Beaver Restoration Webinar Series2020 Past Beaver Restoration Webinar Series

 

Webinar #3: Case Studies of Long-term Changes from Beaver Restoration Activities

Held Tuesday, October 13, 2020 - 3:00pm-4:30pm Eastern

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INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS

• Ellen Wohl, Colorado State University [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]
• 
Nick Bouwes, Utah State University [POWERPOINT PRESENTATION]

ABSTRACT

This third webinar in the ASWM-BLM Beaver Restoration Webinar Series focused on the long-term changes in riverscapes that result from beaver restoration.  Where intense stream restoration is needed, people are identifying low-tech process-based methods that combine the management of grazing, beaver and other approaches that engage processes to create self-sustaining solutions.  Understanding the dynamic nature of these systems is important to understanding where and how they can be useful.  The webinar shared case studies of work completed, focusing on the use of beaver to restore riverscapes.

BIOS

Ellen Wohl, Colorado State UniversityEllen Wohl received a BS in geology from Arizona State University and a PhD in geosciences from University of Arizona. She has been on the geosciences faculty at Colorado State University since 1989. Her research is field-based and focuses on interactions between physical process and form and biota in river corridors, including the effects of beavers. She has written several books for non-specialists, including “Saving the Dammed: Why We Need Beaver-Modified Ecosystems” (2019, Oxford University Press).

Nick BouwesNick Bouwes earned his BS in Zoology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and MS and PhD in Aquatic Ecology at Utah State University. He is owner of Eco Logical Research, co-owner of Anabranch Solutions, and an adjunct faculty in the Department of Watershed Science and director of the Beaver Ecology and Relocation Center at Utah State University. He uses modeling, monitoring and adaptive management to understand riverscapes processes to inform restoration and management. He has been involved in developing and teaching low-tech processed based restoration strategies with an emphasis on mimicking, promoting, and. sustaining beaver dam activity to restore riverscapes. 

 

 
Part 1: Introduction: William Dooley, Association of
State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Ellen Wohl, Colorado State University
  Part 2: Presenter: Nick Bouwes, Utah State University
     
   
Part 3: Questions & Answers    

 
Webinar #2: Identifying Where to Place Beavers and When to Use Beaver Mimicry for Low Tech Restoration 

Held Thursday, September 24, 2020 - 3:00pm-4:30pm Eastern

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INTRODUCTION

PRESENTER

ABSTRACT

This second webinar in the ASWM-BLM Beaver Restoration Webinar Series focused on making decisions about where beaver restoration and/or the use of beaver dam analogs (BDA) can have the greatest positive and least negative impacts. Understanding that beaver restoration is not well-suited for all contexts and purposes, this webinar discussed risk assessment and introduce participants to the primary elements required to assess the efficacy of beaver projects for specific watersheds and sites. The webinar covered how data can be used to make decisions about different kinds of flow devices and when beaver mimicry/BDAs make more sense. The webinar included a demonstration of Utah State University’s Beaver Restoration Assessment Tool (BRAT), a model that helps planners assess key parameters (such as human interaction, hydrological setting, etc.) essential to beaver work. The webinar ended with discussion about the importance of post-construction monitoring.

BIO

Joe WheatonJoe Wheaton is an Associate Professor at Utah State University and a fluvial geomorphologist with over eighteen years of experience in river restoration. Joe's research is focused on better understanding the dynamics of riverscapes, how such fluvial processes shape instream and riparian habitats, and how biota modulate and amplify those processes. Joe co-founded the Restoration Consortium at USU, is the lead author of the Low-Tech Process-Based Restoration of Riverscapes Design Manual and a principle and co-founder of a design-build restoration firm, Anabranch Solutions.

 

 
Part 1: Introduction: William Dooley, Association of
State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Joe Wheaton, Associate Professor, Utah State
University
  Part 2: Presenter: Joe Wheaton, Associate Professor, 
Utah State University
     
   
Parat 3: Presenter: Joe Wheaton, Associate Professor, 
Utah State University
   


Webinar #1: The History of Beaver and the 
Ecosystem Services They Provide

Held Wednesday, March 11, 2020 - 3:00pm-4:30pm Eastern

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INTRODUCTION

PRESENTERS

ABSTRACT

This first webinar in the Association of State Wetland Managers (ASWM) and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) co-hosted six-part webinar series on beaver restoration provided the historical background of beaver on the land and the impacts from loss of beaver (through various hunting, trapping and removal activities) in terms of hydrology. The webinar shared what valley bottoms can be with restoration of hydrology and the role that beavers and beaver dam analogs (BDAs) can play in that restoration. The webinar explained the Stage Zero concept and unpack the challenges created by common practices that have been restoring streams to their first point of failure.

This webinar set the stage for future webinars providing case studies on the results of beaver restoration activities, addressing common barriers and objections to beaver work, identifying where and where not to place these projects, as well as insights on navigating the regulatory environment and stakeholder engagement, as well as what resources are currently available to help those interested in beaver restoration or explaining its value (when used in the right context) to others. 

 

           
   Submitted by Kent Sorenson, Utah Division of Wildlife

 

 

BIOS

Kent SorensonKent Sorenson is an Assistant Habitat Manager With the Utah Division of Wildlife. Kent is active in beaver restoration work in the arid west and has been working in habitat restoration since April 2006. Based on coursework he has completed, Kent incorporates Rosgen fluvial geomorphology and river restoration and sediment transport considerations. He also partners with Beaver River Restoration. Kent has a M.S. in Wildlife and Fisheries Ecology from Oklahoma State University and a B.S. in Wildlife and Fisheries Science from South Dakota State University.

Amy ChadwickAmy Chadwick is the lead Ecologist with Great West Engineering. She holds a B.A. in Biology from The Colorado College and a Master of Science in Forestry (watershed focus) form university of Montana. Amy has been working in wetland and stream restoration in Montana for 18 years and regularly gives presentations and provides training in workshops and on projects to teach people about beavers and stream dynamics, non-lethal beaver management, and process-based restoration aligned with the zero stage restoration principle. She has been involved in the Montana Beaver Working Group since its inception seven years ago and continues to pursue and support efforts to restore stream processes and beaver populations. 

 

 
Part 1: Introduction: Brenda Zollitsch, Association of
State Wetland Managers
Presenter: Kent Sorenson, Habitat Restoration Biologist,
Utah Division of Wildlife Resources
  Part 2: Presenter: Amy Chadwick, Lead Ecologist, Great
West Engineering
     
 
Part 3Presenter: Amy Chadwick, Lead Ecologist, Great
West Engineering
  Part 4: Questions & Answers