family – John, Ben and Joel – are long-time landowners who are passionate about conserving the land, wildlife, and resources for future generations. They are the first landowners to establish a conservation easement in this area. For full story, click here.

UT: San Juan River, Utah Lake added to Utah's list of impaired waterways

By Amy Joi O’Donoghue – Desert News – June 13, 2016
A massive Colorado mine spill that sent toxic metals into the San Juan River and the occurrence of a persistent algae bloom problem at Utah Lake propelled those two bodies of water to the state's list of impaired waterways. The Utah Department of Environmental Quality's draft biennial report released Monday also notes that more than half of Utah's lakes do not meet water quality standards, and nearly half — 47 percent — of its streams are impaired as well. Additional monitoring will be required for another 32 percent of Utah's waterways where there is insufficient data to make a determination, according to the report. For full story, click here.

VT: 500 acres of wetland preserved in Brandon

By Lee J. Kahrs – Mountain Times – June 30, 2016
“I have a simple thesis. If you restore it, they will come.” With that thought, Rutland County Audubon Society Co-President Roy Pilcher summed up Friday’s preservation of 500 acres of wetland at the former Dean Farm on Union Street in Brandon. Owners Lyn and Jim Des Marais have sold an easement of 500 acres of their land along the Otter Creek to the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service. It is Vermont’s largest wetland easement and protects the land in perpetuity from development or alteration of any kind. For full story, click here.

VA: EPA report: Coastal Virginia wetlands slightly above national average

By Tamara Dietrich – Daily Press – June 29, 2016
In the spring and summer of 2011, researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science were crawling through mud, fleeing a swarm of angry yellow jackets and dodging wild pigs. They were among some 50 field crews around the country collecting samples to help compile the first national survey of wetlands in the contiguous states, kicking off a five-year effort by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The results of those samples have finally been analyzed and released. And they show that, overall, the country's wetlands are more healthy than not. For full story, click here.

VA: Dominion assures draining of ash ponds will protect local waters

By Whitney Pipkin – Bay Journal – June 16, 2016
As planned, Dominion Virginia Power has begun a months-long draining of coal ash lagoons into a tributary of the Potomac River and into the James River after agreeing to enhanced treatment of the water discharged at both sites. The company began drawing water on May 9 from its impoundment at the Possum Point power plant near Dumfries, about 30 miles south of the District of Columbia. It started draining a lagoon at its Bremo Bluff plant southeast of Charlottesville at the end of April. For full article, click here.

VA: Duke Univ. tests find leaching from coal ash sites, including 2 in Va.

By Robert Zullo – Richmond Times Dispatch – June 10, 2016
Coal ash ponds at Dominion Virginia Power stations in Bremo Bluff and Chesterfield County are among 21 facilities in five states leaching contaminants into surrounding water, in some cases in excess of federal standards for drinking water and aquatic life, according to a report by Duke University scientists published Friday in a scientific journal. “The magnitude is different for various reasons, but the evidence for leaking was everywhere,” said Avner Vengosh, a professor of geochemistry and water quality at Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment. For full story, click here.

WA: Washington must fix culverts that block salmon from habitat, court rules

By Lynda V. Mapes – The Seattle Times – June 27, 2016
The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has affirmed the state must repair culverts that block passage for salmon to spawning grounds. The decision handed down Monday marks the third time tribes have won their fight in court to hold the state to the promise of the treaties tribes signed in 1854 and 1855 ceding their lands to the federal government. In return, tribes reserved their right to continue to fish in their usual places.The court affirmed the federal government also was assuring tribes they would have fish to catch. For full story, click here.

WI: Wetlands Placed at the Head of the Line: WDNR Front-Loads Wetlands Screening as Part of Project Permitting

By David A. Crass – The National Law Review – June 21, 2016
As of June 1, 2016, projects developed in Wisconsin that may require a permit for wetland impacts are required to accelerate the wetland screening and delineation process in order for permit applications to be considered complete. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) issued guidance outlining the process of submitting either a wetland delineation or documentation that there are no wetlands present in a project area at the beginning of the permit application process, as part of the requirement to submit a “completed application.” The guidance establishes a new process making it necessary to obtain WDNR concurrence concerning either a wetland delineation or a determination of no wetland impact prior to submittal of permit applications for permits under the Wetland and Waterway Program, Stormwater Program, and CAFO Program. For full story, click here.

 

Wetland Breaking News - July 2016

Vanishing Act: Why Insects Are Declining and Why It Matters

By Christian Schwägerl – Environment360 – July 6, 2016
Every spring since 1989, entomologists have set up tents in the meadows and woodlands of the Orbroicher Bruch nature reserve and 87 other areas in the western German state of North Rhine-Westphalia. The tents act as insect traps and enable the scientists to calculate how many bugs live in an area over a full summer period. Recently, researchers presented the results of their work to parliamentarians from the German Bundestag, and the findings were alarming: The average biomass of insects caught between May and October has steadily decreased from 1.6 kilograms (3.5 pounds) per trap in 1989 to just 300 grams (10.6 ounces) in 2014. "The decline is dramatic and depressing and it affects all kinds of insects, including butterflies, wild bees, and hoverflies," says Martin Sorg, an entomologist from the Krefeld Entomological Association involved in running the monitoring project. For full story, click here.

Expanding Antarctic sea ice linked to natural variability

Environmental News Network – July 4, 2016
The recent trend of increasing Antarctic sea ice extent -- seemingly at odds with climate model projections -- can largely be explained by a natural climate fluctuation, according to a new study led by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The study offers evidence that the negative phase of the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO), which is characterized by cooler-than-average sea surface temperatures in the tropical eastern Pacific, has created favorable conditions for additional Antarctic sea ice growth since 2000. For full story, click here.

Is the ozone healing? Gaping hole over Antarctica is shrinking, say scientists

By Eva Botkin-Kowacki – The Christian Science Monitor – June 30, 2016 – Video
The troublesome tear in Earth's protective blanket is getting stitched up. A gaping hole in the ozone layer has been opening up over Antarctica each spring for decades. And now there are signs that the slow process of healing has begun, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Science. Scientists credit this progress to the 1987 Montreal Protocol, an international treaty that phased out chemicals that eat away at the ozone layer, which shields our planet from deadly levels of radiation. For full story and to view video, click here.

Claim that jet stream crossing equator is ‘climate emergency’ is utter nonsense

By Jason Samenow – The Washington Post – June 30, 2016
Two bloggers have made a stunning claim that has spread like wildfire on the Internet: They say the Northern Hemisphere jet stream, the high-altitude river of winds that separates cold air from warm air, has done something new and outrageous. They say it has crossed the equator, joining the jet stream in the Southern Hemisphere. One said this signifies that the jet stream is ‘wrecked‘, the other said it means we have a “global climate emergency.” For full story, click here.

Coral With Leaves: Millions of Trees Joining the List of Climate Change Casualties

By Bob Berwyn – Inside Climate News – June 30, 2016
Dying coral has grabbed attention worldwide, but another equally disturbing die-off is also occurring, and with potentially serious consequences for the climate: Forests around the world are being decimated as the planet grows steadily warmer. Just a few years after mountain pine beetles killed millions of acres of lodgepole pine forests in the Rocky Mountains, the U.S. Forest Service is reporting widespread tree deaths in drought-hammered Southern California. Even Europe's cool, moist forests have been losing trees at a fast rate. Large-scale simultaneous forest loss on different continents could have an impact on forests' ability to absorb atmospheric carbon, scientists say. For full story, click here.

Going Hog Wild in the Marsh

By Rebecca Heisman – Hakai Magazine – June 23, 2016
Sharp has spent the past three years on a quest to understand how feral hogs are affecting the fragile saltwater marshes that line much of the East and Gulf Coasts. And that effort is paying off. Sharp’s preliminary results now suggest that up to half the saltwater marshes in Florida have been damaged by hogs—a problem that has, until now, been largely overlooked. For full article, click here.

New Study Quantifies Benefits of Agricultural Conservation in Upper Mississippi River Basin

Contacts: Alex Demas and Sarah Haymaker, USGS – Soil Erosion News Today – June 22, 2016
Researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Department of Agriculture have published a new study that demonstrates that agricultural conservation practices in the upper Mississippi River watershed can reduce nitrogen inputs to area streams and rivers by as much as 34 percent. The study combined USDA's Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) data with the USGS SPARROW watershed model to measure the potential effects of voluntary conservation practices, which historically have been difficult to do in large river systems, because different nutrient sources can have overlapping influences on downstream water quality. For full story, click here.


Threats to habitat connectivity as sea waters inundate coastal areas

By Jim Melvin, Clemson University – Environmental News Network – June 21, 2016
By the year 2100, sea levels might rise as much as 2.5 meters above their current levels, which would seriously threaten coastal cities and other low-lying areas. In turn, this would force animals to migrate farther inland in search of higher ground. But accelerated urbanization, such as the rapidly expanding Piedmont area that stretches from Atlanta to eastern North Carolina, could cut off their escape routes and create climate-induced extinctions. For full story, click here.

Scorching Hot Southwest Is Climate Change In Action

By Lydia O'Connor – The Huffington Post – June 20, 2016
Deadly, record-breaking heat and wildfires sweeping across the Southwestern U.S. are a clear sign of manmade climate change at work, scientists say. Triple-digit temperatures began scorching Nevada, California, Arizona, Utah and New Mexico early this week. Some of the most intense heat was recorded throughout Arizona, where four hikers died in separate heat-related incidents. On Sunday, the National Weather Service announced temperature records for that calendar day in Yuma at 120 degrees, Phoenix at 118, Tucson at 115 and Flagstaff at 93, NOAA spokeswoman Maureen O’Leary told The Huffington Post. Tucson’s heat tied for the third hottest day every recorded in the city. Michael Mann, a leading climate scientist and professor of meteorology at Penn State University, was in Phoenix on Friday when temperatures hit 106 degrees. He was speaking at a Democratic National Platform committee meeting, where he pointed to the extreme weather as “an example of just the sort of extreme heat that is on the increase due to human-caused climate change,” he told HuffPost. For full story, click here.

'Frankenturtles' released into the Chesapeake Bay by VIMS researchers

By Todd Corillo – WTKR.com – June 16, 2016 – Video
Researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science are studying sea turtle mortality in an effort to protect living turtles from harm by releasing "Frankenturtles" into the Chesapeake Bay. Assistant Professor David Kaplan and graduate student Bianca Santos are trying to pinpoint where hundreds of dead loggerhead sea turtles that wash up on beaches of the Chesapeake Bay every year may have died. They hope that information will help them figure out likely causes of sea turtle death and help map out "safe zones" for the turtles. For full story and to view video, click here.

Fighting big farm pollution with a tiny plant

By Bethany Brookshire – Society for Science & the Public – June 15, 2016
Sometimes a tap water ban can prove a scientific wakeup call. When Toledo, Ohio told its residents not to drink tap water in 2014, Julia Hunckler, 17, took notice. This Marian High School junior lived across the state line in Mishawaka, Ind. The Ohio ban was due to toxins in Lake Erie. A summer bloom of algae had tainted the lake, which was used as a source of drinking water. Chemical fertilizers that washed off of nearby farms had been running into the lake. There, aquatic toxin-makers got a growth boost from the fertilizer. Julia decided to scout for something that might remove that algae booster. Her solution: a tiny freshwater plant. Called duckweed, it indeed slurped up fertilizer. Later, that duckweed can be harvested as feed for local cows, Julia says. For full story, click here.

Great Barrier Reef water quality improved by wetlands restoration, scientist says

By Stephanie Small – ABC News – June 13, 2016
Freshwater ecology expert Dr Nathan Waltham is urging state and federal governments to look to the 13,000 coastal wetlands in Great Barrier Reef catchments to help improve water quality. "If water is flowing down a catchment and it has sediment and nutrients in the water, the wetlands provide a filter. So we refer to wetlands as nature's kidneys," he said. "There's loads of examples unfortunately within the catchments of the Great Barrier Reef where we have these wetlands that were previously connected with the coastline areas, but that's been lost or blocked with land use change." For full story, click here.

Scientists say that 'nature,' untouched by humans, is now almost entirely gone

By Chris Mooney and Brady Dennis – The Washington Post – June 6, 2016
Implicit in much, if not all, modern environmental sentiment is the idea that the natural world has been despoiled by humans — and if we could just leave it alone, things would get better. But new research suggests that in reality, humans have been altering the natural world for millennia, long before the 15th century dawn of the Age of Discovery, when European societies mastered long-distance ocean navigation and began to spread their cultures, animals and diseases to new continents. The result of these changes, accumulating over time, has been “the creation of extensively altered, highly cosmopolitan species assemblages on all landmasses,” the authors write in a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “‘Pristine’ landscapes simply do not exist and, in most cases, have not existed for millennia.” For full story, click here.

The Drought Solution That's Under Our Feet

By Padma Nagappan – News Deeply – June 6, 2016
Now in the fifth year of an epic drought, Californians have explored ways to save water and wring it out of typical and atypical sources. The search has spanned the gamut from funding research, investing in expensive solutions like desalination plants, toying with the idea of recycling wastewater, imposing water-use restrictions, letting lawns go dry and experimenting with irrigation efficiency techniques for the crops that feed the country. Thirsty crops, a burgeoning population and below-average precipitation have also led to seriously overdrawn groundwater sources that took a very long time to fill up. The state’s agricultural industry, which grows more than 250 crops, has also been vilified for its heavy water use. But is the Golden State missing a solution that could offer a high payout – a solution that’s right under its feet? For full story, click here.

The Unbearable Pressures of Endangered Species Protection

By Jimmy Tobias – Pacific Standard Magazine – April 20, 2016
Like an avian Archduke Ferdinand, the greater sage grouse has sparked a ferocious war of lawsuits, protests, and political wrangling in recent years. The plump bird, with its artful mating dance and awkward demeanor, roams some of the best wild land left in the American West. It also lives atop vast oil fields, coal deposits, and precious metal veins across the region and so its numbers have plummeted over the last half-century as the inevitable drilling booms and mining sprees, among other troubles, have decimated its range. For full article, click here.

 

Wetland Breaking News - July 2016

Government Liability and Climate Change: Selected Issues for Wetland and Floodplain Managers

By Jon Kusler – Association of State Wetland Managers – April 2016
There is broad scientific consensus that climate change is occurring. Most scientists agree that this change will, in some instances, cause substantial increases in sea level, ground water levels and the levels of inland lakes, rivers and streams and other inland water bodies. They broadly agree that this will increase not only the depth of flooding on both public and private lands but also the duration of flooding and associated erosion. Governments may increase flood damages by failing to anticipate climate change (e.g., failing to elevate houses) in their programs and policies. This paper by Dr. Jon Kusler, Esq. is one of several designed to help government wetland and floodplain managers understand their potential legal liability for failing to consider climate change in their programs or for incorporating strengthened flood loss reduction standards reflecting climate change in their zoning, building codes, subdivision and other regulations. To download this report, click here.

Reconnecting Rivers to Floodplains: Returning natural functions to restore rivers and benefit communities

American Rivers – Spring 2016
American Rivers just released a new white paper titled "Reconnecting Rivers to Floodplains: Returning natural functions to restore rivers and benefit communities." This paper synthesizes relevant riverine floodplain science and research, and presents a conceptual model for understanding riverine floodplain functions to inform floodplain restoration efforts. This paper was developed as part of American Rivers' efforts to expand their River Restoration Program to include a focus on floodplain restoration, and their intention is for this paper to present a guiding philosophy for American Rivers' involvement in floodplain restoration nationally and serve as an informational resource for others interested in pursuing floodplain restoration. To download the paper, click here.

Blue Carbon Study Supports Tampa Bay Habitat Restoration and Resiliency Planning

Contact: Stefanie Simpson – Restore America’s Estuaries – June 8, 2016
By 2100, seagrasses, marshes and mangroves in Tampa Bay are expected to remove 74 million metric tons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere – an amount equivalent to removing 160,000 cars off the road every year until 2100, according to a new study released today. The study, led by Restore America’s Estuaries in partnership with several leading conservation agencies and organizations including Tampa Bay Estuary Program and Tampa Bay Watch, reinforces the importance of restoring coastal habitats in Tampa Bay and around the nation to buffer the effects of rising seas and a changing climate. To read the full press release, click here. To download the study, click here.

Climate Ready Estuaries Program Creates Interactive Companion Tool to Developing Risk-Based Adaptation Plans

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – June 2016
EPA's Climate Ready Estuaries program has created an online companion tool for "Being Prepared for Climate Change: A Workbook for Developing Risk-Based Adaptation Plans." The workbook is a step-by-step guide for communities and other place-based organizations to develop risk-based climate change adaptation plans. This new interactive online companion tool takes users through the steps of creating a vulnerability assessment. The tool generates a consequence/probability matrix and formats a simple report. The purpose of the workbook and online companion tool is to help users reach an understanding of how climate change may affect their organization's goals. Learn More.

Tools Launched to Promote Climate Adaptation in the Water Utilities Sector

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – May 2016
EPA's Climate Ready Water Utilities initiative has launched two tools that promote a clear understanding of climate science and adaptation options by translating complex climate projections into understandable, actionable, localized information for the water sector (drinking water, wastewater and stormwater utilities). The "Adaptation Case Study and Information Exchange" gives water sector utilities an interactive platform to explore real-world climate adaptation case studies and encourages utilities to connect with one another and share communities' adaptation strategies. The web-based "Workshop Planner for Climate Change and Extreme Events Adaptation" assists water sector stakeholders with conducting climate change adaptation workshops, helping utilities and communities explore and understand how more intense and frequent extreme weather events can affect water resources. Learn More and Access the Tools. Read the Blog Post.

Wetland Breaking News - July 2016

Summer reading for the enviro science crowd

By Douglas Fischer – Environmental Health News – July 1, 2016
Summertime in the mother of all election years, and the reading needs to be easy. No political tomes from us this year. The front pages and websites in our noisy media world have more than enough. So let's get far from Brexit analysis and presidential politics. Head west. Start your environmentally themed summer reading this year with a Western. For full story and a list of summer reading, click here.

How to Revive Local Agriculture in the United States

By Yoni Appelbaum – The Atlantic – June 27, 2016
“I think this administration has really missed their chance to do some innovative things, but also to help the rural economy,” Representative Chellie Pingree said on Monday. The Maine Democrat is upset that even as demand for local, sustainable, and organic agriculture has boomed, the Obama administration has done little to support the efforts of small farmers to supply it. In her view, it’s a wasted opportunity. Pingree is, at one level, an unlikely leader on the issue. The Committee on Agriculture of the United States House of Representatives has six subcommittees and 45 members. It is entirely devoted to crafting a national policy on how America raises and provides access to food. Pingree—although herself an organic farmer—isn’t on it. For full story, click here.

Can Virtual Reality Emerge As a Tool for Conservation?

By Heather Millar – Environment360 – June 27, 2016
Could virtual reality (VR) — immersive digital experiences that mimic reality — save the environment? Well, that may be a bit of a stretch. But researchers say that it could perhaps promote better understanding of nature and give people empathetic insight into environmental challenges. “Virtual reality can give everyone, regardless of where they live, the kind of experience needed to generate the urgency required to prevent environmental calamity,” says Jeremy Bailenson, professor of communication at Stanford University. For full story, click here.

Oil bust leaves states with massive well cleanup

By Paul J. Weber – Associated Press – The Big Story – June 19, 2016
The worst oil bust since the 1980s is putting Texas and other oil producing states on the hook for thousands of newly abandoned drilling sites at a time when they have little money to plug wells and seal off environmental hazards. As U.S. rig counts plunge to historic lows, and with at least 60 oil producers declaring bankruptcy since 2014, energy-producing states are confronting both holes in their budgets and potentially leaking ones in the ground. In Texas alone, the roughly $165 million price tag of plugging nearly 10,000 abandoned wells is double the entire budget of the agency that regulates the industry. For full story, click here.

Global farmland deals now cover area the size of Finland - campaigners

By Chris Arsenault – Thomson Reuters Foundation News – June 14, 2016
Global investors have spent more than $90 billion buying agricultural lands the size of Finland in deals criticized by rights groups for displacing small farmers, according to research published on Tuesday. Internationally, there are now 491 large-scale farmland deals covering territory in 78 countries, said the analysis from GRAIN, a Barcelona-based campaign group. Activists have condemned the deals as "land grabs" hurting developing countries while supporters say large-scale foreign land investments can alleviate poverty and help boost domestic farm productivity. The report found that while the total area covered by large-scale agricultural investments has declined by five million hectares over the past four years, the number of financial deals to secure the land has increased. For full story, click here.

It's the economy that needs to be integrated into the environment - not the other way around

By Andrew Simms – The Guardian – June 14, 2016
BP’s Statistical Review of World Energy is a standard industry reference document. It’s a useful indicator of trends, if occasionally the victim of politics. But the newest edition brings welcome news that the growth of global carbon emissions paused in 2015, partly to do with a shift to renewables, and partly the result of passing economic conditions, both notable in China. But BP, the company that once promised to go “beyond petroleum”, is sticking firmly with oil and gas. Its get-out strategy from appearing over-fossilised in attitude, is to call for a “meaningful carbon price,” advocated by its chief economist, Spencer Dale. For full story, click here.

Should lawyers be ethically obligated to protect the environment?

By Brian Bienkowski – The Daily Climate – June 6, 2016
Contrary to many corny jokes, lawyers do follow a code of ethics. But there’s a glaring omission in the professions’ ethical outline: the environment. The American Bar Association’s Model Rules of Professional Conduct is a suggested blueprint for state bars, laying out a boilerplate for client-lawyer relationships, public service, communication and other matters of the professions. “It talks about other legal obligations for third parties, but never talks about the environment,” said Tom Lininger, a professor at the University of Oregon, School of Law. Lininger wrote the “time has come to remedy the conspicuous omission of environmental protection from the list of lawyers’ ethical duties,” in a paper for the Boston College Law Review. He argues in the paper that, as things currently stand, lawyers are ethically encouraged to advocate for clients but there are no incentives for minimizing potential environmental harm. He proposed a series of “green ethics” amendments to ABA’s rules. For full story, click here.

Non-Native, Invasive Species for Dinner? Bring Out the Melted Butter!

By Marcia Anderson – The EPA Blog – June 21, 2016
Recently, I discovered some really tasty invasive species on the dinner menu in lower Manhattan. Many non-native species can be really good eating if they can be caught and properly prepared. There is an innovative movement for eating invasive species taking place and they are showing up more and more on restaurant menus. For full blog post, click here.

 

 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

WEBINARS

   

MEETINGS

 

TRAINING

 

SPECIAL EVENTS

 
WEBINARS
       
JULY 2016  
       
July 26, 2016
2:00 p.m. ET
  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Webinar: Developing Water Quality Standards for Wetlands  
       
July 26, 2016
3:30 p.m. ET
  Webinar: Endangered Species Act: A Record of Success  
       
July 27, 2016
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of Wetland Managers Members’ Wetland Webinar: Long Term Financial Assurances for Wetland Mitigation  
       
July 28, 2016
2:00 p.m. ET
  Forester University webinar: Flood Best Practices Protecting People & Property with GIS  
       
AUGUST 2016      
       
August 10, 2016
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of State Wetland Managers Training Webinar Series: Soils Training Webinar #2: Hydric Soil Process  
       
August 17, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
  American Water Resources Association (AWRA) webinar: Grand Theft Groundwater! What Would Elvis Do? Implications of the Groundbreaking Mississippi v. Memphis Groundwater Case  
       
August 17, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
  Great Lakes Sea Grant Network Crude Move webinar: Regulatory Activity and Environmental Requirements: Tools for Addressing Multiple Objectives  
       
SEPTEMBER 2016
       
September 14, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
  American Water Resources Association (AWRA) webinar: Scenarios, Simulations and Sustainability Science: Future Planning for Complex Systems  
       
September 14, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
  Center for Water Protection Webcast 4: Incentivizing BMP Installation in Communities with Stormwater Utilities  
       
OCTOBER 2016
       
October 12, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
  Center for Watershed Protection Webcast 5: Retrofitting Revisited: Forward Into the Past  
       
October 26, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
  American Water Resources Association (AWRA) webinar: Oregon's First Integrated Water Resources Strategy: Lessons Learned Since Implementation  
       
NOVEMBER 2016
       
November 16, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
  Center for Watershed Protection Webcast 6: Non-Traditional MS4s  
       
MEETINGS
       
JULY 2016
       
July 24-27, 2016
Louisville, KY
  Soil and Water Conservation Society 71st Annual Conference: Managing Great River Landscapes  
       
July 24-27, 2016
Shepherdstown, WV
  2016 CUAHSI Biennial Symposium: Finding Your Place in Big Data: Using Observations to Understand Hydrologic Processes for Predicting a Changing World  
       
July 24-29, 2016
University of New England,
Biddeford, ME
  2016 Gordon Research Conference: Unifying Ecology Across Scales: Linking the Levels from Physiological to Ecosystem Ecology  
       
July 25-29, 2016
Boulder, CO
  Computational & Information Systems Lab (CISL) Third Annual Graduate Workshop: Environmental Data Analytics  
       
July 26-28, 2016
Arlington, VA
  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: Urban Waters National Training Workshop 2016. This workshop is free and open to all!  
       
July 28, 2016
Washington, DC
  Environmental Law Institute Seminar: Law & Policy of Products Regulation (ELI Summer School, 2016)  
       
July 28-20, 2016
Gulfport, MS
  Mississippi Urban Forest Council: Urban Forestry and Green Infrastructure Conference  
       
July 30-August 3, 2016
St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
  4th International Marine Conservation Congress (IMCC4): Making Marine Science Matter  
       
AUGUST 2016
       
August 1-2, 2016
Orlando, FL
  Water Environment Federation: Intelligent Water Systems Knowledge Development Forum 2016  
       
August 3-4, 2016
Gifford Pinchot State Park
Lewisberry, PA
  Wetland Restoration and Training LLC: Wetland Restoration Workshop. Participants will help build a vernal pond that provides breeding habitat for woodland salamanders and frogs, and rebuild an old farm pond so it looks and functions like an ephemeral wetland. For more information go here or here. Primary instructor Tom Biebighauser, Wetland Restoration and Training, LLC.  
       
August 7-12, 2016
Fort Lauderdale, FL
  2016 Ecological Society of America's (ESA) annual meeting  
       
August 14-18, 2016
Chicago, IL
  American Society of Civil Engineers: GEO Sustainability & Geoenvironment
 
       
August 15–19, 2016
University of Wyoming
Laramie, WY
  Near Surface Geophysics for Hydrology Workshop  
       
August 17-19, 2016
St. Louis, MO
  GIS Applications in Aquatic Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Workshop  
       
August 21-25, 2016
Kansas City, MO
  American Fisheries Society 146th Annual Meeting: Fisheries Conservation and Management: Making Connections and Building Partnerships  
       
August 22-25, 2016
Indianapolis, IN
  StormCon: Designing the Future of Stormwater  
       
August 22-25, 2016
Kentucky Dam Village State Resort Park
Gilbertsville, KY
  2016 Annual KAMM Conference: The Changing Climate of Mitigation
 
       
August 22-25, 2016
Asheville, NC
  NC State University EcoStream - Stream Ecology and Restoration Conference  
       
August 22-26, 2016
Freising, Germany
  Society of Ecological Restoration Europe conference 2016: Best Practice in Restoration  
       
August 23-25, 2016
Cincinnati, OH
  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development/National Risk Management Research Laboratory and Office of Water/Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water, in cooperation with the Association of State Drinking Water Administrators (ASDWA: 13th annual workshop: Small Drinking Water System Challenges and Solutions
 
       
August 23-25, 2016
Salt Lake City, UT
  22nd National Nonpoint Source (NPS) Monitoring Workshop  
       
August 24-26, 2016
Corum, Montpellier, France
  ScenNet International Conference: Scenarios and Models of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Support of Decision Making  
       
August 27-September 2, 2016
Chillwack and Mission, BC
  British Columbia Wildlife Federation Workshop: Lower Mainland Wetlands Institute-2016
 
       
August 27-
September 2, 2016

Stockholm, Sweden
  2016 World Water Week  
       
August 29-September 1, 2016 Melbourne, Australia   Coast to Coast Conference  
       
August 29-September 1, 2016
Montpellier, France
  The 5th International EcoSummit Congress, EcoSummit 2016 - Ecological Sustainability: Engineering Change  
       
SEPTEMBER 2016
       
September 1-10, 2016
Waikiki, HI
  IUCN World Conservation Congress: Planet at the crossroads  
       
September 6-9, 2016
Sacramento, CA
  2016 Floodplain Management Association Annual Conference  
       
September 8-9, 2016
Portland, OR
  National Groundwater Association Conference: Connecting the Dots...Groundwater, Surface Water, and Climate Connections in the Northwest  
       
September 8-10, 2016
Tulcea, Romania
  Romanian Limnogeographical Association (RLA): 3rd International Conference “Water resources and wetlands"  
       
September 8-11, 2016   Ohio Wetlands Association 2016 Regional Wetlands Summit: Living on the Edge: Where humans meet wetlands
 
       
September 9, 2016
Maidstone & Lemington, VT
  The New England Chapter of the Society of Wetland Scientists Field Trip on Hydrologic Considerations Wetland Restoration  
       
September 11-16, 2016
Boston, MA
  6th International Symposium on Deep-Sea Corals. Abstract due by June 30, 2016.  
       
September 12-14, 2016
San Diego, CA
  California Stormwater Quality Association 12th Annual Conference: Stormwater Evolution: Source to Resource  
       
September 15, 2016   Value of Water Coalition: Imagine a Day Without Water  
       
September 15, 2016
Toledo, OH
  Ohio Sea Grant Conference: Understanding Algal Blooms: State of the Science  
       
September 15-16, 2016
London, UK
  Greenwich Maritime Centre (GMC conference: 'Society and the Sea'
 
       
September 16-18, 2016
Gothic, CO
  Guild of Rocky Mountain Ecologists and Evolutionary Biologists (GREEBs) meeting  
       
September 17-18, 2016
Stone Harbor, NJ
  Wetlands Institute: Fall Migration Festival
 
       
September 19-22, 2016
Stuttgart, Germany
  13th International Symposium on River Sedimentation  
       
September 19-24, 2016
Changshu, China
  INTECOL Wetland Working Group, People’s Government of Changshu, Nanjing University: 10th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference  
       
September 20–22, 2016
Sandusky, OH
  Healing Our Waters® – Great Lakes Coalition: 12th Annual Great Lakes Restoration Conference
 
       
September 27-30, 2016
Mount Royal University
Alberta, Canada
  Under Western Skies (UWS) conference: Water: Events, Trends, Analysis  
       
September 29-30, 2016
Baltimore, MD
  EUCI: 2016 EPA 316(b) Fish and Shellfish Impingement & Entrainment in Power & Industrial Facilities Conference
 
       
September 30-
October 2, 2016

Shepherdstown, WV
  Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay: 2016 Chesapeake Watershed Forum
 
       
OCTOBER 2016
       
October 1-2, 2016
Ridgefield, WA
  Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge: Birdfest and Bluegrass
 
       
October 2-6, 2016
Oklahoma City, OK
  EPA Region 6, in partnership with Texas A&M University in Kingsville, the City of Oklahoma City, Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems (MS4s), and States in R6: 18th Annual Stormwater Conference.  
       
October 4-6,2016
Toronto, Canada
  Great Lakes Public Forum 2016  
       
October 4-7, 2016
Marquette, MI
  16th Annual Great Lakes Beach Association Conference  
       
October 5-7, 2016
Las Vegas, NV
  Southern Nevada Water Authority WaterSmart Innovations Conference and Exposition  
       
October 6-7, 2016
Toronto, Ontario Canada
  Great Lakes Commission 2016 Annual Meeting
 
       
October 9-14, 2016
Scheveningen,
The Netherlands

  Physics of Estuaries and Coastal Seas Conference  
       
October 11-14, 2016
Shepherdstown, WV
  Natural Channel Design Review Checklist Workshop  
       
October 16-22, 2016
Sanibel, FL
  Ding Darling Days. Enjoy a week of fun-filled and informative programs, bird walks, tours, paddling and family activities at J. N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge.  
       
October 17-20, 2016
Boise, IA
  4th Northern Rockies Invasive Plants Council Conference  
       
October 17-21, 2016
Leavenworth, WA
  2016 Mountain Climate Conference: Mountains Without Snow: What are the Consequences? Abstracts due by July 14, 2016.  
       
October 18-20, 2016
Atlantic City, NJ
  New Jersey Association for Floodplain Management (NJAFM) 12th Annual Conference: Supporting Municipalities to Reduce Flood Risk. Call for abstract deadline is August 19, 2016.  
       
October 18-21, 2016
Davis, CA
  The Natural Areas Association: 2016 Natural Areas Conference  
       
October 18-22, 2016
Latin America
  Ecosystem Services Partnership (ESP) conference: 'Healthy ecosystems for resilient societies'. Abstract submission deadline is July 15, 2016.  
       
October 19-21, 2016
Birmingham, AL
  11th Annual Regional Stormwater Conference: Stormwater Solutions  
       
October 19-21, 2016
San Diego, CA
  Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum - West Coast  
       
October 20, 2016
Linthicum, MD
  12th Annual MAFSM Conference is taking place on October 20th, 2016 at the Maritime Institute in Linthicum, MD. Deadline for abstracts is July 15th.  
       
October 20-22, 2016
American Museum of
Natural History

New York, NY
  The Center for Biodiversity and Conservation and its partners invite graduate students, post-docs, and early-career professionals to take part in the seventh annual Student Conference on Conservation Science – New York (SCCS-NY)
 
       
October 28-30, 2016
Fairhope, AL
  The Diamondback Terrapin Working Group: 7th Symposium on the Ecology, Status and Conservation of the Diamondback Terrapin. Abstract deadline is August 31, 2016.  
       
October 28-30, 2016
Minneapolis, MN
  Land Trust Alliance Rally 2016 National Land Conservation Conference  
       
October 30-November 2, 2016
Phoenix, AZ
  American Water Works Association: Water Infrastructure Conference & Exposition  
       
NOVEMBER 2016
       
November 1-4, 2016
Banff, Alberta, Canada
  North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) Symposium: Science to Stewardship: Balancing Economic Growth and Lake Sustainability  
       
November 2, 2016
University of Illinois
  The Chicago Wilderness Congress: Celebrating 20 Years: One Home. One Future. The deadline for proposal submissions is July 22, 2016.  
       
November 14-17, 2016
Orlando, FL
  2016 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference  
       
November 13-17, 2016
Indianapolis, IN
  American Water Works Association: Water Quality Technology Conference® & Exposition  
       
November 15, 2016
UC Davis Conference Center Davis, CA
  Hosted by University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources, UC Davis, and UC Riverside the 2nd Annual Do No Harm Workshop: Considerations for the Use of Non-local Species in Ecological Restoration  
       
November 15-17, 2016
Sacramento, CA
  2016 Bay-Delta Science Conference  
       
DECEMBER 2016
       
December 5-9, 2016
Jacksonville, FL
  ACES: A Community on Ecosystem Services conference: Linking Science, Practice, and Decision Making  
       
December 10-15, 2016
New Orleans, LA
  8th National Summit: Our Coasts, Our Future, Our Choice and 25th Biennial Meeting of The Coastal Society  
       
December 12-16, 2016
San Francisco, CA
  AGU Fall Meeting. Abstracts due by August 3, 2016.  
       
TRAINING
       
JULY 2016      
       
July 24-30, 2016
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute summer field seminar: Introduction to Main Seaweeds: Identification, Ecology, and Ethnobotany. For a list of other courses, go here.  
       
July 24-30, 2016
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute course: Restoration of Stream Processes - Field Applications. For a list of other courses, go here.  
       
July 25-29, 2016
Traverse City, MI
  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE), and the Great Lakes Commission (GLC) course on sedimentation in the Great Lakes basin: Interpreting Sediment in the Field: Theory and Field Methods  
       
July 25-August 5, 2016
Polson, MT
  The Flathead Lake Biological Station course: Lake Ecology  
       
July 26-29, 2016
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Plant Identification for Wetland Delineators – 2016  
       
July 27, 2016
Fairfax, VA
  HalfMoon Education, Inc. course: Stormwater Management 2016  
       

July 27-28, 2016
Tiburon, CA

  Wetland Science Program, Romberg Tiburon Center, SFSU course: Coastal Wetland Restoration in the S.F. Bay Area: Adapting to Climate Change  

July 31-August 6, 2016
Steuben, ME

  Eagle Hill Institute summer field course: Mushroom Identification for New Mycophiles: Foraging for Edible and Medicinal Mushroom. For a list of other courses, click here.  
       

July 31-August 6, 2016
Steuben, ME

  Eagle Hill Institute summer field course: The Rocky Coast: Ecology, Botany, and Pattern: Northern Forest Atlas Course:No Keys or Lectures,Lots of Diagrams & Problems. For a list of other courses, click here.  
       
AUGUST 2016
       
August 1-5, 2016
Logan, UT
  Utah State University course: Sediment Transport in Stream Assessment and Design  
       
August 3-4, 2016
Miami, FL
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. course: Florida Statewide Wetland Delineation Training (62-340 FAC)  
       
August 3-4, 2016
Gifford Pinchot State Park

Lewisberry, PA
  Wetland Restoration and Training LLC: Wetland Restoration Workshop. Primary instructor Tom Biebighauser, Wetland Restoration and Training, LLC.
 
       
August 4-5, 2016
Tigard, OR
  Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: Planning and Preparing an Ecological Risk Assessment. This course will also be held on December 1-2, 2016 in Arlington, VA  
       
August 5-6, 2016
Saukville, WI
  University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee course: Wetland Hydrology  
       
August 7-13, 2016
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute seminar: Slime Molds: Miniature Marvels of Nature. For a list of other courses, click here.  
       
August 7-13, 2016
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute seminar: The EPT Taxa (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera): Taxonomy and Stream Biomonitoring. For a list of other courses, click here.  
       
August 8-9, 2016
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Hydrophytic Vegetation (Piedmont)  
       
August 8-11, 2016
Des Moines, IA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. course: ACOE Wetland Delineation / Regional Supplement / Waters of the United States Training  
       
August 8-12, 2016
Smithsonian Conservation
Biology Institute

Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Conservation for Development Professionals: Strategies for Implementing Biodiversity Action Plans for the Private Sector  
       
August 8-October 30, 2016
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
 
       
August 9-October 30, 2016
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training  
       
August 10, 2016
Raleigh, NC
  The Swamp School One-Day Field Workshop: Point Intercept Sampling Procedure for Determining Hydrophytic Vegetation  
       
August 10-11, 2016
Des Moines, IA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
 
       
August 13-20, 2016
Land O'Lakes, WI
  PaleoEcological Observatory Network (PaLEON course: Assimilating Long-Term Data into Ecosystem Models  
       
August 14-20, 2016
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute course: Coastal and Inland Forests of Maine: Identification and Ecology of Trees and Shrubs. For a list of other courses, go here. Instructor: Eric Jones, University of Maine at Machias  
       
August 14-20, 2016
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute course: Taxonomy and Biology of Ferns and Lycophytes. For a list of other courses, go here.  
       
August 15-September 11, 2016
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment
 
       
August 15-18, 2016
Wetland Learning Center
St Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern course: Grasses, Sedges and Rushes  
       
August 15-19, 2016
Moss Landing, CA
  The California Rapid Assessment Method (CRAM) course: 5-day General CRAM Training
 
       
August 15-19, 2016
Arlington, WI
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
August 16-17, 2016
Santa Fe, NM
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2016. Other dates available here.  
       
August 16-18, 2016
Smithsonian Conservation
Biology Institute
Front Royal, VA
  EcoAgricultural Partners Landscape Leadership 3-Day Workshop
 
       
August 21-27, 2016
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute course: Polypores and Other Wood-inhabiting Fungi. For a list of other courses, click here.  
       

August 21-27, 2016
Steuben, ME

  Eagle Hill Institute course: Field Methods for Studying Avian Migration. For a list of other courses, click here.  
       
August 22-25, 2016
Auburn, NY
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
 
       
August 25-26, 2016
Denver, CO
  Water Rights Engineering Including Case Studies  
       

August 28-September 3, 2016
Steuben, ME

  Eagle Hill Institute summer field course: Introduction to Coastal Maine Birds: Identification, Taxonomy, Ecology. For a list of other courses, go here.  
       
August 28-September 3, 2016
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute summer field course: Marine Benthic Macroinvertebrates, Communities, and Habitats. For a list of other courses, click here.  
       
SEPTEMBER 2016
       

September 4-10, 2016
Steuben, ME

  Eagle Hill Institute summer field course: Exploring Medicinal Plants of Maine (and beyond), For a list of other courses, go here.  
       

September 4-10, 2016
Steuben, ME

  Eagle Hill Institute summer field course: Field Ornithology: Shorebirds & Seabirds of Downeast Maine. For a list of other courses, go here.  
       
September 6-November 4, 2016
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design  
       
September 7, 2016
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension course: Land Use and Natural Resources Information Session
 
       
September 12-13, 2016
Charleston, SC
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes  
       

September 12-16, 2016
Covington, LA

  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
September 12-17, 2016
Whitefish, MT
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Wetland Delineation with Emphasis on Soils and Hydrology – 2016  
       
September 12-30, 2016 Online   The Swamp School Course: Habitat Conservation Plans
 
       
September 12-December 4, 2016
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
 
       

September 15-16, 2016
Millville, NJ

  Rutgers University course: Vegetation Identification for Wetland Delineation: South
 
       

September 15-18, 2016
San Diego, CA

  Wetland Training Institute course: Riparian Habitat Restoration in the Arid Southwest  
       
September 19-22, 2016
Pittsburgh, PA
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training  
       
September 26-30, 2016
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       

September 26-
October 7, 2016
Front Royal, VA

 

Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation course: Spatial Ecology, Geospatial Analysis and Remote Sensing for Conservation

 
       
September 27, 2016
Atlanta, Ga
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Endangered Species Act Overview  
       
September 27-29, 2016
Pocono Mountains, PA
  The Swamp School Wetland Plants Field ID Workshop  
       
September 28-30, 2016
Hays, KS
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Woody Plants (Trees, Shrubs, and Vines) Identification – 2016  
       

September 29-30, 2016
Denver, CO

  Urban Watersheds Research Institute course: 2D Floodplain Delineation using 2D HEC-RAS Model  
       
September 29-October 3, 2016
Front Royal, VA
  George Mason University, Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation course: Watershed Conservation: Riparian Restoration  
       
OCTOBER 2016
       
October 3-4, 2016
Tuckerton, NJ
  Rutgers University course: Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants  
       
October 3-7, 2016
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Basic Wetland Delineation. Also on June 6-10, 2016 in Charleston, SC  
       
October 5-7, 2016
Asheville, NC
  North Carolina State University Stream Restoration Program is offering a course on Stream Morphology Assessment
 
       
October 7, 2016
St. Paul, MN
  University of Minnesota course: Hydrology Tools for Minnesota Wetlands  
       
October 11-12, 2016
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species.
 
       
October 14, 2016
Brunswick, NJ
  Rutgers University course: Understanding Advanced Stormwater Management Techniques  
       
October 18-19, 2016
Charleston, SC
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Wetland Delineation Refresher - 2016  
       
October 25-26, 2016
Anchorage, AK
  Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA): Writing the Perfect EA/FONSI, or EIS  
       
October 25-28, 2016
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers University course: Methodology for Delineating Wetlands. Instructors: Ralph Tiner and Mallory N. Gilbert  
       
October 26, 2016
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers University course: Introduction to Wetland Identification  
       
October 27, 2016
Anchorage, Alaska
  Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: Advanced NEPA-Taking the National Environmental Policy Act to the Next Level  
       
NOVEMBER 2016
       
November 2-4, 2016
Raleigh, NC
  North Carolina State University Stream Restoration Program course: Natural Channel Design Principles  
       
November 8-9, 2016
St. Louis Park, MN
  Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA): Writing the Perfect EA/FONSI, or EIS  
       
November 10, 2016
St. Louis Park, MN
  Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: Advanced NEPA-Taking the National Environmental Policy Act to the Next Level  
       
November 14-15, 2016
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology (Piedmont)
 
       
DECEMBER 2016
       
December 1-2, 2016
Denver, CO
  Urban Watersheds Research Institute course: Watershed Modeling Using CUHP-SWMM  
       
December 1-2, 2016
University of Phoenix-Arlington Arlington, VA
  Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) Course: Planning and Preparing an Ecological Risk Assessment  
       

December 5-8, 2016
Santa Fe, NM

  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Federal Wetland / Waters Regulatory Policy  
       
December 12-13, 2016
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement (Eastern Mountains/Piedmont)
 
       
December 12-16, 2016
Smithsonian Conservation
Biology Institute

Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Statistical Downscaling of Global Climate Models using SDSM 5.2  
       
SPECIAL EVENTS 2015
       
September 13-16, 2016
Bloomfield Hills, MI
  Rouge River Water Festival. If you are interested in presenting, click here.  
       
September 17-18, 2016
Stone Harbor, NJ
  Wetlands Institute: Fall Migration Festival  
       
September 17-18, 2016
Brownstown, MI
  Pointe Mouillee Waterfowl Festival  
       
October 7-9, 2016
Houma, LA
  Voice of the Wetlands (VOW) 13th Annual Voice of the Wetlands Festival  
       
October 18-23, 2016
Northeast, NC
  Wings over Water Festival  
       
November 2-6, 2016
Harlingen, TX
  Rio Grande Valley Bird Festival. Field trip destinations include Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge and Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge.  
       
November 15-20, 2016
Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge
San Antonio, NM
  Festival of the Cranes - see wintering sandhill cranes and snow geese by the thousands at this scenic refuge outside of Socorro. Enjoy workshops, tours and other events at one of the most celebrated bird festivals in the country.
 
       
November 24-27, 2016
Chincoteague, VA
  Assateague Island Waterfowl Weekend  
       
November 26, 2016
Stone Harbor, NJ
  Wetlands Institute: Wetland Wonderland  
       

For more wetland events, meetings, conferences, and courses nationwide, visit the ASWM calendar.

 

Wetland Breaking News - July 2016


INDEX

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • Can Native American Oyster Practices Rejuvenate the Chesapeake Bay?
  • 700-year-old West African soil technique could help mitigate climate change
  • Gone: Global Warming Claims a Lake - and a Way of Life
  • Gulf Coast Activists Tell 'Big Green' to Quit Exploiting Their Disasters for Financial Gain
  • It's Not Just Crimes Against Nature, It's Crimes Against People
  • ASWM’S Members’ Wetland Webinar: Long Term Financial Assurances for Wetland Mitigation – July 27, 2016
  • ASWM Soils Training Webinar #2: Hydric Soil Processess – August 10, 2016

 

NATIONAL NEWS

  • UM researchers find lack of government accountability on widespread herbicide use on public land
  • USDA Announces $49 Million Public-Private Investment to Improve Critical Wetlands in 12 States
  • "Living Shorelines" Will Get Fast Track to Combat Sea Level Rise
  • How can industrial-scale agriculture reduce its environmental footprint?
  • EPA removes underground tanks on Navajo Nation to protect local water
  • Water Systems Violate Lead Rules Nationwide, Advocacy Group Finds
  • Court strikes down Obama fracking rules for public lands
  • Study finds surprising source of Colorado River water supply
  • The Nature Conservancy and The Fertilizer Institute join forces
  • Gulf of Mexico Alliance Releases Third Governors' Action Plan for Healthy and Resilient Coasts

STATE NEWS

  • AL: TVA will cap coal ash impoundment
  • AL: Study: Plastic waste pervasive in Mobile Bay, Gulf of Mexico shorelines
  • AK: Building in a wetland is never easy. In Bethel, it just got harder
  • CA: U.S. EPA Proposes Greater Protection from Selenium in San Francisco Bay and Delta
  • CA: In California, Study Finds Drilling and Fracking into Freshwater Formations
  • CA: California Proposes Adopting New Permitting Program for Wetlands and Waters of the State
  • FL: Fighting Zika in the US: The Battle Over GMO Mosquitoes
  • FL: Toxic algae bloom crisis hits Florida, drives away tourists
  • FL: Controversial Everglades oil well plan moving forward
  • GA: Ga. Power Finds Contaminants Near Coal Ash Ponds At 3 Plants
  • MD: Panel to study how to reduce bay pollution at Conowingo Dam
  • MD: As climate changes, Assateague Island's caregivers may give nature the final say on seashore's future
  • MD: Blue crab population in Chesapeake Bay grows, but doesn't reach goals
  • MA: How Western Mass. Handles Contamination Left By GE In Its Waterways
  • MI: After decades of planning, work begins on key St. Marys River restoration project
  • MI: Waukesha gets permission to draw water from Lake Michigan
  • NY: As sea level rises, Hudson River wetlands may expand
  • NY: $2.5M Restoration Project Brings Natural Wetland to Meadow Lake
  • NY: Study: Jamaica Bay wetland islands may be 200 years old
  • NC: North Carolina's Factory Farms Produce 15,000 Olympic Pools Worth of Waste Each Year
  • OH: Algae 2016: Only a mild bloom for western Lake Erie if current weather patterns hold
  • PA: Green City, Clean Waters Blows Past Year Five Targets
  • TX: TCEQ: Contested Coal Mine Can Release Wastewater Into Drinking Supply
  • UT: Utah Family Land Donation Establishes Bear River Watershed Conservation Area
  • UT: San Juan River, Utah Lake added to Utah's list of impaired waterways
  • VT: 500 acres of wetland preserved in Brandon
  • VA: EPA report: Coastal Virginia wetlands slightly above national average
  • VA: Dominion assures draining of ash ponds will protect local waters
  • VA: Duke Univ. tests find leaching from coal ash sites, including 2 in Va.
  • WA: Washington must fix culverts that block salmon from habitat, court rules
  • WI: Wetlands Placed at the Head of the Line: WDNR Front-Loads Wetlands Screening as Part of Project Permitting

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • Vanishing Act: Why Insects Are Declining and Why It Matters
  • Expanding Antarctic sea ice linked to natural variability
  • Is the ozone healing? Gaping hole over Antarctica is shrinking, say scientists
  • Claim that jet stream crossing equator is ‘climate emergency’ is utter nonsense
  • Coral With Leaves: Millions of Trees Joining the List of Climate Change Casualties
  • Going Hog Wild in the Marsh
  • New Study Quantifies Benefits of Agricultural Conservation in Upper Mississippi River Basin
  • Threats to habitat connectivity as sea waters inundate coastal areas
  • Scorching Hot Southwest Is Climate Change In Action
  • 'Frankenturtles' released into the Chesapeake Bay by VIMS researchers
  • Fighting big farm pollution with a tiny plant
  • Great Barrier Reef water quality improved by wetlands restoration, scientist says
  • Scientists say that 'nature,' untouched by humans, is now almost entirely gone
  • The Drought Solution That's Under Our Feet
  • The Unbearable Pressures of Endangered Species Protection

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • Government Liability and Climate Change: Selected Issues for Wetland and Floodplain Managers
  • Reconnecting Rivers to Floodplains: Returning natural functions to restore rivers and benefit communities
  • Blue Carbon Study Supports Tampa Bay Habitat Restoration and Resiliency Planning
  • Climate Ready Estuaries Program Creates Interactive Companion Tool to Developing Risk-Based Adaptation Plans
  • Tools Launched to Promote Climate Adaptation in the Water Utilities Sector

POTPOURRI

  • Summer reading for the enviro science crowd
  • How to Revive Local Agriculture in the United States
  • Can Virtual Reality Emerge As a Tool for Conservation?
  • Oil bust leaves states with massive well cleanup
  • Global farmland deals now cover area the size of Finland – campaigners
  • It's the economy that needs to be integrated into the environment - not the other way around
  • Should lawyers be ethically obligated to protect the environment?
  • Non-Native, Invasive Species for Dinner? Bring Out the Melted Butter!

WEBINARS, MEETINGS, TRAINING

  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Webinar: Developing Water Quality Standards for Wetlands
  • Webinar: Endangered Species Act: A Record of Success
  • Association of Wetland Managers Members’ Wetland Webinar: Long Term Financial Assurances for Wetland Mitigation and Volunatary Restoration
  • Flood Best Practices Protecting People & Property with GIS
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Training Webinar Series: Soils Training Webinar #2: Hydric Soil Process
  • American Water Resources Association (AWRA) webinar: Grand Theft Groundwater! What Would Elvis Do? Implications of the Groundbreaking Mississippi v. Memphis Groundwater Case
  • Great Lakes Sea Grant Network Crude Move webinar: Regulatory Activity and Environmental Requirements: Tools for Addressing Multiple Objectives
  • American Water Resources Association (AWRA) webinar: Scenarios, Simulations and Sustainability Science: Future Planning for Complex Systems
  • Center for Water Protection Webcast 4: Incentivizing BMP Installation in Communities with Stormwater Utilities
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webcast 5: Retrofitting Revisited: Forward Into the Past
  • American Water Resources Association (AWRA) webinar: Oregon's First Integrated Water Resources Strategy: Lessons Learned Since Implementation
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webcast 6: Non-Traditional MS4s

Meetings

  • Soil and Water Conservation Society 71st Annual Conference: Managing Great River Landscapes
  • Finding Your Place in Big Data: Using Observations to Understand Hydrologic Processes for Predicting a Changing World
  • 2016 Gordon Research Conference: Unifying Ecology Across Scales: Linking the Levels from Physiological to Ecosystem Ecology
  • Computational & Information Systems Lab (CISL) Third Annual Graduate Workshop: Environmental Data Analytics
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: Urban Waters National Training Workshop 2016
  • Environmental Law Institute Seminar: Law & Policy of Products Regulation (ELI Summer School, 2016)
  • Mississippi Urban Forest Council: Urban Forestry and Green Infrastructure Conference
  • 4th International Marine Conservation Congress (IMCC4): Making Marine Science Matter
  • Water Environment Federation: Intelligent Water Systems Knowledge Development Forum 2016
  • Wetland Restoration and Training LLC: Wetland Restoration Workshop
  • 2016 Ecological Society of America's (ESA) annual meeting
  • American Society of Civil Engineers: GEO Sustainability & Geoenvironment
  • Near Surface Geophysics for Hydrology Workshop
  • GIS Applications in Aquatic Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Workshop
  • American Fisheries Society 146th Annual Meeting: Fisheries Conservation and Management: Making Connections and Building Partnerships
  • StormCon: Designing the Future of Stormwater
  • 2016 Annual KAMM Conference: The Changing Climate of Mitigation
  • NC State University EcoStream - Stream Ecology and Restoration Conference
  • Society of Ecological Restoration Europe conference 2016: Best Practice in Restoration
  • Small Drinking Water System Challenges and Solutions
  • 22nd National Nonpoint Source (NPS) Monitoring Workshop
  • ScenNet International Conference: Scenarios and Models of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Support of Decision Making
  • British Columbia Wildlife Federation Workshop: Lower Mainland Wetlands Institute-2016
  • 2016 World Water Week
  • Coast to Coast Conference
  • 5th International EcoSummit Congress, EcoSummit 2016 - Ecological Sustainability: Engineering Change
  • IUCN World Conservation Congress: Planet at the crossroads
  • 2016 Floodplain Management Association Annual Conference
  • Connecting the Dots...Groundwater, Surface Water, and Climate Connections in the Northwest
  • 3rd International Conference “Water resources and wetlands”
  • Ohio Wetlands Association 2016 Regional Wetlands Summit: Living on the Edge: Where humans meet wetlands
  • New England Chapter of the Society of Wetland Scientists Field Trip on Hydrologic Considerations Wetland Restoration
  • 6th International Symposium on Deep-Sea Corals
  • California Stormwater Quality Association 12th Annual Conference: Stormwater Evolution: Source to Resource
  • Value of Water Coalition: Imagine a Day Without Water
  • Ohio Sea Grant Conference: Understanding Algal Blooms: State of the Science
  • Greenwich Maritime Centre (GMC conference: 'Society and the Sea'
  • Guild of Rocky Mountain Ecologists and Evolutionary Biologists (GREEBs) meeting
  • Wetlands Institute: Fall Migration Festival
  • 13th International Symposium on River Sedimentation
  • 10th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference
  • Healing Our Waters®– Great Lakes Coalition: 12th Annual Great Lakes Restoration Conference
  • Under Western Skies (UWS) conference: Water: Events, Trends, Analysis
  • EUCI: 2016 EPA 316(b) Fish and Shellfish Impingement & Entrainment in Power & Industrial Facilities Conference
  • Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay: 2016 Chesapeake Watershed Forum
  • Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge: Birdfest and Bluegrass
  • 18th Annual Stormwater Conference
  • Great Lakes Public Forum 2016
  • 16th Annual Great Lakes Beach Association Conference
  • Southern Nevada Water Authority WaterSmart Innovations Conference and Exposition
  • Great Lakes Commission 2016 Annual Meeting
  • Physics of Estuaries and Coastal Seas Conference
  • Natural Channel Design Review Checklist Workshop
  • Ding Darling Days
  • 4th Northern Rockies Invasive Plants Council Conference
  • 2016 Mountain Climate Conference: Mountains Without Snow: What are the Consequences?
  • New Jersey Association for Floodplain Management (NJAFM) 12th Annual Conference: Supporting Municipalities to Reduce Flood Risk
  • Natural Areas Association 2016 Natural Areas Conference
  • Ecosystem Services Partnership (ESP) conference: 'Healthy ecosystems for resilient societies'
  • 11th Annual Regional Stormwater Conference: Stormwater Solutions
  • Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum - West Coast
  • 12th Annual MAFSM Conference
  • Student Conference on Conservation Science – New York (SCCS-NY)
  • 7th Symposium on the Ecology, Status and Conservation of the Diamondback Terrapin
  • Land Trust Alliance Rally 2016 National Land Conservation Conference
  • American Water Works Association: Water Infrastructure Conference & Exposition
  • North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) Symposium: Science to Stewardship: Balancing Economic Growth and Lake Sustainability
  • The Chicago Wilderness Congress: Celebrating 20 Years: One Home. One Future
  • 2016 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference
  • American Water Works Association: Water Quality Technology Conference® & Exposition
  • Considerations for the Use of Non-local Species in Ecological Restoration
  • 2016 Bay-Delta Science Conference
  • ACES: A Community on Ecosystem Services conference: Linking Science, Practice, and Decision Making
  • 8th National Summit: Our Coasts, Our Future, Our Choice and 25th Biennial Meeting of The Coastal Society
  • AGU Fall Meeting

Training

  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Introduction to Main Seaweeds: Identification, Ecology, and Ethnobotany
  • Eagle Hill Institute course: Restoration of Stream Processes - Field Applications
  • Interpreting Sediment in the Field: Theory and Field Methods
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station course: Lake Ecology
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Plant Identification for Wetland Delineators – 2016
  • HalfMoon Education, Inc. course: Stormwater Management 2016
  • Coastal Wetland Restoration in the S.F. Bay Area: Adapting to Climate Change
  • Mushroom Identification for New Mycophiles: Foraging for Edible and Medicinal Mushroom
  • The Rocky Coast: Ecology, Botany, and Pattern: Northern Forest Atlas Course:No Keys or Lectures, Lots of Diagrams & Problems
  • Utah State University course: Sediment Transport in Stream Assessment and Design
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. course: Florida Statewide Wetland Delineation Training (62-340 FAC)
  • Wetland Restoration and Training LLC: Wetland Restoration Workshop
  • Planning and Preparing an Ecological Risk Assessment
  • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee course: Wetland Hydrology
  • Slime Molds: Miniature Marvels of Nature
  • The EPT Taxa (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera): Taxonomy and Stream Biomonitoring
  • Hydrophytic Vegetation (Piedmont)
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. course: ACOE Wetland Delineation / Regional Supplement / Waters of the United States Training
  • Conservation for Development Professionals: Strategies for Implementing Biodiversity Action Plans for the Private Sector
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • Point Intercept Sampling Procedure for Determining Hydrophytic Vegetation
  • Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Assimilating Long-Term Data into Ecosystem Models
  • Coastal and Inland Forests of Maine: Identification and Ecology of Trees and Shrubs
  • Taxonomy and Biology of Ferns and Lycophytes
  • The Swamp School Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment
  • Environmental Concern course: Grasses, Sedges and Rushes
  • The California Rapid Assessment Method (CRAM) course: 5-day General CRAM Training
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2016
  • EcoAgricultural Partners Landscape Leadership 3-Day Workshop
  • Polypores and Other Wood-inhabiting Fungi
  • Field Methods for Studying Avian Migration
  • The Swamp School course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • Water Rights Engineering Including Case Studies
  • Introduction to Coastal Maine Birds: Identification, Taxonomy, Ecology
  • Marine Benthic Macroinvertebrates, Communities, and Habitats
  • Exploring Medicinal Plants of Maine (and beyond)
  • Field Ornithology: Shorebirds & Seabirds of Downeast Maine
  • The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • UC Davis Extension course: Land Use and Natural Resources Information Session
  • Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Wetland Delineation with Emphasis on Soils and Hydrology – 2016
  • The Swamp School Course: Habitat Conservation Plans
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • Rutgers University course: Vegetation Identification for Wetland Delineation: South
  • Riparian Habitat Restoration in the Arid Southwest
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Spatial Ecology, Geospatial Analysis and Remote Sensing for Conservation
  • Endangered Species Act Overview
  • The Swamp School Wetland Plants Field ID Workshop
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Woody Plants (Trees, Shrubs, and Vines) Identification – 2016
  • 2D Floodplain Delineation using 2D HEC-RAS Model
  • George Mason University, Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation course: Watershed Conservation: Riparian Restoration
  • Rutgers University course: Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • North Carolina State University Stream Restoration Program course: Stream Morphology Assessment
  • University of Minnesota course: Hydrology Tools for Minnesota Wetlands
  • Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
  • Rutgers University course: Understanding Advanced Stormwater Management Techniques
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Wetland Delineation Refresher - 2016
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) course: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA): Writing the Perfect EA/FONSI, or EIS
  • Rutgers University course: Methodology for Delineating Wetlands
  • Rutgers University course: Introduction to Wetland Identification
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) course: Advanced NEPA-Taking the National Environmental Policy Act to the Next Level
  • Natural Channel Design Principles
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) course: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA): Writing the Perfect EA/FONSI, or EIS
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) course: Advanced NEPA-Taking the National Environmental Policy Act to the Next Level
  • Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology (Piedmont)
  • Urban Watersheds Research Institute course: Watershed Modeling Using CUHP-SWMM
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) course: Planning and Preparing an Ecological Risk Assessment
  • Federal Wetland / Waters Regulatory Policy
  • Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement (Eastern Mountains/Piedmont)
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation course: Statistical Downscaling of Global Climate Models using SDSM 5.2

SPECIAL EVENTS

  • Wetlands Institute: Fall Migration Festival
  • Rouge River Water Festival
  • Pointe Mouillee Waterfowl Festival
  • Voice of the Wetlands (VOW) 13th Annual Voice of the Wetlands Festival
  • Wings over Water Festival
  • Rio Grande Valley Bird Festival
  • Festival of the Cranes
  • Assateague Island Waterfowl Weekend
  • Wetlands Institute: Wetland Wonderland

 

Wetland Breaking News - December 2015

Wetland Breaking News - March 2016


The Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News (WBN)
is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those Wetland Breaking News - April 2016working in water resources and related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published for over fifteen years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.

The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to .

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled and Edited by Marla Stelk, Editor; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors. Executive Director: Jeanne Christie. Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399 Fax: 207-892-3089

All photos by Jeanne Christie, ASWM


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