WBN August 2018

                

IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

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Editor's Note

Dear Wetlanders,

Summertime is almost over. For many of you who have busy summer field seasons, I’m sure it’s a bit of a relief once you can smell fall in the air. For me, it’s a little bittersweet – Maine has short summers, so I always feel a little disappointed when September rolls around. However, fall is actually my favorite time of year and I always look forward to the new challenges and opportunities that seem to happen with every change in season. I am particularly looking forward to my new role as Executive Director at the Association of State Wetland Managers starting September 1st!

As seems to be the new normal, there has been a lot of activity on the federal level over the past month. You’ll see some articles in the Editor’s Choice section that highlight activities of specific significance to our members, including the recent federal District 4 court decision lifting the suspension of the Clean Water Rule in 26 states. We have also included a press release on the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers memo that supports state assumption of Section 404 of the Clean Water Act, as well as an article on the bill recently introduced by Senator Barrasso to the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works that would limit state authority in the use of Section 401 to condition federal permits.

In National News, you’ll find an article on the new White House Science Advisor that was nominated by President Trump and an article on the proposed changes to the Endangered Species Act. And in this era of uncertainty, states continue to forge onward and do great things as you’ll see from our State News section. You’ll also find several articles throughout this edition about flooding and climate change as wetland protection and restoration are critical tools for natural hazard management and pre-disaster mitigation. As always, thank you for all you do for wetlands and we hope you enjoy this edition of Wetland Breaking News!

Best regards,

Marla J. Stelk
Editor
Wetland Breaking News

 
   
              


Editor's Choice


Clean Water Rule: Judge Shifts Legal Brawl, Revives WOTUS in 26 States

By Ariel Wittenberg and Amanda Reilly – E&E News – August 16, 2018
The Obama-era Clean Water Rule became the law in 26 states today as a federal judge in South Carolina issued a nationwide injunction on the Trump administration's delay of the regulation that defines what wetlands and waterways get federal protection. The injunction targets the Trump administration's February order suspending the rule while EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers worked up a new version. The Southern Environmental Law Center sued on behalf of several environmental groups, saying the administration rushed the rulemaking and violated the Administrative Procedure Act. Read full story here.

Barrasso aims to change the Clean Water Act to give states less power to stop projects

By Heather Richards – Casper Star Tribune – August 16, 2018
Sen. John Barrasso is not pleased with Washington state. Although that is not an unusual position to hold in Wyoming — which is engaged in a legal dispute with the coastal state over coal — what the senator plans to do about his frustration could narrow a unique power that allows states to veto the federal government. Barrasso has proposed changes to the Clean Water Act that he argues will close loopholes that are ripe for abuse. The provision up for revision, section 401, grants states the authority to certify projects that could affect their waterways. The flip side of that authority is states can refuse to greenlight a project or require conditions for certification — even if the federal government has approved it. Read article here. Read the National Coalition letter in response to the proposed provision here.

Army Issues Memorandum to Empower States & Tribes in their Permitting Authority

U.S. Army – August 7, 2018
The U.S. Army released a memorandum taking initial steps to empower States and tribes in assuming Section 404 permit authority under the Clean Water Act (CWA). In taking on this authority, States and tribes can accelerate job-creating economic development and infrastructure, all while continuing to protect the environment. Letters are also being sent to State Governors and the tribal leaders for all the Federally recognized tribes encouraging them to assume this traditional Federal permitting ability. New Jersey and Michigan have already assumed the 404 permit program. Read article here. Download PDF of memorandum here.

Administration Ending Rule that Made Industry Pay for Damages to Key Animal Habitat

By Miranda Green – The Hill – July 27, 2018
The Trump administration is ending an Obama-era practice of mandating that industry alleviate the destruction of key habitats for endangered species by paying the government. The Fish and Wildlife Service announced on Friday the withdrawal of the compensatory mitigation policy for the Endangered Species Act, which directed the agency to set a "net-benefit" goal for natural resources extraction on public land. Read full story here.

  

 

 

National News 


EPA Says its New Coal Plan Could 'Adversely Affect Human Health'

By Tal Axelrod – The Hill – August 21, 2018 – Video
A recently introduced Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) plan to ease restrictions on emissions from coal-fired power plants would lead to new carbon-related health issues and as many as 1,400 premature deaths per year, according to an EPA analysis of the proposal. As compared to the standards of performance that it replaces… implementing the proposed rule is expected to increase emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and increase the level of emissions of certain pollutants in the atmosphere that adversely affect human health,” the EPA said in its analysisRead full story and view video here.

A Running List of How President Trump is Changing Environmental Policy

By Michael Greshko, Laura Parker, Brian Clark Howard, and Daniel Stone – National Geographic– August 21, 2018
The Trump Administration’s tumultuous presidency has brought a flurry of changes—both realized and anticipated—to U.S. environmental policy. Many of the actions roll back Obama-era policies that aimed to curb climate change and limit environmental pollution, while others threaten to limit federal funding for science and the environment. It’s a lot to keep track of, so National Geographic will be maintaining an abbreviated timeline of the Trump Administration’s environmental actions and policy changes, as well as reactions to them. Read full story and view list here.

New Study Identifies Strategies in US Climate Litigation

George Washington – University Public Health – August 20, 2018
The courts have played a central role in climate change policy, starting with a landmark Supreme Court case that led to the mandatory regulation of greenhouse gases in the United States. How do the courts address climate cases today? Who wins, who loses and what kinds of strategies make a difference in the courtroom? Researchers at the George Washington University (GW) have published a study in Nature Climate Change that for the first time analyzes all U.S climate change lawsuits over a 26-year period. Read full story here.

Water Use for Fracking has Risen Up by up to 770 Percent Since 2011

Provided by Duke University – PHYS.org – August 15, 2018
The amount of water used per well for hydraulic fracturing surged by up to 770 percent between 2011 and 2016 in all major U.S. shale gas and oil production regions, a new Duke University study finds. The volume of brine-laden wastewater that fracked oil and gas wells generated during their first year of production also increased by up to 1440 percent during the same period, the study shows. If this rapid intensification continues, fracking's water footprint could grow by up to 50-fold in some regions by the year 2030—raising concerns about its sustainability, particularly in arid or semi-arid regions in western states, or other areas where groundwater supplies are stressed or limited. Read full story here.

Northeastern, Nature Conservancy Team Up to Tackle Climate Change, Save Coastal Cities

By Sophia Fox-Sowell – News Northeastern – August 8, 2018
Coastal communities are particularly vulnerable to climate change. Rising sea levels and increasingly frequent ocean storms threaten residents who depend on the environment for their economy and infrastructure. To address these issues, Northeastern’s Coastal Sustainability Institute and The Nature Conservancy are combining their expertise in coastal conservation. “It’s clear that coastal risks are rising,” said Mike Beck, the lead marine scientist for The Nature Conservancy, a global conservation organization that works to protect communities from coastal hazards and climate change. “There’s a need for cost-effective solutions and an interest from decision-makers to address these issues together.” Read full story here.

Destructive Flood Risk in U.S. West Could Triple if Climate Change Left Unchecked

By Bob Berwyn – InsideClimateNews – August 8, 2018
The risk of devastating floods like the one that damaged California's Oroville Dam in 2017 will soar in many of North America's Western river basins by 2100, if we don't dramatically slow climate change, according to a new study. Read full story here.

Farmers are Drawing Groundwater from the Giant Ogallala Aquifer Faster Than Nature Replaces It

By Char Miller – The Conversation – August 7, 2018
Every summer the U.S. Central Plains go dry, leading farmers to tap into groundwater to irrigate sorghum, soy, cotton, wheat and corn and maintain large herds of cattle and hogs. As the heat rises, anxious irrigators gather to discuss whether and how they should adopt more stringent conservation measures. They know that if they do not conserve, the Ogallala Aquifer, the source of their prosperity, will go dry. Read full story here.

Rain-on-Snow Flood Risk to Increase in Many U.S. Mountain Regions

By Trent Knoss – University of Colorado Boulder – August 6, 2018
Flooding caused by rain falling on snowpack could more than double by the end of this century in some areas of the western U.S. and Canada due to climate change, according to new research from CU Boulder and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The greatest flood risk increases are projected for the Sierra Nevada, the Colorado River headwaters and the Canadian Rocky Mountains—places where residents are no strangers to flood concerns. Conversely, lower elevations in coastal regions of California, Oregon, Washington and maritime British Columbia could see decreases in rain-on-snow flood risk. Read full story here.

Win for Wetlands: Program Helps Farmers Conserve More Flood Prone Land

By Nicole Erwin – WKMS – August 6, 2018
The Farm Bill being debated in Congress could have significant effects well beyond farms -- including on our waterways. Over the years wetlands have been stripped and drained to grow crops. A program funded by the Farm Bill pays farmers to conserve wetlands, and more farmers are looking to take flood prone land out of production. Read or listen to full story here.

Survival of North America’s Desert Wetlands Depends on Lake Mead

By Amena H. Saiyid – Bloomberg BNA – August 4, 2018
La Cienega de Santa Clara, sitting at the edge of the Sonoran Desert in northwestern Mexico, appears like a mirage. Lagoons filled with cattails are a balm to dry eyes after a dusty, hourlong ride from the U.S.-Mexico border. Fed by water draining from farms in the Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation and Drainage District in Arizona, the Cienega—created by an engineering accident in the late 1970s—is the largest brackish water marsh in the Colorado River region, spanning about 40,000 acres. North of the lagoon is the Salton Sea, which also relies on drain water from California farms in the Imperial Irrigation District. Now these wetlands, as well as the hundreds of species of birds and fish that live in them, may be at risk. Read full story here.

Trump Taps Meteorologist as White House Science Advisor

By Sara Reardon – Scientific American – August 1, 2018
U.S. President Donald Trump will nominate meteorologist Kelvin Droegemeier as his government’s top scientist. If confirmed by the Senate, Droegemeier would lead the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). Droegemeier would be the first non-physicist to serve as White House science adviser since Congress established the OSTP in 1976. “I think he is a very solid choice,” says John Holdren, who led OSTP for eight years as Obama’s science adviser. “He is a respected senior scientist and he has experience in speaking science to power.” Read full article here.

After Decades of Effort, the Chesapeake Bay is Turning Around

By Evan Lubofsky – Hakai Magazine – August 1, 2018
Complex. Mottled. Imperiled. Screwed. These are just some of the words scientists scrawled on cocktail napkins at a dinner in July 2016 to describe the state of the seagrasses covering the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay. “We all met at the Rams Head Tavern in Annapolis, and during the meal we created a word cloud by having everyone write down the first three words that came to mind,” says Bill Dennison, vice president of science application at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. Dennison, a marine botanist, was leading an interdisciplinary group of about a dozen scientists, including ecologists, biologists, and oceanographers, who were analyzing the bay’s health. Over the past several decades, the US government has poured billions of dollars into cleaning up and restoring the bay. Dennison and his colleagues had come together to answer a seemingly basic, yet distressingly difficult, question: has it made a difference. Now, two years after that meeting, and after crunching reams of data, the team can say with confidence: yes. But the Donald Trump administration has tried for the past two years to cut funding to the restoration project. Can the gains last? Read full article here.

Clean Water Act: Beaten in WOTUS Messaging War, Greens Gird for Trump Rule

By Ariel Wittenberg – E&E News – July 30, 2018
There's no simple way to explain why some wetlands and waterways get Clean Water Act protection and others don't. Chris Wood learned that the hard way. In 2015, the Trout Unlimited CEO posted a video extolling the Obama administration's Clean Water Rule — which was also known as the Waters of the U.S. rule, or WOTUS — saying it would "re-establish the protections" for the Little Cacapon River that runs behind his West Virginia farm. Not everyone got the message. One friend called with a question, "Dude, what do you mean by protections of the Clean Water Act?" "It was deflating," Wood recalled. "The message was lost because I assumed a baseline of knowledge that wasn't there." And with the Trump administration expected next month to release a replacement for the Obama rule that will likely reduce the numbers of streams and wetlands protected by the Clean Water Act, environmentalists are preparing for a messaging fight. Read full story here.

Researchers Develop New Capability to Evaluate Human-Driven Change in Eastern U.S. Streams

PHYS.org – July 27, 2018
A stream classification system developed by researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory can help assess physical changes to United States streams and rivers from human influences and aid in more effective management of water resources. The novel framework, published in PLOS ONE, is designed to incorporate physical habitat features important to stream ecology, including size, gradient, temperature, hydrology, valley confinement and substrate, into a composite map of stream diversity. An initial focus on the Eastern U.S. estimated over 5,000 stream types, most of which are rare and as many as one third affected by human impacts. Read full story here.

Community Stormwater Partnership Receives National Environmental Award

Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies July 25, 2018
A community partnership including the Yale-based Urban Resources Initiative (URI) that has helped the city of New Haven tackle the challenge of stormwater runoff has received a prestigious award from Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. The 2018 Roy Family Award for Environmental Partnership was awarded to the Advancing Green Infrastructure Program, a public-private partnership, which has built hundreds of “bioswales” across the city to reduce the pollution and flooding impacts of stormwater runoff. Read full story here.

Coastal Resilience on Capitol Hill: Protecting the United States' Infrastructure, Economy, and Security

By Rebecca Lorenzen – News Security Beat – July 24, 2018
Every dollar invested in preparing for natural disasters could save seven dollars, said Alice Hill, Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution, at a recent briefing on Capitol Hill. Catastrophic events like Superstorm Sandy present significant financial risks to U.S. businesses, the federal treasury, and the global economy. These complex emergencies have taught us that “everything is connected: our transportation system failed, our health sector failed,” said Hill, in the wake of these storms. Read full story here.

Trump Administration Proposes Revamping the Endangered Species Act

By Ari Natter – Bloomberg – July 19, 2018
A decades-old law credited with saving from extinction the American bald eagle, the iconic bird of prey whose image graces the presidential seal, would be reworked under a proposal the Trump administration announced Thursday. Enforcement of the Endangered Species Act, which seeks to prevent plants and animals from becoming extinct, would be changed to make it is easier to remove species from the list of protected ones. The proposal also makes changes that speed the approval process that federal agencies are required to complete before making changes that could harm endangered species, and would weaken protections for critical habitat. Read full story here.

Green Groups Sue Over Expanded Gulf Drilling

By Wyatt Schiff – The Hill – July 18, 2018
Green groups are suing the Trump administration over its decision to expand drilling in the Gulf of Mexico. Earthjustice filed the lawsuit on Monday on behalf of three groups, the Gulf Restoration Network, the Sierra Club and the Center for Biological Diversity, against the Interior Department and Bureau of Ocean Energy Management. The suit targets a decision from the administration to open up 78 million acres of the Gulf to potential drilling. The groups say regulators have failed to do the necessary environmental checks and are in violation of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Administrative Procedure Act (APA). Read full story here.

Nature Can Heal Itself After an Oil Spill, it Just Needs a Little Help

By Steven D. Siciliano – The Conservation – July 17, 2018
Moving oil across the Rockies is dangerous. No matter the safety precautions, spills will sometimes occur. Cleaning the soil afterwards is difficult, expensive and time-consuming. If you don’t clean the soil, the gas and oil will move from the soil and pollute nearby streams, rivers and lakes. Site owners often resort to digging up soil and dumping it in landfills. Read full story here.

 

 
 State News 

AK: Army Corp Shrugs Off EPA, Approves Alaska Wetland Damage

By Ariel Wittenberg – E&E News – August 16, 2018
The Army Corps of Engineers' approval this week of the massive Donlin Gold mine project in southwestern Alaska disregarded EPA concerns about how the project should offset damage to wetlands and streams. As the Clean Water Act permitting agency for development in wetlands, the Army Corps is supposed to require "compensatory mitigation" — restoring or preserving water resources to offset damage done by projects. The agency's Alaska District is requiring Donlin Gold to preserve thousands of acres of wetlands and restore several streams to compensate for damage caused by the open-pit mine, which would sprawl over 2.2 square miles and require nearly 5,000 acres for tailings and waste rock disposal. But the district hardly required any mitigation for the 316-mile pipeline that would supply natural gas to the mining project. Read full story here.

AK: Inside Alaska's Battle Over Land, Sea, and Life

By Bill Weir – CNN – July 28, 2018 – Video
There is a gold rush underway in Alaska. A rush to tap the black gold of oil beneath the pristine coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in the north. A rush to blast free the yellow gold, silver and copper hidden in the hills above Bristol Bay in the south. But while the great Klondike Gold Rush of 1896 was touched off by a few lucky prospectors and the glint of creek-bed precious metal, this one began on election night, 2016. Donald Trump set out to deregulate the environment on a scale unseen in generations, much to the delight of oil, gas and mining companies eager to tap Alaska's natural wealth. But as he appointed climate change deniers and anti-EPA warriors to his Cabinet, his win also brought dismay to fishermen and wildlife guides, conservationists and native tribes who believe that the true wealth of the Last Frontier is unspoiled wilderness and unrivaled biodiversity. Read full story and view video here.

CA: Restored Wetlands Could Lower Local Surface Temperatures

By Sarah Stanley – EOS – August 17, 2018
The Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, a vast freshwater tidal marsh located about 65 kilometers northeast of San Francisco, once harbored abundant birds, shellfish, salmon, elk, and other wildlife that sustained local Native American populations. By the late 19th century, however, settlers had built levees and drained most of the delta for farming. The region’s role as a central hub of California’s water supply has led to decades of challenges and legal controversy over land use in the delta, but today, restoration efforts are under way to restore wetlands in parts of the 2,800-square-kilometer delta. These restoration efforts provide a unique opportunity to study the climate effects of this land use transition. Read full story here.

CA: How Saving Southern California’s Steelhead Trout Could Also Help Save the State’s Watersheds

By Debra Utacia Krol – The Revelator – August 8, 2018
Can saving an endangered fish help heal some of California’s regional water woes? Masses of steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) once migrated freely between the sea and river headwaters along the California coast. That began to change about a century ago as dams, stream realignments, bridges, invasive species and degraded estuaries all took their toll on steelhead, putting this intriguing member of the salmon family on a path toward near-extinction. Now a coalition of private and public entities hopes to reverse the trend — and re-invigorate vital watersheds in California’s most densely populated region in the process. Read full story here.

FL: What is Causing Florida’s Algae Crisis?

By Karl havens – PHYS.org – August 10, 2018
Two large-scale algae outbreaks in Florida are killing fish and threatening public health. Along the southwest coast, one of the longest-lasting red tide outbreaks in the state's history is affecting more than 100 miles of beaches. Meanwhile, discharges of polluted fresh water from Lake Okeechobee and polluted local runoff water from the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee watersheds have caused blooms of blue-green algae in downstream estuaries on both coasts. Karl Havens, a professor at the University of Florida and director of the Florida Sea Grant Program, explains what's driving this two-pronged disaster. Read full story here.

ID: Pre-vegetated Mats, Logs Control Erosion, Restore Wetlands

By Dianna Troyer – Capital Press – August 21, 2018
Wetland plants growing in logs and mats made from coir, the fiber from the outer husk of coconuts, have been the key to growth at North Fork Native Plants, a nursery in eastern Idaho specializing in providing plants for restoration and reclamation projects. Read full story here.

IL: Here’s How a Mile of Chicago’s River Became a Wildlife Haven

By Leslie Nemo – Mother Jones – August 7, 2018
If you can bypass the cheese display at the Goose Island Whole Foods in Chicago, there’s a strange sight out the building’s back doors. In the river below float 80 coconut-fiber beds, replete with native grasses, shrubs, and even river birch trees. Most days, you’ll also see Nick Wesley, co-founder of the nonprofit Urban Rivers, inspecting the beds from a kayak pulled up alongside. The plants he’s tending are the beginnings of the Wild Mile. The initiative, led by Urban Rivers, aims to transform the steel-walled North Branch Canal of the Chicago River into a lush wildlife haven. Read full article here.

LA: Environmental Bonds Could Help Speed State Coastal Restoration Projects

By Mark Schleifstein – Nola–The Times-Picayume – August 14, 2018 – Video
A $40 million project to rebuild 835 acres of wetlands and reduce storm surge flooding of Port Fourchon could become a test of a new "pay for success" environmental bond program that might provide up-front construction money to the state and entice oil and gas or other firms to fund bonuses to bond buyers and contractors if the work reduces wetland losses better than expected. Read full story and view video here.

ME: Nature Conservancy Sees an Opportunity to Fight Climate Change—Using Maine’s Woodlands

By Kevin Miller – Portland Press Herald – August 14, 2018
Deep in the commercial forests of northern Maine, trees are often valued for their lumber potential or for the ecological benefits they provide. But now a small and growing number of businesses from as far away as California may
be investing in Maine’s woods as a way to address climate change. Trees absorb carbon dioxide – and larger trees means more of the greenhouse gas is locked away. In an effort to head off global warming, California and two Canadian provinces are requiring some companies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions or purchase carbon “offsets” in order to comply with government limits. The Nature Conservancy, a nonprofit forest landowner, hopes to connect those companies with the vast
Maine woods in a way that could benefit both. Read full story here.

ME: Largest Conservation Effort in Maine History Aims to Save the State’s Coast—and its Culture

By Patti Wight – Maine Public Radio – August 6, 2018 – Video
Less than one percent of Maine's coastline offers guaranteed public access. It's a near-historic low that the Maine Coast Heritage Trust wants to reverse. Wednesday the organization announced a $125 million fundraising campaign to expand ocean waterfront access and protect it from development pressure and climate change. Supporters say the goal is to stitch back together the shreds of a tapestry that has already started to unravel. Read full story and view video here

MD: Garbage Pours into Chesapeake Bay, and States Quarrel Over Whose Mess It Is

By Julia Jacobs – The New York Times – August 10, 2018
After rain pummeled Mid-Atlantic States in recent weeks, Maryland officials publicly lamented the masses of trash flowing into Chesapeake Bay — and blamed two states to the north. One Maryland official called the pileup of woody debris, plastic bottles and broken Styrofoam an “aesthetic assault.” Another called it an “insult” to the bay and an environmental crisis that could reverse years of progress toward reducing pollution in the country’s largest estuary. As destructive storms hit in late July, officials opened more than 20 floodgates in the Conowingo Dam in northern Maryland, pushing floating garbage and debris down the Susquehanna River from upstream states. But whose trash is it? And who is responsible for cleaning it up? Read full story here.

MA: Massachusetts Raises the Bar (Just a Bit) on Climate Ambition

By Dan Gearino – InsideClimate News – August 2, 2018
The legislature in Massachusetts has passed a law that encourages more use of renewable energy, but environmental advocates are disappointed because the state had seemed poised to pass something far more ambitious. The bill, which now goes to Gov. Charlie Baker, was passed this week on the final day of session, following months of wrangling. This was a clash between two chambers of the Massachusetts legislature that are both controlled by Democrats but disagree about how quickly to move on clean energy and climate change. Read full story here.

MA: Baker-Polito Administration Awards $3.2 Million for Coastal Communities to Prepare for Climate Change

Contact: Katie Gronendyke – Mass.gov – August 1, 2018
The Baker-Polito Administration today announced more than $3.2 million in funding to support local efforts to proactively plan for and adapt to coastal storm and climate change impacts, including storm surge, flooding, erosion and sea level rise. These Coastal Resilience grants, provided by the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM), are being awarded to Braintree, Chatham, Chelsea and Everett, Dennis, Duxbury Beach Reservation, Inc., Gloucester, Hull, Ipswich, Kingston, Marion, Mattapoisett, Nantucket, Provincetown, Salem, Wareham and Winthrop. Under the Baker-Polito Administration, 67 projects have been funded through this grant program, representing an investment of over $9.1 million. Read full press release here.

MI: Wave of Future: Drainage Districts Could Ease Floods

By Garrett Neese – The Daily Mining Gazette – August 20, 2018
Some Houghton County municipalities are looking to lessen the damage of future floods by establishing drainage districts. The districts, set up within individual watersheds, would be used to fund stormwater drainage projects within the watershed’s boundary, including means such as open ditches or underground storm piping. Watershed boundaries have natural limits depending on topography and ground composition to direct the flow of stormwater into larger water bodies. Read full story here.

MI: Reconnecting in Detroit: The Transformative Potential of Citizen Science

By John H. Hartig – Center for Humans & Nature – August 7, 2018
Gabrielle Herin always loved animals and nature. At the age of fourteen, she came knocking at the door of the Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge looking for volunteer opportunities. She quickly became involved in invasive species removal, tree planting, trail maintenance, Hawkfest, Pointe Mouillee Waterfowl Festival, and bald eagle tours. Her love of the outdoors and passion for conservation were heightened by her citizen science and stewardship experiences at the refuge. Over a five-year period, she volunteered over four-hundred-fifty hours at the refuge, where she came to see how she is part of an ecosystem that requires stewardship by everyone. Gabrielle’s volunteer efforts helped her earn a Congressional Gold Medal that recognizes young Americans for exceptional initiative, achievement, and service. Read full story here.

NH: 800 Miles of Merrimack Watershed Tainted by Road Salt

By Joshua Carney – The Eagle-Tribune – July 25, 2018
More than 10 percent of streams in the Merrimack River watershed are impacted by high chloride concentrations as a result of road salt applied during the winter, according to new research released by the University of New Hampshire Monday. Researchers at the New Hampshire Agricultural Experiment Station studied how road salt application during the winter is impacting stream water quality throughout the year, as salt concentrations can be highest in the summer and can potentially harm freshwater plants, invertebrates, amphibians and fish. Read full story here.

NJ: Ocean City Proposes $3.2 million Plan to Rebuild Wetlands

Michelle Brunetti – Press of Atlantic City – July 25, 2018
The city is proposing a $3.2 million project to combat erosion and rebuild marsh on a wetlands island that provides protection from storm damage to some bayside blocks. It would be funded with a $2 million grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and a $1.2 million city match, said ACT Engineers of Robbinsville Vice President Eric B. Rosina at a public meeting on the project Tuesday night at City Hall. The firm is a consultant on the project. The project would enhance and restore more than 150 acres of tidal wetlands there, according to ACT. Read full story here.

PA: Saving the Bay

By David Pacchioli – Penn State News – August 20, 2018
When Matt Royer teaches undergraduates about nutrient pollution, he calls it a next-generation environmental problem. “I start with a history of the environmental movement,” says Royer, director of Penn State’s Agriculture and Environment Center. “Most of our current law was born out of those televised images from the 1960s, images of rivers catching on fire, smog inversions, oil spills on California beaches. Things that are easy to see, that have drastic, immediate impacts.” Nutrient pollution is not like that. Its impacts mount gradually, and they can be difficult to spot. But it’s a major issue affecting water quality around the world: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency names it “one of America's most widespread, costly and challenging environmental problems.” Read full story here.

TX: “Mother Nature is Very Resilient”: A Year After Harvey, Coastal Ecosystems Are Thriving

By Natalia Alamdari – The Texas Tribune – August 15, 2018
When Larry McKinney steers his boat around the bays near Corpus Christi, he’s normally able to navigate by sight. But since Hurricane Harvey made landfall a year ago, dumping anywhere from 20 to 50 inches of rainwater along the Texas coast, McKinney’s usual markers aren’t as recognizable. “Some of the islands that you used for landmarks have disappeared or been reconfigured,” said McKinney, executive director of the Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies. “The natural infrastructure has changed, and the system’s adapted to that.” In the year since Harvey, McKinney and his colleagues at the Texas A&M Corpus Christi interdisciplinary institute continue to research how both humans and nature reacted and adapted to the storm. Read full story here.

TX: Residents Mixed on Planned Clear Creek Watershed Flood Prevention Projects in Upcoming $2.5B Bond Election

By Jake Magee – Community Impact – July 18, 2018
In his decades living in Harris County, resident Steve Williams had never seen anything like Hurricane Harvey. “We got 2 feet of water in our house in 15 minutes,” Williams said. “Something is terribly wrong with that.” Williams was among hundreds who showed up to the Harris County Flood Control District’s Clear Creek Watershed meeting Tuesday. It was one of 23 meetings the district is holding in Harris County’s 23 watersheds to hear public feedback on planned flood-prevention projects that would be funded by the upcoming $2.5 billion bond election. Read full story here.

WI: Wisconsin Reservation Offers a Climate Success Story and a Warning

By Rebecca Hersher – NPR – August 15, 2018
When Star Ames was a child there was a flood. The streets were like rivers and the houses like islands. It was 1960 and the village of Odanah, Wis. was up to its neck. The town had been built on the banks of the Bad River, in the floodplain. "I remember watching the river come up," Ames says. "Every place we thought was high enough, the water kept coming up." Odanah was home to thousands of members of the Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Chippewa Tribe, and, as the water rose, people were trapped. After the big flood in 1960, Ames set out to move thousands of Odanah residents to higher ground. Read or listen to full story here.

WY: Buffalo Wetlands Get Inventoried

By Floyd Whiting – Buffalo Bulletin – August 8, 2018
Phil Gonzales stood on a dirt path as his eyes scanned the landscape for birds and other wildlife. He and a team of over 20 volunteers were taking inventory of Buffalo’s wetlands located along the Clear Creek Trail south of the Buffalo Senior Center. What they found was the wetlands are healthy – despite some limitations. Read full story here.


 

Wetland Science News

In Eastern US, Adult Trees Adapt and Acclimate to Local Climate

PHYS.org – August 21, 2018
Trees growing in temperate forests in the eastern US show strong adaptation or acclimation to local climate. So reports a new study that analyzed more than 23,000 tree cores to investigate how adult trees respond to changes in climatic conditions. Results were published this week in the journal Ecosphere. Charles Canham, a forest ecologist at Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, led the research team, which included several collaborators from the USDA Forest Service. He explains, "By looking at data in tree rings, we were able to reveal how individual trees responded to variations in climate during a roughly 40 year period. There is evidence of pervasive local adaptation." Read full story here.

Are Coastal Nuclear Power Plants Ready for Sea Level Rise?

By John Vidal – Hakai Magazine – August 21, 2018
The outer defensive wall of what is expected to be the world’s most expensive nuclear power station is taking shape on the shoreline of the choppy gray waters of the Bristol Channel in western England. By the time the US $25-billion Hinkley Point C nuclear station is finished, possibly in 2028, the concrete seawall will be 12.5 meters high, 900 meters long, and durable enough, the UK regulator and French engineers say, to withstand the strongest storm surge, the greatest tsunami, and the highest sea-level rise. But will it? Read full article here.

Think Rivers Are Dangerous Now? Just Wait

By Matt Simon – WIRED – August 20, 2018
A river is a mercurial thing, running deep and fast in the rainy season, and low and slow when the rains fade. It can dry up completely one year, then turn into a raging flood the next. Every so often, a river disappears entirely, bringing down the communities it once nourished. You hear a lot about how climate change is fueling the rise of our seas but not so much about how it will transform our rivers, the flooding of which currently affects almost 60 million people a year. An ambitious new study in Nature Climate Change, though, takes on the task of modeling rivers’ reactions to a warming world. With their projections of flooding severity, the researchers were able to quantify possible losses of both property and human life. As with any climate model, the researchers are making assumptions to present just one possible future scenario—but even in the best case, things don’t look pretty. Read full story here.

‘Abrupt Thaw’ of Permafrost Beneath Lakes Could Significantly Affect Climate Change Models

By Jeff Richardson – University of Alaska Fairbanks – August 15, 2018
Methane released by thawing permafrost from some Arctic lakes could significantly accelerate climate change, according to a new University of Alaska Fairbanks-led study. The study, which was published Aug. 15 in the journal Nature Communications, focuses on the carbon released by thawing permafrost beneath thermokarst lakes. Such lakes develop when warming soil melts ground ice, causing the surface to collapse and form pools of water. Those pools accelerate permafrost thaw beneath the expanding lakes, providing food for microbes that produce the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane. Read full story here.

How Climate Change is Making ‘Red Tide’ Algal Blooms Even Worse

By Angela Fritz – The Washington Post – August 15, 2018 – Video
Red tide is killing Florida’s southwest coast. Fish, manatees, sea turtles — some of them endangered — and nine dolphins have washed up dead on the beaches, and all of them are confirmed or suspected to have been poisoned by the algal bloom. The body of a young whale shark was found on a beach in late July, and biologists believe that it was the first known whale shark to have been killed by red tide. Now the toxic algae — Karenia brevis — is working up the coast from Sanibel Island to Tampa Bay. Respiratory irritation in humans has been reported as far north as Manatee County, just south of Tampa Bay, where high concentrations of the algae were measured last week. The water off Pinellas County — Clearwater, Largo, St. Petersburg — had elevated concentrations of red tide beyond a normal “background” state for the first time this month. Florida Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency for seven counties on the southwest coast Tuesday. Read full story here.

River Complexity Maintains Regional Population Stability

Science Daily – July 31, 2018
An international group of researchers has demonstrated that branching complexity of rivers affects regional population stability and persistence in nature, contrary to current theories which suggest the importance of an ecosystem's size. At the turn of the 21st century, ecosystems have become exposed to greater environmental uncertainty with intensive heat waves, out-of-season cold snaps and superstorms. "One urgent task for ecologists is to unravel how regional populations of organisms are maintained during rapid environmental changes," said Hokkaido University's Akira Terui who led the study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Read full article here.

Coldwater Streams May Provide Refuge Against Changing Climate

Science Daily – July 24, 2018
Coldwater stream habitats are vulnerable to effects of climate change, particularly to changes in precipitation and air temperatures that alter their hydrology. Some of these streams are expected to diminish in size, permanently transition to warmer habitats, or possibly go dry. However, streams in deep canyons, poleward-facing slopes, thick canopy cover, groundwater-fed areas, and with fewer anthropogenic impacts are more likely to resist these changing conditions. Such areas may act as coldwater refugia -- areas buffered from climate change that enable persistence of the ecosystem and its resources -- and may provide long-term habitat to ecologically and economically important species. Read full article here.

Rivers in the Sky: How Deforestation is Affecting Global Water Cycles

By Fred Pearce – Yale Environment 360 – July 24, 2018
Every tree in the forest is a fountain, sucking water out of the ground through its roots and releasing water vapor into the atmosphere through pores in its foliage. In their billions, they create giant rivers of water in the air – rivers that form clouds and create rainfall hundreds or even thousands of miles away. But as we shave the planet of trees, we risk drying up these aerial rivers and the lands that depend on them for rain. A growing body of research suggests that this hitherto neglected impact of deforestation could in many continental interiors dwarf the impacts of global climate change. It could dry up the Nile, hobble the Asian monsoon, and desiccate fields from Argentina to the Midwestern United States. Read full story here.

Recognizing Their Role in Maintaining Healthy Watersheds “Beaver Believers” Work to Rehab Rodent’s Reputation

By Sarah Boon – Science – July 23, 2018
Why should we care about beavers? Consider all they do. Beavers convert vegetation to marsh to wetland and back
again. They facilitate water storage in ponds and recharge groundwater. Ponds and meadows sculpted by beavers
concentrate nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. Not only does this create fertile ground, it helps filter agricultural
runoff. Beaver-dammed landscapes create habitats for other species, and their complexes can serve as wildfire breaks.
Read full blog post here.

Human Influence Detected in Changing Seasons

Anne M Stark – Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory – July 19, 2018
For the first time, scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and five other organizations have shown that human influences significantly impact the size of the seasonal cycle of temperature in the lowest layer of the atmosphere. To demonstrate this, they applied a so-called “fingerprint” technique. Fingerprinting seeks to separate human and natural influences on climate. It relies on patterns of climate change -- typically patterns that are averaged over years or decades. But in the new research appearing in the July 20 edition of the journal Science, the team studied seasonal behavior, and found that human-caused warming has significantly affected the seasonal temperature cycle. Read full story here.

Urbanization and Changes to Climate Could Pack One-Two Punch for Watersheds in the Future, Study Finds

PHYS.org – July 18, 2018
Watersheds channel water from streams to oceans, and more than $450 billion in food, manufactured goods and other economic factors depend on them, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Watersheds also are crucial to the health of surrounding ecosystems and communities. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri have found that climatic changes and urban development, when working in tandem, could have profound effects on watersheds by midcentury. Read full story here.

Study Finds Climate Determines Shapes of River Basins

Environmental News Network – July 18, 2018
There are more than 1 million river basins carved into the topography of the United States, each collecting rainwater to feed the rivers that cut through them. Some basins are as small as individual streams, while others span nearly half the continent, encompassing, for instance, the whole of the Mississippi river network. River basins also vary in shape, which, as MIT scientists now report, is heavily influenced by the climate in which they form. The team found that in dry regions of the country, river basins take on a long and thin contour, regardless of their size. In more humid environments, river basins vary: Larger basins, on the scale of hundreds of kilometers, are long and thin, while smaller basins, spanning a few kilometers, are noticeably short and squat. The difference, they found, boils down to the local availability of groundwater. Read full story here.
 

Resources and Publications

Fewer blue lakes and more murky lakes across the continental U.S.: Implications for planktonic food webs

By Dina M. Leech, Aminal I. Pollard, et al. – ALSO – August 21, 2018
Elevated allochthonous inputs of organic matter are increasingly recognized as a driver of ecosystem change in lakes, particularly when concurrent with eutrophication. Evaluation of lakes in a nutrient‐color paradigm (i.e., based on total phosphorus and true color) enables a more robust approach to research and management. To assess temporal and spatial patterns in nutrient‐color status for U.S. lakes and associated food web attributes, we analyzed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Lakes Assessment (NLA) data. With 1000+ lakes sampled in 2007 and 2012 in a stratified random sampling design, the NLA enables rigorous assessment of lake condition across the continental U.S. We demonstrate that many U.S. lakes are simultaneously experiencing eutrophication and brownification to produce an abundance of “murky” lakes. Overall, “blue” lakes decreased by ~ 18% (46% of lakes in 2007 to 28% in 2012) while “murky” lakes increased by almost 12% (24% of lakes in 2007 to 35.4% in 2012). No statistical differences were observed in the proportions of “green” or “brown” lakes. Regionally, murky lakes significantly increased in the Northern Appalachian, Southern Plains, and Xeric ecoregions. Murky lakes exhibited the highest epilimnetic chlorophyll a concentrations, cyanobacterial densities, and microcystin concentrations. Total zooplankton biomass was also highest in murky lakes, primarily due to increased rotifer and copepod biomass. However, zooplankton: phytoplankton biomass ratios were low, suggesting reduced energy transfer to higher trophic levels. These results emphasize that many lakes in the U.S. are simultaneously “greening” and “browning”, with potentially negative consequences for water quality and food web structure. Read full article here.

Financing Resilient Communities and Coastlines: How Environmental Impact Bonds Can Accelerate Wetland Restoration in Louisiana and Beyond

Environmental Defense Fund – August 2018
A new report by EDF and Quantified Ventures finds that environmental impact bonds could help the state of Louisiana — and other coastal areas dealing with land loss and sea level rise — restore its rapidly disappearing coast faster and for less money, while involving local asset owners in voluntarily helping pay for projects that realize superior reduction in land loss. The report outlines next steps the state of Louisiana would need to take to pilot the environmental impact bond, including establishing credit rating, resolving any uses of Gulf oil spill funds and determining the bond's tax-exempt status. If implemented, it would be the first ever environmental impact bond for wetland restoration and would help Louisiana be a world leader in coastal resilience financing. Read more and download the report here. Direct link to the report.

The Collingwood Harbour Story: From shipbuilding to Great Lakes Pollution Hot Spot to Waterfront Revitalization

Contact Dr. John Hartig – International Association for Great Lakes Research
Collingwood Harbour was the first Great Lakes Area of Concern to be delisted. No longer a pollution hotspot, the town has cleaned up its harbor and restored all impaired beneficial uses using an ecosystem approach. Its former shipyards site has been transformed to an award-winning waterfront community, and the town and vicinity are now a four-season vacation spot. Read full Case Study here.

 

Potpourri

 
Near Two Million Acres on Fire in the United States 

Environmental News Network – August 20, 2018
The West Coast of the United States is shrouded in smoke from the 110 large fires (this does not include smaller fires within each complex of fires) that have erupted across the region during this fire season. Over 1.9 million acres are or have been ablaze. Six new large fires were reported in Idaho, Nevada and Oregon over the weekend and eight large fires have been contained including the Ferguson Fire near Yosemite National Park in California. Read full story here. 

With Half the Planet Saved for Nature, Will We Have Enough to Eat?

By Brandon Keim – Anthropocene Magazine – August 15, 2018
The idea of devoting half of Earth’s terrestrial surface to rich, intact forms of nature has stirred conservationist imaginations in the last few years. It’s an inspiring vision, simple yet powerful, a bright aspiration amidst the gloom of extinctions and extirpations. Between the idea and the reality, though, is plenty of practical uncertainty. What would setting aside half the planet’s land actually entail? Who would make the decisions? And, crucially, what would this mean for food production, which currently represents the single largest human land use? Read full article here. 

Study: Human Wastewater Valuable to Global Agriculture, Economics 

By Lois Yoksoulian – Illinois News Bureau – August 15, 2018
It may seem off-putting to some, but human waste is full of nutrients that can be recycled into valuable products that could promote agricultural sustainability and better economic independence for some developing countries. Cities produce and must manage huge quantities of wastewater. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a model to clarify what parts of the world may benefit most from re-circulation of human-waste-derived nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus from cities and back into farm fields. They report their findings in the journal Nature Sustainability. Read full story here. 

Natural Disasters Widen Racial Wealth Gap 

Science Daily – August 15, 2018
Damage caused by natural disasters and recovery efforts launched in their aftermaths have increased wealth inequality between races in the United States, according to new research from Rice University and the University of Pittsburgh.  "Damages Done: The Longitudinal Impacts of Natural Hazards on Wealth Inequality in the United States" will appear in an upcoming edition of Social Problems. A supplement to the paper highlights the wealth gap between whites and blacks attributable to natural disaster damage from 1999 through 2013 in 20 U.S. counties. Read full story here. 

New Defense Bill Strengthens the Military’s Flood & Energy Readiness and Saves Taxpayer Dollars—All While Addressing Climate Change 

By Shana Udvardy – Union of Concerned Scientists – August 7, 2018
Today, President Trump signed into law H.R. 5515, the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2019. The NDAA FY 2019 builds to the future and reflects the reality of climate change and therefore provides a useful roadmap for Congress as they consider different proposals to help the nation prepare for future environmental conditions, including climate change. The Armed Services Committee deserves recognition for their leadership in ensuring that taxpayer dollars are spent wisely by requiring important energy and climate resiliency measures.  Read full blog post here.

Climate Taxes on Agriculture Could Lead to More Food Insecurity than Climate Change Itself

PHYS.org – July 31, 2018
New IIASA-led research has found that a single climate mitigation scheme applied to all sectors, such as a global carbon tax, could have a serious impact on agriculture and result in far more widespread hunger and food insecurity than the direct impacts of climate change. Smarter, more inclusive policies are needed instead. The research, published in Nature Climate Change, is the first international study to compare across models the effects of climate change on agriculture with the costs and effects of mitigation policies, and look at subsequent effects on food security and the risk of hunger. Read full story here.

Climate Change: We're Not Literally Doomed, but... There's Space for Action Between "Everything is Fine," and "The Apocalypse is Upon Us"

By Kate Marvel – Scientific American – July 30, 2018
There is really no such thing as a post-apocalyptic story. Someone, after all, has to survive to tell the tale. An apocalypse must be incomplete to be interesting: cockroaches don’t present much opportunity for character development. And yet, this is how we sometimes talk about climate change: we’re doomed, the apocalypse is coming, the end of the world is nigh. Don’t get me wrong: climate change is an overwhelmingly horrific thing. It will lead—it already is leading- to massive economic damage, desperate refugees, and the loss of things we love. But it’s fundamentally different from an asteroid impact or zombie plague, and I think it’s important to understand why. Read full blog post here.

A Photographer Documents the Effects of Climate Change on Maine's Intertidal Zones

By Veer Mudambi – Smithsonian Magazine – July 27, 2018
As Tim Briggs strolls along the beach in Tidal Falls, Maine, he spies a group of harbor seals frolicking in the water. The 22-year-old marine biology student grabs his camera and begins snapping pictures. “Everyone loves seals,” he says with a chuckle. Which is true—but the playful creatures are not who he is here to photograph today. Briggs’ subjects are much smaller, spikier, and perhaps less obviously charismatic. They are the mussels, barnacles, algae, crabs and sea stars that create the complex and delicate miniature ecosystems along coastal areas. Briggs is here as an undergraduate researcher and photographer on a research trip for Northeastern University’s Marine Science Center. His photos will appear on Northeastern’s College of Science news site as well as in outreach and educational materials. The purpose is to study temperature and environmental trends to predict how climate change affects the variety of organisms within the intertidal zones—the area of the beach between high and low tide. Read full article here.

Fish Subsidies are Speeding the Decline of Ocean Health

By: Elizabeth Wilson – PEW – July 19, 2018
More than 1 billion people worldwide depend on seafood as a main source of protein, and about 100 million people rely directly on fishing for their income, yet according to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), 90 percent of marine fisheries are either fully fished or overfished. Fisheries subsidies are one of the key drivers behind this decline in fish stocks. Read full story here.

 



 Calendar of Events


WEBINARS
     
MEETINGS     
TRAINING     

 

 Special Events


World Shorebirds Day
September 6, 2018
Everywhere

Nature and Optics Festival
September 8, 2018
Sonoma, CA

International Coastal Cleanup Day: Fight for Trash Free Seas
September 15, 2018

National Estuaries Week
September 15-22, 2018

The Avenue Viera:
Wild About Nature
September 22, 2018
Viera, FL

Wetlands Institute:
Fall Migration Festival
September 22, 2018
Cape May, NJ

Save the Bay: Bay Day
October 6, 2018

2018 Voice of the Wetlands Festival
October 12-14, 2018
Houma, LA

Maine Maritime Museum:
Birding on the Bay

October 14 and 28, 2018
Bath, ME

               
WEBINARS  
               
August 2018  
               
August 27, 2018
2:00 p.m. ET
  Environmental Law Institute Webinar: Assessing Stream Functions and Conditions – Challenges and Solutions  
               
August 29, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET 
  The Swamp School Webinar: Waters of the State – Section 404(g)  
       
August 29, 2018
2:00 p.m. ET
  Association of State Wetland Managers: Compensatory Mitigation Webinar: An Ecological Framework for Reviewing Compensatory Mitigation: Biotic Processes (Part 3 of 4)  
       
August 30, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  Soak Up the Rain New England (free) Webinar Series: Greening the Streets of Watertown, MA: Edenfield Avenue “Green Streets” Demonstration Project   
       
August 30, 2018
2:00 p.m. ET 
  Land Trust Alliance Webinar: Coastal Resilience in a Changing Climate   
       
September      
       
September 5, 2018
12:00 p.m. ET 
  Environmental Law Institute Webinar: Beyond Politics: The Private Governance Response to Climate Change    
       
September 6, 2018
2:00 p.m. ET 
  Land Trust Alliance Webinar:  A Bigger Role: How Conserved Lands Can Serve As Natural Climate Solutions   
       
September 6, 2018
2:00 p.m. ET 
  National Water Quality Monitoring Council Webinar: Integrating Physical and Economic Data into Water Accounts for the United States   
       
September 11, 2018
5:00 p.m. ET  
  Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe: Climate-driven species redistribution in marine systems by Gretta Pecl of the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies and Centre for Marine Socioecology in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia   

 

September 12, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  American Water Works Association Webinar: Utility Tools and Strategies for Climate Change Planning  
       
September 13, 2018
2:00 p.m. ET
  Association of State Wetland Managers: Compensatory Mitigation Webinar: An Ecological Framework for Reviewing Compensatory Mitigation Plans: Plan Review (Part 4 of 4)  
       
September 19, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  American Water Resources Association Webinar: Groundwater Discharges and Clean Water Act Compliance  
       
OCTOBER 2018  
       
October 2, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET 
  EBM Tools Network Webinar: Managing Global Acidification on a Regional Scale: How the US Mid-Atlantic and Northeast Coastal Acidification Networks (MACAN and NECAN) Are Working to Understand Impacts through Partnerships  
       
October 10, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  American Water Resources Association Webinar: Forecast Informed Reservoir Operations Improve Water Management    
       
October 10, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  Center for Watershed Protection Webcast: Innovations in Stream Restoration Design and Construction   
       
October 23, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  EBM Tools Network Webinar: Leverage a Global Volunteer Network and Access the Data Needed to Solve Environmental Challenges  
       
NOVEMBER 2018  
       
November 14, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  American Water Resources Association Webinar: Setting Up a Water Bank: From the Ground(water) Up   
       
November 14, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  Center for Watershed Protection Webcast: It Ain’t Easy Getting Green: Incentivizing Watershed Programs  
       
November 28, 2018
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of State Wetland Managers:  Members Wetland Webinar: Planning Wetland Restoration at the Watershed Level  
       
DECEMBER 2018  
       
December 19, 2018
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of State Wetland Managers: Members Wetland Webinar: Using a Living Shorelines Prioritization Tool for Wetland Improvements  
       
MEETINGS  
 
AUGUST 2018  
       
August 26-30, 2018
New Orleans, LA
  National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration (NCER)

 
       
August 26-31, 2018
Stockholm, Sweden
  SIWI: World Water Week: Water, ecosystems and human development  
       
August 27-29, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  California Adaptation Forum  
       
SEPTEMBER 2018  
       
September 5-9, 2018
Tulcea, Romania
  Romanian Limnogeographical Association (RLA): 4th International Conference “Water resources and wetlands”    
       
September 9-12, 2018
Tampa, FL
  Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies 108th Annual Meeting

 
       
September 9-13, 2018
Reykjavik, Iceland
  Society of Ecological Restoration Conference: Restoration in the Era of Climate Change  
       
September 10-12, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  San Francisco Estuary Partnership: 2018 Bay-Delta Science Conference: Our Estuary at an Intersection    
       
September 12, 2018
Saugerties, NY 
  2018 NYC Watershed and technical Conference: Clean water Through Protection and Partnership   
       
September 12-13, 2018
Portsmouth University
Portsmouth, UK
  Constructed Wetland Association Annual Conference 2018: How to Make Better Constructed Wetlands  
       
September 12-14, 2018
San Francisco, CA
  Global Climate Action Summit   
       
September 13, 2018
Toledo, OH
  Ohio Sea Grant: Understanding Algal Blooms: State of the Science Conference  
       
September 15-16, 2018
University of Maryland
Baltimore, MD
  Maryland Native Plant Society Annual Fall Conference: The Times They are A ‘Changin’: Threats to Maryland’s Native Plant Communities

 
       
September 17-19, 2018
Columbia, SC
  2018 Carolinas Climate Resilience Conference  
       
September 17-21, 2018
Gothic CO
  MtnClim 2018: Anticipating climate change impacts in mountains: Embracing variability    
       
September 18-20, 2018
Cadiz, KY
  Kentucky Association of Mitigation Managers Conference   
       
September 18-20, 2018
Camp Hill, PA
  Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the International Erosion Control Association: 25th Annual Environmental Conference & Tradeshow   
       
September 19-21, 2018
Boulder, CO
  National Center for Atmospheric Research: 8th International Workshop on Climate Informatics  
       
September 20-23, 2018
University of Georgia
Athens, GA
  Center for Integrative Conservation Research: Integrative Conservation Conference

 
       
September 22, 2018
University of Pittsburgh
  Three Rivers Evolution Event  
       
September 24-28, 2018
Jena, Germany
  10th International Conference on Ecological Informatics    
       
September 24-30, 2018
New York, NY
  Climate Week NYC  
       
September 28-29, 2018
Kingston, RI
  Inclusive SciComm: A Symposium on Advancing Inclusive Public Engagement with Science  
       
OCTOBER 2018   
       
October 2-3, 2018
Indianapolis, IN
  2018 Great Lakes Commission Annual Meeting  
       
October 2-5, 2018
Pittsburgh, PA 
  2018 AASHE Conference & Expo: Global Goals: Rising to the Challenge   
       
October 4, 2018
University of Connecticut
Storrs, CT
  University of Connecticut: Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group 2018 Invasive Plant Symposium   
       
October 5-7, 2018
Miami, FL
  2018 Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference (SEEC)   
       
October 7-10, 2018
Washington, DC 
  Behavior, Energy & Climate Change Conference  
       
October 7-11, 2018
Cleveland, OH
  The Wildlife Society's 25 Annual Conference  
       
October 9-12, 2018
Houghton, MI
  2018 State of Lake Superior Conference    
       
October 10-12, 2018
Little Rock, AR
  2018 Society of Wetland Scientists South Central Chapter Fall Meeting
 
       
October 11-13, 2018
Pittsburgh, PA
  Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2018 National Land Conservation Conference   
       
October 15-18, 2018
Spokane, WA
 
  Society for Ecological Restoration Northwest Chapter and the Society of Wetland Scientists Pacific Northwest Chapter Joint Regional Conference: Restoring Resilient Communities in Changing Landscapes  
       
October 15-18, 2018
Rome, Italy
  World Congress on Climate Change  
       
October 16-17, 2018
St. Paul, MN
  University of Minnesota Water Resources Center: Minnesota Water Resources Conference  
       
October 17, 2018
Oakland, CA 
  Alameda County Flood Control and Water Conservation District Conference: Alameda County Watershed Confluence    
       
October 17-18, 2018
Detroit, MI
  Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: Great Lakes Restoration Conference    
       
October 18-21, 2018
Antalya, Turkey
  International Marine & Freshwater Sciences Symposium (MarFresh2018)
 
       
October 20, 2018
Leominster, MA
  MACC Fall Conference   
       
October 21-29, 2018
Dubai
  13th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands  
       
October 22-26, 2018
Stowe, VT
  American Meteorological Society: 29th Conference on Severe Local Storms  
       
October 23-25, 2018
Bloominton, IN
  Natural Areas Conference: Building Resilience: The Future of Natural Areas   
       
October 24-25, 2018
Miami Beach, FL
  Southeast Florida Regional Compact: Southeast Florida Regional Climate Leadership Summit  
       
October 24-26, 2018
New York, NY
  American Museum of Natural History Center for Biodiversity and Conservation: Student Conference on Conservation Science-New York

 
       
October 27-28, 2018
Knoxville, TN
  National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS): 10th Annual Undergraduate Research Conference  
       
October 28-31, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  American Water Works Association: Water Infrastructure Conference  
       
October 29-31, 2018
San Diego, CA
  6th International Conference on Sustainable Environment and Agriculture  
October 30-November 2, 2018
Cincinnati, OH 
  38th International Symposium of the North American Lake Management Society: Now Trending: Innovations in Lake Management    
       
October 30-November 2, 2018
Galveston, TX
  American Shore & Beach Preservation Association: 2018 National Coastal Conference: Resilient Shorelines for Rising Tides  
       
NOVEMBER 2018   
       
November 2-3, 2018
State College, PA
  4th Biennial Pennsylvania Botany Symposium
 
       
November 4-7, 2018
Baltimore, MD
 
  American Society of Agronomy, the Crop Science Society of America, and the Canadian Society of Agronomy: 2018 International Annual Meeting: Enhancing Productivity in a Changing Climate   
       
November 9-11, 2018
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI
  Sustainability and Development Conference  
       
November 13-15, 2018
Homer, AK
  Alaska Committee for Noxious and Invasive Pest Management: Invasive Species Workshop   
       
November 13-16, 2018
Chicago, IL
  Lincoln Park Zoo 2nd International Wildlife Reintroduction Conference  
       
November 17, 2018
Cromwell, CT
  CACIWC Annual Meeting and Environmental Conference  
       
November 19-20, 2018
Paris, France
  6th Global Summit on Climate Change: Paleoclimatology: The Earth’s Climate in Long View  
       
November 25-29, 2018
Champions Gate, FL
  American Water Works Association, Florida Section: 2018 Fall Conference: Planning the Future of Water  
       
November 26-27, 2018
Tokyo, Japan
  World Summit on Climate Change & Global Warming  
 
DECEMBER 2018   
       
December 8-13, 2018
Long Beach, CA
  Restore America’s Estuaries Conference: 9th National Summit on Coastal and Estuarine Restoration and Management  
       
December 10-14, 2018
Washington, DC 
  AGU Fall Meeting

 
       
December 11-13, 2018
Indianapolis, IN
  North Central Region Water Network: North Central Region One Water Action Forum  
       
JANUARY 2019   
       
January 6-9, 2019
San Diego, CA
  International Soils Meeting: Soils Across Latitudes

 
       
January 27-30, 2019 
Cape May, NJ
  2019 Delaware Estuary Science & Environmental Summit: Estuary 2029: Saving our System Through Collaboration
Abstracts due by August 30, 2018
 
       
FEBRUARY 2019   
       
February 5-7, 2019
Phoenix, AZ
  Tamarisk Coalition and the Desert Botanical Garden: Riparian Restoration Conference
Abstract deadline: October 1, 2018
 
       
February 5-7, 2019
Osage Beach, MO
  Missouri Natural Resources Conference

 
       
February 5-7, 2019
Stevenson, WA
  River Restoration Northwest: Stream Restoration Symposium

 
       
February 11-15, 2019
Anchorage, AK
  Alaska Forum on the Environment

 
       
February 19-21, 2018
Madison, WI
  Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Wetland Science Conference
Proposals due by November 1, 2018
 
       
February 27-28, 2018
Toronto, Canada
  International Conference on Water Management Modeling  
       
MARCH 2019  
       
March 13-17, 2019
Raleigh, NC 
  CitSci 2019: Growing Our Family Tree   
       
March 25-29, 2019
Denver, CO
  National Water Quality Monitoring Council: 11th Annual National Monitoring Conference  
       
  

 

 
TRAINING  
   
AUGUST 2018  
       
August 26-September 1, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Mosses: Orthotrichaceae of Maine  
       
Augut 26-September 1, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Independent Study: Pyrenolichens
 
 
       
August 28-31, 2018
Annapolis, MD
  National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) Workshop: Socio-Environmental Synthesis: Interdisciplinary Skill Building, Proposal Writing,  Collaborating    
       
August 29-30, 2018
Denver, CO 
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training   
       
August 29-30, 2018
Lansing, MI
  Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Michigan Rapid Assessment Method for Wetlands (MiRAM)    
       
August 31-September 1, 2018
Denver, CO
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training  
       
 SEPTEMBER 2018  
       
September 6-7, 2018
Whitefish, MT
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum   
       
September 6-7, 2018
Whitefish, MT
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018  
       
September 7-9, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Asters and Goldenrods  
       
September 10, 2018
Boston, MA
  Institute for Wetland & Environmental Education & Research, Inc.: Wetlands and Their Borders Course  
       
September 10-14, 2018
Covington, LA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
September 10-14, 2018
St. Michaels, MD 
  Environmental Concern Course: Basic Wetland Delineation    
       
September 10-December 3, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist    
       
September 10, 2018-
December 3, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018  
       
September 11-12, 2018
Charleston, SC
  D & D West Course: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes - 16 hours (field)  
       
September 11-14, 2018
Boston, MA 
  Institute for Wetland & Environmental Education & Research, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineator Training  
       
September 12-13, 2018
Kansas City, MO 
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training  
       
September 12-13, 2018
Spokane, WA 
  Washington Department of Ecology Workshop: Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington    
       
September 13-14, 2018
San Diego, CA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Riparian Habitat Restoration for the Arid Southwest
 
       
September 14, 2018
Boylston, MA
  Association of Massachusetts Wetland Scientists Workshop: Late Season Sedges  
       
September 14-16, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Current Issues in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation    
       
September 17-18, 2018
Covington, LA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
September 17-18, 2018
Covington, LA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018  
       
September 17-28, 2018
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: The Ecology and Conservation of Migratory Birds  
       
September 17-October 15, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments    
       
September 17-October 15, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Living Shoreline Design  
       
September 19-20, 2018
Washtenaw County, MI
  Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Asters and Goldenrods in Michigan Wetlands  
       
September 20-22, 2018
Laramie, WY
  CUAHSI: Near Surface Geophysics for Hydrology Workshop   
       
September 21, 2018
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Plant ID – Familiarization for New Wetland Delineators   
       
September 21-23, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review Process   
       
September 24-25, 201
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Evaluating Hydric Soils in the Field   
       
September 24-28, 2018
Covington, LA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
September 24-27, 2018
Aliquippa, PA
  The Swamp School: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training  
       
September 24-28, 2018
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
September 26-27, 2018
Baton Rouge, LA 
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
 
       
September 27-28, 2018
Gainesville, FL 
  Southeastern Botany, LLC Workshop: Grass & Sedge Workshop    
       
September 28-29, 2018
Baton Rouge, LA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training  
       
September 28-30, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Fall Maine Mushroom  
       
OCTOBER 2018  
       
October 1-December 24, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018  
       
October 4-5, 2018
Tuckerton, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants
 
       
October 5-7, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Columbus Day Weekend Retreat  
       
October 8- November 5, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets    
       
October 8-December 31, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator  
       
October 9-12, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  D&D West Course: Basic Wetland Delineation - 40 hours (½ lecture, ½ field)  
       
October 9-12, 2018
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Methodology for Delineating Wetlands  
       
October 10-11, 2018
Marquette, MI
  Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Hydric Soils Identification    
       
October 10-11, 2018
Richmond, VA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
October 10-11, 2018
Richmond, VA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018  
       
October 12-14, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Bryophytes: Mosses and Liverworts   
       
October 17-18, 2018
San Diego, CA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
 
       
October 19-21, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Northeastern Freshwater Fish Assemblages   
       
October 22-25, 2018
Pittsburgh, PA
  The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design  
       
October 22-November 5, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Habitat Conservation Plans  
       
October 23-24, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  D & D West Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species - 16 hours (lecture)  
       
October 23-28, 2018
Boulder, CO
  CUAHSI – NCAR Training Workshop: The Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System

 
       
October 25-26, 2018
Gainesville, FL
  Southeastern Botany, LLC Workshop: Grass & Sedge Workshop   
       
October 26-28, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Crustose and Foliose Lichens    
       
October 31-November 1, 2018
Tampa, FL
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training  
       
NOVEMBER 2018  
       
November 5-9, 2018
John Bunker Sands Wetland Center
Seagoville, TX
  The Swamp School CourseWetland Delineation Training  
       
November 5, 2018-
January 28, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018  
       
November 5, 2018-January 28, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist    
       
November 7-8, 2018
Columbus, OH
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training   
       
November 7-8, 2018
Charleston, SC
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
November 7-8, 2018
Charleston, SC
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018  
       
November 8, 2018
Lacey, WA
  Washington Department of Ecology Workshop: Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
 
       
November 8-9, 2018
Hillsborough, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Education Course: Lake Management  
       
November 8-11, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Tree and Shrub Identification Using Twigs and Other Winter Characteristics    
       
November 12-13, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  D & D West Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology – Piedmont - 16 hours (field)  
       
November 12, 2018-
February 4, 2019

Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design    
       
November 13-15, 2018
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Winter Woody Plant ID   
       
November 26-December 24, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment   
       
DECEMBER 2018  
       
December 3-31, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets  
       
December 3, 2018-
February 25, 2019

Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018    
       
December 5-6, 2018
Tampa, FL
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training   
       
December 7-8, 2018
Tampa, FL
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training  
       
December 10-11, 2018
Charleston, SC
  D & D West Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement – Eastern Mountains/Piedmont) - 16 hours (½ lecture, ½ field)  
       
December 10, 2018-April 2019
Pittsburgh, PA
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator  
       
December 12-13, 2018
Houston, TX 
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training  
       
December 13-14, 2018
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Education Course: Identification of Wetland Plants in Winter  
       
December 17-31, 2018 
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals  
       
JANUARY 2019  
       
January 13-18, 2019
Oracle, AZ
  CUAHSI Master Class: Advanced Techniques in Watershed Science   
       
SPECIAL EVENTS  
       
September 6, 2018
Everywhere
  World Shorebirds Day  
       
September 8, 2018
Sonoma, CA
 
  Nature and Optics Festival   
       
September 15, 2018   International Coastal Cleanup Day: Fight for Trash Free Seas

 
       
September 15-22, 2018   National Estuaries Week  
       
September 22, 2018
Viera, FL
  The Avenue Viera: Wild About Nature

 
       
September 22, 2018
Cape May, NJ
  Wetlands Institute: Fall Migration Festival 
 
 
       
October 6, 2018   Save the Bay: Bay Day  
       
October 12-14, 2018
Houma, LA
  2018 Voice of the Wetlands Festival    
       
October 14 and 28, 2018
Bath, ME
  Maine Maritime Museum: Birding on the Bay  
 
       
 

  

INDEX


EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • Clean Water Rule: Judge Shifts Legal Brawl, Revives WOTUS in 26 States
  • Barrasso aims to change the Clean Water Act to give states less power to stop projects
  • Army Issues Memorandum to Empower States & Tribes in their Permitting Authority
  • Administration Ending Rule that Made Industry Pay for Damages to Key Animal Habitat
  • National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Announces $2.19 Million in Grants to Benefit Forests and Wetlands within the Greater Mississippi Alluvial Valley

NATIONAL NEWS

  • EPA Says its New Coal Plan Could 'Adversely Affect Human Health'
  • A Running List of How President Trump is Changing Environmental Policy
  • New Study Identifies Strategies in US Climate Litigation
  • Water Use for Fracking has Risen Up by up to 770 Percent Since 2011
  • National Geographic Request for Proposals - AI for Earth, Artificial intelligence tools for a more sustainable planet
  • Northeastern, Nature Conservancy Team Up to Tackle Climate Change, Save Coastal Cities
  • Destructive Flood Risk in U.S. West Could Triple if Climate Change Left Unchecked
  • Farmers are Drawing Groundwater from the Giant Ogallala Aquifer Faster Than Nature Replaces It
  • Rain-on-Snow Flood Risk to Increase in Many U.S. Mountain Regions
  • Win for Wetlands: Program Helps Farmers Conserve More Flood Prone Land
  • Survival of North America’s Desert Wetlands Depends on Lake Mead
  • Trump Taps Meteorologist as White House Science Advisor
  • After Decades of Effort, the Chesapeake Bay is Turning Around
  • Clean Water Act: Beaten in WOTUS Messaging War, Greens Gird for Trump Rule
  • Researchers Develop New Capability to Evaluate Human-Driven Change in Eastern U.S. Streams
  • Community Stormwater Partnership Receives National Environmental Award
  • Coastal Resilience on Capitol Hill: Protecting the United States' Infrastructure, Economy, and Security
  • Trump Administration Proposes Revamping the Endangered Species Act
  • Green Groups Sue Over Expanded Gulf Drilling
  • Nature Can Heal Itself After an Oil Spill, it Just Needs a Little Help

STATE NEWS

  • AK: Army Corp Shrugs Off EPA, Approves Alaska Wetland Damage
  • AK: Inside Alaska's Battle Over Land, Sea, and Life
  • CA: Restored Wetlands Could Lower Local Surface Temperatures
  • CA: How Saving Southern California’s Steelhead Trout Could Also Help Save the State’s Watersheds
  • FL: What is Causing Florida’s Algae Crisis?
  • ID: Pre-vegetated Mats, Logs Control Erosion, Restore Wetlands
  • IL: Here’s How a Mile of Chicago’s River Became a Wildlife Haven
  • LA: Environmental Bonds Could Help Speed State Coastal Restoration Projects
  • ME: Nature Conservancy Sees an Opportunity to Fight Climate Change—Using Maine’s Woodlands
  • ME: Largest Conservation Effort in Maine History Aims to Save the State’s Coast—and its Culture
  • MD: Garbage Pours into Chesapeake Bay, and States Quarrel Over Whose Mess It Is
  • MA: Massachusetts Raises the Bar (Just a Bit) on Climate Ambition
  • MA: Baker-Polito Administration Awards $3.2 Million for Coastal Communities to Prepare for Climate Change
  • MI: Wave of Future: Drainage Districts Could Ease Floods
  • MI: Reconnecting in Detroit: The Transformative Potential of Citizen Science
  • NH: 800 Miles of Merrimack Watershed Tainted by Road Salt
  • NJ: Ocean City Proposes $3.2 million Plan to Rebuild Wetlands
  • PA: Saving the Bay
  • TX: “Mother Nature is Very Resilient”: A Year After Harvey, Coastal Ecosystems Are Thriving
  • TX: Residents Mixed on Planned Clear Creek Watershed Flood Prevention Projects in Upcoming $2.5B Bond Election
  • WI: Wisconsin Reservation Offers a Climate Success Story and a Warning
  • WY: Buffalo Wetlands Get Inventoried

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • In Eastern US, Adult Trees Adapt and Acclimate to Local Climate
  • Are Coastal Nuclear Power Plants Ready for Sea Level Rise?
  • Think Rivers Are Dangerous Now? Just Wait
  • ‘Abrupt Thaw’ of Permafrost Beneath Lakes Could Significantly Affect Climate Change Models
  • How Climate Change is Making ‘Red Tide’ Algal Blooms Even Worse
  • River Complexity Maintains Regional Population Stability
  • Coldwater Streams May Provide Refuge Against Changing Climate
  • Rivers in the Sky: How Deforestation is Affecting Global Water Cycles
  • Recognizing Their Role in Maintaining Healthy Watersheds, “Beaver Believers” Work to Rehab Rodent’s Reputation
  • Human Influence Detected in Changing Seasons
  • Urbanization and Changes to Climate Could Pack One-Two Punch for Watersheds in the Future, Study Finds
  • Study Finds Climate Determines Shapes of River Basins

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • Fewer blue lakes and more murky lakes across the continental U.S.: Implications for planktonic food webs
  • Financing Resilient Communities and Coastlines: How Environmental Impact Bonds Can Accelerate Wetland Restoration in Louisiana and Beyond
  • The Collingwood Harbour Story: From shipbuilding to Great Lakes Pollution Hot Spot to Waterfront Revitalization
  • FEMA Pre-Disaster Mitigation and Flood Mitigation Assistance Funds Available

POTPOURRI

  • Near Two Million Acres on Fire in the United States
  • With Half the Planet Saved for Nature, Will We Have Enough to Eat?
  • Study: Human Wastewater Valuable to Global Agriculture, Economics
  • Natural Disasters Widen Racial Wealth Gap
  • New Defense Bill Strengthens the Military’s Flood & Energy Readiness and Saves Taxpayer Dollars—All While Addressing Climate Change
  • Climate Taxes on Agriculture Could Lead to More Food Insecurity than Climate Change Itself
  • Climate Change: We're Not Literally Doomed, but... There's Space for Action Between "Everything is Fine," and "The Apocalypse is Upon Us"
  • A Photographer Documents the Effects of Climate Change on Maine's Intertidal Zones
  • Fish Subsidies are Speeding the Decline of Ocean Health

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Webinars

August

  • Environmental Law Institute Webinar: Assessing Stream Functions and Conditions – Challenges and Solutions
  • The Swamp School Webinar: Waters of the State – Section 404(g)
  • Association of State Wetland Managers: Compensatory Mitigation Webinar: An Ecological Framework for Reviewing Compensatory Mitigation: Biotic Processes (Part 3 of 4)
  • Soak Up the Rain New England (free) Webinar Series: Greening the Streets of Watertown, MA: Edenfield Avenue “Green Streets” Demonstration Project
  • Land Trust Alliance Webinar: Coastal Resilience in a Changing Climate

September

  • Environmental Law Institute Webinar: Beyond Politics: The Private Governance Response to Climate Change
  • Land Trust Alliance Webinar: A Bigger Role: How Conserved Lands Can Serve As Natural Climate Solutions
  • National Water Quality Monitoring Council Webinar: Integrating Physical and Economic Data into Water Accounts for the United States
  • Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by OCTO and NatureServe: Climate-driven species redistribution in marine systems by Gretta Pecl of the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies and Centre for Marine Socioecology in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
  • American Water Works Association Webinar: Utility Tools and Strategies for Climate Change Planning
  • Association of State Wetland Managers: Compensatory Mitigation Webinar: An Ecological Framework for Reviewing Compensatory Mitigation Plans: Plan Review (Part 4 of 4)
  • American Water Resources Association Webinar: Groundwater Discharges and Clean Water Act Compliance

October

  • EBM Tools Network Webinar: Managing Global Acidification on a Regional Scale: How the US Mid-Atlantic and Northeast Coastal Acidification Networks (MACAN and NECAN) Are Working to Understand Impacts through Partnerships
  • American Water Resources Association Webinar: Forecast Informed Reservoir Operations Improve Water Management
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webcast: Innovations in Stream Restoration Design and Construction
  • EBM Tools Network Webinar: Leverage a Global Volunteer Network and Access the Data Needed to Solve Environmental Challenges

November

  • American Water Resources Association Webinar: Setting Up a Water Bank: From the Ground(water) Up
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webcast: It Ain’t Easy Getting Green: Incentivizing Watershed Programs
  • Association of State Wetland Managers: Members Wetland Webinar: Planning Wetland Restoration at the
    Watershed Level

December

  • Association of State Wetland Managers: Members Wetland Webinar: Using a Living Shorelines Prioritization Tool for Wetland Improvements

Meetings

August

  • • National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration (NCER)
    • SIWI: World Water Week: Water, ecosystems and human development
    • California Adaptation Forum

September

  • Romanian Limnogeographical Association (RLA): 4th International Conference “Water resources and wetlands”
  • Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies 108th Annual Meeting
  • Society of Ecological Restoration Conference: Restoration in the Era of Climate Change
  • San Francisco Estuary Partnership: 2018 Bay-Delta Science Conference: Our Estuary at an Intersection
  • 2018 NYC Watershed and technical Conference: Clean water Through Protection and Partnership
  • Constructed Wetland Association Annual Conference 2018: How to Make Better Constructed Wetlands
  • Global Climate Action Summit
  • Ohio Sea Grant: Understanding Algal Blooms: State of the Science Conference
  • Maryland Native Plant Society Annual Fall Conference: The Times They are A ‘Changin’: Threats to Maryland’s Native Plant Communities
  • 2018 Carolinas Climate Resilience Conference
  • MtnClim 2018: Anticipating climate change impacts in mountains: Embracing variability
  • Kentucky Association of Mitigation Managers Conference
  • Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the International Erosion Control Association: 25th Annual Environmental Conference & Tradeshow
  • National Center for Atmospheric Research: 8th International Workshop on Climate Informatics
  • Center for Integrative Conservation Research: Integrative Conservation Conference
  • Three Rivers Evolution Event
  • 10th International Conference on Ecological Informatics
  • Climate Week NYC
  • Inclusive SciComm: A Symposium on Advancing Inclusive Public Engagement with Science

October

  • 2018 Great Lakes Commission Annual Meeting
  • 2018 AASHE Conference & Expo: Global Goals: Rising to the Challenge
  • University of Connecticut: Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group 2018 Invasive Plant Symposium
  • 2018 Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference (SEEC)
  • Behavior, Energy & Climate Change Conference
  • The Wildlife Society 25th Annual Conference
  • 2018 State of Lake Superior Conference
  • 2018 Society of Wetland Scientists South Central Chapter Fall Meeting
  • Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2018 National Land Conservation Conference
  • Society for Ecological Restoration Northwest Chapter and the Society of Wetland Scientists Pacific Northwest Chapter Joint Regional Conference: Restoring Resilient Communities in Changing Landscapes
  • World Congress on Climate Change
  • University of Minnesota Water Resources Center: Minnesota Water Resources Conference
  • Alameda County Flood Control and Water Conservation District Conference: Alameda County Watershed Confluence
  • Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: Great Lakes Restoration Conference
  • International Marine & Freshwater Sciences Symposium (MarFresh2018)
  • MACC Fall Conference
  • 13TH Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands
  • American Meteorological Society: 29th Conference on Severe Local Storms
  • Natural Areas Conference: Building Resilience: The Future of Natural Areas
  • Southeast Florida Regional Compact: Southeast Florida Regional Climate Leadership Summit
  • American Museum of Natural History Center for Biodiversity and Conservation: Student Conference on Conservation Science-New York
  • National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS): 10th Annual Undergraduate Research Conference
  • American Water Works Association: Water Infrastructure Conference
  • 6th International Conference on Sustainable Environment and Agriculture
  • 38th International Symposium of the North American Lake Management Society: Now Trending: Innovations in Lake Management
  • American Shore & Beach Preservation Association: 2018 National Coastal Conference: Resilient Shorelines for Rising Tides

November

  • 4th Biennial Pennsylvania Botany Symposium
  • American Society of Agronomy, the Crop Science Society of America, and the Canadian Society of Agronomy: 2018
  • International Annual Meeting: Enhancing Productivity in a Changing Climate
  • Sustainability and Development Conference
  • Alaska Committee for Noxious and Invasive Pest Management: Invasive Species Workshop
  • Lincoln Park Zoo 2nd International Wildlife Reintroduction Conference
  • CACIWC Annual Meeting and Environmental Conference
  • 6th Global Summit on Climate Change: Paleoclimatology: The Earth’s Climate in Long View
  • American Water Works Association, Florida Section: 2018 Fall Conference: Planning the Future of Water
  • World Summit on Climate Change & Global Warming

December

  • Restore America’s Estuaries Conference: 9th National Summit on Coastal and Estuarine Restoration and Management
  • AGU Fall Meeting
  • North Central Region Water Network: North Central Region One Water Action Forum

January 2019

  • International Soils Meeting: Soils Across Latitudes
  • 2019 Delaware Estuary Science & Environmental Summit: Estuary 2029: Saving our System Through Collaboration

February 2019

  • Tamarisk Coalition and the Desert Botanical Garden: Riparian Restoration Conference
  • Missouri Natural Resources Conference
  • River Restoration Northwest: Stream Restoration Symposium
  • Alaska Forum on the Environment
  • Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Wetland Science Conference
  • International Conference on Water Management Modeling

March 2019

  • CitSci 2019: Growing Our Family Tree
  • National Water Quality Monitoring Council: 11th Annual National Monitoring Conference

Training

August

  • Eagle Hill Institute: Mosses: Orthotrichaceae of Maine
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Independent Study: Pyrenolichens
  • National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) Workshop: Socio-Environmental Synthesis: Interdisciplinary Skill Building, Proposal Writing, Collaborating
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Michigan Rapid Assessment Method for Wetlands (MiRAM)
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training

September

  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Asters and Goldenrods
  • Institute for Wetland & Environmental Education & Research, Inc.: Wetlands and Their Borders Course
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Environmental Concern Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018
  • D & D West Course: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes - 16 hours (field)
  • Institute for Wetland & Environmental Education & Research, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineator Training
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Washington Department of Ecology Workshop: Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Riparian Habitat Restoration for the Arid Southwest
  • Association of Massachusetts Wetland Scientists Workshop: Late Season Sedges
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Current Issues in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation
  • Wetland TrainingWetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
  • Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: The Ecology and Conservation of Migratory Birds
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Living Shoreline Design
  • Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Asters and Goldenrods in Michigan Wetlands
  • CUAHSI: Near Surface Geophysics for Hydrology Workshop
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Plant ID – Familiarization for New Wetland Delineators
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review Process
  • Environmental Concern Course: Evaluating Hydric Soils in the Field
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • The Swamp School: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Southeastern Botany, LLC Workshop: Grass & Sedge Workshop
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Fall Maine Mushroom

October

  • The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Columbus Day Weekend Retreat
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator
  • D&D West Course: Basic Wetland Delineation - 40 hours (½ lecture, ½ field)
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Methodology for Delineating Wetlands
  • Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Hydric Soils Identification
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Bryophytes: Mosses and Liverworts
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Northeastern Freshwater Fish Assemblages
  • The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Habitat Conservation Plans
  • D & D West Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species - 16 hours (lecture)
  • CUAHSI – NCAR Training Workshop: The Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System
  • Southeastern Botany, LLC Workshop: Grass & Sedge Workshop
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Crustose and Foliose Lichens
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training

November

  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
  • Washington Department of Ecology Workshop: Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Education Course: Lake Management
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Tree and Shrub Identification Using Twigs and Other Winter Characteristics
  • D & D West Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology – Piedmont - 16 hours (field)
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • Environmental Concern Course: Winter Woody Plant ID
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment

December

  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training
  • D & D West Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement – Eastern Mountains/Piedmont)
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Education Course: Identification of Wetland Plants in Winter
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals

January 2019

  • CUAHSI Master Class: Advanced Techniques in Watershed Science