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STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

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All photos by
Jeanne Christie, ASWM

   


Dear Wetlanders,

It seems this year we are being challenged to do more with less. This is not necessarily a bad thing Often, being in this type of situation requires us to reach outside of ourselves and our organizations, our communities, to seek partners that can help us share the load. Collaboration can result in greater, more effective outcomes if done well. As Helen Keller has been quoted as saying, “Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.” In fact, nature by its very essence is the biggest example of collaboration there is. Each animal, plant, mineral, water molecule, etc. interacts with each other in myriad ways from the molecular level to the manifestation of physical form. It’s a complex web that scientists have been passionately trying to understand better since the beginning of civilization.

I get really excited when I learn about new collaborations that have developed among unlikely partners to solve seemingly insurmountable challenges. Take, for example, the Iowa Watershed Approach (IWA). This is one the biggest collaborations I have ever heard about, involving 22 partners to improve resiliency and water quality across the state. Partners include: Iowa Homeland Security and Emergency Management, Iowa Flood Center at the University of Iowa, Iowa Economic Development Authority, The Iowa Water Center at Iowa State University, University of Northern Iowa, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship, Iowa Department of Natural Resources, City of Dubuque, Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, City of Coralville, City of Storm Lake, Iowa Agriculture Water Alliance, Conservation Districts of Iowa, The Nature Conservancy, Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation, Iowa Soybean Association, Silver Jackets Flood Risk Management Team, Iowa Corn Growers Association, Iowa Farm Bureau, Iowa Association of Water Agencies, Iowa Association of Counties, and Iowa Department of Transportation. To learn more about this project, participate in our webinar about it this week on Tuesday, October 24th.

I was also very excited to hear about the renewal of the U.S.and Mexico conservation agreement on managing the Colorado River – you can read about it in National News. Another inspiring story in National News this month is entitled, “Conservatives and conservationists find common ground on Chesapeake shores.” And in State News there is a great story about a collaborative effort between the Friends of the San Juan, San Juan County Land Bank and two private waterfront property owners to restore a marine wetland along Fisherman Bay in Washington State.

Here’s to continued collaborations and ground-breaking accomplishments!

Best regards,


Marla J. Stelk
Editor, Wetland Breaking News

   
             


Supreme Court to hear Florida-Georgia "water wars" case

By Craig Pittman – Tampa Bay Times – October 10, 2017
In an order issued Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court announced it would hear arguments in the long-running “tri-state water wars” case involving Florida and Georgia -- a case that has already run up astronomical legal bills for both states. The tri-state water wars, involving not just Florida and Georgia but also Alabama, have been going on since 1990. All three states lay claim to the water flowing through the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee and Flint River Basin. Georgia needs it for the thirsty residents of growing Atlanta. Alabama needs it for the power plants built along the river. And Florida needs it to keep its famed Apalachicola oyster industry going. For full story, click here.

Deciphering dueling analyses of clean water regulations

By Kevin J. Boyle, Matthew J. Kotchen, and V. Kerry Smith – Science Magazine – October 6, 2017
Government agencies are often required to conduct benefit-cost analyses for major regulatory actions. When benefit-cost analysis is consistent with best practices, it provides a systematic and science-based approach for informing policy and regulatory decisions. It has been particularly important for health and environmental regulations. Yet the wide disparity between the quantified benefits in two recent and conflicting regulatory impact analyses (RIAs) related to the U.S. Clean Water Act (CWA) has the potential to undermine the credibility of agencies' benefit-cost analyses. It also highlights the need for a more systematic protocol that ensures the information base is adequate and appropriately applied to support agency analyses and public decision-making. This includes applications in the context of the CWA, which is the focus of an 11 October hearing in the U.S. Supreme Court. For full article, click here.

Maryland proposes regulations for faster, better Chesapeake Bay restoration

Contact: Jay Apperson – Maryland Department of the Environment – October 11, 2017
The Maryland Department of the Environment has proposed regulations to establish the Maryland Water Quality Trading Program and accelerate the restoration of the Chesapeake Bay while bringing economic benefits to Maryland. The regulations are proposed under Maryland environmental law to ensure enforcement and accountability under the federal Clean Water Act. The proposed regulations are designed to provide greater flexibility and reduce costs in achieving Maryland’s goals under its blueprint to meet federal pollution limits for the Bay. The voluntary program would establish a marketplace for private sector participation in meeting Bay cleanup goals. For full story, click here.

Policy changes needed at every level to survive the next storm

By Chad Berginnis – The Hill – September 3, 2017
Rainfall amounts from Harvey were huge, but not unprecedented. Texas previously held the continental U.S. record for a rainfall when Tropical Storm Amelia in 1978 dumped 48 inches of rain. In terms of property damage and economic loss, Harvey may end up surpassing Katrina, but we will see other floods like it in the future. For full blog post, click here.

 

EPA head seeks to avoid settlements with green groups

By Timothy Gardner – Reuters – October 16, 2017
The head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued a directive to his agency on Monday seeking to end the practice of settling lawsuits with environmental groups behind closed doors, saying the groups have had too much influence on regulation. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, who sued the agency he now runs more than a dozen times in his former job as attorney general of oil producing Oklahoma, has long railed against the so-called practice of “sue and settle.” The EPA under former President Barack Obama quietly settled lawsuits from environmental groups with little input from regulated entities, such as power plants, and state governments, he argues. For full story, click here. 

Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill May Be Largest Since 2010 BP Disaster

By Nico Grant – Bloomberg – October 16, 2017
An oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico last week may be the largest in the U.S. since the 2010 blowout at BP Plc’s Macondo well that sank the Deepwater Horizon rig and killed 11 people. LLOG Exploration Co. reported about 7,950 to 9,350 barrels of oil was released Oct. 11 to Oct. 12 from subsea infrastructure about 40 miles (64 kilometers) southeast of Venice, Louisiana, according to the company and the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement. That would make it the largest spill in more than seven years, BSEE data show, even though it’s a fraction of the millions of barrels ejected in the 2010 incident. For full story, click here.

Trump Names Former Texas Regulator as White House Environmental Adviser

By Lisa Friedman – The New York Times – October 13, 2017
President Trump has nominated a former top Texas environmental regulator, who has argued that carbon dioxide is a harmless gas that should not be regulated, to be the White House senior adviser on environmental policy. The former regulator, Kathleen Hartnett White, will lead the Council on Environmental Quality if confirmed by the Senate. Currently she serves as a senior fellow at the Texas Public Policy Foundation, a free-market think tank. She previously served as the chairwoman of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality under Rick Perry, who was governor at the time and is now the Energy Secretary. For full story, click here.

Judge Deals Blow to Tribes in Dakota Access Pipeline Ruling

By Phio McKenna – InsideClimate News – October 11, 2017
The Dakota Access pipeline may continue pumping oil during an ongoing environmental review by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, a federal judge ruled on Wednesday. The ruling was a blow to the Standing Rock Sioux and Cheyenne River Sioux tribes of North and South Dakota, whose opposition to the pipeline sparked an international outcry last fall, as well as heated demonstrations by pipeline opponents who were evicted from protest camps near the Standing Rock reservation earlier this year. U.S. District Judge James Boasberg said he would not rescind a previous permit for the pipeline issued by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers while the agency reassesses its prior environmental review of the 1,200-mile pipeline. For full story, click here.

GAO to probe whether Trump administration is protecting agencies’ scientific integrity

By Juleit Eilperin – The Washington Post – October 11, 2017
The Government Accountability Office will look into whether the Trump administration is safeguarding scientific integrity. Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.) asked the GAO to investigate the issue on Sept. 25, calling media reports of political appointees screening Environmental Protection Agency grants and officials at multiple agencies purging references to climate change and other scientific information “troubling.” “It is vital that science be impartial and free from interference, suppression or distortion,” wrote Nelson, the top Democrat on the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee. For full story, click here. 

Courts Thwart Administration’s Effort to Rescind Obama-Era Environmental Regulations

By Eric Lipton – The New York Times – October 6, 2017
The rapid-fire push by the Trump administration to wipe out significant chunks of the Obama environmental legacy is running into a not-so-minor complication: Judges keep ruling that the Trump team is violating federal law. The latest such ruling came late Wednesday, when a federal magistrate judge in Northern California vacated a move by the Department of Interior to delay compliance with rules curbing so-called flaring, a technique oil and gas companies use to burn off leaking methane. Flaring is blamed for contributing to climate change as well as lost tax revenues because the drilling is being done on federal land. For full story, click here.

Trump picks coal lobbyist for EPA deputy role, drawing mixed reaction

By Eric Walsh – Reuters – October 5, 2017
President Donald Trump on Thursday named Andrew Wheeler, a coal industry lobbyist and former congressional staffer, as his pick for deputy administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, prompting contrasting reactions from industry and environmental groups. The Sierra Club, an environmental group, called his nomination, which is subject to Senate confirmation, “absolutely horrifying,” while a coal industry group and some Republican politicians said he was well qualified for the job. For full story, click here.

Miles of Algae Covering Lake Erie

By Jugal K. Ppatel and Yuliya Parshina-Kottas – The New York Times – October 3, 2017
A potentially harmful algae bloom covered more than 700 square miles in the western basin of Lake Erie last week, turning the lake bright green and alarming residents and local officials. Scientists say that algae blooms have been a growing problem for Lake Erie since the 2000s, mostly because of the extensive use of fertilizer on the region’s farmland. The algae blooms contain cyanobacteria, which, under certain conditions, can produce toxins that contaminate drinking water and cause harm to the local ecosystem. During last week’s bloom, the amount of toxins in the algae remained low at the intake points where towns draw water from the lake, according to officials. For full story, click here.

WOTUS rollback seen as death blow for 'very unique habitat'

By Ariel Wittenberg – E&E News – October 2, 2017
Tea-colored water seeps from bogs here in eastern North Carolina's soggy, shrubby "blacklands," as local farmers call them. The Algonquin Indians called them pocosins. "They're not the most charismatic wetland," said Eric Soderholm, a wetland-restoration specialist for the Nature Conservancy. "But their impact on the ecosystem is invaluable." Pocosins serve as ecological sentries regulating freshwater quantity and quality in estuaries. But they are also coveted by farmers for their rich soil. Protecting pocosins hasn't been easy on the Albemarle-Pamlico Peninsula — 3,200 square miles squeezed by Albemarle and Pamlico sounds in coastal North Carolina. Wetlands at the Pocosin Lakes refuge have been damaged by ditches dug decades ago for farming and are surrounded by corn and soybean fields. And with the Trump administration trying to repeal and rewrite the Obama-era Clean Water Rule, which is aimed at determining which isolated streams and wetlands get protected by the Clean Water Act, pocosins and other "isolated wetlands" may soon be back in play for farming and development. For full story, click here.

Interior Department to Overhaul Obama’s Sage Grouse Protection Plan

By Lisa Friedman – The New York Times – September 26, 2017
The Trump administration will seek to reconsider an Obama-era blueprint for protecting the greater sage grouse, a move that could lead to new mineral leasing, grazing and other commercial activities across the quirky bird’s Western habitat. The Interior Department intends this week to publish a formal notice of intent to amend 98 sage grouse habitat management plans across 10 states, according to multiple agency and state officials who have been briefed on the effort. Those plans, completed in 2015, were adopted after a decade of negotiations among conservationists, sportsmen and extraction industries as well as federal, state, local and tribal authorities.  For full story, click here.

US, Mexico expand pact on managing overused Colorado River

By Dan Elliott– Phys.org – September 26, 2017
The United States and Mexico have agreed to renew and expand a far-reaching conservation agreement that governs how they manage the overused Colorado River, which supplies water to millions of people and farms in both nations. The agreement to be signed Wednesday calls for the U.S. to invest $31.5 million in conservation improvements in Mexico's water infrastructure to reduce losses to leaks and other problems, according to officials of U.S. water districts who have seen summaries of the agreement. The water that the improvements save would be shared by users in both nations and by environmental restoration projects. For full story, click here.

Restoration of historic Great Black Swamp could help save Lake Erie

By Tom Henry – The Blade – September 22, 2017
The best hope for saving Lake Erie may lie in a serious commitment to restoring 10 percent of the historic Great Black Swamp, according to a scientific paper published this month by one of the world’s top wetlands experts. That’s 100,000 acres of the former Great Black Swamp’s 1 million acres. The paper asserts that taking that much strategically located farmland out of production at a time would itself bring a 40 percent reduction in Ohio’s phosphorus releases, the same percentage state and federal officials have challenged Ohio to achieve by 2025. But as radical as it may seem to restore parts of the Great Black Swamp, Bill Mitsch — the highly renowned scientist pushing the idea — said he is in no way advocating a return to the horse-and-buggy era. For full story, click here.

The West’s Wildfires Are Taking a Toll on Reservoirs

By Alastair Bland – News Deeply Water Deeply – September 20, 2017
Around California, the country and the world, reservoirs are silently filling with sediment, and only a few people are thinking about it. Among them is Tim Randle, a civil engineer with the United States Bureau of Reclamation’s Sedimentation and River Hydraulics Group. “We used to be gaining water storage capacity with dam building,” said Randle, who is based in Denver. “Now, around the world, the pace is slowing down as sediment builds up. This is true in the U.S., too.” For full story, click here.

EPA labs across U.S. face consolidation as budget cuts loom

Devika Krishna Kumar – Reuters – September 19, 2017
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is consolidating research and testing laboratories to cut costs, sparking criticism the move will undercut its ability to respond to regional disasters such as Hurricane Harvey. The EPA plans to relocate or merge at least five labs, including one in Houston responsible for overseeing tests at 13 Superfund program toxic waste sites hit by Harvey flooding, lab employees and union officials said. In June, Kenneth Wagner, an adviser to EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, suggested to Houston employees at a meeting in June THAT their work could shift to Oklahoma by 2020, they said. For full story, click here.

Conservatives and conservationists find common ground on Chesapeake shores

By Story Hinckley – The Christian Science Monitor – September 18, 2017
Like his father, his grandfather, and his great-grandfather, J.C. Hudgins has spent his entire life in Mathews, Va., making his living off the Chesapeake Bay. In the mornings, Captain Hudgins pulls up his crab pots and sells some 10 bushels to the nearby J&W Seafood on Gwynn’s Island. His afternoons are often filled with eco-tours, where he teaches passengers what it takes to be a sustainable crabber or oysterman aboard his boat “Risky Business II,” before settling in for the night with Fox News. “It’s a living, but you don’t get rich,” says Hudgins, looking out at the water from his dock. “I’ve worked hard all my life, nobody has ever given me anything.” That’s a sentiment Americans are accustomed to hearing from working-class conservatives. Hudgins’ opinions on environmental policy, however, take a sharp turn from the stance that many liberals associate with people from conservative communities. But to Hudgins and many of his neighbors living on Virginia’s Middle Peninsula, conservatism and conservation go hand-in-hand. For full story, click here.

We already knew how to reduce damage from floods. We just didn’t do it.

By David Conrad and Larry Larson – The Washington Post – September 1, 2017
The waters stretched as far as you could see, and then farther, in every direction. Rainfall totals were reported in feet, not the usual inches. Dozens of people died. Highways were submerged; thousands upon thousands of square miles of land were deluged. The damage totaled billions of dollars. It happened 24 years ago, in the Great Flood of 1993 in the upper Midwest. For full story, click here.
 

 
 

AK: Alaskans Push U.S. Government to Investigate B.C.’s Border Mines

By Judith Lavoie – Desmog Canada – October 3, 2017
Fish and wildlife in Alaska’s major watersheds are threatened by six British Columbia mines close to the Alaska border, according to a new petition that asks U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross to investigate the threat of acid-mine drainage, heavy metals pollution and the possibility of catastrophic dam failure originating in the Canadian province. The formal petition, organized by a coalition of Alaskan tribal governments and conservation groups, calls for the International Joint Commission to investigate threats from B.C. mines that will continue to hang over the watersheds for centuries after their closure. For full story, click here 

CA: Cleanup from California Fires Poses Environmental and Health Risks

By Kirk Johnson – The New York Times – October 16, 2017
Dr. Karen Relucio has heard reports of people digging into the ashes of their burned homes in recent days without gloves, wearing only shorts and T-shirts, looking for sentimental items that might have survived California’s horrific wildfires. And as the chief public health officer in Napa County, one of the hardest-hit places, she has used her office as a bully pulpit to urge them to stop, immediately. “Just think of all the hazardous materials in your house,” she said in an interview. “Your chemicals, your pesticides, propane, gasoline, plastic and paint — it all burns down into the ash. It concentrates in the ash, and it’s toxic,” said Dr. Relucio, who declared a public emergency over the hazardous waste from the fires, as have at least two other counties. For full story, click here.

CA: U.S. EPA awards $5.2 million to protect and restore San Francisco Bay

Contact: Michele Huitric – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – October 10, 2017
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded about $5.2 million for water protection and restoration projects in the San Francisco Bay Area. “A healthy San Francisco Bay is vital to the environmental and economic health of the region,” said EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt. "EPA is succeeding in our mission to protect and restore habitats and water quality by supporting local partners and projects." For full story, click here.

CA: Hill Slough tidal wetland project moves forward in Suisun Marsh

By Todd R. Hansen – Daily Republic – September 26, 2017
A two-phase, $10.65 million project to restore 850 acres of managed wetlands to tidal wetlands in the Hill Slough Wildlife Area of the Suisun Marsh recently won approval by the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission. For full story, click here.
 
CA: Cities Chafe at Clean Water Rules for L.A.'s Concrete River

By Amena H. Saiyid – Bloomberg – September 25, 2017
The L.A. River may be the perfect setting for Hollywood-style car chases, but it’s not your typical river and shouldn’t be treated like one under the law, a group of Southern California municipalities says. They want the federal government to exclude the concrete-lined Los Angeles River and its paved tributaries from Clean Water Act requirements under an upcoming regulation, a move they say could save them from spending billions of dollars on stormwater controls. For full story, click here.

CO: The water under Colorado’s Eastern Plains is running dry as farmers keep irrigating “great American desert”

By Bruce Finley – The Denver Post – October 9, 2017
Colorado farmers who defied nature’s limits and nourished a pastoral paradise by irrigating drought-prone prairie are pushing ahead in the face of worsening environmental fallout: Overpumping of groundwater has drained the High Plains Aquifer to the point that streams are drying up at the rate of 6 miles a year. The drawdown has become so severe that highly resilient fish are disappearing, evidence of ecological collapse. A Denver Post analysis of federal data shows the aquifer shrank twice as fast over the past six years compared with the previous 60. For full story, click here.

FL: Hurricane Exposes and Washes Away Thousands of Sea Turtle Nests

By Mark Schlueb – University of Central Florida Today – October 5, 2017
Hurricane Irma took a devastating toll on incubating sea turtle nests in the Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge, one of the most important loggerhead and green turtle nesting sites in the world, according to new estimates from the UCF Marine Turtle Research Group. Researchers found significant dune erosion that swept away some nests and exposed the eggs of others. It was a record year for green turtle nesting along the refuge’s beaches in southern Brevard County, but storm surge due to hurricane Irma destroyed many unhatched loggerhead and green turtle nests. UCF researchers estimate that of nests laid through the end of September, more than half of the season’s green turtle nests and a quarter of loggerhead nests were lost. For full story, click here.

FL: Lake O hits highest level since 2005, raising concerns its dike could fail

By Craig Pittman – Tampa Bay Online – October 5, 2017
Rainfall from Hurricane Irma has pushed the water level in Lake Okeechobee to its highest point since 2005. Now, with more wet weather in the forecast, nearby residents fear a collapse of the 80-year-old dike around the lake. As a result, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is dumping large volumes of lake water out into coastal estuaries — exactly as it did last year, when those releases caused a massive toxic algae bloom that closed Atlantic coast beaches over the Fourth of July weekend. Meanwhile, Corps officials have stepped up inspections of the dike to three to four times a week to make sure its continuing leaks don't grow to the point of endangering people living near it. For full story, click here.

FL: A 1775 Map Reveals the Extent of Human Impact on Florida’s Coral Reefs

By Veronique Greenwood – The Atlantic – October 2, 2017
More than 240 years ago, the mapmaker George Gauld put pen to paper and drew the Florida Keys. The scant frill of islands curls across the ocean, surrounded by minute notations of depth—and surprisingly detailed descriptions. “A great part of this extensive Bank is quite dry at low water,” reads one notation. “This bank is full of Coral Patches,” says another. Gauld’s intention was probably primarily to highlight “hazards to navigation,” says the historical ecologist Loren McClenachan. “But he also happened to have a natural-history bent. He included information he didn’t necessarily have to. He drew the mangroves, and he wrote ‘seagrass on the bottom,’ and he wrote, ‘this is where the turtles nest.’” For full story, click here.

HI: Another Growing Threat to Hawaii’s Coral Reefs: Invasive Algae

By Nathan Eagle – Civil Beat – September 18, 2017
Hawaii’s corals appear to have been spared this summer from another mass bleaching, a stress response caused by warmer waters that has ravaged reefs in recent years. But they haven’t been so lucky with another emerging threat. An invasive algae called leather mudweed is rapidly spreading in places where it had been mostly removed and has been found in new areas around Oahu, according to a site survey last month by the state Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Aquatic Resources. For full story, click here.

IL: Federal judge sides with Corps in homebuilder's wetland dispute

By Dena Aubin – Reuters – September 20, 2017
A federal judge in Chicago has tossed a lawsuit brought by an Illinois homebuilder accusing the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers of wrongly designating 13 acres of a 100-acre parcel as wetlands, halting the development of a subdivision there for years. The decision on Tuesday by U.S. District Judge John Blakey ends a 2015 lawsuit by Orchard Hill Building Company seeking to set aside the Corps’ finding that it had jurisdiction over the property under the Clean Water Act (CWA). For full story, click here.

IA: Drainage districts' authority to mitigate nitrate pollution debated

By James Q. Lynch – The Gazette – October 12, 2017
Drainage districts, one of the lowest tiers of Iowa government, could play a big role in addressing ag-sourced nitrate pollution that threatens well water, aquifers and the growing “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico, according to a new report from an Iowa think tank. Drainage districts “probably have the power and the obligation” to address nitrate pollution, according to David Osterberg, co-founder of the Iowa City-based Iowa Policy Project and its lead staff researcher on energy and environment. For full story, click here.

IA: Wetland improves flood control, water quality

By Jean Caspers-Simmet – Iowa Farmer Today – October 7, 2017
The wetland and CRP grasses and flowers on farmland owned by Doug Bohlen’s father, Randy, are reducing flooding, removing nitrates from tile water and creating wildlife habitat. “I’m proud of this area,” said Doug Bohlen, who is in charge of planning for his 89-year-old father’s farm, which sits at the headwaters of Beaver Creek. “It’s finally starting to develop the way I wanted. There is all kinds of wildlife. Hopefully what we’ve done here will take off and go into other watersheds.” The wetland is part of the Beaver Creek Watershed Project, which includes five other wetland structures north and east of Colwell on the Floyd/Chickasaw County line. For full story, click here.

LA: Louisiana plans to restore the dying Maurepas Swamp with water diverted from the Mississippi

By Della Hasselle – The Lens – September 29, 2017
Louisiana’s coastal restoration agency has gotten about $14 million to engineer a system to reconnect the Mississippi River to the Maurepas Swamp, which has been cut off from its rejuvenating floodwaters for about 80 years. The money comes from the Restore Council, established by Congress to allocate fines from the BP oil spill. The swamp, which is mostly forested wetlands, has been dying for decades due to logging and the levees built along the river to prevent flooding. Canals dug to remove cypress trees have allowed saltwater to penetrate into the swamp, killing trees. For full story, click here. 

MD: Herring, shad get head start before Bloede Dam removal

By Timothy B. Wheeler – Bay Journal – October 1, 2017
Bulldozers, excavators and construction workers are bulling their way into Patapsco Valley State Park near Baltimore this fall. They’re the advance guard for a task force charged with removing a dormant hydroelectric dam on the Patapsco River and reopening a big stretch of the river to spawning runs of migratory fish. If the project stays on schedule, Bloede Dam should be gone by the spring of 2019. And, biologists shouldn’t have long to wait to see some action. For full article, click here.

MD: New Grant Program Funds Nature-Based Solutions to Protect Coastal Communities

Maryland Department of Natural Resources – September 20, 2017
The Board of Public Works today approved funding for a new Coastal Resiliency Grant Program to help Maryland’s coastal communities enhance their resiliency to the effects of extreme storms and weather. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources program will help design four shoreline improvement demonstration projects across the state with an additional two projects pending. For full story, click here.

MD: Army helping restore wetlands habitat on Chesapeake's Poplar Island

By Stacy A. Ouellette and Devon Suits – U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – September 20, 2017
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Baltimore District is leading an interagency project to help restore the ecosystem at Poplar Island in the Chesapeake Bay. The Paul S. Sarbanes Ecosystem Restoration Project at Poplar Island is a $1.4-billion sustainability project to provide habitat for diamondback terrapins, over 160 bird species, crabs, rockfish and killifish, all native to the area. Poplar Island, located about 34 miles southeast of Baltimore in Chesapeake Bay, had eroded from more than 1,100 acres in the mid 1800s to a mere four, until the Corps of Engineers, in partnership with the Maryland Port Administration, began restoring the island two decades ago to its original footprint, using silt dredged from the Baltimore shipping channels. For full story, click here.

MI: Understanding Muskegon Lake – a Great Lakes Estuary under Stress

CIGLR – 2017
Like many areas of the Great Lakes and their connecting waterways, the Muskegon Lake drowned river-mouth estuary is plagued by the scientifically complex and economically damaging water quality issues of harmful algal blooms (HABs) and low oxygen conditions, or hypoxia. Located on the eastern shore of Lake Michigan, the Muskegon Lake estuary is listed as an EPA Area of Concern (AOC) and a NOAA Habitat Blueprint focus area due to its historical contamination and habitat degradation. The types of human-induced water quality issues experienced by this system make it the perfect model to study and relate to larger lakes and coastal estuaries. If we can determine what is causing HAB formation, what makes HABs release toxins, and what leads to hypoxia, we can help inform efforts to restore Muskegon Lake and similarly affected systems. For full story, click here.

MN: Slight gain in Minnesota wetlands acreage, but quality is concerning

By Micah Emmel-Duke – Star Tribune – October 12, 2017
Since Europeans began settling in Minnesota, about half of the state's wetlands have disappeared. But in recent years, the state has stopped the loss and actually gained a few acres, according to data released last month. Wetland quality is another matter. "From a strict acreage standpoint, Minnesota is holding steady and maybe even gaining small amounts of wetlands, but there's some concern with the type changes," said Steve Kloiber, wetland monitoring coordinator at the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR). "Not all wetlands are the same, and they don't have the same functions." Between 2006 and 2014, Minnesota gained just barely more wetland acreage than it lost, according to the most recent data, published in September by the DNR. For full story, click here.

MN: Clean water vs. farm profits at heart of debate over new fertilizer rules

By Josephine Marcotty – Star Tribune – October 10, 2017
When Marla Waseka converted the gracious Franciscan nunnery northwest of St. Cloud to a boutique lakeside resort and retreat in 2008, the nitrate levels in her well were low. A few years later they were so high she had to warn her guests not to drink the water. And when authorities warned they'd shut her down if it weren't fixed, she spent $12,000 to drill a deeper well for clean water. Now Minnesota is poised to roll out it's first-ever strategy to protect drinking water from the farm fertilizers that carry nitrates — one of Minnesota's worst pollution problems. What makes Waseka angry is that it won't do nearly enough to clean up the water. For full story, click here.

MN: Progress on cleaning Minnesota River swamped by high volume of water

By Jennifer Bjorhus – Star Tribune – October 3, 2017
The increasing volume of water flowing down the Minnesota River is offsetting slim gains in water quality. That’s the core finding of a new report on the Minnesota River, one of the state’s most polluted rivers and one that flows into the Mississippi River in St. Paul. The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency’s conclusion is grim: “Sediment clouds the water, phosphorus causes algae, nitrogen poses risks to humans and fish, and bacteria makes the water unsafe for swimming.” For full story, click here.

MN: Minnesota Artist Bob Hautman Wins 2017 Federal Duck Stamp Contest

By Dave Orrick – Twin Cities Pioneer Press – September 16, 2017
Minnesota’s Hautman brothers’ Duck Stamp Dynasty continues. Bob Hautman’s acrylic of mallards pitching into cattails was named the winner of the 2017 Federal Duck Stamp Contest on Saturday. The artwork will be made into the 2018-19 duck stamp. Officially known as the Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp, the $25 stamps are bought by hunters, birders and others, with proceeds raising about $40 million annually to conserve and protect wetlands in the national wildlife refuge system. You can buy them here. Hautman’s will go on sale in late June. For full story, click here.

ND: Drought affects duck hunting wetlands in the Northern Plains

By Blake Nicholson – Associate Press – SFGate – September 22, 2017
When duck hunters in the Northern Plains take to the field this fall, they will find fewer wetlands where they can set up their blinds and float their decoys following a summer of devastating drought. The number of duck-hunting wetlands in North Dakota is down about 40 percent from last year, to the lowest level in nine years, according to the Game and Fish Department's annual fall wetland survey. For full story, click here.

NV: Why Southern Nevada Is Fighting to Build a 250-Mile Water Pipeline

By Daniel Rothberg – News Deeply Water Deeply – October 12, 2017
In 2015, Albuquerque delivered as much water as it had in 1983, despite its population growing by 70 percent. In 2016, Tucson delivered as much water as it had in 1984, despite a 67 percent increase in customer hook-ups. The trend is the same for Phoenix, Las Vegas and Los Angeles, said longtime water policy researcher Gary Woodard, who rattled off these statistics in a recent phone interview. Southwestern cities boomed during these decades, yet water demand fell far below projections. Efficiency and conservation worked better than water managers could have hoped. For full story, click here.

NY: Cuomo announces completion of a $4.3 million wetland restoration project on Strawberry Island

Niagara Frontier Publications – September 14, 2017
Earlier this week, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo announced the completion of a $4.3 million wetland restoration project on Strawberry Island, located off Grand Island in the upper Niagara River near Buffalo, that will rejuvenate the island's fish and wildlife preserve. The project focused on supporting the ecological restoration of the Niagara River to increase the sustainability of the environment, while promoting the region's growing tourism industry in Western New York. For full press release, click here.

TX: Many homeowners unaware they lived in reservoir 'flood pools'

By Lise Olsen – Houston Chronicle – September 28, 2017 – Video
Hong Soule and her husband Charles bought their two-story house in Cinco Ranch Equestrian Village for its views of George Bush Park. Soule, a native of Shanghai, gazed at that vast green space and saw fresh air, playgrounds, soccer fields and a dog park. She didn't realize this bucolic setting was part of a reservoir - a lake bottom just waiting to fill. It took Hurricane Harvey to make that clear. For full story, click here.

TX: Harvey's Floods Have Caused Houston Superfund Site Containing Highly Toxic Chemicals to Leak

By Alex Zielinski – San Antonio Current – September 19, 2017
A Houston toxic waste site has reported three highly-dangerous chemical spills — brought on by Hurricane Harvey's torrential rains — to the U.S. government. The 17-acre U.S. Oil Recovery site in East Houston (technically in the town of Pasadena) has been a federal Superfund waste cleanup site since 2011. In 2009, local investigators discovered that U.S Oil Recovery company had been leaking the various hazardous chemicals it collected from industrial clients into the air and local bayou, a regular fishing location which connects to Houston's main shipping channel. Texas prosecutors stuck the company's owner with five criminal felonies. For full story, click here.

VT: Wild lake trout make a surprise return to Lake Champlain

By Brian MacQuarrie – Boston Globe – September 29, 2017
Wild lake trout disappeared from Lake Champlain more than a century ago, vanished like ghosts from this 120-mile-long ribbon of water between Vermont and New York, pollution and overfishing having taken their toll. But suddenly, the sleek and beautiful fish are back in growing numbers, reemerging in the lake’s cold, deep core. For full story, click here.

VA: Living Shoreline Creates Positive Change at Leesylvania State Park

Prince William Living – September 2017
There are some changes happening to the shoreline at Leesylvania State Park. Since a living shoreline was created there about a year ago in order to halt erosion, new plantings have taken hold, wildlife have taken to it and things are looking good. A living shoreline is created through a combination of planting native marsh vegetation along a shore and installing of a barrier of rocks just offshore. The piled rocks, each two to three feet in diameter, piled two to three feet high, serve as a breakwater. Both elements of the technique have been placed on 800 feet of shoreline along the Potomac River in Leesylvania State Park. For full story, click here.

WA: Ecology Certifies Port for 25.7 Acres of Wetland Impact as Regional General Permit Moves Forward

By Justyna Tomtas – The Chronicle – October 5, 2017
After taking a tour of the Pleasant Valley Mitigation Site last week, the state Department of Ecology has decided it will authorize 25.7 acres of additional wetland impacts for the Port of Chehalis as the process of renewing the port’s regional general permit continues. The permit, which is used to offset wetland fill on port-owned property, lapsed in September of last year. Twenty-five acres of credit were authorized under the original permit, six of which have already been used. Officials from Ecology said they wouldn’t have a problem authorizing wetland fill for the 19 acres left at the site, but later increased that amount after touring the mitigation site. The port’s application requested 40 acres. For full story, click here.

WA: Partners restore Fisherman Bay coastal wetland

The Islands’ Sounder – September 21, 2017
Outdated and unnecessary dikes, berms and ditches that once clogged a marine wetland along Lopez’s Fisherman Bay were removed last week through a collaborative effort led by Friends of the San Juans, in partnership with the San Juan County Land Bank and two private waterfront property owners. “The flow of tidal water, habitat for juvenile fish and other species, nutrients and woody debris are now improved through the restoration of the natural grade, vegetation, and connectivity between the salt marsh and the waters of Fisherman Bay,” said Tina Whitman, science director with Friends of the San Juans. Next steps include replanting native trees and shrubs to enhance the wetland buffer and installation of an interpretive panel on the value of connected coastal wetlands at the publicly accessible Fisherman Bay Spit Preserve. For full story, click here.

WI: Public questions wetland permit for Monroe County frac plant

By Chris Hubbuch – Lacrosse Tribune – October 6, 2017
There was little public support Friday for a Georgia timber company’s plans to fill wetlands in order to build a $65 million frac sand plant in Monroe County even as the contested project received federal approval. Half a dozen people spoke against the project at a public hearing on the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources’ proposal to amend a permit allowing Meteor Timber to fill 16¼ acres of wetlands for its sand processing and loading facility in the town of Millston, which environmentalists call “massive” wetland destruction. For full story, click here.

WI: GOP Bill Would End Wisconsin Wetland Development Permits

By Todd Richmond – Associated Press – U.S. News – October 2, 2017
Wisconsin Republicans are pushing to allow developers to build on state wetlands without any oversight after passing a $3 billion incentives package for a Foxconn Technology Group plant exempting the facility from a host of environmental regulations. The Foxconn incentives bill allows the Taiwanese company to fill wetlands without permits. Conservationists and Republican supporters alike predicted the legislation could pave the way for much broader environmental rollbacks after the bill's critics complained other businesses don't get such perks. For full story, click here.

WI: In Wisconsin, GOP pushes to end sulfide mining moratorium

By Todd Richmond – Associated Press Wisconsin State Farmer September 24, 2017
Gov. Scott Walker voted to ban copper and gold mining in Wisconsin two decades ago. Now he may be asked to lift the one of-a-kind prohibition as his fellow Republicans push to continue opening up the state's north woods to mining. Conservationists have warned pollution from mining for so-called sulfide ores such as copper, zinc and gold could devastate northern Wisconsin's water — one of the reasons the Legislature adopted a de facto moratorium on such mines in 1998. But after relaxing the state's iron mining laws four years ago, GOP lawmakers have introduced a bill that would lift the prohibition. They say they want to jump-start the economy in the rural, sparsely populated northern half of the state. For full story, click here
 

Scientists develop tool which can predict coastal erosion and recovery in extreme storms

By Alan Williams – University of Plymouth – October 11, 2017 – Video
The damage caused to beaches by extreme storms on exposed energetic coastlines and the rate at which they recover can now be accurately predicted thanks to new research led by the University of Plymouth. Working with the University of New South Wales, scientists have developed a computer model which uses past wave observations and beach assessments to forecast the erosion and/or accretion of beach sediments over the coming year. They believe it could be a sea change for coastal managers, giving them the opportunity to make decisions that could protect communities from severe wave damage. For full story and to view video, click here.

Chesapeake Bay's Dead Zones: Researchers Estimate That Hypoxic Area Biggest Since 2014

By Suraj Radhakrishnan – International Business Times – October 11, 2017 – Video
A study conducted by the researchers from Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) has revealed the oxygen-deprived dead zones in the Chesapeake Bay —the largest estuary in the United States — are at their highest levels since 2014. The research comes after federal scientists made similar predictions. Dead Zones are the hypoxic areas in water bodies where there is oxygen depletion. These regions cannot support aquatic life forms that need water to breathe. The oxygen levels in the Chesapeake Bay — the indentation in the Atlantic Ocean is surrounded by the U.S. states of Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New York State, District of Columbia, and Virginia — are so low that pockets where hypoxia is seen no longer support fish, crabs, and other aquatic organisms. For full story and to view video, click here.

These Giant Invasive Beasts May Actually Be Good for the Planet

By Emma Marris – National Geographic – October 6, 2017 – Video
Wild horses grazing on the Western range, dromedary camels roaming the Australian outback, hippos lounging in Colombian lakes—they all have two things in common: They’re very large herbivores, and they’re on the “wrong” continent. They were imported from their native range by people—in the case of the hippos, by the now-deceased drug lord Pablo Escobar, whose private zoo the beasts escaped from. The conventional view among ecologists is that these species and other expatriate herbivores are an ecological problem. A new study takes issue with that, arguing that we should welcome them in their new ranges. For full story and to view video, click here.

Ecosystem expert says 'interacting effects' contribute to rise in blue green algae

CBC News – October 2, 2017
Global climate change could be behind the rise in blue-green algae blooms across northern Ontario, at least according to a renowned Canadian ecosystem scientist. "We're trying to figure out what triggers the cyanobacteria blooms in landscapes that are historically not known to have had these...blooms," says Irena Creed, the executive director of the School of Environment and Sustainable Development at the University of Saskatchewan. She was in Sudbury, Ont., on Friday for Laurentian University's annual watershed lecture. Creed spoke to a group of environmental scientists, biologists and community members about her research into cyanobacteria, the scientific name for the algae blooms. "There are so many interacting effects of all of those global change drivers, that it becomes hard to tease apart what may be contributing to the rise — and it's globally a rise — in cyanobacterial blooms," Creed says. For full story, click here. 

What Scientists Are Learning About the Impact of an Acidifying Ocean

By Matthew O. Berger – News Deeply Oceans Deeply – October 2, 2017
The ocean is becoming increasingly acidic as climate change accelerates and scientists are ramping up investigations into the impact on marine life and ecosystems. In just a few years, the young field of ocean acidification research has expanded rapidly – progressing from short-term experiments on single species to complex, long-term studies that encompass interactions across interdependent species. “Like any discipline, it takes time to mature, and now we’re seeing that maturing process,” said Shallin Busch, who studies ocean acidification at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle. For full story, click here.

Strips of Native Prairie Plants Could Reduce Pollution Runoff from Farm Fields

By Amy Mayer – Harvest Public Media – October 2, 2017
A new study says small patches of native prairie plants provide a range of conservation benefits to Iowa’s landscape and could reduce water pollution from farm fields. So-called “prairie strips” are patches of land strategically planted with native, perennial mixes of grasses and flowers on the edges of crop fields. “What we've been able to document over a decade worth of research on prairie strips,” Iowa State University professor Lisa Schulte Moore says, “is that by converting just a little bit of that crop area to prairie strips we get very substantial benefits.” For full story, click here.

Bay grasses return to the shores of Solomons, but will they persist?

University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science – September 26, 2017
Early this September, Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) researchers Bob “JJ” Orth and David Wilcox and their colleagues at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory (CBL) got a big surprise. Each year, Orth and Wilcox review aerial photos of Chesapeake Bay to map the coverage of bay grasses, also called submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), in our nation’s largest estuary. When they inspected photographs of the Patuxent River, they noticed something interesting: small patches of dark color near the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory’s research pier, which enters the Patuxent River off of Solomons Island. As they examined images from other parts of the Patuxent, they saw similar, often larger patches of what looked like bay grasses. Because bay grasses have not been seen off of the pier since the late 1960s, the VIMS researchers contacted their CBL colleagues Jeremy Testa, Lora Harris, and Walter Boynton, encouraging them to take a closer look. For full story, click here.

Building a Better Coral Reef

By Damien Cave and Justin Gillis – The New York Times – September 20, 2017
On the Great Barrier Reef, off Australia — After a plunge beneath the crystal-clear water to inspect a coral reef, Neal Cantin pulled off his mask and shook his head. “All dead,” he said. Yet even as he and his dive team of international scientists lamented the devastation that human recklessness has inflicted on the world’s greatest system of reefs, they also found cause for hope. For full story, click here.

Glacial melt will wreck ecosystems

By Tim Radford – Climate News Network – September 15, 2017
Glaciers cover one-tenth of the planet’s land surface – but not for much longer.
Glaciers worldwide are in retreat, and losing mass. They are shrinking and melting, and that will create problems almost everywhere, according to new research. Between 2003 and 2009, glaciers melted on a gargantuan scale, with an estimated 1,350 cubic kilometers of meltwater streamed from what had once been vast streams of slowly flowing ice. For full story, click here.

Trump administration will propose repealing Obama’s key effort to combat climate change

By Brady Dennis and Juliet Eilperin – The Washington Post – October 6, 2017
The Trump administration plans to scrap former president Barack Obama’s signature plan for reducing greenhouse-gas emissions from the nation’s power plants, arguing that the previous administration overstepped its legal authority, according to a 43-page proposal obtained Thursday by The Washington Post. The proposal, which the administration plans to propose as early as Tuesday, comes months after President Trump issued a directive instructing the Environmental Protection Agency to begin rewriting the controversial 2015 regulation, known as the Clean Power Plan, as part of a broader effort to obliterate his predecessor’s efforts to make combating climate change a top government priority. For full story, click here.

Soil holds potential to slow global warming, Stanford researchers find

By Rob Jordan – Stanford News – October 5, 2017
If you want to do something about global warming, look under your feet. Managed well, soil’s ability to trap carbon dioxide is potentially much greater than previously estimated, according to Stanford researchers who claim the resource could “significantly” offset increasing global emissions. They call for a reversal of federal cutbacks to related research programs to learn more about this valuable resource. The work, published in two overlapping papers Oct. 5 in Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution and Systematics and Global Change Biology, emphasizes the need for more research into how soil – if managed well – could mitigate a rapidly changing climate. For full story, click here.

High-altitude Colorado boreal toad left unlisted as endangered species

By Kevin Fixler – Summit Daily – October 5, 2017
The eastern boreal toad population in the high elevations of Colorado and other Rocky Mountain states may be in decline, but it will not be granted protected status under the national Endangered Species Act. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, operating under the umbrella of the Department of the Interior, announced Thursday its rejection of 25 species from threatened or endangered listing, including the subalpine amphibian. Within the federal agency's Mountain-Prairie Region, the Great Sand Dunes tiger beetle and Northern Rocky Mountain fisher were under review for protection as well, but were also left unlisted. For full story, click here. 

One of the oldest climate change experiments has led to a troubling conclusion

By Chris Mooney – The Washington Post – October 5, 2017
One of the regular complaints of climate change doubters and skeptics is that scientific projections of a dire future are too heavily based on computer simulations, or models, which — they say — rest on a variety of questionable assumptions. But a major climate change study published Thursday relied not on models but experimental data — a 26-year record of observations, no less — to reach a conclusion perhaps just as worrying. The research, tracking the emissions of carbon from artificially heated plots of a forest in Massachusetts, reinforces fears about the possibility of a climate change “feedback” involving the planet’s soils, one that could pile on top of and substantially worsen the ongoing warming trend triggered by the burning of fossil fuels. For full story, click here.

The Most Powerful Evidence Climate Scientists Have of Global Warming

By Sabrina Shankman and Paul Horn – InsideClimate News – October 3, 2017
Earth's temperature is rising, and it isn't just in the air around us. More than 90 percent of the excess heat trapped by greenhouse gas emissions has been absorbed into the oceans that cover two-thirds of the planet's surface. Their temperature is rising, too, and it tells a story of how humans are changing the planet. This accrued heat is "really the memory of past climate change," said Kevin Trenberth, the head of climate analysis at the National Center for Atmospheric Research and co-author of a new paper on ocean warming. It's not just the amount of warming that is significant—it's also the pace. For full story, click here.

Could This One Simple Idea be the Key to Solving Farmer-Environmentalist Conflicts?

By Brian Bohman – Ensia – September 28, 2017
Imagine waking up one day and learning that your community’s water supply is contaminated by a pollutant in concentrations deemed unsafe by officials. That’s what happened to the citizens of Perham, Minnesota, in the 1990s, when workers discovered that the level of nitrates — a pollutant that can cause serious illness or death in infants — in city well water was so high that they needed to dilute it with water sourced from uncontaminated wells to meet public health standards. The likely culprit was the use by local farmers of nitrogen fertilizer, which, if applied in quantities greater than what crops use, can end up contaminating groundwater. The finding set the stage for a potential standoff between farmers focused on growing crops and environmentalists focused on keeping water clean. For full story, click here.

Costs of Climate Change: Early Estimate for Hurricanes, Fires Reaches $300 Billion

By Sabrina Shankman – InsideClimate News – September 28, 2017
The devastation from hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria—plus dozens of wildfires that raged across the West in early August—could result in the costliest string of weather events in U.S. history, according to a new report. Over the course of a few weeks, the hurricanes and wildfires left a trail of damage that could add up to nearly $300 billion, according to early estimates from the authors of "The Economic Case for Climate Action in the United States," a report released on Wednesday by the nonprofit Universal Ecological Fund. If they're right, the cost of the damage would be equivalent to nearly half the president's proposed 2018 budget for the Department of Defense. For full story, click here.

Puerto Ricans could be newest U.S. 'climate refugees'

Daniel Cusick and Adam Aton – E&E News – September 28, 2017
Hurricane Maria's destruction on Puerto Rico could spawn one of the largest mass migration events in the United States' recent history, experts say, as tens of thousands of storm victims flee the island territory to rebuild their lives on the U.S. mainland. The displaced islanders, thousands of whom were awaiting flights yesterday from San Juan's Luis Muñoz Marín airport, might be among the nation's newest "climate refugees," a demographic that includes former residents of southernmost Louisiana and the shrinking islands of Alaska's Bering Strait. For full story, click here.

Coastal vulnerabilities known long before Harvey

By Keith Magill – Houma Today – September 18, 2017
A group that has long pushed for federal help to bolster Louisiana’s eroding coastal wetlands are pointing to Hurricane Harvey’s damage in Texas as an example of why such efforts matter. The America’s Wetland Foundation hosted forums in 2011 and 2012 across the Gulf Coast, from South Padre Island, Texas, to Florida, to assess communities’ resiliency in the face of hurricanes and rising seas associated with climate change. For full story, click here.

It’s Time to Ditch the Concept Of ‘100-Year Floods’

By Maggie Koerth-Baker – FiveThirtyEight – August 30, 2017
Photos of water-covered neighborhoods and families riding floating refrigerators to safety have made clear the scale of Hurricane Harvey’s wrath. But the risks that coastal Texans faced before the storm hit — and the probability that others will be dealt a similar fate — are still a confusing mess. Surveys have shown that even people who live across the street from the bureaucratically determined risk zones known as floodplains don’t understand how those boundaries were drawn or what the risk metric that defines them really means. That’s no surprise to experts, who say the concept of the “100-year flood” is one of the most misunderstood terms in disaster preparedness. For full story, click here.  

 


National Conservation Easement Database provides data update and launches updated website

The National Conservation Easement Database (NCED) is the first national database of conservation easement information, compiling records from land trusts and public agencies throughout the United States. This public-private partnership brings together national conservation groups, local and regional land trusts, and state and federal agencies around a common objective. The NCED is the first nationwide database and website for sharing and managing information about conservation easements. This effort helps agencies, land trusts, and other organizations plan more strategically, identify opportunities for collaboration, advance public accountability, and raise the profile of what’s happening on-the-ground in the name of conservation. For more information, click here.

Measuring the role of seagrasses in regulating sediment surface elevation

Nature.com – September 20, 2017
Seagrass meadows provide numerous ecosystem services and their rapid global loss may reduce human welfare as well as ecological integrity. In common with the other ‘blue carbon’ habitats (mangroves and tidal marshes) seagrasses are thought to provide coastal defense and encourage sediment stabilization and surface elevation. A sophisticated understanding of sediment elevation dynamics in mangroves and tidal marshes has been gained by monitoring a wide range of different sites, located in varying hydrogeomorphological conditions over long periods. In contrast, similar evidence for seagrasses is sparse; the present study is a contribution towards filling this gap. Surface elevation change pins were deployed in four locations, Scotland, Kenya, Tanzania and Saudi Arabia, in both seagrass and unvegetated control plots in the low intertidal and shallow subtidal zone. The presence of seagrass had a highly significant, positive impact on surface elevation at all sites. Combined data from the current work and the literature show an average difference of 31 mm per year in elevation rates between vegetated and unvegetated areas, which emphasizes the important contribution of seagrass in facilitating sediment surface elevation and reducing erosion. This paper presents the first multi-site study for sediment surface elevation in seagrasses in different settings and species. For full article, click here.xxxxx

Ecosystem Valuation Reference Inventory

The Environmental Valuation Reference Inventory (EVRI) is a searchable compendium of summaries of environmental and health valuation studies. These summaries provide detailed information about the study location, the specific environmental assets being valued, the methodological approaches and the estimated monetary values along with proper contextualization. The EVRI database now contains over 4,000 summaries of valuation studies and information from new studies is being added on an ongoing basis. For more information and to search the website, click here

Restoring tides to reduce methane emissions in impounded wetlands: A new and potent Blue Carbon climate change intervention

Nature.com – September 20, 2017
Coastal wetlands are sites of rapid carbon (C) sequestration and contain large soil C stocks. Thus, there is increasing interest in those ecosystems as sites for anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission offset projects (sometimes referred to as “Blue Carbon”), through preservation of existing C stocks or creation of new wetlands to increase future sequestration. Here we show that in the globally-widespread occurrence of diked, impounded, drained and tidally-restricted salt marshes, substantial methane (CH4) and CO2 emission reductions can be achieved through restoration of disconnected saline tidal flows. Modeled climatic forcing indicates that tidal restoration to reduce emissions has a much greater impact per unit area than wetland creation or conservation to enhance sequestration. Given that GHG emissions in tidally-restricted, degraded wetlands are caused by human activity, they are anthropogenic emissions, and reducing them will have an effect on climate that is equivalent to reduced emission of an equal quantity of fossil fuel GHG. Thus, as a landuse-based climate change intervention, reducing CH4 emissions is an entirely distinct concept from biological C sequestration projects to enhance C storage in forest or wetland biomass or soil, and will not suffer from the non-permanence risk that stored C will be returned to the atmosphere. For full article, click here. 

14 Solutions to Problems Climate Change Poses for Conservation: Examples from the WCS Climate Adaptation Fund

CAKE - Climate Adaptation Knowledge Exchange – 2017
While climate change is still a relatively new concern for conservation practitioners, a growing number of organizations and agencies are tackling the challenge. These groups are identifying and implementing on-the- ground projects to address the effects of climate change on wildlife and ecosystems. In this report, we describe several climate-driven problems that are projected to affect, or are already affecting, particular wildlife species and ecosystems, and solutions that conservation groups are implementing to help plants and animals respond and adapt. These projects are tangible examples of climate-informed conservation, and can serve as inspiration for others grappling with similar issues. For full report, click here.

Guidance for Design Hydrology for Stream Restoration and Channel Stability

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine – 2017
TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Research Report 853: Guidance for Design Hydrology for Stream Restoration and Channel Stability provides written guidance and interactive tools to help hydraulic engineers assess the current conditions adjacent to a stream crossing and in the upstream watershed. Specifically, the guidance and tools provide support in assessing the current conditions adjacent to a stream crossing and in the upstream watershed to determine design effort, performing the appropriate hydrological and geomorphic analysis using a set of analytical and analog tools, and designing the channel through the stream crossing for stability and sediment balance. For more information and to download this report, click here.



Judge Dismisses Lawsuit Portraying Environmental Activism as Illegal Racket

By Nicholas Kusnetz – InsideClimate News – October 16, 2107
A federal judge on Monday dismissed a Canadian logging company's lawsuit against Greenpeace and another activist group that accused them of running a criminal enterprise through their environmental campaigns. The case is one of two brought by corporations against the environmental group and several of its peers that invoke federal racketeering law. Legal and environmental experts have described the legal tactic as a new and particularly dangerous example of corporations and wealthy individuals attempting to silence opponents. For full story, click here.

Risk MAP Standards and Guidance release delayed until February 2018

Association of State Floodplain Managers – October 13, 2017
The Federal Emergency Management Agency maintains guidelines and standards to support the Risk Mapping, Assessment and Planning program. These guidelines and standards define the specific implementation of the statutory and regulatory requirements for the National Flood Insurance Program. These also outline the performance of Flood Risk Projects, processing of Letters of Map Change and related Risk MAP activities. More information is available at FEMA.gov. For full story, click here. The period for comments on the guidance documents is being extended until Oct. 31, 2017. 
An unexpectedly happy—or at least nuanced—tale of invasion

By Brandon Keim – Anthropocene Magazine – October 11, 2017
Within a few years of their escape in the early 1990s from farms off the coast of Germany, Pacific oysters established feral populations along the North Sea’s eastern shores. The oysters were invasive, spreading without restriction, and smothered native mussels, which are an important bottom-of-the-food-chain food source for the region’s seabirds. Ecological catastrophe appeared imminent. Yet that’s not what happened. Twenty-six years after their arrival, Pacific oysters and mussels now seem to be coexisting. The resulting communities, dubbed “oyssel reefs” by researchers who describe the invasion’s dynamics in the journal Ecosphere, may even be healthier than the mussels alone. “The introduction and spread of Pacific oysters has entailed more resistant, more resilient and more diverse communities at sites of the former mussel beds,” said Karsten Reise, the study’s lead author and an ecologist at the Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research. “Oyssel reefs are likely to better cope with the challenges of the Anthropocene. For full article, click here.

These dogs are helping to solve environmental problems

By Isabelle Groc Ensia October 11, 2017
It is still cool in the morning as Spots gets ready to start work. Calm and confident, the imposing 10-year old light brown Kangal is leading a herd of goats into a pasture. “He is always excited to go out with the goats,” says Tyapa Toivo, small livestock manager at the Cheetah Conservation Fund (CCF). In this part of north-central Namibia, the goats graze every day on the same land where leopards, cheetahs and jackals also live. But the goats are safe with Spots. He watches over them intensely, and if a predator approaches, he barks loudly and places himself between the herd and the threatening animal. This is usually sufficient to scare the predator away. “Our goats go out every day and we have cheetah roaming around, but I have never experienced losses from a cheetah,” says Toivo. “They know that this herd of goats is with a dog, so they don’t bother coming any closer.” For full story, click here.

Why Protect 600,000 Square Miles That Most People Will Never See?

By Jenny Woodman – Ensia – October 3, 2017 – Video
Much of what lay beneath the ship was a mystery. The edge of the continental shelf plummets more than 2 miles (3.2 kilometers) somewhere in the vicinity of oceanographer Robert Ballard’s Exploration Vessel (E/V) Nautilus, which was making its way to Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary, about 60 miles (97 kilometers) northwest of San Francisco. For full story and to view video, click here. 

Finland's wetlands are an internationally significant archaeological repository

Contact: Satu Koivisto – Eurek Alert – September 26, 2017
Finland is among the most wetland-rich countries in Europe. The ecological and geological characteristics of the country, as well as its climate history, have promoted paludification and the formation of peatlands and alluvial strata. Nevertheless, little archaeological research has been conducted in Finland's wetlands. Satu Koivisto's doctoral dissertation Archaeology of Finnish wetlands: With special reference to studies of Stone Age stationary wooden fishing structures addresses this significant lack of information. The dissertation focuses particularly on Stone Age wooden fishing structure remains. For full public release, click here

What would an entirely flood-proof city look like?

By Sophie Knight – The Guardian –September 25, 2017
They call it “pave, pipe, and pump”: the mentality that has dominated urban development for over a century. Along with the explosion of the motorcar in the early 20th century came paved surfaces. Rainwater – instead of being sucked up by plants, evaporating, or filtering through the ground back to rivers and lakes – was suddenly forced to slide over pavements and roads into drains, pipes and sewers. Their maximum capacities are based on scenarios such as 10-year storms. And once they clog, the water – with nowhere else to go – simply rises. The reality of climate change and more frequent and intense downpours has exposed the hubris of this approach. As the recent floods from Bangladesh to Texas show, it’s not just the unprecedented magnitude of storms that can cause disaster: it’s urbanisation. For full story, click here. 

“Unlawful Government Takings”

By Janice Kaspersen – Forester Daily News – September 18, 2017
Among the many, many flooded homes in Houston after Hurricane Harvey are some for which the owners say the government is responsible. A group of homeowners is suing both the Army Corps of Engineers and the San Jacinto River Authority for releasing water from a reservoir—water, they say, that damaged or destroyed more than a thousand homes that wouldn’t have otherwise been flooded. With some of those homes valued as high as a million dollars, the damages could run to billions. For full story, click here.

Tracking Little Turtles on the Prairie

By Cara Byington – Cool Green Science – September 6, 2017
What do you do if you only have eight known Blanding’s turtles in the population you’re studying at Illinois’s Nachusa Grasslands Preserve? Well, if you’re Rich King and colleagues, you lure them into hoop traps baited with sardines, attach tiny transmitters to their shells with an epoxy resin, and then spend the months from April to October using radio telemetry to track them by hiking the prairie holding an antenna above your head, all of which is not as easy as it may sound. For full blog post, click here. 

 

 

WEBINARS

   

MEETINGS

 

TRAINING

 

SPECIAL EVENTS

 

MORE DECEMBER MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR​

WEBINARS
       
OCTOBER 2017
       
October 24, 2017
3:00 p.m. ET
  Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance Webinar: The Iowa Watershed Approach: A New Paradigm for Flood Resilience  
       
October 25, 2017
3:00 p.m. ET
  ASWM Hot Topics Webinar: Wetland Link International Americas: Evaluation of environmental awareness-raising activities at wetland sites  
       
October 31, 2017
2:00 p.m. ET  
  USDA NRCS Science and Technology Webinar: Restoring Native Plant Communities: Soil and Hydrology Suited Planning Tools  
       
NOVEMBER 2017
       
November 1, 2017
3:00 p.m. ET
  ASWM Members’ Wetland Webinar: Centred Outdoors: Trading Screen Time for Wild Spaces — One Community's Approach   
       
November 3, 2017
1:00 p.m. ET
  US Water Alliance Webinar: Addressing Nutrient Pollution in Our Nation’s Waters  
       
November 9, 2017
1:00 p.m. ET
  U.S. EPA Watershed Academy Webcast: Using CAST to Develop Implementation Plans that Meet Loading Targets in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed  
       
November 9, 2017
2:00 p.m. ET
  Association of State Floodplain Managers Webinar: After the Disaster: Mitigating Infrastructure Against Flooding Using 406 Mitigation Assistance  
       
November 9, 2017
2:00 p.m. ET
  Forester University Webinar: Sewage Treatment by Floating Wetlands – Nature’s Trickle Filter  
       
November 15, 2017
1:00 p.m. ET
  Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Stream Restoration: Where Are We Now?  
       
November 15, 2017
2:00 p.m. ET
  Land Trust Alliance Webinar: Rethinking Land Protection Priorities to Engage Your Whole Community  
       
November 29, 2017
3:00 p.m. ET
  ASWM Members’ Wetland Webinar: Restoration Outcomes and Reporting: An Assessment of Wetland Area Gains in Wisconsin   
       
DECEMBER 2017
       
December 7, 2017
2:00 p.m. ET
  Forester University Webinar: Voodoo Hydrology – The Pitfalls of Urban Hydrology Methods  
       
December 13, 2017
3:00 p.m. ET
  ASWM Members’ Wetland Webinar: How to Keep Headcuts from Working their Way Up or Downstream and Destroying Wetlands  
       
MEETINGS
 
OCTOBER 2017
       
October 24, 2017 
Washington, DC
  Environmental Law Institute Workshop: Blueprint for Change: New Approaches and Needed Changes to Managing Natural Resource Risks, Liabilities and Opportunities  
       
October 24-26, 2017
Atlantic City, NJ
  2017 NJAFM Annual Conference  
       
October 24-27, 2017 
Ft. Lauderdale, FL
  2017 ASBPA National Coastal Conference: Beaches, Bays and Beyond
 
       
October 25-27, 2017
Boyne Falls, MI
  Michigan Aquatic Restoration Conference  
       
October 26, 2017
Washington, DC 
  Environmental Law Institute Seminar: Environmental Information: A Workshop for Researchers  
       
October 26-28, 2017
Denver, CO
  Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2017 National Land Conservation Conference  
       
October 27-28, 2017 
Lake Ariel, PA
  6th Annual Lacawac Ecology Conference   
       
October 30-November 2, 2017
Houston, TX
  American Water Works Association: Water Infrastructure Conference  
       
October 31-November 2, 2017
Wilmington, NC
 
  Bottomland and Swamp Forests Symposium  
NOVEMBER 2017
       
November 1-3, 2017
Shaw Centre
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 
  9th Canadian Science Policy Conference  
       
November 2-3, 2017
Bowie State University
Bowie, MD
  ESA Communicating Science Workshop  
       
November 3, 2017
University of Toledo College of Law
  Great Lakes Water Conference: The Trump and Trudeau Administrations on Water
 
       
November 4, 2017
Wellfleet, MA
  Mass Audubon: 15th Annual State of Wellfleet Harbor Conference
 
       
November 5-9, 2017
Portland, OR
  2017 AWRA Annual Conference  
       
November 5-9, 2017
Providence, RI
  Coastal Estuarine Research Federation (CERF) Conference: Coastal Science at the Inflection Point: Celebrating Successes & Learning from Challenges   
       
November 6, 2017
Stanford, CA
  Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment:
Young Environmental Scholars (YES) Annual Conference 
 
       
November 7-10, 2017
Green Bay, WI
  International Association for Great Lakes Research: State of Lake Michigan Conference   
       
November 6-9, 2017
Green Bay, WI
  International Association for Great Lakes Research: State of Lake Michigan Conference  
       
November 8-9, 2017
Manhattan, KS
  Kansas Water Office Governor's Conference: Future of Water in Kansas  
       
November 8-9, 2017
Tustin, MI
 
  13th Annual Michigan Clean Water Corps Conference  
November 8-10, 2017
Boston, MA
  Greenbuild WaterBuild Summit: Rising Above: Using Innovative Solutions to Build Resilience  
       
November 9, 2017
Gulfport, FL
  5th Annual ELI-Stetson Wetlands Workshop: Conserving the Coasts: The State of Marine Ecosystems and Coastal Compensatory Mitigation  
       
November 11-17, 2017
Baltimore, MD  
  9th US Symposium on Harmful Algae: Training the next generation  
       
November 15, 2017
Milwaukee, WI
  Southeastern Wisconsin Invasive Species Consortium, Inc.: 10th Annual Education Symposium: Nasty Aquatic Plants & Animal Species: Got ‘Em? Get “Em!    
       
November 23-24, 2017
St. John's Newfoundland & Labrador
  Geomatics Atlantic 2017  
       
November 28-30, 2017
Sanya, China  
  International Symposium on Environmental and Sustainability Agriculture Development  
       
November 29-30, 2017
Washington, DC 
  Solving Infrastructure Challenges Through Partnerships  
       
DECEMBER 2017
       
December 6, 2017
Edgewater, MD
  Patuxent River Conference: River Management Stories: Making the Leap from Information to Application    
       
December 8, 2017
Linthicum, MD
  Maryland Water Monitoring Council Annual Conference  
       
December 11-15, 2017
New Orleans, LA
  AGU Fall Meeting

 
       
December 13, 2017
Linthicum Heights, MD 
  Chesapeake Water Environment Association Fall Seminar: Stormwater, Too Simple?    
       
December 18-19, 2017
San Diego, CA
  ICHA 2017: 19th International Conference on Harmful Algae
 
 
JANUARY 2018
       
January 4-6, 2018
Acme, MI
  Northern Michigan Waterways Hazardous Material Spill Planning Committee: 27th Annual No Spills Conference: New and Innovative Technology for Spill Prevention & Response  
       
January 5-9, 2018
Pacific Grove, CA
  American Society of Naturalists Conference  
       
January 11-13, 2018
College Park, MD
  Future Harvest CASA (Chesapeake Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture) Annual Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed Conference  
       
January 29, 2018-February 2, 2018
Bariloche, Argentina  
  Species Range Shifts & Local Adaptation: Challenging ecologcial and evolutionary ideas and assumptions

 
       
January 31-February 1, 2018
Wilmington, DE
  2018 Delaware Wetlands Conference
Abstracts accepted through November 1, 2017
 
       
FEBRUARY 2018
       
February 1-4, 2018
Princess Royal
Ocean City, MD 
  Maryland Association for Environmental & Outdoor Education: Expand Your Influence! Empowering Citizens Action for the Environment  
       
February 5-7, 2018
Denver, CO
  International LiDAR Mapping Forum  
       
February 11-16, 2018 
Portland, OR
  2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting

 
       
February 20-22, 2018
Oconomowoc, WI  
  Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Wetland Science Conference  
       
February 28-March 1, 2018
Oconomowoc, WI 
  ICWMM: International Conference on Water Management Modeling
Submit an abstract by December 31, 2017
 
       
February 28-March 2, 2018
Denver, CO
  Climate Leadership Conference  
 
MARCH 2018
       
March 8-9, 2018
University of Denver Sturm College
  Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute: 2018 Western Places/Western Spaces. Proposal deadline is August, 25, 2018  
       
March 14-16, 2018
Chattanooga, TN
  Southeast Regional Conference for Community and Land Conservation   
       
March 18-21, 2018
Scottsdale, AZ
  21st Annual NFDA Conference  
       
March 21-22, 2018
Singapore City, Singapore
  International Convention on Global warming and Climate Change  
       
March 25-28, 2018
Seattle, WA
  American Water Works Association: Sustainable Water Management Conference

 
       
APRIL 2018
       
April 8-12, 2018
Chicago, IL 
  US-IALE 2018 Annual Meeting  
       
April 20-22, 2018
Stevens Point, WI
 
  Midwest-Great Lakes Chapter of the Society for Ecological Restoration: 2018 Annual Chapter Meeting. Submit an abstract by December 1, 2017.   
       
April 22-25, 2018
Orlando, FL
  2018 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference; GIS & Water Resources X: Spatial Analysis of Watersheds: Ecological, Hydrological, and Societal Responses
Deadline for abstracts is January 9, 2018.
 
       
April 23-26, 2018
Coral Springs, FL
  University of Florida: 12th International Symposium on Biogeochemistry of Wetlands  
       
April 24-26, 2018
Forat Collings, CO
  Instream Flow Council: Flow 2018 Managing Rivers, Reservoirs and Lakes in the Face of Drought: Practical Tools and Strategies for Sustaining and Protecting Ecological Values of Water  
       
April 25-26, 2018
Glens Falls, NY
  NEIWPCC: 29th Annual Nonpoint Source Pollution Conference
 
 
 MAY 2018
       
May 4-5, 2018
San Diego, CA
  P3 Water Summit: Solving Water Challenges Through Partnerships   
       
May 7-8, 2018
Atlanta, GA 
  Water Environment Reuse Foundation: 2018 Research Conference: Advancing Reuse & Integrated Water  
       
May 8-11, 2017
Louisville, KY 
  National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Invest in the Environment   
       
May 20-24, 2018
Detroit, MI
  Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting: Navigating Boundaries in Freshwater Science  
       
May 29-June 1, 2018
Denver, CO
  Society of Wetland Scientists 2018 Annual Meeting: Wetland Science: Integrating Research, Practice and Policy - An Exchange of Expertise   
       
May 30-June 1, 20`8
San Antonio, TX
  Resource Institute, Inc: Southwest Stream & Wetland Restoratoin Conference  
       
JUNE 2018
       
June 4-6, 2018
Berkeley, CA 
  Berkeley Natural History Museums, the Berkeley Initiative for Global Change Biology, and iDigBio Second Annual Digital Data in Biodiversity Research Conference  
       
June 10-13, 2018
Washington, DC
  National Flood Conference   
       
June 10-15, 2018
Victoria, B.C., Canada 
  ASLO (Association for the Science of Limnology and Oceanography) 2018 Summer Meeting  
       
June 12-15, 2018
Jyväskylä, Finland
  Scientific Committee of the Society for Conservation Biology Europe Section's 5th European Congress for Conservation Biology (ECCB 2018)  
       
June 17-22, 2018 
Phoenix, AZ
  Association of State Floodplain Managers Annual Conference: Managing Floods Where Mountains Meet the Desert. Call for presentations deadline is October 13, 2017  
 
JULY 2018
       
July 8-11, 2018
Broomfield, CO
  Natural Hazards Center: 2018 Natural Hazards Workshop  
       
July 10-12, 2018
Minneapolis, MN
  US Water Alliance: One Water Summit  
       
July 21-26, 2018
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  North American Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB): Conservation Science, Policy, & Practice: Connecting the Urban to the Wild
 
       
AUGUST 2018
       
August 5-10, 2018
New Orleans, LA
  2018 ESA Annual Meeting  
       
August 13-16, 2018
Asheville, NC
  North Carolina State University: EcoStream Conference

 
       
August 26-30, 2018
New Orleans, LA
  National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration (NCER)
Call for Session Proposals due by October 1, 2017
 
       
August 26-31, 2018
Stockholm, Sweden
  SIWI: World Water Week: Water, ecosystems and human development  
       
TRAINING
       
OCTOBER 2017
       
October 23, 2017
New Brunswick, NJ
 
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Understanding Advanced Stormwater Management Techniques   
       
October 23-26, 2017
Teatown Lake Reservation
Westchester County, NY
  The Swamp School: Wetland Delineation Training  
       
October 23-27, 2017
Asheville, NC 
  Resource Institute Course: Level I -  Applied Fluvial Morphology   
       
October 24-27, 2017
National Conservation Training Center
Shepherdstown, WV 
  Stream Mechanics: Stream Functions Pyramid Workshop   
       
October 26, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Building Stream Buffers  
       
October 26-27, 2017
Denver, CO
  Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Stormwater Green Drainage Design Using EPA SWMM-LID  
       
October 27, 2017 
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: EIR/EIS Preparation and Review
 
 
       
October 27, 2017-
November 3, 2017

Portland, OR 
  Portland State University Course: River Restoration Project Design   
       
NOVEMBER 2017
       
November 2-3, 2017
Charleston, SC
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
November 6-9, 2017
Columbus, OH
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: ACOE Wetland Delineation, Waters of the US and Regional Supplement Training  
       
November 6-
December 4, 2017

Online
  The Swamp School Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets  
       
November 6-
December 4, 2017

Online
  The Swamp School Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment   
       
November 6, 2017-
January 29, 2018

Online
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training   
       
November 6, 2017-
January 29, 2018

Online
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Botanist  
       
November 7-9, 2017
Gainseville, FL
  CUAHSI and the University of Florida 3-day Training Workshop: Using In-Situ Water Quality Sensors - Lagrangian and Eulerian Applications  
       
November 8, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Mitigation Measure Development and Monitoring  
       
November 8, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetland Pollinators  
       
November 9, 2017
Stetson University College of Law
Gulfport, FL
  Fifth Annual ELI-Stetson Wetlands Workshop: Conserving the Coasta: The State of Marine Ecosystems and Coastal Compensatory Mitigation  
       
November 11, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern, Inc. Course: Life in a Chesapeake Bay Marsh Tour  
       
November 13-14, 2017
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands, and Hydrology (Coastal Plain or Piedmont)  
       
November 13-16, 2017
Seagoville, TX
 
  The Swamp School: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training  
       
November 13-16, 2017
Richmond, VA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: Wetland Delineation Training  
       
November 13-17, 2017
Portland, OR
  U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Training: Climate-Smart Conservation with Scenario Planning
 
       
November 15, 2017 
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Streambank Assessment and Restoration    
       
November 15-16, 2017
Richmond, VA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: Regional Supplment Wetland Delineation Training. For other dates, go here.  
       
November 16-17, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Environmental Planning and Site Analysis. Also held on December 14-15, 2017  
       
November 16-17,2017
Hillsborough, NJ 
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Lake Management    
       
November 17, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Air Quality Analysis  
       
November 29, 2017 
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: The General Plan in California  
       
November 30-December 1, 2017 
Tiburon, CA
  San Francisco Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve Course: Advanced Wetland Delineation
 
 
DECEMBER 2017
   
December 1, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Water Quality Regulation and Permitting    
       
December 4, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service: Introduction to Species Status Assessment  
       
December 4-5, 2017
Washington, DC 
  American Law Institute Continuing Legal Education: Clean Water Act: Law and Regulation 2017    
       
December 4-18, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals   
       
December 4-18, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Habitat Conservation Plans  
       
December 4, 2017-
February 26, 2018

Online
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator  
       
December 4, 2017-
February 26, 2018

Online
  The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design  
       
December 4, 2017-
February 26, 2018
Online 
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training   
       
December 6-8, 2017
Davis, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems  
       
December 7, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetlands of the World   
       
December 8, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Habitat Conservation Planning  
       
December 13, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: POW! The Planning of Wetlands   
       
December 13-15, 2017
Davis, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: GIS for Forestry Application  
       
December 14, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern, Inc.: WOW! WOW! Facilitator   
       
December 14, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Implementing Citizen Science In Your Outdoor Classroom  
       
JANUARY 2018
       
January 8-April 2, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School: Online Course: Wetland Delineation Training  
       
January 8-April 2, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School: Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator 2018  
       
January 8-February 5, 2018
Online 
  The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2018  
       
January 15-18, 2018
Cardiff-by-the-Sea, CA
  The Swamp School Course: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training  
       
January 15-February 12, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School: Online Course: Ecological Risk Assessment 2018  
       
January 17-19, 2018
Knoxville, TX
  NIMBioS Investigative Workshop: Modeling Ecotoxicological Dynamics Subject to Stoichiometric Constraints  
       
January 22-23, 2018
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Educatin Course: Rutugers Identificatoin of Wetland Plants in Winter  
       
FEBRUARY 2018
       
February 5-8, 2018
Seagoville, TX 
  The Swamp School Course: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training  
       
February 5-April 30, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Delineation Training  
       
February 5-April 30, 2018 
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist  
       
February 8-9, 2018
Washington, DC 
  American Law Institute Course: Environmental Law 2018
 
 
       
February 12-13, 2018
New Orleans, LA
  EUCI Course: Endangered Species Act, Wetlands, Stormwater & Floodplain Regulatory Compliance for Energy and Utilities  
       
February 12-23, 2018
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology
 
       
February 12-26, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals 2018
 
       
February 19-March 19, 2018 
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Phase 1 Environmental Assessments 2018  
       
February 21-22, 2018
Oakland, CA
  National Living Shorelines Tech Transfer Workshop  
       
February 26-March 26, 2018 
Online 
  The Swamp School Online Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment 2018  
       
MARCH 2018
       
March 12-16, 2018
Asheville, NC
  Resource Institute: Level 1 - Applied Fluvial Morphology
 
       
March 14-18, 2018
Bermuda
  Earth Institute Center for Environmental Sustainability Course: Coral Reef Ecology: Bermuda
 
       
March 19-23, 2018
Asheville, NC
  Resource Institute: Level II - River Morphology and Application  
 
APRIL 2018
       
April 16-20, 2018
Front Royal, VA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
April 16-20, 2018
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: Communication and Facilitation Skills for Conservation Managers  
       
April 23-26, 2018
Aliquippa, PA
  The Swamp School: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training
 
       
JUNE 2018
       
June 25-July 6, 2018
University of Montana
  Flathead Lake Bio Station: Conservation Ecology  
       
June 25-July 20, 2018
University of Montana
  Flathead Lake Bio Station: Seminars in Ecology and Resource Management  
       
AUGUST 2018
       
Augut 6-17, 2018
University of Montana
  Flathead Lake Bio Station: Stream Ecology  
       
SEPTEMBER 2018
       
September 17-28, 2018
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: The Ecology and Conservation of Migratory Birds  
       
September 24-28, 2018
Aliquippa, PA
  The Swamp School: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training  
   
SPECIAL EVENTS
       
November 10-12, 2017
Easton, MD 
  Waterfowl Festival  
       
February 2, 2018   World Wetlands Day: Wetlands for a Sustainable Urban Future   
       
February 22-25, 2018
Port Aransas, TX 
  Whooping Crane Festival  
       
April 21, 2018   World Fish Migration Day: Working together for happy fish  
    
       


 


EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • Supreme Court to hear Florida-Georgia "water wars" case
  • Deciphering dueling analyses of clean water regulations
  • Maryland proposes regulations for faster, better Chesapeake Bay restoration
  • Policy changes needed at every level to survive the next storm

NATIONAL NEWS

  • EPA head seeks to avoid settlements with green groups
  • Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill May Be Largest Since 2010 BP Disaster
  • Trump Names Former Texas Regulator as White House Environmental Adviser
  • Judge Deals Blow to Tribes in Dakota Access Pipeline Ruling
  • GAO to probe whether Trump administration is protecting agencies’ scientific integrity
  • Courts Thwart Administration’s Effort to Rescind Obama-Era Environmental Regulations
  • Trump picks coal lobbyist for EPA deputy role, drawing mixed reaction
  • Miles of Algae Covering Lake Erie
  • WOTUS rollback seen as death blow for 'very unique habitat'
  • Interior Department to Overhaul Obama’s Sage Grouse Protection Plan
  • US, Mexico expand pact on managing overused Colorado River
  • Restoration of historic Great Black Swamp could help save Lake Erie
  • The West’s Wildfires Are Taking a Toll on Reservoirs
  • EPA labs across U.S. face consolidation as budget cuts loom
  • Conservatives and conservationists find common ground on Chesapeake shores
  • We already knew how to reduce damage from floods. We just didn’t do it.

STATE NEWS

  • AK: Alaskans Push U.S. Government to Investigate B.C.’s Border Mines
  • CA: Cleanup from California Fires Poses Environmental and Health Risks
  • CA: U.S. EPA awards $5.2 million to protect and restore San Francisco Bay
  • CA: Hill Slough tidal wetland project moves forward in Suisun Marsh
  • CA: Cities Chafe at Clean Water Rules for L.A.'s Concrete River
  • CO: The water under Colorado’s Eastern Plains is running dry as farmers keep irrigating “great American desert”
  • FL: Hurricane Exposes and Washes Away Thousands of Sea Turtle Nests
  • FL: Lake O hits highest level since 2005, raising concerns its dike could fail
  • FL: A 1775 Map Reveals the Extent of Human Impact on Florida’s Coral Reefs
  • HI: Another Growing Threat to Hawaii’s Coral Reefs: Invasive Algae
  • IL: Federal judge sides with Corps in homebuilder's wetland dispute
  • IA: Drainage districts' authority to mitigate nitrate pollution debated
  • IA: Wetland improves fslood control, water quality
  • LA: Louisiana plans to restore the dying Maurepas Swamp with water diverted from the Mississippi
  • MD: Herring, shad get head start before Bloede Dam removal
  • MD: New Grant Program Funds Nature-Based Solutions to Protect Coastal Communities
  • MD: Army helping restore wetlands habitat on Chesapeake's Poplar Island
  • MI: Understanding Muskegon Lake – a Great Lakes Estuary under Stress
  • MN: Slight gain in Minnesota wetlands acreage, but quality is concerning
  • MN: Clean water vs. farm profits at heart of debate over new fertilizer rules
  • MN: Progress on cleaning Minnesota River swamped by high volume of water
  • MN: Minnesota Artist Bob Hautman Wins 2017 Federal Duck Stamp Contest
  • ND: Drought affects duck hunting wetlands in the Northern Plains
  • NV: Why Southern Nevada Is Fighting to Build a 250-Mile Water Pipeline
  • NY: Cuomo announces completion of a $4.3 million wetland restoration project on Strawberry Island
  • TX: Many homeowners unaware they lived in reservoir 'flood pools'
  • TX: Harvey's Floods Have Caused Houston Superfund Site Containing Highly Toxic Chemicals to Leak
  • VT: Wild lake trout make a surprise return to Lake Champlain
  • VA: Living Shoreline Creates Positive Change at Leesylvania State Park
  • WA: Ecology Certifies Port for 25.7 Acres of Wetland Impact as Regional General Permit Moves Forward
  • WA: Partners restore Fisherman Bay coastal wetland
    WI: Public questions wetland permit for Monroe County frac plant
    WI: GOP Bill Would End Wisconsin Wetland Development Permits
    WI: In Wisconsin, GOP pushes to end sulfide mining moratorium

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • Scientists develop tool which can predict coastal erosion and recovery in extreme storms
  • Chesapeake Bay's Dead Zones: Researchers Estimate That Hypoxic Area Biggest Since 2014
  • These Giant Invasive Beasts May Actually Be Good for the Planet
  • Ecosystem expert says 'interacting effects' contribute to rise in blue green algae
  • What Scientists Are Learning About the Impact of an Acidifying Ocean
  • Strips of Native Prairie Plants Could Reduce Pollution Runoff from Farm Fields
  • Bay grasses return to the shores of Solomons, but will they persist?
  • Building a Better Coral Reef
  • Glacial melt will wreck ecosystems
  • Trump administration will propose repealing Obama’s key effort to combat climate change
  • Soil holds potential to slow global warming, Stanford researchers find
  • High-altitude Colorado boreal toad left unlisted as endangered species
  • One of the oldest climate change experiments has led to a troubling conclusion
  • The Most Powerful Evidence Climate Scientists Have of Global Warming
  • Could This One Simple Idea be the Key to Solving Farmer-Environmentalist Conflicts?
  • Costs of Climate Change: Early Estimate for Hurricanes, Fires Reaches $300 Billion
  • Puerto Ricans could be newest U.S. 'climate refugees'
  • Coastal vulnerabilities known long before Harvey
  • It’s Time to Ditch the Concept Of ‘100-Year Floods’

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • National Conservation Easement Database provides data update and launches updated website
  • Measuring the role of seagrasses in regulating sediment surface elevation
  • Ecosystem Valuation Reference Inventory
  • Restoring tides to reduce methane emissions in impounded wetlands: A new and potent Blue Carbon climate change intervention
  • 14 Solutions to Problems Climate Change Poses for Conservation: Examples from the WCS Climate Adaptation Fund
  • Guidance for Design Hydrology for Stream Restoration and Channel Stability

POTPOURRI

  • Judge Dismisses Lawsuit Portraying Environmental Activism as Illegal Racket
  • Risk MAP Standards and Guidance release delayed until February 2018
  • An unexpectedly happy—or at least nuanced—tale of invasion
  • These dogs are helping to solve environmental problems
  • Why Protect 600,000 Square Miles That Most People Will Never See?
  • Finland's wetlands are an internationally significant archaeological repository
  • What would an entirely flood-proof city look like?
  • “Unlawful Government Takings:
  • Tracking Little Turtles on the Prairie

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

WEBINARS, MEETINGS, TRAINING

Webinars

  • Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance Webinar: The Iowa Watershed Approach: A New Paradigm for Flood Resilience
  • ASWM Hot Topics Webinar: Wetland Link International Americas: Evaluation of environmental awareness-raising activities at wetland sites
  • USDA NRCS Science and Technology Webinar: Restoring Native Plant Communities: Soil and Hydrology Suited Planning Tools
  • ASWM Members’ Wetland Webinar: Centred Outdoors: Trading Screen Time for Wild Spaces —One Community's Approach
  • US Water Alliance Webinar: Addressing Nutrient Pollution in Our Nation’s Waters
  • Association of State Floodplain Managers Webinar: After the Disaster: Mitigating Infrastructure Against Flooding Using 406 Mitigation Assistance
  • Forester University Webinar: Sewage Treatment by Floating Wetlands – Nature’s Trickle FilterCenter for Watershed Protection Webinar: Stream Restoration: Where Are We Now?
  • Land Trust Alliance Webinar: Rethinking Land Protection Priorities to Engage Your Whole Community
  • ASWM Members’ Wetland Webinar: Restoration Outcomes and Reporting: An Assessment of Wetland Area Gains in Wisconsin
  • Forester University Webinar: Voodoo Hydrology – The Pitfalls of Urban Hydrology Methods
  • ASWM Members’ Wetland Webinar: How to Keep Headcuts from Working their Way Up or Downstream and Destroying Wetlands

Meetings

  • Environmental Law Institute Workshop: Blueprint for Change: New Approaches and Needed Changes to Managing Natural Resource Risks, Liabilities and Opportunities
  • 2017 NJAFM Annual Conference
  • 2017 ASBPA National Coastal Conference: Beaches, Bays and Beyond
  • Michigan Aquatic Restoration Conference
  • Environmental Law Institute Seminar: Environmental Information: A Workshop for Researchers
  • Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2017 National Land Conservation Conference
  • 6th Annual Lacawac Ecology Conference
  • American Water Works Association: Water Infrastructure Conference
  • Bottomland and Swamp Forests Symposium
  • 9th Canadian Science Policy Conference
  • ESA Communicating Science Workshop
  • Great Lakes Water Conference: The Trump and Trudeau Administrations on Water
  • Mass Audubon: 15th Annual State of Wellfleet Harbor Conference
  • 2017 AWRA Annual Conference
  • Coastal Estuarine Research Federation (CERF) Conference: Coastal Science at the Inflection Point: Celebrating Successes & Learning from Challenges
  • Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment: Young Environmental Scholars (YES) Annual Conference
  • International Association for Great Lakes Research: State of Lake Michigan Conference
  • Kansas Water Office Governor's Conference: Future of Water in Kansas
  • 13th Annual Michigan Clean Water Corps Conference
  • Greenbuild WaterBuild Summit: Rising Above: Using Innovative Solutions to Build Resilience
  • 5th Annual ELI-Stetson Wetlands Workshop: Conserving the Coasts: The State of Marine Ecosystems and Coastal Compensatory Mitigation
  • 9th US Symposium on Harmful Algae: Training the next generation
  • Southeastern Wisconsin Invasive Species Consortium, Inc.: 10th Annual Education Symposium: Nasty Aquatic Plants & Animal Species: Got ‘Em? Get “Em!
  • Geomatics Atlantic 2017
  • International Symposium on Environmental and Sustainability Agriculture Development
  • Solving Infrastructure Challenges Through Partnerships
  • Patuxent River Conference: River Management Stories: Making the Leap from Information to Application
  • Maryland Water Monitoring Council Annual Conference
  • AGU Fall Meeting
  • Chesapeake Water Environment Association Fall Seminar: Stormwater, Too Simple?
  • ICHA 2017: 19th International Conference on Harmful Algae
  • 27th Annual No Spills Conference: New and Innovative Technology for Spill Prevention & Response
  • American Society of Naturalists Conference
  • Future Harvest CASA Annual Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed Conference
  • Species Range Shifts & Local Adaptation: Challenging ecological and evolutionary ideas and assumptions
  • 2018 Delaware Wetlands Conference
  • Maryland Association for Environmental & Outdoor Education Expand Your Influence! Empowering Citizens Action for the Environment
  • International LiDAR Mapping Forum
  • 2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting
  • Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Wetland Science Conference
  • ICWMM: International Conference on Water Management Modeling
  • Climate Leadership Conference
  • Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute: 2018 Western Places/Western Spaces
  • Southeast Regional Conference for Community and Land Conservation
  • 21st Annual NFDA Conference
  • International Convention on Global warming and Climate Change 
  • American Water Works Association: Sustainable Water Management Conference
  • US-IALE 2018 Annual Meeting
  • Midwest-Great Lakes Chapter of the Society for Ecological Restoration: 2018 Annual Chapter Meeting
  • 2018 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference; GIS & Water Resources X: Spatial Analysis of Watersheds: Ecological, Hydrological, and Societal Responses
  • University of Florida: 12th International Symposium on Biogeochemistry of Wetlands
  • Instream Flow Council: Flow 2018
  • NEIWPCC: 29th Annual Nonpoint Source Pollution Conference
  • P3 Water Summit: Solving Water Challenges Through Partnerships
  • National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Invest in the Environment
  • Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting: Navigating Boundaries in Freshwater Science
  • SWS 2018 Annual Meeting: Wetland Science: Integrating Research, Practice and Policy - An Exchange of Expertise
    Resource Institute, Inc: Southwest Stream & Wetland Restoratoin Conference
  • Berkeley Natural History Museums, the Berkeley Initiative for Global Change Biology, and iDigBio Second Annual Digital Data in Biodiversity Research Conference
  • National Flood Conference
  • ASLO 2018 Summer Meeting
  • Scientific Committee of the Society for Conservation Biology Europe Section's 5th European Congress for Conservation Biology
  • Association of State Floodplain Managers Annual Conference: Managing Floods Where Mountains Meet the Desert
  • Natural Hazards Center: 2018 Natural Hazards Workshop
  • US Water Alliance: One Water Summit
  • North American Congress for Conservation Biology: Conservation Science, Policy, & Practice: Connecting the Urban to the Wild
  • 2018 ESA Annual Meeting
  • North Carolina State University: EcoStream Conference
  • National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration (NCER)
  • SIWI: World Water Week: Water, ecosystems and human development

Training

  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Understanding Advanced Stormwater Management Techniques
  • The Swamp School: Wetland Delineation Training
  • Resource Institute Course: Level I – Applied Fluvial Morphology
  • Stream Mechanics: Stream Functions Pyramid Workshop
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Building Stream Buffers
  • Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Stormwater Green Drainage Design Using EPA SWMM-LID
  • UC Davis Extension Course: EIR/EIS Preparation and Review
  • Portland State University Course: River Restoration Project Design
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Basic: Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum – SC
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: ACOE Wetland Delineation, Waters of the US and Regional Supplement Training
  • The Swamp School Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets
  • The Swamp School Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Botanist
  • CUAHSI and the University of Florida 3-day Training Workshop: Using In-Situ Water Quality Sensors - Lagrangian and Eulerian Applications
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Mitigation Measure Development and Monitoring
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetland Pollinators
  • Fifth Annual ELI-Stetson Wetlands Workshop: Conserving the Coasts: The State of Marine Ecosystems and Coastal Compensatory Mitigation
  • Environmental Concern, Inc. Course: Life in a Chesapeake Bay Marsh Tour
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands, and Hydrology (Coastal Plain or Piedmont)
  • The Swamp School: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: Wetland Delineation Training
  • U.S Fish & Wildlife Service Training: Climate Smart Conservation with Scenario Planning
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Streambank Assessment and Restoration
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • UC Davis Extension Course Environmental Planning and Site Analysis
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Lake Management
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Air Quality Analysis
  • UC Davis Extension Course: The General Plan in California
  • San Francisco Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve Course: Advanced Wetland Delineation
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Water Quality Regulation and Permitting
  • U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service: Introduction to Species Status Assessment
  • American Law Institute Continuing Legal Education: Clean Water Act: Law and Regulation 2017
  • The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
  • The Swamp School Course: Habitat Conservation Plans
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
  • The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetlands of the World
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Habitat Conservation Planning
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: POW! The Planning of Wetlands
  • UC Davis Extension Course: GIS for Forestry Application
  • Environmental Concern, Inc.: WOW! WOW! Facilitator
  • Environmental Concern Course: Implementing Citizen Science In Your Outdoor Classroom
  • The Swamp School: Online Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School: Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator 2018
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2018
  • The Swamp School Course: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School: Online Course: Ecological Risk Assessment 2018
  • NIMBioS Investigative Workshop: Modeling Ecotoxicological Dynamics Subject to Stoichiometric Constraints
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Rutgers Identification of Wetland Plants in Winter
  • The Swamp School Course: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
  • American Law Institute Course: Environmental Law 2018
  • EUCI Course: Endangered Species Act, Wetlands, Stormwater & Floodplain Regulatory Compliance for Energy and Utilities
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals 2018
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Phase 1 Environmental Assessments 2018
  • National Living Shorelines Tech Transfer Workshop
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment 2018
  • Resource Institute: Level 1 - Applied Fluvial Morphology
  • Earth Institute Center for Environmental Sustainability Course: Coral Reef Ecology: Bermuda
  • Resource Institute: Level II - River Morphology and Application
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: Communication and Facilitation Skills for Conservation Managers
  • The Swamp School: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training
  • Flathead Lake Bio Station: Conservation Ecology
  • Flathead Lake Bio Station: Seminars in Ecology and Resource Management
  • Flathead Lake Bio Station: Stream Ecology
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: The Ecology and Conservation of Migratory Birds
  • The Swamp School: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training

SPECIAL EVENT

  • Waterfowl Festival
  • World Wetlands Day: Wetlands for a Sustainable Urban Future 
  • Whooping Crane Festival
  • World Fish Migration Day: Working together for happy fish
       
Wetland Breaking News - September 2017
 
 

Wetland Breaking News - March 2016

The Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News (WBN) is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those working in water resources and related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published Wetland Breaking News - January 2017for over fifteen years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to .

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled and Edited by Marla Stelk, Editor; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors. Executive Director: Jeanne Christie. Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399 Fax: 207-892-3089
All photos by Jeanne Christie, ASWM
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