Members' Wetland Webinar Series

ASWM Member Webinar

The Association of State Wetland Managers (ASWM) holds a webinar each month for its members. ASWM Member webinars cover a variety of topics encompassing wetland science, policy, program implementation, and legal issues. These webinars, including recordings for past webinars are available to ASWM members. If you are not a member, you are invited to join ASWM. For information about membership, click here.

For more information about this  webinar series, please contact Laura Burchill at or (207) 892-3399.

Future Members' Webinar Schedule

ASWM Members webinars are generally held the fourth Wednesday of the month unless the date and time needs to be adjusted for when the presenter(s) is available.

If you haven’t used Go To Webinar before or you just need a refresher, please view our guide prior to the webinar here.

If you would like to participate in the webinar but believe there is not enough time to join and register, please contact Laura at or call 207-892-3399.  


Restoration Outcomes and Reporting: An Assessment of Wetland Area Gains in Wisconsin

Wednesday, November 29, 2017 - 3:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Eastern

PRESENTERS

  • Tom Dahl, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Retired)
  • Rusty Griffin, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

ABSTRACT

Billions of dollars have been spent to restore wetlands throughout the conterminous United States, leading to gains in wetland area nationwide. However, knowledge regarding the impact of these additions is limited, in part due to the lack of a centralized restoration database, varying definitions of restoration, and shifting protocols amongst restoration initiatives.

This presentation will share findings from a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service study of 430 wetland restoration projects in Wisconsin between 2003 and 2008. The study used high-resolution photography to evaluate the restoration projects. Aerial photo-interpretation and geospatial analysis were used to determine pre- and post-project status of wetland extent and habitat type(s). Wetland extent was mapped within project boundaries and wetland area gains were identified. Wetlands were classified by cover type and hydrology to record reestablished habitats, as well as document the prevailing land use setting of the project area and compare these results to data reported by the state. The majority of wetland area gains were classified as seasonally flooded emergent marshes, and restoration sites were primarily located within agricultural settings.

The study found 39% of wetland area gains reported by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) agreed with the study’s geospatially derived data. Actual reestablished wetland area was 61% less than the reported reestablished area. These results are valuable for documenting discrepancies between restoration accomplishment reporting and change in wetland area observed, and understanding current trends in reestablishment, including habitat types, hydrologic regimes, and land use settings. Results are beneficial to resource managers by providing insight into restoration shortcomings and the over-reporting that can occur when GIS tracking is not employed.

BIOS

Tom Dahl (Retired) worked for the USFS for more than 34 years. He was the Chief and Senior Scientist for the USFWS Support Center in Madison, Wisconsin. Wetlands Geospatial data holdings forming the wetlands data layer of the national data infrastructure, the National Wetland Status and Trends Database and services web pages on data discovery and delivery over the internet. He has led numerous interagency efforts to improve data quality, address standards, address policy changes and make information publically accessible .Leading statistical national studies culminating in peer reviewed national studies. He has authored numerous technical reports on wetland loss. These studies have informed national policy, leading to presidential calls for halting and reversing wetland losses. He is the author of the frequently cited “Wetlands Losses in the United States 1780s to 1980s” report which has served as a baseline for many assessments of wetland loss since that time. Most recently, he co-authored both a national study on the status and trends of coastal wetland loss and the status and trends of prairie wetlands in the United States.

Rusty Griffin is a Physical Scientist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's, National Standards and Support Team in Madison Wisconsin. He is responsible for quality assurance/quality control and national consistency for the wetlands layer of the National Spatial Data Infrastructure. Rusty has over 10 years of experience in wetland mapping – creating NWI maps as a private contractor and a federal employee, holds a B.S. in Geology from Portland State University, a MNR from Utah State University, and is a member of the National Technical Committee for Hydric Soils.
 

 

  

Members' Wetland Webinar Series

There is no charge for current members. To register, click here.


 ASWM Members' Wetland Webinar SeriesIf you would like to register for this and future ASWM Member Webinars and are not a current member, please click on “Join ASWM”. After receiving your membership payment you will be sent a confirmation email and you can return to this page to register.

If you would like to participate in the webinar but believe there is not enough time to join and register, please contact Laura at  or call 207-892-3399.

A Certificate of Participation to be used toward Continuing Education Credits will be available for this Webinar. Click here for more Information.


How to Keep Headcuts from Working their Way Up or Downstream and Destroying Wetlands

Wednesday, December 13, 2017 - 3:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Eastern

PRESENTER

  • Tom Biebighauser, Wetland Restoration and Training

ABSTRACT

Head-cuts are the number one cause of wetland and pond failure. Both natural and constructed wetlands can be drained by advancing head-cuts. Head-cuts cause deep and wide ditches to form, remove standing water and lower the elevation of groundwater. A head-cut can unzip a wetland overnight, causing tremendous erosion in the process. Techniques available for protecting wetlands from head-cuts will be examined in this webinar.

BIO

Tom Biebighauser is a Wildlife Biologist and Wetland Ecologist who has restored over 1,950 wetlands in 24-States, in Canada,
New Zealand, and Puerto Rico. He has studied drainage for 34-years, learning from contractors who worked their lives to destroy wetlands. Tom teaches practical, hands-on workshops where participants learn how to restore wetlands by becoming involved in the design and construction of naturally appearing and functioning wetlands. He has written 4-books about wetland restoration
techniques, and instructs graduate-level courses on the topic at the University Louisville's Speed School of Engineering, and at Eastern Kentucky University. Tom has received 44-awards for his contributions to wetland restoration, including the National Wetlands Award for Conservation and Restoration in 2015.
 

Members' Wetland Webinar Series

There is no charge for current members. To register, click here.


 ASWM Members' Wetland Webinar SeriesIf you would like to register for this and future ASWM Member Webinars and are not a current member, please click on “Join ASWM”. After receiving your membership payment you will be sent a confirmation email and you can return to this page to register.

If you would like to participate in the webinar but believe there is not enough time to join and register, please contact Laura at  or call 207-892-3399.

A Certificate of Participation to be used toward Continuing Education Credits will be available for this Webinar. Click here for more Information.



To view Past Members' Wetland Webinars:

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Nonmembers To view recent Members' Webinars, please join ASWM.

To view 2012 webinars (publicly available), click here.