Wetland Breaking News: December 2019

                  

IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

To view past issues of Wetland Breaking News on our website, please click here.

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Thank you for your continued interest.


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 Wetland Breaking News: December 2019

 

Editor's Note

Dear Wetlanders,

I love this time of year with all the festive lights, the smell of balsam and the bounty of good food. All our snow in Maine has now vanished due to a brief warming streak with lots of rain, but never fear – more is on the way later today. Hopefully enough to do some snowshoeing over the holiday break.

What I am really looking forward to is the winter solstice, after which we’ll finally turn the corner and the days will begin getting longer again. And then we begin a new year, full of hope and anticipation.

Wetland Breaking News will be morphing next year into the Wetland News Digest. The staff feels the new name is better suited to the type of publication it represents, and we’ll also be giving the newsletter a face lift. Never fear - much of the same content will be provided and it will still be published on a monthly basis. We hope you will enjoy the new look and feel of our monthly news chronicle.

There are many good stories in this edition. Of note in Editor’s Choice, a significant development in California Trout v. Hoopa Valley Tribe where the U.S. Supreme Court left in place an appeals court decision holding the one-year clock for states to issue Clean Water Act Section 401 certification. And in State News, Arizona decided to abandon its effort to assume the Clean Water Act Section 404 program. And you’ll find some useful new resources and publications on page 14.

All of us at ASWM wish you and your loved ones a very merry holiday season and a wonderful new year!

Marla J. Stelk
Editor
Wetland Breaking News

 

 

Wetland Breaking News: May 2019

   
                


Editor's ChoiceWetland Breaking News: December 2019


Supreme Court Leaves in Place Ruling Restricting States Clean Water Act Permitting Authority

By Morgan Lewis – JD Supra – December 12, 2019
The US Supreme Court declined to review an appeals court decision holding that the one-year clock for states to issue a certification under Section 401 of the Clean Water Act for a federal permit does not reset if applications are withdrawn and resubmitted. The Court denied certiorari on December 9 in California Trout v. Hoopa Valley Tribe, letting stand a decision of the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit that California and Oregon had waived their authority to issue conditions on a federal hydroelectric permit under Section 401 of the Clean Water Act. Read full story here.

Congressional Leaders Reach Tentative Deal to Avert Government Shutdown

By Emily Cochrane – The New York Times – December 12, 2019
Senior lawmakers announced on Thursday that they had reached a tentative bipartisan agreement on funding the government for the remainder of the fiscal year, offering a solution to avert a shutdown after weeks of haggling over money for President Trump’s border wall and other matters. Representative Nita M. Lowey, Democrat of New York, and Senator Richard C. Shelby, Republican of Alabama, who lead the House and Senate Appropriations Committees, described an “agreement in principle” on $1.37 trillion in federal spending. Read full story here.

Government watchdog to probe movement of land management bureau out of DC

By Rachel Frazin – The Hill – December 11, 2019
The Government Accountability Office (GAO), will probe the Trump administration’s decision to relocate Bureau of Land Management (BLM) staff from Washington, D.C., to Colorado, House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Raúl Grijalva (D-Ariz.) announced Wednesday. Grijalva described the plan to relocate the BLM’s headquarters as an attempt to “undermine” the agency’s mission and said it is “not being made in good faith” during a Wednesday press conference. Read full story here.

States slashed 4,400 environmental agency jobs in past decade: study

By Rebecca Beitsch – The Hill – December 5, 2019
A new report warns that spending cutbacks at state environmental protection agencies have led to thousands of job cuts at a time when the federal government is rolling back regulations. The study from the advocacy group Environmental Integrity Project found that states have eliminated 4,400 positions at agencies responsible for protecting the environment over the past decade. Read full story here. 
Wetland Breaking News: December 2019

 

Wetland Breaking News: December 2019National News 


EPA Awards $4 Million to Protect America’s Estuaries and Coastal Waters

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – December 4, 2019
Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a $4 million cooperative agreement with Restore America’s Estuaries to help fund projects supporting National Estuary Program coastal watersheds and estuaries. Restore America’s Estuaries will operate a competition that provides entities from across the country an opportunity to apply for funding for projects that will improve the health of our nation’s waters. Read full news release here.

The Clean Water Act Might Just Survive This Latest Attack

By Cale Jaffe – The Regulatory Review – November 25, 2019
The most important Clean Water Act case in more than a decade was recently argued before the U.S. Supreme Court. At issue in County of Maui v. Hawaii Wildlife Fund are clean water values that have undergirded American law for more than 50 years. Conservationists have been worried that this case could gut one of the foundations of modern environmental law. But the justices’ questions during oral argument provide room for cautious optimism. The Clean Water Act just might survive this challenge. Diminished, perhaps, but not defeated. Read full story here.

Top House Democrats Urge GAO to Conduct Review After Third Major Keystone Pipeline Spill

House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure – November 18, 2019
Today, Chairman of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure Peter DeFazio (D-OR), Chairman of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Frank Pallone Jr. (D-NJ), Chairman of the Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials Dan Lipinski (D-IL), and Chairman of the Subcommittee on Energy, Bobby L. Rush (D-IL) officially requested the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) conduct a review of the operator of the Keystone Pipeline System as well as the federal agency that oversees it. The request comes on the heels of a crude oil spill in Edinburg, North Dakota, the third major spill from the pipeline in three years. Read full press release here.

E.P.A. to Limit Science Used to Write Public Health Rules

By Lisa Friedman – The New York Times – November 11, 2019
The Trump administration is preparing to significantly limit the scientific and medical research that the government can use to determine public health regulations, overriding protests from scientists and physicians who say the new rule would undermine the scientific underpinnings of government policymaking. A new draft of the Environmental Protection Agency proposal, titled Strengthening Transparency in Regulatory Science, would require that scientists disclose all of their raw data, including confidential medical records, before the agency could consider an academic study’s conclusions. E.P.A. officials called the plan a step toward transparency and said the disclosure of raw data would allow conclusions to be verified independently. Read full story here.

EPA Announces $2.5 Million in Funding to Restore and Protect Water Quality on Tribal Lands

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – November 5, 2019
Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is announcing an estimated $2.5 million in federal grant funding to improve water quality on tribal lands. Awards made under this competitive grant announcement will support tribal-led projects that will make a significant difference in water quality and human health on tribal lands. Read full news release here.

 

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The purpose of this annual meeting is to support state and tribal wetland program managers, and other wetland professionals as they respond to challenges in the coming year.

Agenda Topics will include:

State/Tribal Wetland Program Capacity BuildingWetland Breaking News - December 2019
Wetland Restoration
Wetland Mitigation
Wetland Mapping
Wetlands and Wildlife
Emerging Wetland Tools and Technology

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For More Information, Please Visit the Meeting Webpage Here.

 

 

 State NewsWetland Breaking News: December 2019


AZ: Arizona Abandons Controversial Effort to Manage Clean Water Act Permit Program

Elizabeth Whitman – Phoenix New Times – December 6, 2019
Staffing and budget cuts over the last decade have left state environmental protection agencies woefully under-powered, to the detriment of the air we breathe and the water we drink, a new report says. The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality is among the hardest hit. The report, published on December 5 by the Environmental Integrity Project, a Washington, D.C.-based environmental watchdog nonprofit founded by a former Environmental Protection Agency official, examined the abilities of state environmental agencies to implement and monitor federal environmental laws, including the Clean Air Act and the Clean Water Act. Read full story here.

CO: Efforts to relocate an ancient wetland could help determine the fate of a water project on Lower Homestake Creek

By Sarah Tory – Vail Daily – November 17, 2019
One morning last month, Brad Johnson arrived at a patch of rippling yellow grasses alongside U.S. 24, a few miles south of Leadville in the upper Arkansas River valley. Sandwiched among a cluster of abandoned ranch buildings, a string of power lines and a small pond, it is an unassuming place — except, of course, for its views of 14,000-foot peaks rising across the valley. But appearances can be deceiving. The rather ordinary-looking property was a fen, which is a groundwater-fed wetland filled with organic “peat” soils that began forming during the last ice age and that give fens their springy feel. “It’s like walking on a sponge,” Johnson said, marching across the marshy ground, stopping every now and then to point out a rare sedge or grass species. Read full story here.

FL: $5.3 million dollar grant awarded to Ding Darling for wetland restoration in Sanibel

WFTX-TV / Fox 4 – November 14, 2019
A federal grant will give Southwest Florida Refuge resources to enhance the wetland habitat for roosting and nesting birds. The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation announced its award of 5.3 million dollars to the Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge on Sanibel Island. The money will be used to restore the newly acquired, 68-acre "Wulfert Bayous," adjacent to the refuge. Read full story here.

KY: Secretary Bernhardt Unveils New National Wildlife Refuge in Kentucky

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – November 22, 2019
Friday, U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt, along with U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials, and their counterparts from the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, announced the establishment of the Green River National Wildlife Refuge near the confluence of the Ohio and Green rivers in Henderson, Kentucky. “Under President Donald Trump’s leadership, the Department of the Interior has opened and expanded nearly 1.7 million acres of land, and today we’re thrilled to add Green River National Wildlife Refuge to the list,” said Secretary Bernhardt. “This is not just great news for our outdoor recreationists, but also for the wildlife that will benefit from this conservation effort. Thanks to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s dedication that led to establishing this spectacular refuge in Western Kentucky.” Read full story here.

ME: Hundreds show up to voice concerns about transmission corridor

By Steve Collins – Sun Journal – December 5, 2019
The companies that want to see a new $1 billion transmission project to bring hydropower from Quebec to Massachusetts call it a badly needed step to combat the climate crisis and ensure New England’s energy future. Its critics, though, see it differently. At a three-and-a-half hour public hearing Thursday called by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, dozens of foes fired off an array of insults for the proposal: a travesty, a bad deal, a monstrosity, a nightmare, a disaster and more. Former state Sen. Tom Saviello of Wilton said if it goes through, Maine will be the loser. While Central Maine Power earns $5 million in monthly profits from the deal – and Hydro Quebec pockets billions for decades to come – the average Mainer, he said, would save enough “to buy a Whoopie pie once a month.” Read full story here.

ME: Sustenance fishing rules proposed for Maine waters draw mixed response

By Kevin Miller – Portland Press Herald – November 21, 2019
Paper industry groups urged Maine’s Board of Environmental Protection on Thursday to slow down and potentially ratchet back a proposal to tighten pollution standards on waterways used by tribal members for sustenance fishing. Representatives for the Penobscot Nation and a statewide environmental group, meanwhile, called on regulators to move forward with implementing a law that would give Maine some of the most protective water quality standards in the nation. Read full story here.

MD: Climate change threatens four polluted ‘Superfund’ sites in Baltimore region, GAO report says

By Scott Dance – The Baltimore Sun – November 25, 2019
Sea level rise, flash flooding and other climate change-related threats pose a risk of spreading contamination from four EPA-designated Superfund sites in the Baltimore region, according to a new federal report. They include former dump sites and industrial operations that are being or were cleaned up under the Environmental Protection Agency program formally known as the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act. Read full story here.

MA: The State Wants to Turn Cranberry Bogs into Wetlands. It's Gritty Work

Barbara Moran – WBUR – November 26, 2019
Alex Hackman picks up a shovel and digs into what used to be a cranberry bog. Down through an inch or two of tough green cranberry vines, down into the sandy soil beneath. Down, down, down. "It's tough going," says Hackman, stopping to catch his breath. "This is, you know, a century of effort by the prior farmers to have this beautiful dense layer of cranberry vines." Hackman is a restoration ecologist with the Massachusetts Division of Ecological Restoration. He runs a state program dedicated to turning cranberry bogs back into wetlands. Read full story here.

OH: ODNR announces new Maumee River wetland projects as part of H2Ohio plan

By Bri Malaska – NBC 24 News Thursday, – November 21, 2019 – Video
The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) is rolling out the first projects of the governor's H2Ohio initiative. Just last week, Gov. Mike DeWine revealed details for the multi-million dollar project. Thursday morning, the Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority voted unanimously to accept the funds from the ODNR to launch the two projects in Toledo totaling over $5 million. The first six wetland projects of the H2Ohio initiative were unveiled there. Read full story and view video here.

PA: 13+ tons of tires removed from wetlands

The Susquehanna County Independent & the Weekender – November 8, 2019
About 13 tons of tires were removed from a wetlands area in New Milford last week in a clean-up effort that brought together students, businesses and agencies. Palmira Miller of the Pennsylvania Environmental Council (PEC) said Blue Ridge Honor Society students started to clean the legacy dumpsite last year – removing 150 tires at that time – but wanted to return to complete the job this year. Read full story here.

TN: EPA proposal lets toxins flow at struggling coal plants

Ariel Wittenberg and Benjamin Storrow – E&E News – November 22, 2019
The Tennessee Valley Authority has long argued it shouldn't be required to limit the toxic metals that its coal-fired power plant dumps into the Cumberland River. The Cumberland Fossil Plant's unusually large wastewater discharges, the federally owned utility maintained, merits a Clean Water Act exemption. Without one, TVA said, the plant would be stuck — unfairly — with hefty compliance costs. That argument failed to sway the Obama-led EPA, but it scored with Trump administration regulators who wrote an exemption for "high flows" into regulations proposed this month for water used to clean coal plants' air filters. Only the Cumberland plant qualifies for that exemption, which allows the discharge of nearly 10 times more mercury than would be allowed at other power stations. Downstream from the TVA plant are popular Cumberland River fishing spots, including the Cross Creek National Wildlife Refuge. Other provisions in the Trump proposal would help coal power plants whose owners made pitches for special consideration. Read full
story here.

TN: APSU and Fort Campbell partner for wetlands research on post

Charles Booth, APSU – Leaf Chronicle – November 11, 2019
Austin Peay State University and the Fort Campbell Army installation deepened their growing relationship on Nov. 6 when the two organizations initiated an Intergovernmental Support Agreement, allowing APSU faculty and students to identify wetland ecosystems within the 105,000-acre Army post. During a special ceremony on post, APSU President Alisa White and Col. Jeremy Bell, Fort Campbell garrison commander, signed the historic agreement. “Thank you for investing some resources from Fort Campbell to Austin Peay State University, and that primary resource is access,” White said. “Wetlands are important. They’re important to the nation, and this is a project we believe in.” Read full story here.

TX: How an Old Law Is Helping Fight New Plastic Problems

The Revelator – November 18, 2019 – Video
On October 15 a federal court approved the largest citizen-suit settlement ever awarded under the Clean Water Act: $50 million. A fourth-generation Texas shrimper, Diane Wilson, used the citizen suit provision of the Clean Water Act to sue the petrochemical manufacturer Formosa Plastic for violating the Clean Water Act. Formosa was discharging plastic pellets into Lavaca Bay, a water body located off the Gulf of Mexico halfway between Houston and Corpus Christi. In the recent fight against plastic pollution, advocates and lawmakers have focused their attention on enacting new laws like plastic bans. But Wilson’s victory is a reminder that enforcement of existing laws is still a valuable tool in battling plastic pollution — and citizen suits can be leveraged to hold industry accountable. Read full story and view video here.

VT: VNRC claims water quality victory in today's Supreme Court ruling

Vermont Business Magazine – November 11, 2019
Today the Vermont Supreme Court overturned the Environmental Court’s decision that economic considerations trump environmental factors in setting conditions for Morrisville Water and Light’s (MWL) application for a Water Quality Certificate (WQC) pursuant to Section 401 of the Clean Water Act (CWA). The Vermont Natural Resources Council (VNRC) and Vermont Trout Unlimited (TU) challenged the Environmental Court decision that, according to VNRC Policy and Water Program Director Jon Groveman, “radically departed from how the Vermont Water Quality Standards have been applied in Vermont and across the country and if allowed to stand would result in significant harm to Vermont’s waters.” Read full article here.

VA: Northam orders highest flood-protection standards in the US for new state-owned buildings

By Tamara Dietrich – Daily Press – November 15, 2019
Gov. Ralph Northam has put Virginia at the forefront of flood-risk building standards for state-owned property, incorporating federal projections for sea level rise. Already, state buildings in Virginia can’t be erected in flood-prone areas without a variance. Under an executive order announced Friday, those buildings now must be erected at even higher elevations to minimize the risks from flooding. Northam said in a statement that the new flood-protection standards are the strongest in the country for state-owned property. Read full story here.

WA: Veterans Become Budding Marine Scientists through Washington Internship Program

NOAA Fisheries – November 8, 2019
In the Puget Sound region of Washington, Kate Rovinski helps study Dungeness crabs at NOAA’s Mukilteo Research Station, part of the Northwest Fisheries Science Center. The crabs are the target of a valuable West Coast fishery at high risk to the effects of ocean acidification. Rovinski got started in the lab through a promising new pathway for veterans in marine science: the NOAA Washington Department of Veterans Affairs Veterans Conservation Corps Internship Program. The internship program allows veterans to be part of marine science research teams. Work includes both lab and field experiences in a range of disciplines related to the health of Puget Sound, including salmon recovery and ocean acidification. Read full story here.

WV: More Than 180 Years Later, 'Eelway' To Help American Eel Return Further Upstream

By Liz McCormick – West Virginia Public Broadcasting – November 26, 2019
At the end of Vineyard Road in Falling Waters, West Virginia, there is an old, stone and brick structure on the Potomac River. This small, historic building is a hydroelectric power plant owned by Cube Hydro Partners based in Maryland. Beside the structure is ‘Dam #5.’ The dam, owned by the National Park Service, stretches the width of the river – from the West Virginia side to the Maryland side. It is 20 feet tall and was originally built in the 1830s. While the dam provides electricity, it has also had an unintended consequence. Read full story here.


Wetland Breaking News: December 2019

 

Wetland Breaking News: December 2019Wetland Science News


Within Sight of New York City, an Old-Growth Forest Faces Storms and Sea Level Rise

By Kevin Krajick – State of the Plant – December 3, 2019
Bounding the southern approach to New York harbor, New Jersey’s low, narrow Sandy Hook peninsula is home to an extremely rare forest: a 65-acre patch of eastern holly and red cedar trees, some of which date to the early 1800s. Close to sea level, rooted in nutrient-poor sand and exposed to wind from all directions, such forests once covered much of the East Coast. These few trees have survived the development that has swallowed nearly everything around them, along with countless storms, and — so far — rising sea levels. In 2012, Hurricane Sandy tore through, killing many trees with saltwater inundation and wind. The skeletons of the dead now whiten in the sun. With the slow inland march of rising ocean waters, and the increasing climate-driven potential for future powerful storms like Sandy, how much longer the rest may exist is an open question. Read full blog post here.

In bleak report, U.N. says drastic action is only way to avoid worst effects of climate change

By Brady Dennis – The Washington Post – November 26, 2019 – Video
The world has squandered so much time mustering the action necessary to combat climate change that rapid, unprecedented cuts in greenhouse gas emissions offer the only hope of averting an ever-intensifying cascade of consequences, according to new findings from the United Nations. Already, the past year has brought devastating hurricanes, relentless wildfires and crippling heat waves, prompting millions of protesters to take to the streets to demand more attention to a problem that seems increasingly urgent. Read full story and view video here.

Soaking in the Rain

By Samantha Watters – Maryland Today – November 25, 2019
You might not have thought twice about the thicket at street’s end or that cluster of trees growing wild on the corner, but they make a difference in controlling stormwater runoff, according to a University of Maryland-led study. The study published in the Journal of Environmental Management was based on analysis of urban green spaces in Baltimore. It found that regardless of their sizes, swatches of forest are about as effective at absorbing rainfall as built green infrastructure features like rain gardens, retention areas planted with grasses and perennials that help rain soak into the ground. Read full story here.

Fish in California estuaries are evolving as climate change alters their habitat

By Tim Stephens – UC Santa Cruz – November 21, 2019
The threespine stickleback, a small fish found throughout the coastal areas of the Northern Hemisphere, is famously variable in appearance from one location to another, making it an ideal subject for studying how species adapt to different environments. A new study shows that stickleback populations in estuaries along the coast of California have evolved over the past 40 years as climate change has altered their coastal habitats. The study, published November 21 in Global Change Biology, looked at variation in the armoring that protects the stickleback from predators, specifically the number of bony plates along their sides (called lateral plates). Previous research showed that populations in northern California have a more complete set of this armoring than populations in southern California, corresponding to differences in their habitats. Read full story here.

Nearly all America's endangered species will struggle to adapt to climate crisis

Oliver Milman – The Guardian – November 19, 2019
The climate crisis is poised to deliver a severe blow to America’s most threatened animals, with a new study finding that almost every species considered endangered is vulnerable in some way to global heating. Of the 459 animal species listed as endangered by the US government, researchers found that all but one, or 99.8%, have characteristics that will make it difficult for them to adapt to rising temperatures. Read full story here.

Study shows how cover crops and perennials do not necessarily increase carbon storage in soil

Iowa State University – November 8, 2019
The ability of cover crops to stimulate microbes deep in the soil of farm fields leads to significant gains in water quality but does not necessarily increase the capacity of soil to store carbon, according to a recently published study from Iowa State University scientists. The study, published in the academic journal Global Change Biology Bioenergy, analyzed soil samples that had undergone a wide range of long-term treatments. Steven Hall, an assistant professor of ecology, evolution and organismal biology and corresponding author of the study, said the research delves deep below the surface to explore how cover crops and perennial prairie plants affect soil microbial activity. Read full story here.

Healthy wetlands could help stave off rising seas

By JoAnn Adkins – FIU News – November 1, 2019
Sea levels are rising, so what happens if the ground starts sinking? A team of researchers led by FIU scientist Sean Charles set out to determine if and how saltwater intrusion can cause coastal wetlands to sink. Their findings demonstrate local actions can play a large role in the resilience of ecosystems to climate change. Read full story here.

Wetland Breaking News: December 2019

 

Wetland Breaking News: December 2019Resources and Publications


The Thin Green Line

Environmental Integrity Project – December 5, 2019
The Environmental Integrity Project examined the budgets of the environmental agencies in the lower 48 states (numbers for Alaska and Hawaii were not available). Our analysis surveyed annual expenditures and staffing levels from fiscal year 2008 to 2018 for state agencies that protect public health and the environment from all forms of pollution. We found that 31 states reduced funding for their environmental agencies’ pollution control programs, with 25 states imposing cuts of at least 10 percent. Forty states reduced staffing levels at their environmental agencies, with 21 states cutting their environmental workforce by at least 10 percent. Overall, states eliminated 4,400 positions at agencies responsible for protecting the environment. Read more and download the report here.

Financing Emissions Reductions for the Future – State of Voluntary Carbon Markets Report 2019

Ecosystem Marketplace – December 5, 2019
Airlines, oil companies, and individuals are using voluntary carbon markets to achieve net reductions in greenhouse gas emissions at levels not seen in seven years, according to Financing Emissions Reductions for the Future: State of the Voluntary Carbon Markets 2019, which was published by Forest Trends’ Ecosystem Marketplace initiative today at year-end climate talks (COP25) in Madrid, Spain. Companies feel an urgency to reduce their emissions, but they can’t eliminate them internally overnight,” said Michael Jenkins, President and CEO of Forest Trends. “Many are now using voluntary carbon markets to offset those emissions they can’t eliminate until they can transition to new technologies.” This is the 12th edition of the report, which Ecosystem Marketplace first began publishing in 2007. It draws on extensive market data gathered from the years 2017 and 2018, coupled with interviews to interpret findings and identify trends in the current calendar year. Read more and access report here.
 

A New Coast: Strategies for Responding to Devastating Storms and Rising Seas

By Jeffrey Peterson – Island Press – November 2019
More severe storms and rising seas will inexorably push the American coastline inland with profound impact on communities, infrastructure, and natural systems. In A New Coast, Jeffrey Peterson draws a comprehensive picture of how storms and rising seas will change the coast. Peterson offers a clear-eyed assessment of how governments can work with the private sector and citizens to be better prepared for the coming coastal inundation. Read more and order book here.

 

Awards & Grants

2020 Wetland Foundation Travel Grants
The Wetland Foundation is soliciting applications for 2020 travel grants. For more information, visit The Wetland Foundation websiteApplication deadline is December 18, 2019.

EPA Announces Requests for Applications for the 2020 Environmental Education Grants Program
As authorized by the National Environmental Education Act of 1990, EPA is pleased to announce the availability of up to $3 million in funding for locally-focused environmental education projects under the 2020 Environmental Education Grant Program. EPA will award three to four grants in each of the agency’s 10 regions. Groups interested must submit their application by January 6, 2020, to be considered. The Requests for Application (RFA) is posted hereApplications must be submitted by January 6, 2020, electronically through Grants.gov by following the instructions in the RFA. The full list of solicitation notices is available at Grants.gov and here at the EPA website

2020 Katherine S. McCarter Student Policy Award
Ecological Society of America (ESA) invites applications for its Katherine S. McCarter Graduate Student Policy Award (GSPA). Offered each year, this award gives graduate students hands-on science policy experience including interacting with congressional decision-makers, federal agency officials, and others engaged in science and public policy. The two-day event will occur in mid-March 2020 in Washington DC. The final date will be confirmed in January after Congress releases its 2020 schedule. Applications due by January 9, 2020.

Request for Proposals, City of Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks Funded Research Program
The Open Space and Mountain Parks Department (OSMP) of the City of Boulder has funding available through its funded research program for scientific inquiry on OSMP lands. Preference is given to original proposals that address priority research topics identified by the department. However, all proposals will be considered based on their merits. For research that crosses the boundaries of OSMP and our neighbors (Boulder County Parks and Open Space and Jefferson County Open Space), we will also consider interagency grant proposals for joint funding. The maximum award amount for OSMP proposals is $10,000. Proposal deadline is January 10, 2019. Full details are available here.

Ecological Society of America (ESA) Awards
The American Society of Naturalists, the Society for the Study of Evolution, and the Society of Systematic Biologists announce the call for nominations for the 1st annual ASN/SSE/SSB Inclusiveness, Diversity, Equity, and Access (IDEA) Award. The IDEA Award will be given to a person at any career stage who has strengthened the ecology and evolutionary biology community by promoting inclusiveness and diversity in our fields. The award can also be presented to a group. The recipient will receive a plaque at the annual meeting of ASN/SSB/SSE and a $1000 honorarium. Nominations should be submitted by January 15, 2020.

EPA Seeks Nominations for the 2020 PEY-PIAEE Awards
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Environmental Education is now accepting applications for the 2020 Presidential Environmental Youth Awards (PEYA) and Presidential Innovation Awards for Environmental Educators (PIAEE). Winners will be invited to Washington, D.C. in mid-2020 to be honored by the agency and present their work in a poster session. Applications for both awards must be received by 11:59 p.m. ET on January 15, 2020.

2020 Huyck Research Grant
E.N. Huyck Preserve, Inc. and Biological Research Station in Rensselaerville NY is accepting applications for 2020 Huyck Research Grants. Application deadline is February 21, 2020. 

 

 
PotpourriWetland Breaking News: December 2019


‘Culture will be eroded’: climate crisis threatens to flood Harriet Tubman park

By Oliver Milman – The Guardian – November 26, 2019
On the flat, marshy stretches of Maryland’s eastern shore, not a huge amount has changed since Harriet Tubman escaped from slavery here 170 years ago. Rivers and streams lace a wedge of land dotted with wood-board churches and small towns. Crabs and oysters are plucked from the adjacent Chesapeake Bay. The climate crisis is set, however, to completely transform low-lying Dorchester county, threatening to submerge some of the key heritage associated with Tubman, the celebrated abolitionist whose daring missions helped free scores of slaves from bondage in her homeland. Read full story here.

Stealing the Rain

By Brian Richter – Sustainable Waters – November 21, 2019
One of the great benefits of my role as the water scarcity editor for the international Water Security journal is that it forces me to read a lot more journal articles than I otherwise would. And sometimes I get a sneak peek at something really cool! Read full story here.

Mitigation Matters: Policy Solutions to Reduce Local Flood Risk

PEW – November 19, 2019
Since 2000, floods have cost the United States more than $845 billion in damage to homes, businesses, and critical infrastructure. The expense of adapting to more frequent and severe storms is projected to rise over the next several decades, placing a premium on the need to take action now to reduce the impacts of future floods. Read full article here.

Why the world is running out of sand

By Vince Beiser – BBC – November 17, 2019
A South African entrepreneur shot dead in September. Two Indian villagers killed in a gun battle in August. A Mexican environmental activist murdered in June. Though separated by thousands of miles, these killings share an unlikely cause. They are some of the latest casualties in a growing wave of violence sparked by the struggle for one of the 21st Century’s most important, but least appreciated, commodities: ordinary sand. Read full story here.

The EPA Says We Need to Reuse Wastewater

By G. Tracy Mehan, III – Scientific America – November 12, 2019
On September 10, 2019, at the 34th Annual WateReuse Symposium in San Diego, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a draft National Water Reuse Action Plan for public comment—containing 46 proposed actions, to be accomplished by a mix of federal, state, local and private stakeholders, in order to promote 10 strategic objectives. For many in the water sector, this was a welcome recognition—a validation, if you will, of a new movement and set of practices and technologies that will impact drinking water, energy, agriculture and industry throughout the nation. Read full blog post here.

Song of the Seagrass

Attish Kanhai – Earth Island Journal – November 6, 2019
In the early twentieth century, coal miners would carry canaries in cages with them as they descended into the cavernous depths of mines. As long as the canaries kept singing, the miners would continue working. If the canaries stopped singing, it was usually because they had died, alerting the miners about the presence of carbon monoxide and other toxic gases. In a way, our oceans also come equipped with their own canaries. And while corals may be the best-known example, seagrasses are an important early warning system of underwater environmental degradation that we have ignored for far too long. Read full article here.

Bringing the world's buried wetlands back from the dead

By Matthew Brown and James Brooks – Associated Press – November 5, 2019
The ghosts are all around the gently rolling farmlands of eastern England. But you have to know where to look. These are not the kind of phantoms that scare or haunt — they are ghost ponds. Over the years, landowners buried them, filling in wetlands so they had more land for planting crops and other needs, or let ponds fade away with neglect. Along with those ponds, they erased entire ecosystems — and contributed to the decline of wetlands worldwide. The result: an array of environmental calamities, ranging from rising floods to species hurtling toward extinction. There are some who are trying to reclaim these lost waterbodies. Read full story here.

Wetland Breaking News: December 2019

 

Wetland Breaking News: December 2019

 

 

 Calendar of Events


WEBINARS
     
MEETINGS     
TRAINING  

 

Wetland Breaking News: December 2019


Special Events

World Wetlands Day
February 2, 2020

Orlando Wetlands Park Festival
Christmas, FL
February 15, 2020

Great Lakes Day
March 4-5, 2020
Washington, DC

Wings Over Water Birding Festival
March 20 – 22, 2020
Blaine, WA



Wetland Breaking News: December 2019

 

WEBINARS  
       
JANUARY 2020  
       
January 15, 2020
12:30 p.m. ET 
  Ecological Landscape Alliance Webinar: Reconnecting Water, Soils, and Vegetation: Green Infrastructure in the Urban Environment  
       
January 15, 2020
1:00 p.m. ET 
  EBM Tools Network Webinar: Defining and Using Evidence in Conservation Practice by Nick Salafsky of Foundations of Success  
       
January 21, 2020
2:00 p.m. ET 
  EBM Tools Network Webinar: Improving coastal resiliency through vulnerability assessment and natural adaptation prioritization   
       
January 23, 2020
1:00 p.m. ET 
 
  Swamp School Webinar: 2020 Wetland Status and Trends  
       
January 29, 2020
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of State Wetland Managers Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: In Lieu Fee Mitigation for Impacts to Aquatic Resources: Current Program Instruments and Implementation Practices in the United States  
FEBRUARY 2019  
       

February 10, 2020
12:00 p.m. ET 
 

  Ecological Landscape Alliance Webinar: Conservation, Education, and Community Building through Prairie Restoration  
       
February 13, 2020
1:00 p.m. ET
  EBM Tools Network Webinar: A New Coast: Strategies for Responding to Devastating Storms and Rising Seas  
       
February 26, 2020
3:00 p.m. ET 
  Association of State Wetland Managers Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: The Future of Restoration of Wetlands from Constructed Impoundments  

 

MEETINGS
     
JANUARY 2020
     
January 3-7, 2020
Pacific Grove, CA
  American Society of Naturalists Stand Alone Meeting
     
January 6-9, 2020
Washington, DC
  National Council for Science and the Environment Conference: Science and Environmental Decision-Making
     
January 29, 2020
UC Davis Campus
Davis, CA
  UC Davis Coastal and Marine Sciences Institute Environmental DNA Symposium: How to Achieve a True Consensus for Best Environmental Data Practices

     
January 29-30, 2020
Wlminton, DE
  Delaware Wetlands Conference 2020

     
January 30-
February 1, 2020

New Haven, CT
  26th Annual International Society of Tropical Foresters Conference: Restoration for What and for Whom? Shifting the Paradigm in Tropical Forest Management
     
FEBRUARY 2020
     
February 6-9, 2020
University of Georgia Athens, GA
  Integrative Conservation Conference (ICC) Conference
     
February 12-15, 2020
Austin, TX
  5th International Symposium: Urbanization and Stream Ecology

     
February 16-21, 2020
San Diego, CA
  Ocean Sciences Meeting 

     
February 18-20, 2020
Elkhart Lake, WI
  Wisconsin Wetlands Association: 25th Annual Wetland Science Conference: A Clear Vision for Wetlands
     
MARCH 2020
     
March 4-5, 2020
Washington, DC
  Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: Great Lakes Day 2020

     
March 4-6, 2020
Newport, RI
  NEIWPCC Northeast Aquatic Biologists Conference
     
March 18-20, 2020
Chattanooga, TN
  Land Trust Alliance: 2020 Southeast Land Conservation Confernce
     
March 23-26, 2020
Austin, TX
  American Water Resources Association Conference: Geospatial Water Technology Conference Complex Systems
     
APRIL 2020
     
April 17-19, 2020
Stamford, CT
  Eagle Hill Institute: Spring Northeast Natural History Conference
     
April 19-22, 2020
Richmond, VA
  NatureServe: Biodiversity Without Boundaries 2020

     
April 26-28, 2020
Gainesville, FL
  University of Florida: Conference on Applied Statistics in Agriculture and Natural Resources. Abstract deadline: January 31, 2020
     
April 27-29, 2020
Baton Rouge, LA
  University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences: 13th International Symposium on Biogeochemistry of Wetlands
     
April 28-29, 2020
Clayton, NY
  2020 New York State Wetlands Forum Conference
     
April 28-30, 2020
Novi Michigan
  Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy: Great Lakes Water Infrastructure Conference 
 
MAY 20202
     
May 4-8, 2020
Boise, ID
  National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Investing in the Environment
     
May 7-8, 2020
Saratoga Springs, NY
  Land Trust Alliance: New York Land Conservation Conference: Building Resilient and Inclusive Communities
   
May 12-15, 2020
Richmond, VA
  River Management Training Symposium: Mountain Creeks to Metro Canals
   
May 27-30, 2020
Orlando, FL
  Ducks Unlimited 83rd annual National Convention
 
JUNE 2020
     
June 7-11, 2020
Fort Worth, TX
  Association of State Floodplain Managers: 2020 Annual Conference: Resiliency Where the West Begins
     
June 7-11, 2020
Quebec City, Canada
  Canadian Land Reclamation Association (CLRA), the Society for Ecological Restoration (SER) and the Society of Wetland Scientists (SWS) joint Conference: From Reclaiming to Restoring and Rewilding
     
June 21-25, 2020
University Park, PA
  Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences 8th International Symposium: Physiological Processes in Roots of Woody Plants. Submit an abstract by February 7, 2020.
     
June 21-25, 2020
Queenland, Australia
  EcoSummit 2020: Building a Sustainable and Desirable Future: Adapting to Changing Land and Sea-Scape
     
June 21-26, 2020
Waterville Valley, NH
  Gordon Research Conference: Biological Responses to Winter Climate Change
     
June 22-25, 2020
Stanford University
Stanford, CA
  CMWR 2020 Biennial Conference: Data, Models, Data-driven Models, and Their Use in Decision-Making
     
June 22-26, 2020
Sydney, Australia
  International Statistical Ecology Conference
     
June 29-
July 1, 2020

Ballina-Byron Bay, Australia
  Centre for Coastal Biochemistry at Southern Cross University: 15th Australasian Environmental Isotope Conference. Abstract deadline: March 4, 2020

     
JULY 2020
     
July 5-10, 2020
Bremen, Germany
  14th International Coral Reef Symposium

     
July 13-14, 2020
Manchester, NH
  Gordon Research Seminar: Genomic Changes Behind Adaptation and Ecosystem Functions

     
July 26-31, 2020
Denver, CO
  North American Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB 2020): Crossing Boundaries: Innovative Approaches to Conservation
     
AUGUST 2020
     
August 2-7, 2020
Salt Lake City, UT
 

Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting: Harnessing the Ecological Data Revolution

     
SEPTEMBER 2020
     
September 27-
October 1, 2020

Louisville, KY
  Wildlife Society’s Annual Conference
 
OCTOBER 2020
     
October 4-8, 2020
Providence, RI 
  202 Summit: The National Coastal and Estuarine Summit 
 
Wetland Breaking News: December 2019

 

TRAINING/WORKSHOPS
 
January 2020 
     
January 6, 2019
Online
  Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Skills Mastery Program
     
January 6, 2019
Online (14 weeks)
  Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Botanist/Winter Edition
     
January 6, 2019
Online (2-14 weeks)
  Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design
     
January 13-16, 2019
Raleigh, NC
  Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
     
January 15-17, 2019
Annapolis, MD
  National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC): Graduate Leaders in Socio-Environmental (S-E) Synthesis Workshop.
     
January 18-25, 2019
Canberra, Australia
  Stable isotopes in Biosphere Systems Workshop
     
February 2020
     
February 3, 2020
Onlinle
 
  Swamp School Online Course: Functional Mitigation Design for Dam Removals
     
February 3, 2020
Onlinle
 
  Swamp School Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator
     
February 10-12, 2020
Annapolis, MD
  National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC): People, Land, & Ecosystems: Leveraging NEON for Socio-Environmental Synthesis
     
February 10-13, 2020
Atlanta, GA
  Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
     
February 10-21, 2020
Onlinle
 
  Swamp School Course: Stream Restoration Part 3 – Stream Ecology
     
MARCH 2020
     
March 2, 2020
Online
  Swamp School Online Workshop: Living Shoreline Design

   
March 2, 2020
Online

  Swamp School Online Workshop: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
     
March 9-20, 2020
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Consrvation Course: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology
     
March 30, 2020
Front Royal, VA
  Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Monitoring Techniques
     
March 30, 2020
Online (14 weeks)
  Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Botanist
     
March 30, 2020
Online (14 weeks)
  Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
     
MAY 2020
     
May 4, 2020
Online (2-14 weeks)
  Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
     
May 4-7, 2020
Aliquippa, PA
  Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design
     
May 18-29, 2020
Flagstaff, AZ
  Northern Arizona University Symposium: New Advances in Land Carbon Cycle Modeling
     
May 19-June 9, 2020
Wrangell, AK
  Tatoosh School Course: Community Ecology
     
   JUNE 2020 
     
June 1, 2020
Online (3-16 weeks)
  Swamp School Online Workshop: Stream Restoration Part 4 – Stream Design
June 1-11, 2020
Annapolis, MD
 
  National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center’s (SESYNC) Education Program Course: Bayesian Modeling for Socio-Environmental Data
     
June 7-12, 2020
Boston, MA
  Ecological Forecasting Initiative Summer Course

     
June 8-13, 2020
Rock Harbor, MI
  Isle Royale & Keweenaw Parks Association: Plant I.D. Workshop
     
JULY 2020
     
July 7-9, 2020
Cooper Harbor, MI
  Isle Royale & Keweenaw Parks Association: Plant I.D. Workshop
     
AUGUST 2020
     
August 2-15, 2020
Bar Harbor, ME
  College of the Atlantic’s Summer Program: Field Botany: Plants of New England
     

 

 









 

INDEX

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • Supreme Court Leaves in Place Ruling Restricting States Clean Water Act Permitting Authority
  • Congressional Leaders Reach Tentative Deal to Avert Government Shutdown
  • Government watchdog to probe movement of land management bureau out of DC
  • States slashed 4,400 environmental agency jobs in past decade: study

NATIONAL NEWS

  • EPA Awards $4 Million to Protect America’s Estuaries and Coastal Waters
  • The Clean Water Act Might Just Survive This Latest Attack
  • Top House Democrats Urge GAO to Conduct Review After Third Major Keystone Pipeline Spill
  • E.P.A. to Limit Science Used to Write Public Health Rules
  • EPA Announces $2.5 Million in Funding to Restore and Protect Water Quality on Tribal Lands

STATE NEWS

  • AZ: Arizona Abandons Controversial Effort to Manage Clean Water Act Permit Program
  • CO: Efforts to relocate an ancient wetland could help determine the fate of a water project on Lower Homestake Creek
  • FL: $5.3 million dollar grant awarded to Ding Darling for wetland restoration in Sanibel
  • KY: Secretary Bernhardt Unveils New National Wildlife Refuge in Kentucky
  • ME: Hundreds show up to voice concerns about transmission corridor
  • ME: Sustenance fishing rules proposed for Maine waters draw mixed response
  • MD: Climate change threatens four polluted ‘Superfund’ sites in Baltimore region, GAO report says
  • MA: The State Wants to Turn Cranberry Bogs into Wetlands. It's Gritty Work
  • OH: ODNR announces new Maumee River wetland projects as part of H2Ohio plan
  • PA: 13+ tons of tires removed from wetlands
  • TN: EPA proposal lets toxins flow at struggling coal plants
  • TN: APSU and Fort Campbell partner for wetlands research on post
  • TX: How an Old Law Is Helping Fight New Plastic Problems
  • VT: VNRC claims water quality victory in today's Supreme Court ruling
  • VA: Northam orders highest flood-protection standards in the US for new state-owned buildings
  • WA: Veterans Become Budding Marine Scientists through Washington Internship Program
  • WV: More Than 180 Years Later, 'Eelway' To Help American Eel Return Further Upstream
 

Wetland Breaking News: December 2019


INDEX


Editor's Choice

National News

State News

Wetland Science News

Resources & Publications

Potpouri

Calendar of Events

WETLAND SCIENCE NEWS

  • Within Sight of New York City, an Old-Growth Forest Faces Storms and Sea Level Rise
  • In bleak report, U.N. says drastic action is only way to avoid worst effects of climate change
  • Soaking in the Rain
  • Fish in California estuaries are evolving as climate change alters their habitat
  • Nearly all America's endangered species will struggle to adapt to climate crisis
  • Study shows how cover crops and perennials do not necessarily increase carbon storage in soil
  • Healthy wetlands could help stave off rising seas

RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONS

  • The Thin Green Line
  • Financing Emissions Reductions for the Future – State of Voluntary Carbon Markets Report 2019
  • A New Coast Strategies for Responding to Devastating Storms and Rising Seas

POTOURRI 

  • ‘Culture will be eroded’: climate crisis threatens to flood Harriet Tubman park
  • Stealing the Rain
  • Mitigation Matters: Policy Solutions to Reduce Local Flood Risk
  • Why the world is running out of sand
  • The EPA Says We Need to Reuse Wastewater
  • Song of the Seagrass
  • Bringing the world's buried wetlands back from the dead

Wetland Breaking News: December 2019

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Webinars

January 2020

  • Ecological Landscape Alliance Webinar: Reconnecting Water, Soils, and Vegetation: Green Infrastructure in the Urban Environment
  • EBM Tools Network Webinar: Defining and Using Evidence in Conservation Practice by Nick Salafsky of Foundations of Success
  • EBM Tools Network Webinar: Improving coastal resiliency through vulnerability assessment and natural adaptation prioritization
  • Swamp School Webinar: 2020 Wetland Status and Trends
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: In Lieu Fee Mitigation for Impacts to Aquatic Resources: Current Program Instruments and Implementation Practices in the United States

February 2020

  • Ecological Landscape Alliance Webinar: Conservation, Education, and Community Building through Prairie Restoration
  • EBM Tools Network Webinar: A New Coast: Strategies for Responding to Devastating Storms and Rising Seas
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: The Future of Restoration of Wetlands from Constructed Impoundments 

MEETINGS

January 2020

  • American Society of Naturalists Stand Alone Meeting
  • National Council for Science and the Environment Conference: Science and Environmental Decision-Making
  • UC Davis Coastal and Marine Sciences Institute Environmental DNA Symposium: How to Achieve a True Consensus for Best Environmental Data Practices
  • Delaware Wetlands Conference 2020
  • 26th Annual International Society of Tropical Foresters Conference: Restoration for What and for Whom? Shifting the Paradigm in Tropical Forest Management

February 2020

  • Integrative Conservation Conference (ICC) Conference
  • 5th International Symposium: Urbanization and Stream Ecology
  • Ocean Sciences Meeting
  • Wisconsin Wetlands Association: 25th Annual Wetland Science Conference

March 2020

  • Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: Great Lakes Day 2020
  • NEIWPCC Northeast Aquatic Biologists Conference
  • Land Trust Alliance: 2020 Southeast Land Conservation Conference
  • American Water Resources Association Conference: Geospatial Water Technology Conference: Complex Systems

April 2020

  • Eagle Hill Institute: Spring Northeast Natural History Conference
  • NatureServe: Biodiversity Without Boundaries 2020
  • University of Florida: Conference on Applied Statistics in Agriculture and Natural Resources
  • University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences: 13th International Symposium on Biogeochemistry of Wetlands
  • 2020 New York State Wetlands Forum Conference
  • Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy: Great Lakes Water Infrastructure Conference

May 2020

  • National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Investing in the Environment
  • Land Trust Alliance: New York Land Conservation Conference: Building Resilient and Inclusive Communities
  • River Management Society Symposium: Mountain Creeks to Metro Canals
  • Ducks Unlimited 83rd Annual National Convention

June 2020

  • Association of State Floodplain Managers: 2020 Annual Conference: Resiliency Where the West Begins
  • Canadian Land Reclamation Association (CLRA), the Society for Ecological Restoration (SER) and the Society of Wetland Scientists (SWS) joint Conference: From Reclaiming to Restoring and Rewilding
  • Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences 8th International Symposium: Physiological Processes in Roots of Woody Plants
  • EcoSummit 2020: Building a Sustainable and Desirable Future: Adapting to Changing Land and Sea-Scape
  • Gordon Research Conference: Biological Responses to Winter Climate Change
  • CMWR 2020 Biennial Conference: Data, Models, Data-driven Models, and Their Use in Decision-Making
  • International Statistical Ecology Conference
  • Centre for Coastal Biochemistry at Southern Cross University: 15th Australasian Environmental Isotope Conference

July 2020

  • 14th International Coral Reef Symposium
  • Gordon Research Seminar: Genomic Changes Behind Adaptation and Ecosystem Functions
  • North American Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB 2020): Crossing Boundaries: Innovative Approaches to Conservation

August 2020

  • Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting: Harnessing the ecological data revolution

September 2020

  • Wildlife Society’s Annual Conference

October 2020

  • 202 Summit: The National Coastal and Estuarine Summit

 

Training/Workshops

January 2020

  • Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Skills Mastery Program
  • Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Botanist/Winter Edition
  • Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC): Graduate Leaders in Socio-Environmental (S-E) Synthesis Workshop
  • Stable isotopes in Biosphere Systems Workshop

February 2020

  • Swamp School Online Course: Functional Mitigation Design for Dam Removals
  • Swamp School Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator
  • National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC): People, Land, & Ecosystems: Leveraging NEON for Socio-Environmental Synthesis
  • Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • Swamp School Online Course: Stream Restoration Part 3 – Stream Ecology

March 2020

  • Swamp School Online Workshop: Living Shoreline Design
  • Swamp School Online Workshop: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology
  • Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Monitoring Techniques
  • Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Botanist
  • Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Delineator

May 2020

  • Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • Northern Arizona University Symposium: New Advances in Land Carbon Cycle Modeling
  • Tatoosh School Course: Community Ecology

June 2020

  • Swamp School Online Workshop: Stream Restoration Part 4 – Stream Design
  • Swamp School Online Workshop: Stream Restoration Part 4 – Stream Design
  • National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center’s (SESYNC) Education Program Course: Bayesian Modeling for Socio-Environmental Data
  • Ecological Forecasting Initiative Summer Course
  • Isle Royale & Keweenaw Parks Association: Plant I.D. Workshop

July 2020

  • Isle Royale & Keweenaw Parks Association: Plant I.D. Workshop

August 2020

  • College of the Atlantic’s Summer Program: Field Botany: Plants of New England

Wetland Breaking News: December 2019

 

   
Wetland Breaking News: December 2019

 Wetland Breaking News: Decem,ber 2019

 

Wetland Breaking News:May 2019