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STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

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All photos by
Jeanne Christie, ASWM

   


Dear Wetlanders,

In the final days of 2017, I find myself (as most folks do), reflecting on the events of the past year. As I reflect on them, I try to put them into the context of history as well as my own personal and professional evolution. It helps me gauge whether or not I’m on track with my own goals, as well as where we, as a nation and as a community of practice, are in regard to the development of scientific knowledge, policy and practice. This past year has seen a significant shift in policy which has and will continue to demand that we adapt while at the same time, keep our eye on the goal of responsible resource management. We have also continued to increase our scientific understanding of the natural world around us and how we, as humans, can better manage, protect and restore the aquatic ecosystems around us in order to attain multiple co-benefits for wildlife, water quality, recreation, resiliency and more.

The Association of State Wetland Managers (ASWM) has continued to grow, and through all of our collective efforts with many partners and our members, we have completed multiple projects aimed at increasing the capacity of federal, state and tribal wetland programs as well as others involved in wetland practice and policy, including private practitioners, academia, and folks just interested in wetlands and other aquatic resources. ASWM’s founder, Dr. Jon Kusler, PhD completed a very comprehensive and easily digestible book on “Government Liability for Flood Hazards.” ASWM staff completed a 4 year project on improving wetland restoration outcomes and released its final white paper entitled, “Wetland Restoration: Contemporary Issues & Lessons Learned.” And in July, ASWM staff also completed an analysis of ten different wetland communications case studies, and compiled all their findings into a final report to help other agencies and organizations develop their own communication plans. These are just a few of our recent accomplishments.

We are confident that together, with all of you, ASWM will continue to make great strides in 2018. If you haven’t had a chance to view our end of 2017 fun video journey, “Another Very Weird Wetland Adventure,” with the swamp creature, bog boy and nature girl, we hope you’ll check it out and enjoy a good chuckle – we certainly did while making it!

All of us at ASWM wish you and yours all our best wishes for a wonderful holiday season and a joyous New Year!

With warm appreciation,

Marla J. Stelk
Editor, Wetland Breaking News

   
             


Federal maps underestimate flood risk for tens of millions of people, scientists warn

By Carolyn Gramling – Science News – December 13, 2017
National flood maps are underestimating the risk for tens of millions of people in the United States. That’s the conclusion of researchers presenting a new study December 11 at the American Geophysical Union’s fall meeting. The U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency estimates that about 13 million people live in a “1-in-100-year” floodplain zone, a region that has a 1 percent chance of flooding in any given year. But the agency’s risk assessment largely focuses on larger streams and rivers, and lacks assessments of risk along smaller tributaries. FEMA’s calculations “miss a lot of the risk,” says Oliver Wing, a geographer at the University of Bristol in England. For full story, click here.

Pay-for-Performance: Bringing the Best of the Private Sector to Realize Wetland Restoration

By Shannon Cunniff – Restore the Mississippi River Delta– December 6, 2017
Over the next 15 years, Louisiana will receive billions of dollars for coastal restoration from Gulf oil spill settlements. While this influx will provide a significant, steady investment in restoring Louisiana’s coast, the amount falls short of what is needed to fully implement the wetland restoration projects in the state’s Coastal Master Plan. One idea to help reduce the funding gap is outcome-based contracting. Often called pay-for-performance contracting, this approach could help the state build wetland restoration projects at a lower cost, more quickly, and with better quality, so that they are more sustainable to erosion and sea level rise. Last spring, the Louisiana Legislature approved the use of outcome-based contracting, and next week, Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) is hosting a public meeting to solicit input on the approach. For full story, click here.

Decades-past logging still threatens spotted owls in national forests

By Eric Hamilton – University of Wisconsin-Madison – December 6, 2017
Logging of the largest trees in the Sierra Nevada’s national forests ended in the early 1990s after agreements were struck to protect species’ habitat. But new research reported Dec. 6 in the journal Diversity and Distributions by University of Wisconsin–Madison ecologists shows that spotted owls, one of the iconic species logging restrictions were meant to protect, have continued to experience population declines in the fore sts. Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology graduate student Gavin Jones, Professor Zach Peery, senior scientist R. J. Gutiérrez, and their colleagues say the owls in the area may still be paying an “extinction debt” that was created by historical logging of large trees. These large, old trees the owls rely on are slow to grow back, meaning the owl population could still be showing the effects of logging that ended decades ago. For full story, click here.

Reducing How Much Nitrogen Enters a Lake Has Little Impact on Algal Blooms, Find Canadian Scientists

Contact: Sumeep Bath – International Institute for Sustainable Development – December 18, 2017
Lakes suffering from harmful algal blooms may not respond to reduced, or even discontinued, artificial nitrogen loading. Many blue-green algae responsible for algal blooms can fix atmospheric nitrogen dissolved in the water, and therefore water stewards should focus their efforts on removing phosphorus from lakes to combat algal blooms. For full story, click here.

How much soil goes down the drain: New data on soil lost due to water

Science Daily – December 15, 2017
According to a new study by the University of Basel, the European Commission -- Joint Research Centre and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH, UK), almost 36 billion tons of soil is lost every year due to water, and deforestation and other changes in land use make the problem worse. The study also offers ideas on how agriculture can change to become a part of the solution from being part of the problem. Soil is an essential resource for satisfying human needs, such as food and feed production, fibre, clean air and water. Soil is not an infinite resource though. Human activity and changes in land use lead to increased soil loss, which in turn degrades nature's recycling system and diminishes land productivity, thus decreasing human wellbeing worldwide. For full article, click here.

Belowground Fungal Interactions with Trees in Forests Help Explain Non-native Plant Invasions

Contact: Jane Hodgins– USDA Forest Service – December 1, 2017
University suggests that tiny soil fungi that help and are helped by trees may influence a forest’s vulnerability to invasion by non-native plants. Research published Dec. 1 in the online edition of the journal Ecology Letters suggests that the invasion of nonnative plants is strongly related to what type of mycorrhizal fungi are dominant in forest ecosystems. Mycorrhizal fungi are a type of fungi that help trees feed on minerals in the soil and, in turn, feed off sugars in tree roots. Lead author Insu Jo of Purdue University and his co-authors, including Grant Domke, a research forester with the Forest Service’s Northern Research Station, explored how dominant forest tree mycorrhizal type affects understory plant invasions. For full story, click here.

Floods are necessary for maintaining healthy river ecosystems

Steve Lundebert – Oregon State University – November 27, 2017
Flooding rivers can wreak havoc on homes and roads but are necessary for healthy ecosystems, research at Oregon State University suggests. The study shows that alterations to rivers’ natural flow patterns – because of dams, diversions and changes in precipitation – cause damage to riparian plant communities and river ecosystems in general. Even minor shifts in temporal flow patterns harm networks of competing vegetation, said the study’s corresponding author, Jonathan Tonkin of the OSU College of Science. The most severe effects, he said, occur when cyclical flooding is removed from the equation. For full story, click here.

 

Mining giant to leave coal group over climate change stance

By Timothy Cama – The Hill – December 19, 2017
Mining giant BHP Billiton Ltd., one of the world’s largest coal companies, said Tuesday it would leave an international coal association over the group’s positions on climate change. BHP, which is headquartered in London and Melbourne, Australia, is also considering exiting the U.S. Chamber of Commerce over climate policy as well, the company said. For full story, click here.

Canada Provides $45 Million for Great Lakes Protection

Info Superior – December 16, 2017
On December 1st, the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Catherine McKenna, announced that the Government of Canada will invest $44.84 million for the Great Lakes Protection Initiative, which is part of the $70.5 million of new funding allocated for freshwater protection, in Budget 2017. Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change said, “Canada believes that sustained action on Great Lakes restoration is key to the health and economic prosperity of citizens in this important region. Working alongside American and Canadian partners, the Government of Canada will continue to promote strong action on both sides of the border—to tackle climate change and protect the shared waters of our Great Lakes.” New programming will focus on reducing toxic and nuisance algae and strengthening the resilience of Great Lakes coastal wetlands. For full blog post, click here. 

Exxon Agrees to Disclose Climate Risks Under Pressure from Investors

By John H. Cushman, Jr. and David Hasemyer – InsideClimate News – December 12, 2017
Under pressure from investors, prosecutors and global regulators, ExxonMobil Corp. agreed on Monday to strengthen its analysis and disclosure of the risks its core oil business faces from climate change and from government efforts to rein in carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels. That will require Exxon to face squarely the implications of reduced oil demand if the world makes good on the pledges of the Paris climate agreement to cut carbon emissions practically to zero fast enough to avoid the worst effects of global warming. For full story, click here. 

EPA Awards $1.345 Million to New England States to Help Protect Wetlands

Contact: David Deegan – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency December 6, 2017
EPA has awarded $1.345 million in grants to strengthen the capacity of the states to protect and restore wetlands. The Wetland Program Development Grants provide states, interstate agencies, and tribes with funding to develop and refine comprehensive state and local wetlands programs. Supplemental funding for these projects will be awarded in FY18 but the amounts will be budget dependent. For full news release, click here.  

Clean energy: experts outline how governments can successfully invest before it’s too late

Contact: Fred Lewsey – University of Cambridge – December 6, 2017
Researchers distil twenty years of lessons from clean energy funding into six ‘guiding principles’. They argue that governments must eschew constant reinventions and grant scientists greater influence before our “window of opportunity” to avert climate change closes. Governments need to give technical experts more autonomy and hold their nerve to provide more long-term stability when investing in clean energy, argue researchers in climate change and innovation policy in a new paper published today. Writing in the journal Nature, the authors from UK and US institutions have set out guidelines for investment in world-changing energy innovation based on an analysis of the last twenty years of “what works” in clean energy research programs. For full story, click here.

Stopping the next wave of invasive species in Saskatchewan lakes

By Costa Maragos – University of Regina – December 5, 2017
Invasive species continue to be a critical threat to freshwater ecosystems in Saskatchewan and across North America. But the species that have yet to enter Saskatchewan waters might be of greatest concern. Zebra and Quagga mussels are invasive species from Eurasia that have severely altered the ecosystems of the Great Lakes and many other water bodies in North America. Now, these mussels are making their way toward Saskatchewan. The good news? They’re not here yet. For full story, click here.

Trump shrinks two huge national monuments in Utah, drawing praise and protests

By Josh Dawsey and Juliet Eilperin – The Washington Post – December 4, 2017 Video
President Trump on Monday drastically scaled back two national monuments established in Utah by his Democratic predecessors, the largest reduction of public-lands protection in U.S. history. Trump’s move to shrink the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments by more than 1.1 million acres and more than 800,000 acres, respectively, immediately sparked an outpouring of praise from conservative lawmakers as well as protests by activists outside the White House and in Utah. The changes plunge the Trump administration into uncharted legal territory, as no president has sought to modify monuments established under the 1906 Antiquities Act in more than half a century. For full story, click here.

Farmer wins round in 31-year wetland legal battle

By Curt Harler – American Agriculturalist – December 4, 2017
David has won the latest round against Goliath in Erie County, Pa. It’s only one round, but a key round for farmer Robert Brace in a legal fight with the federal government stretching back 31 years to one of America’s first “swampbuster” cases. The outcome could impact still more land. “My life ended 31 years ago,” Brace says. And he warns other farmers that their livelihoods are in danger, too. The key legal points are: What constitutes normal farm practices in Erie County? And, what should happen if the federal government decides a farmer isn’t complying with regulations? “They [U.S. EPA and Army Corps of Engineers] make the regulations. They interpret them,” Brace says. “You don’t have any rights at all.” For full story, click here.

Bill expected to make Manitoba a leader in wetland protection

Contact: Ian Hitchen – Cisionn – November 30, 2017
Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC) congratulates the government on introducing the Sustainable Watersheds Act in the legislature today, a law that is expected to make Manitoba a leader in conservation. Once passed, the new law -- combined with the Climate and Green Plan and watershed-based planning – is expected to play an important part in environmental protection in this province. "Passage of this bill would be a win for all Manitobans," says Scott Stephens, DUC Director of Regional Operations for the Prairies. "Wetlands reduce flooding, improve water quality and enhance biodiversity throughout Manitoba." For full story, click here.

GOP crafts spending bill provisions aimed at speeding repeal of water protection rule

By Juliet Eilperin – The Washington Post – November 30, 2017
House and Senate Republicans have inserted language into spending bills aimed at blocking legal challenges to the Trump administration’s effort to repeal a 2015 water protection rule that gave two federal agencies broad leeway in regulating activities that could affect streams and tributaries. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt, who challenged the rule in federal court when he was Oklahoma’s attorney general, has made repeal of Waters of the United States (WOTUS) a top priority. He traveled to Kentucky on Thursday to meet with Gov. Matt Bevin (R) and members of the Kentucky Farm Bureau Federation, in part to discuss how to rewrite the rule. Both the EPA and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers would carry out the regulation. For full story, click here. 

Great Lakes cleanup program celebrates 15 years of success

By Ben Wegleitner – Sea Grant – November 27, 2017
The Great Lakes region is celebrating an anniversary: On November 27, 2002, Congress passed the Great Lakes Legacy Act—or GLLA, for short—to accelerate contaminated sediment cleanups in local waterways. To date, the program has cleaned up 4.1M cubic yards of legacy pollutants, restored habitat for fish and wildlife and revitalized coastal communities. Legacy pollutants—chemical contaminants left behind by industry from decades ago and prior to modern pollution laws—remain a burden in some Great Lakes communities. In fact, the U.S. side of the Great Lakes have 27 Areas of Concern (AOC) that are still considered impaired due to risks to human health, pollution, habitat loss, degradation and other issues. For full story, click here.

An Island Nation Turns Away from Climate Migration, Despite Rising Seas

By Ben Walker, – InsideClimate News – November20, 2017
Taneti Maamau, president of the Republic of Kiribati, leans forward from his office desk at Parliament, clasps his hands, and grins. "We try to isolate ourselves from the belief that Kiribati will be drowned," he says. "The ultimate decision is God's." As early as 2050, it is estimated that climate change will render Kiribati, a string of 33 coral atolls that necklace the central Pacific, unlivable. And when it does, the i-Kiribati—the name that Kiribati's indigenous residents give themselves—will have to move. For full article, click here

Chesapeake Bay funding could get a big boost under new farm bills

Tamara Dietrich – Daily Press – November 17, 2017 – Video
Federal funding to restore the Chesapeake Bay has declined in recent years and is under threat in Washington today, but could get a big boost under bipartisan bills just introduced in Congress. The Chesapeake Bay Farm Bill Enhancements Act of 2017 would triple the amount of conservation funds available for the bay and other regions from $100 million to $300 million, increase mandatory funding for the bay and enhance agricultural conservation efforts. For full story and to view video, click here.

3 Western groups unite to promote 'common sense' land policy

By Jennifer Yachnin – E&E News – October 16, 2017
Three conservation groups representing Western rural communities and interests announced a new coalition aimed to influence federal policy on large-scale resource planning, including cooperative management of private and public lands. The New Mexico-based Western Landowners Alliance, the Oregon-based Rural Voices for Conservation Coalition and the Texas-based Partners for Conservation will continue to maintain their individual organizations but recently issued a series of six core principles that will guide each group's work to influence federal agencies and lawmakers. For full story, click here.

 

 
 

CA: EPA says herbicide in Roundup weed killer doesn't cause cancer, contradicting California regulators

By Geoffrey Mohan – Los Angeles Times – December 18, 2017
The federal Environmental Protection Agency on Monday said glyphosate, the primary ingredient in the weed killer Roundup and one of the most widely used herbicides in agriculture, likely does not cause cancer. The assessment contradicts the conclusion of a European scientific panel as well as California regulators, who have included the chemical on the Proposition 65 list of probable carcinogens. For full story, click here.

CO: Native fish species at risk following water removal from the Colorado River

Contact: David Jacobs – PeerJ – December 12, 2017
Agriculture and domestic activities consume much of the Colorado River water that once flowed to the Colorado Delta and Northern Gulf of California. The nature and extent of impact of this fresh-water loss on the ecology and fisheries of the Colorado Delta and Gulf of California is controversial. A recent publication in the journal PeerJ reveals a previously unseen risk to the unique local biodiversity of the tidal portion of the Delta. For full press release, click here.

IA: Wells Fargo gives funds to Ducks Unlimited wetland projects

By Mitchell Schmidt – The Gazette – November 24, 2017
Wells Fargo has announced a $250,000 grant to Ducks Unlimited to go toward wetland projects. With the grant, Ducks Unlimited will work with the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship and the Iowa Department of Natural Resources to restore wetlands, according to a news release. Those projects will help reduce nutrient runoff, improve water quality, reduce downstream flooding and provide waterfowl and wildlife habitat, the release states. For full story, click here.

LA: Federal tax bill would raise Louisiana's cap for oil revenue that pays for coastal restoration

By Tristan Baurick – NOLA.com – The Times-Picayume – December 14, 2017
Louisiana congressional leaders have worked a provision into the Republicans' sweeping tax bill that would substantially raise the limit on offshore oil and gas revenues Louisiana and other Gulf states can use for coastal restoration and protection projects. For full story, click here.

LA: Local wetlands advocate receives award

By Keith Magill – Houma Today.com – December 3, 2017
The head of a local wetlands-advocacy group has received a regional honor for her work.
Susan Testroet-Bergeron, director of the Thibodaux-based Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program, received a third place Gulf Guardian award in a category that recognizes individuals. The Gulf of Mexico Program cited her work incorporating residents’ stories into programs that educate people about Louisiana’s coastal land loss and its impact on communities. For full story, click here.

MD: Maryland Announces Comprehensive Oyster Restoration Plan

Maryland Department of Natural Resources – December 15, 2017
The Maryland Department of Natural Resources today announced a comprehensive plan on oyster restoration, including its intention to recommend Breton Bay and the upper St. Mary’s River as the fourth and fifth tributaries to satisfy the state’s commitment to the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement goal of restoring native oyster habitat and populations in five tributaries by 2025. The department’s selection complements ongoing large-scale oyster restoration activities in Harris Creek, the Little Choptank River and the Tred Avon River. For full story, click here.

MD: Biologist fighting uphill battle to get eelways built on Potomac dams

By Karl Blankenship – Bay Journal – December 15, 2017
Decades ago, as Ed Enamait and other biologists surveyed the Potomac River for walleye, smallmouth bass, muskie and other freshwater game fish, they discovered a disturbing trend. Every year during the 1980s and ’90s, their electroshocking gear brought fewer stunned eels to the surface. “It was troubling,” said Enamait, then a fisheries biologist with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. “And it just kept going down.” For full article, click here.

MN: Murray County to review aquatic invasive species plan

By Jody Issackson – Independen t – December 19, 2017
During today’s Murray County Board meeting, Zoning/Environmental Administrator Jean Christoffels will be reviewing amendments to the Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Prevention and Management Plan that will guide the spending of $88,500 in 2018. “AIS are threatening Minnesota waters,” Christoffels said in the introduction to the document. “Their presence can be harmful to fish populations, water quality, as well as water recreation.” Murray County does not currently have any aquatic invasive species. Taking preventive measures will keep it that way. For full story, click here.

MO: Waterfowl area to see improvements

By Missouri Conservation Department – Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette – December 18, 2017
The Missouri Department of Conservation continues to plan for the renovation of the wetland management pools and water control structures at the Schell-Osage Conservation Area. This project will improve the wetlands for waterfowl habitat, improve the fishery at Schell Lake and reduce long-term flood damage. The initial start date is not yet set, but all or portions of the waterfowl hunting areas will be closed for several seasons once construction begins. For full story, click here.

NC: In the Outer Banks, Officials and Property Owners Battle to Keep the Ocean at Bay

By Nicholas Kusnets – InsideClimate News – November 28, 2017
This hurricane season, Lance Goldner harbored an unusual wish: that his beach house on North Carolina's scenic Outer Banks would collapse in a storm. Goldner bought the property with his brother 14 years ago, when it was part of a row of cottages perched above the high-tide line. They'd planned to rent it out, but for much of the past decade, the faded yellow structure has stood vacant. Today, insulation spills from its bowels. Windows are boarded up. And high tides wash underneath between pilings, even on calm days. Ever since a nor'easter slammed the Outer Banks in 2009, damaging hundreds of homes along these barrier islands, Goldner's cottage has been largely uninhabitable. The storm sucked the land out from beneath the homes. Now only two remain in a row that once numbered 10. Erosion has gradually consumed the shoreline in the tourist town of Nags Head, seizing homes and threatening nearly a billion dollars' worth of property. Sea level rise from climate change is making matters worse. For homeowners caught in the middle, the damage has left some facing substantial financial losses. For full story, click here.

OH: Ohio EPA Says Rover Pipeline Caused More Wetland Spills

By M.L. Schultze – WOSU Public Media – November 21, 2017
The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency is planning this week to issue new notices of violations against the company building the 700-mile Rover Pipeline across the state. EPA director Craig Butler says more drilling fluid has been spilled into streams and wetlands along Rover’s diagonal path across Ohio. He says Energy Transfer Partners is supposed to be avoiding such spills by doing its horizontal drilling underground, instead of digging trenches to lay the pipeline. For full story, click here.

OH: State of Ohio Releases Latest Version of Plan to Reduce Nutrients in Lake Erie Basin

Contact: Heidi Griesmer – Ohio Environmental Protection Agency – November 17, 2017
The Ohio Lake Erie Commission and the State of Ohio have completed the Ohio Domestic Action Plan (DAP) 1.0 to reduce phosphorus entering Lake Erie under the binational Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement with a goal of reducing phosphorus loading to Lake Erie by 40 percent by 2025. This version of the Ohio DAP is being provided to U.S. EPA for review and comment and to serve as Ohio’s part of the US Domestic Action Plan, the final version of which is due in Feb. 2018. For full story, click here.

OR: Jackson Bottom Wetlands in Hillsboro getting a makeover

By John William Howard – Portland Tribune – December 5, 2017
As autumn rains return to Jackson Bottom Wetland Preserve in Hillsboro, everything begins to change.
In the summer, this preserve is all but bone-dry, and the main visible wildlife are small amphibians and a handful of big birds. But the marshes and ponds will be teeming with life over the next several months. The city of Hillsboro — along with Metro, Clean Water Services and other organizations — is looking to restore a self-sustaining seasonal wetland and erase decades of misuse in Jackson Bottom, a 270-acre preserve along Hillsboro's southern border. For full story, click here.

OR: Some county wetland designations based on faulty data, federal official says

Lebanon Local – November 26, 2017
Lebanon City Manager Gary Marks said while recent news about changes to Linn County wetlands designation does not affect Lebanon, there may be some changes soon for the city. The method Linn County planners use to determine the location of wetlands is at odds with recommendations of state and federal agencies, according to a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service official. A wetland designation affects land use and building permits and can require that a property owner pay for wetlands mitigation. Mitch Bergeson, a project leader for of the USFWS’s National Wetlands Inventory department, sent an email on Nov. 9 to “clarify some misunderstandings about the USFWS’s National Wetlands Inventory dataset and explain some data modifications that may have caused some confusion.” For full story, click here.

PA: EPA Awards $3.7 Million to Pennsylvania for Chesapeake Bay Restoration

Contact: David Sternberg – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – December 14, 2017
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced today that it is providing $3.7 million to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) to implement best management practices (BMPs) on agricultural lands in Pennsylvania’s portion of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. These practices will reduce the loads of nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment pollution going to the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. For full news release, click here.

RI: URI researcher: Spotted turtles in trouble in Rhode Island

Contact: Todd McLeish – University of Rhode Island – December11, 2017
A University of Rhode Island doctoral student who surveyed the state for freshwater turtles and studied their habitat preferences found that the once-common spotted turtle is in trouble, due largely to habitat disturbance. Scott Buchanan, a New Jersey native working in collaboration with URI Associate Professor Nancy Karraker, repeatedly visited 88 different wetlands in the state over three years and captured nearly 2,000 turtles of four different species. Just 50 were spotted turtles, a species considered by the state to be of high conservation concern and a candidate for the U.S. endangered species list. For full story, click here.

TX: After Harvey, some South Texans more wary than ever about plan to build landfill near floodplain

By Shannon Najmabadi – The Texas Tribune – December19, 2017
Nearly four months ago, Hurricane Harvey's rainfall inundated ultra-polluted Superfund sites in and around Houston, triggering the leak of hazardous waste. Now, 300 miles south, near Laredo, a company's efforts to develop a landfill in close proximity to a 100-year floodplain is drawing fresh concerns in light of the environmental problems that emerged in Harvey's wake. “The proposed landfill is, as far as I can tell, right in the middle of a floodplain and a creek that is an immediate tributary of the Rio Grande,” said George Altgelt, a Laredo city councilman. “From a practical standpoint, who builds a dump in the middle of a creek? When did that become a good idea?” For full story, click here.

VT: Wetlands violation contested

By Susan Smallheer – Rutland Herald – November 17, 2017
The town is in hot water with the state, which claims Clarendon violated state wetlands rules when it built its new ballfield on Route 7B two years ago. But the town isn’t taking the notice of violation well, and plans on contesting it, Selectman Michael Klopchin said Thursday. Klopchin, the board chairman, said the town received the notice of violation by certified mail Wednesday and held an emergency meeting that evening to discuss the situation. He said the town “followed all the rules” in getting its Act 250 land use permit and others needed to build the ballfield, which used fill from a nearby state project at the Rutland- Southern Vermont Regional Airport. He said it wasn’t a wetland that was filled in, but a drainage ditch created by the construction of the new Agency of Transportation highway garage. For full story, click here.

VA: Virginia board approves first of two pipeline projects despite fervent opposition

By Whitney Pipkin – Bay Journal – December11, 2017
A proposed natural gas pipeline through mountainous western Virginia cleared a key hurdle last week, as the State Water Control Board approved water-related permits needed to begin building the 106-mile segment through the state. The board’s approval of the Mountain Valley Pipeline on Thursday, after two days of meetings in Richmond, was seen by environmentalists as an indicator of how the citizen regulatory body would rule next week on another gas conduit, the proposed Atlantic Coast Pipeline, which would cut through the state’s portion of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. For full article, click here.

VA: Dominion’s review of coal ash ‘alternatives’ still favors on-site storage

By Whitney Pipkin – Bay Journal – December 6, 2017
After a year’s worth of study dictated by Virginia lawmakers, Dominion Energy still thinks burying millions of tons of coal ash in nearly a dozen pits across the state is the best way to prevent it from polluting nearby rivers and streams. That’s the upshot of a presentation that the Richmond-based company made this week to the State Water Commission, a joint House-Senate legislative study committee. For full article, click here.

VA: Rappahannock River Property Donated Back to American Indian Tribe

Chesapeake Bay Magazine – December 4, 2017
A piece of land near the Rappahannock River has been returned to its original owners, the Rappahannock Tribe, thanks to a U.S. Senator and the Chesapeake Conservancy. Retired U.S. Senator John Warner, a Virginia Republican, and his daughter, Ms. Virginia Warner, worked with the Conservancy to donate nearly an acre of land on Carters Wharf Road in Warsaw, Virginia. The land is located near the public boat landing at Fones Cliffs along the Rappahannock River. It will become a staging area for the Rappahannock Tribe's Return to the River program, an effort to get the tribe's youth involved in their ancestral traditions, including water-related activities like canoeing, fishing, and camping. The Conservancy also donated a canoe to the tribe. For full article, click here.

WA: Clark County developer fined $17,000 for not protecting wetlands

Contact: David Bennett – Washington Department of Ecology – December 14, 2017
After a Clark County developer failed to follow through on his obligation to protect wetlands, the Washington Department of Ecology issued him a $17,000 penalty. In 2005, Dennis Pavlina of Vancouver, Wash., and his now-defunct company Gold Medal Group began illegally grading and filling 37 acres of wetlands in the Salmon Creek watershed to build a business park known as Battle Ground Village. For full story, click here. 

WV: Reclaiming Appalachia: A Push to Bring Back Native Forests to Coal Country

By Elizabeth McGowan – YaleEnvironment 360 – December 14, 2017 – Video
Near the top of Cheat Mountain in West Virginia, bulldozer operator Bill Moore gazes down a steep slope littered with toppled conifers. Tangled roots and angled boulders protrude from the slate-colored soil, and the earth is crisscrossed with deep gouges. “Anywhere else I’ve ever worked,” Moore says, “if I did what I did here, I’d be fired.” Moore is working for Green Forests Work, a small nonprofit, as part of a project to rehabilitate a rare red spruce-dominant forest on 2,000 acres that were mined for coal in the 1970s and 1980s. The mine became part of the Monongahela National Forest in 1989 when the U.S. Forest Service purchased more than 40,000 contiguous acres known as the Mower Tract. For full story and to view video, click here.

WI: Wisconsin Passes “Mining for America” Bill

Info Superior – December 15, 2017
Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker signed the “Mining for America” bill into law on December 11th in Rhinelander. The bill eliminates the “mining moratorium” on the issuance of permits for sulfide ore mining, without changing environmental standards. In the press release issued upon signing the bill, Governor Walker points out that, “Mining is a vital piece of Wisconsin’s history and is at the core of our cultural identity. With this new bill, we’re paying tribute to our state’s rich roots in the field and creating new family-supporting careers in the mining industry, all while protecting our abundant and valuable natural resources.” For full story, click here.

WI: Plans Afoot to Restore Small Wetland within Milwaukee’s Evolving Harbor District

By Susan Bence – MUWM Radio – December 4, 2017
Before the City of Milwaukee was the Milwaukee we know, it was a massive marsh and wetland system fed by the Milwaukee, Menomonee and Kinnickinnic Rivers. By the 1850s, the wetlands were filled in and replaced by factories and foundries. By some miracle, one small bit of wetland – now called the Grand Trunk - survived along the harbor’s south central edge. Despite the channelized Kinnickinnic River just to the wetland's west, endangered garter snakes and other native critters are still found in the 6.5 degraded acres. The wetland's renaissance is included within Milwaukee’s harbor district plan, called the Water and Land Use Plan. For full story, click here.

 
 

 

Melting of East Antarctic Ice Sheet Could Cripple Major U.S. Cities

University of South Florida – December 13, 2017
The world’s largest ice sheet may be less stable than previously thought, posing an even greater threat to Florida’s coastline. The first-ever marine geologic survey of East Antarctica’s Sabrina Coast, published this week in Nature concludes that some regions of the massive East Antarctic Ice Sheet have been sensitive to climate change for millions of years. Much like the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, this region of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet is grounded below sea level and local glaciers are experiencing ice mass loss due to ocean warming. For full story, click here.

Human-Caused Warming Likely Intensified Hurricane Harvey's Rains

American Geophysical Union – December 13, 2017
New research shows human-induced climate change increased the amount and intensity of Hurricane Harvey’s unprecedented rainfall. The new findings are being published in two separate studies and being presented in a press conference today at the 2017 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, along with additional new findings about recent Atlantic Ocean hurricanes. For full story, click here.

Arctic saw 2nd warmest year, smallest winter sea ice coverage on record in 2017

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration – December 12, 2017
A NOAA-sponsored report shows that the warming trend transforming the Arctic persisted in 2017, resulting in the second warmest air temperatures, above average ocean temperatures, loss of sea ice, and a range of human, ocean and ecosystem effects. Now in its 12th year, the Arctic Report Card, released today at the annual American Geophysical Union fall meeting in New Orleans, is a peer-reviewed report that brings together the work of 85 scientists from 12 nations. While 2017 saw fewer records shattered than in 2016, the Arctic shows no sign of returning to the reliably frozen region it was decades ago. For full news release, click here.

Cyanobacteria in lakes: Risks linked to loss of diversity

Science Daily – December 11, 2017
The composition of cyanobacterial communities in peri-alpine lakes has become increasingly similar over the past century. Climate warming and a period of eutrophication have favoured in particular potentially toxic species which can adapt rapidly to environmental changes. These are the findings of an Eawag-led study analysing DNA extracted from sediment cores. For full article, click here.

Saving Salamanders: Vital to Ecosystem Health

Contact: Marisa Lubeck – U.S. Geological Survey – December 12, 2017
One-third of the planet’s amphibian species are threatened with extinction. Now, these vulnerable creatures are facing a new foe: the Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal) fungus, which is the source of an emerging amphibian disease that caused the die-off of wild European salamander populations. The Bsal fungus has not yet appeared in U.S. salamander populations. However, scientists caution that without preventive measures, the fungus is likely to emerge via the international pet trade or through other human activities. From 2010 to 2014, over 750,000 salamanders were legally imported into the United States. Salamanders control pests by eating insects like mosquitos and by becoming food for larger animals. Their moist, permeable skin makes salamanders vulnerable to drought and toxic substances, so they are exceptional indicators of ecosystem health. The health of important ecosystems, including forests and wetlands, contributes billions of dollars to the economy by supporting the fishing and timber industries and recreation. For full story, click here.

More frequent fires reduce soil carbon and fertility, slowing the regrowth of plants

By Sarah Derouin – Stanford University – December 11, 2017
Frequent burning over decades reduces the amount of carbon and nitrogen stored in soils of savanna grasslands and broadleaf forests, in part because reduced plant growth means less carbon being drawn out of the atmosphere and stored in plant matter. These findings by a Stanford-led team are important for worldwide understanding of fire impacts on the carbon cycle and for modeling the future of global carbon and climate change. The results, published Dec. 11 in the journal Nature, offer a new perspective on the impact of fire on soil fertility. For full story, click here.

Sustainable dams – are they possible? CSU expert weighs in

By Anne Manning – Colorado State University – December 8, 2017
Humans have been altering natural waterways for centuries, but only in the last several decades have dams raised ecological concerns. N. LeRoy Poff, professor of biology at Colorado State University, studies the ecological impact to rivers from human-caused changes, such as dam building, and how these modified river systems can be managed for resilience. For full story, click here.

Transportation Replaces Power in U.S. as Top Source of CO2 Emissions

YaleEnvironment 360 – December 4, 2017
Power plants have been the biggest source of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States for more than 40 years. But according to new data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration, transportation has now claimed the top spot. The U.S. transportation sector — which includes cars, trucks, planes, trains, and boats — now emits 1.9 billion tons of CO2 annually. The electric power sector emits 1.8 billions tons. For full story, click here.

Texas A&M Team Making Models to Predict Droughts

By Leslie Lee Texas A&M Today November 29, 2017
Drought-predicting computer models are not made just so that scientists can say “I told you so” when your favorite lake runs low. From agriculture, to infrastructure, to tourism — major sectors of the economy need a heads-up on what weather conditions are coming down the pipe. These vitally needed models run on input data, and two Texas A&M University experts are working to improve the precipitation data fed into models, which will in turn help federal agencies such as the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Research Line Office and National Weather Service (NWS) better predict and prepare for droughts. For full story, click here.

Higher plant species richness may not be enough to protect ecosystems from the worst impacts of climate extremes

Phys.org – November 29, 2017
Higher plant species richness is not always sufficient to reduce ecosystem vulnerability to climate extremes, as shown in a comprehensive literature analysis published today in the Journal of Ecology. While biodiversity is under threat around the globe, the number of extreme weather events is on the rise as a direct consequence of climate change. Researchers from several institutes around Europe have now looked into the scientific literature that addresses these global changes to examine the interactions between biodiversity and extreme weather events. For full story, click here.

Soil Researchers Quantify an Important, Underappreciated Factor in Carbon Release to the Atmosphere

Contact: Janet Lathrop – University of Massachusetts-Amherst – November 27, 2017
Soil plays a critical role in global carbon cycling, in part because soil organic matter stores three times more carbon than the atmosphere. Now biogeochemist Marco Keiluweit at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and colleagues elsewhere for the first time provide evidence that anaerobic microsites play a much larger role in stabilizing carbon in soils than previously thought. Further, current models used to predict the release of climate-active CO2 from soils fail to account for these microscopic, oxygen-free zones present in many upland soils, they say. For full story, click here.

Study of Darwin’s finches reveals that new species can develop in as little as two generations

Princeton University – November 27, 2017
The arrival 36 years ago of a strange bird to a remote island in the Galápagos archipelago has provided direct genetic evidence of a novel way in which new species arise. On Nov. 23 in the journal Science, researchers from Princeton University and Uppsala University in Sweden report that the newcomer belonging to one species mated with a member of another species resident on the island, giving rise to a new species that today consists of roughly 30 individuals. The study comes from work conducted on Darwin’s finches, which live on the Galápagos Islands in the Pacific Ocean. The remote location has enabled researchers to study the evolution of biodiversity due to natural selection under pristine conditions. For full story, click here. 

Flathead catfish, swimming under the radar for years, now raising concerns

By Donna Morelli – Bay Journal – November 26, 2017
Charlie Wandrei first flipped through photographs of beaming anglers holding monster flathead catfish about five years ago at the Pennsylvania Sportsman’s Show in Harrisburg. He was hooked. “I was absolutely excited,” said Wandrei, who’s from Adams, MA. “I live near the Connecticut River, which has a lot of catfish, but they don’t get nearly as big as those.” Wandrei got a photo of his own in June, smiling widely while holding a 35-pound lunker pulled from the Susquehanna River. The characteristics that make the flathead catfish, Pylodictis olivaris, attractive to anglers are the same ones that worry scientists. Weighing up to 100 pounds, they are voracious feeders that vacuum up any smaller fish they can fit into their gaping mouths. But they are not native to the Susquehanna, and they are growing larger and faster there than they do in their native range, the Mississippi River basin. For full article, click here.

Serene Sirens: USGS Sea Cow Science

Contacts: Kaitlin Kovacs and Catherine Puckett – U.S. Geological Survey – November 24, 2017 Video
It may be hard to believe the legend that sailors long-at-sea once considered manatees to be mermaids. The manatee nickname – the “Sea Cow” – which comes from the herbivores’ affinity for grazing on vegetation and their slow, ambling way just makes more sense. But a U.S. Geological Survey video reveals that while they may be cow-like, they also have more than a bit of the magical mermaid to them. For nearly four decades, researchers with the USGS Sirenia Project have been committed to understanding the biology and ecology of the threatened West Indian manatee to aid managers in actions that could best help the population. Through long-term, detailed studies on the life history, population dynamics, and ecological requirements of the manatee, USGS scientists work cooperatively with federal and state biologists and managers on research identified as essential for the recovery of the species. To do this, the USGS manatee researchers rely on a variety of tools and techniques; puzzle pieces that come together to form the expertise of the Sirenia Project. For full story, click here.

Meadows beat out shrubs when it comes to carbon storage

By Idun Haugan – Gemini – November 23, 2017
A remote field site in the Norwegian mountains is improving our understanding of carbon cycling in high-latitude alpine areas. Excess carbon dioxide, emitted by burning fossil fuels like coal and petroleum, is one of the most important factors in driving global warming. While the world is focused on controlling these emissions to limit climate change, less attention has been paid to the capacity of vegetation and soils to take up and store carbon. For full story, click here.

Death by Killer Algae

By Claudia Geib – Hakai Magazine – November 21, 2017
They didn’t think much of the first dead whale. Dwarfed by the rugged cliffs of Patagonia’s high green fjords, the team of biologists had sailed into a gulf off the Pacific Ocean searching for the ocean’s smaller animals, the marine invertebrates they were there to inventory. That night, while hunting for an anchorage in a narrow bay, the team spotted a large, dead whale floating on the water’s surface. But for the biologists, death—even of such an enormous animal—didn’t seem so unusual. Not so unusual, that is, until they found the second whale, lying on the beach. And a third. And a fourth. In all, they found seven in that bay alone. Over the next day, they counted a total of 25 dead whales in the fjord. As the team of five researchers from Chile’s Huinay Scientific Field Station sailed south across the Golfo de Penas, the dead were there, too: 200 kilometers away, they found four more whales on the beaches of the exposed, outer coast. At one point, someone’s dog rolled in one of the corpses. The scent of dead whale hung in the boat for weeks. “Everybody was clear about it—this is not normal,” says Vreni Häussermann, director of Huinay station and the leader of the group that made the discovery in April 2015. Häussermann and her team found themselves drawn into a whodunit worthy of a detective show: they’d become accidental witnesses to a mass killing. But what had caused it, and just how many had fallen victim? For full article, click here.

Ribbed Mussels Could Help Improve Urban Water Quality

Contact: Shelley Dawicki – NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center – November 21, 2017
Ribbed mussels can remove nitrogen and other excess nutrients from an urban estuary and could help improve water quality in other urban and coastal locations, according to a study in New York City’s Bronx River. The findings, published in Environmental Science and Technology, are part of long-term efforts to improve water quality in the Bronx River Estuary. Researchers at NOAA Fisheries Milford Laboratory in Milford, Connecticut began the two-year pilot project in June 2011. They used a 20 x 20-foot raft with mussel growing lines hanging below as their field location in an industrial area near Hunt’s Point in the South Bronx, not far from a sewage treatment plant. The waters were closed to shellfish harvesting because of bacterial contamination. Scientists monitored the condition of the ribbed mussels (Geukensia demissa) and the water quality over time to see how each responded. For full article, click here.  

Seagrass is a key fishing ground globally

Stockholm University – November 17, 2017
New research demonstrates that seagrass meadows are important fishing grounds all around the globe. The work highlights that there is an urgent need to start appreciating and understanding this role to be able to build more sustainable fisheries. A study led by Dr Lina Mtwana Nordlund at Stockholm University, published in the scientific journal Fish & Fisheries, examines the global extent to which these underwater meadows support fishing activity. “If there is seagrass and people there is most certainly fishing. It doesn’t matter if it is a country with high or low human development, fishing occurs. But the reasons for fishing and the target species vary” says Dr Nordlund who is based at Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Science at Stockholm University in Sweden. For full story, click here.

'Time bomb' of wetland-killing bugs set to explode next year

By Tristan Baurick – NOLA– The Times-Picayune – November 17, 2017 – Video
The plague of foreign insects killing a critical coastal marsh grass in Louisiana is likely to worsen next year, according to scientists studying the problem. Over the past year, a tiny Asian scale insect has decimated vast stands of roseau cane, a flood- and erosion-resistant marsh grass that holds large sections of the lower Mississippi River Delta together. As the plant dies, the landscape will unravel, exacerbating the state's land loss crisis, Louisiana State University scientists say. For full story, click here.

Groundwater Depletion Could Be Significant Source of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

American Geophysical Union – November 16, 2017
Humans may be adding large amounts of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere by using groundwater faster than it is replenished, according to new research. This process, known as groundwater depletion, releases a significant amount of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere that has until now been overlooked by scientists in calculating carbon sources, according to the new study. The study’s authors estimate groundwater depletion in the United States could be responsible for releasing 1.7 million metric tons (3.8 billion pounds) of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere every year. For full story, click here.

 

 


Environmental Markets and Stream Barrier Removal

The Nature Conservancy – Global Solutions – October 2017
American waterways bear the effects of more than 100 years of heavy and widespread development. As a result, less than 2% of U.S. rivers are free-flowing—constrained by dams, levees and road crossings and other obstructions. The aim of this paper is to explore opportunities provided by existing regulatory programs in the United States to improve stream health through the removal of these barriers to aquatic connectivity. Federal requirements to offset impacts to streams provide more than $3 billion a year for restoration projects. However, dam and other infrastructure removal is often not available as a restoration option. Barrier removal projects support highly durable restoration outcomes that can permanently increase habitat connectivity and improve natural river processes and functions important for the health of freshwater and estuary habitats. This report lays out recommendations for overcoming the existing challenges to widespread adoption of barrier removal projects as a compensatory mitigation method and to support an ‘environmental market’ in dam removal. To download the report, click here.

Implementing nature-based flood protection

The World Bank – 2017
Effective flood risk management is critical to protect people and their livelihoods from flooding and to limit future losses. Nature-based measures and their ability to address flood risk are receiving increasing attention. Until recently, most flood risk management involved conventional engineering measures. These measures are sometimes referred to as “hard” engineering or “gray” infrastructure. Examples include building embankments, dams, levees, and channels to control flooding. Recently the concept of “nature-based solutions”, “ecosystem-base adaptation”, “eco-DRR” or “green infrastructure” has emerged as a good alternative or complement to traditional gray approaches. Nature-based solutions make use of natural processes and ecosystem services for functional purposes, such as decreasing flood risk or improving water quality. The objective of this document is to present five principles and implementation guidance for planning, such as evaluation, design, and implementation of nature-based solutions for flood risk management as an alternative to or complementary to conventional engineering measures. To view report, click here.


Fenced Nature Preserves Have Benefits Beyond Their Boundaries

By Robert Lawrence – Hakai Magazine – December 15, 2017
With few exceptions, New Zealand has been free of land mammals since it broke away from Australia and Antarctica 80 million years ago. In their place, a unique ecosystem arose, with distinctive flightless birds, large insects, and primitive reptiles and amphibians evolving to fit the niches so often occupied by mammals. But this experiment in evolution came to an abrupt end when the first humans sailed to the pristine archipelago about 750 years ago, bringing dogs and rats with them. European settlers later added livestock, fur trade animals, and stowaway rodents, which are now all tangled into New Zealand’s ecology. Consequently, a large swath of New Zealand’s native species has fallen to predation, competition, and hunting. And no group has felt it more than the birds. So far, 59 New Zealand bird species that we know of have gone extinct. Of the 180 native bird species that have survived, 73 are considered threatened. For full article, click here.

Engineers create plants that glow

By Anne – MIT News – December 12, 2017
Imagine that instead of switching on a lamp when it gets dark, you could read by the light of a glowing plant on your desk. MIT engineers have taken a critical first step toward making that vision a reality. By embedding specialized nanoparticles into the leaves of a watercress plant, they induced the plants to give off dim light for nearly four hours. They believe that, with further optimization, such plants will one day be bright enough to illuminate a workspace. For full story, click here.

Coastal Kids’ Books to Cozy Up with This Season

By Raina Delisle – Hakai Magazine – December 7, 2017
Long after the Hatchimals have hatched, their batteries have died, and they’ve been relegated to the donation bin, a good book will still be standing strong on the shelf. From tall pirate tales to small seabirds with big personalities, here are nine new coastal books for the children on your list. To read more and view list, click here.

What to do with invasive species? Put ‘em on the menu.

By Bret Thorn – National Restaurant News – December 6, 2017
Sourcing fish sustainably can be a difficult challenge for restaurant operators, but some chefs are going beyond that. They’re not just using seafood caught responsibly from healthy fisheries, or farmed fish raised without damaging the environment. They are working to cut down on the populations of invasive species by feeding them to their customers. That’s what’s happening with the wild blue catfish of the Chesapeake Bay area. For full story, click here.  

Rooftop wiretap aims to learn what crows gossip about at dusk

By Hannah Hickey – University of Washington – December 5, 2017 – Video
The University of Washington Bothell is home to a flock of some 15,000 crows that sleep in the nearby wetlands during fall, winter and spring. What are crows saying when their loud cawing fills a dark winter’s evening? Despite the inescapable ruckus, nobody knows for sure. Birds congregate daily before and after sleep, and they make some noise, but what might be happening in those brains is a mystery. Curious about these raucous exchanges, researchers at the University of Washington Bothell are listening in. They are placing equipment on the roof of their building — a meeting place for some of the thousands of crows that sleep in nearby campus trees — and using a sort of computerized eavesdropping to study the relationship between calls and the birds’ behavior. For full story and to view video, click here. 

Contemplating wetland mitigation? You might want to consult an attorney

By Peter Welte – Agweek – November 27, 2017
Wetlands are in the news again. It's timely, as corn harvest is nearly wrapped up, and fields are soon to be covered with snow. With the spring melt, drainage becomes a topic of interest. And so does wetlands compliance. Last week Senator John Hoeven hosted a meeting in Bismarck with Natural Resources Conservation Service Acting Chief Leonard Jordan. The purpose of the meeting was to have a roundtable discussion with agriculture producers, commodity groups and representatives from the drain tile industry. Hoeven, who chairs the Senate Agriculture Appropriations Committee and who is also a member of the Senate Agriculture Committee, wanted the NRCS chief to hear from farmers about issues pertaining to the NRCS determinations about wetlands. For full opinion, click here.

Raising a hellbender is rough, but rewarding

By Aaron Dodds – Farm and Dairy – November 24, 2017
Over the past 10 years, the Jefferson Soil and Water Conservation District has been a part of the
Ohio Hellbender Partnership, an organization of private, state and federal entities that is trying to preserve the state endangered hellbender. The hellbender is the largest native salamander found in North America and is found within the unglaciated ragged and worn hills of Appalachia and the Ozarks. Jefferson County and its citizens have an extensive and intertwined relationship with the hellbender (stone carvings of hellbenders by the Monongahela people dating to 600 BC were found in the Ohio River bed stone just north of Steubenville) that continues to this day. For full story, click here 

Why the world needs to rethink the value of water

Oxford Science Blog – November 23, 2017
The value of water for people, the environment, industry, agriculture and cultures has been long-recognized, not least because achieving safely-managed drinking water is essential for human life. The scale of the investment for universal and safely-managed drinking water and sanitation is vast, with estimates around $114B USD per year, for capital costs alone. For full blog post, click here.

Voluntary programs don’t provide enough incentive for utilities to reduce their emissions 

By Sarah DeWeerdt – Anthropocene Magazine – November 21, 2017
In the United States, states are often said to be the laboratories of democracy, testing out the feasibility and effectiveness of policies that, if successful, might later be adopted at the national level. They are also laboratories of climate change action, researchers from Emory University reported in Nature Climate Change on November 6. Their analysis shows that legally binding targets and penalties can help U.S. states reduce greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation. But voluntary policies with no mechanism for enforcement do not lead to reduced emissions. For full article, click here.

An ‘impossible’ stream to restore

By Taylor Stark – Chesapeake Bay Program – November 20, 2017
A small, serene stream is tucked into the woods between two bustling shopping centers and a busy highway in Annapolis, Maryland. Although hidden, the declining health of this stream had raised concern for several years, causing many to doubt its ability to flourish again. Meet the “impossible stream,” located near the Annapolis Harbour shopping center and one of four waterways that drains into Church Creek, the most impaired tributary of the South River. The creek faces many challenges in addition to the degrading quality of upstream waterways. Along its path, Church Creek encounters an abundance of developed land, including, more than 70 percent impervious surface. This means that stormwater draining into Church Creek, then the South River and eventually the Chesapeake Bay, is filled with sediment and other pollutants. In order to save Church Creek, the Annapolis Harbour Center stream had to be restored. For full blog post, click here.

Farmers Can Help #SaveTheBay... But They Need Our Help

Choose Clean Water Coalition – November 15, 2017
The Chesapeake watershed is home to many farms; 87,000 to be exact. Farmers have been a force for Bay restoration for a long time, employing a litany of different sustainable farming practices to protect clean water in local streams and rivers. A new report by the Chesapeake Bay Commission finds that these practices are serving the watershed well, however farmers will require much more outside help to get the Bay to meet its 2025 cleanup goals. For full blog post, click here.

 

WEBINARS

   

MEETINGS

 

TRAINING

 

SPECIAL EVENTS

 

MORE DECEMBER MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR​

WEBINARS
       
   JANUARY 2018
       
January 9, 2018
2:00 p.m. ET
  USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service Webinar: Improving Soil Health Globally  
       
January 9, 2018
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of State Wetland Managers:  Future Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar: Reaching Across the Border to Improve Water Supplies for People and Nature: The United States, Mexico, and the Colorado River  
       
January 11, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  EBM Tools Network Webinar: Hurricane Irma Rapid Reef Assessment in South Florida and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary  
       
January 11, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  The Swamp School Webinar: 2018 Wetland Status and Trends
 
       
January 11, 2018
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of State Wetland Managers: Invasive Species Webinar: Managing Invasive Species in the Great Lakes: Establishing Goals & Objectives, Monitoring Programs, and Cooperative Management Areas in Michigan  
       
January 17, 2018
2:00 p.m. ET
  Great Lakes Phragmites Collaborative Webinar: Multi-scale remote sensing methods for Phragmites detection in southwestern Ontario  
       
January 17, 2018
3:00 p.m. ET 
  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Webinar: EPA Tools and Resources Webinar: Urban Background Study   
       
January 18, 2018
2:00 p.m. ET
  Land Trust Alliance Webinar: Learning Landscapes: A Sustainable Education Program   
       
January 25, 2018
2:00 p.m. ET
  Webinar: Decision Support Tools and Framework for Climate-SmartRestoration  
       
MEETINGS
 
JANUARY 2018
       
January 3-5, 2018
Acme, MI
  Northern Michigan Waterways Hazardous Material Spill Planning Committee: 28th Annual No Spills Conference: Protecting the Grat Lakes: Ownership, Resurgence and Renewal  
       
January 3-7, 2018
San Francisco, CA
  Society for Integrative & Comparative Biology: Annual Meeting  
       
January 4-7, 2018
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada 
  Canadian Conference for Fisheries Research: Making a Difference to Canada's Aquatic Resources   
       
January 5-9, 2018
Pacific Grove, CA
  American Society of Naturalists Conference  
       
January 11-13, 2018
College Park, MD
  Future Harvest CASA (Chesapeake Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture) Annual Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed Conference  
       
January 15-19, 2018
Hicc, Hyderabad, India
  Geospatial World Forum  
       
January 21-24, 2018
Boston, MA
  New England Water Environment Association (NEWEA) Annual Conference  
       
January 23-25, 2018
Washington, D.C.
  National Council for Science & the Environment (NCSE): The Science, Business, and Education of Sustainable Infrastructure: Building Resilience in a Changing World  
       
January 29, 2018-February 2, 2018
Bariloche, Argentina  
  Species Range Shifts & Local Adaptation: Challenging ecologcial and evolutionary ideas and assumptions

 
       
January 31-February 1, 2018
Wilmington, DE
  2018 Delaware Wetlands Conference

 
       
FEBRUARY 2018
       
February 1-4, 2018
Princess Royal
Ocean City, MD  
  Maryland Association for Environmental & Outdoor Education: Expand Your Influencce! Empowering Citizens Action for the Environment   
       
February 5-7, 2018
Denver, CO
  International LiDAR Mapping Forum  
       
February 6-8, 2018
Grand Junction, CO
  Tamarisk Coalition: Riparian Restoration Conference
 
       
February 7-8, 2018
Saskatoon, SK
  2018 Native Prairie Restoration/Reclamation Workshop: Look to the Future, Learn from the Past  
       
February 11-16, 2018 
Portland, OR
  2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting

 
       
February 13-17, 2018 
Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada
  Society for Ecological Restoration Meeting: Restoration for Resilience Ecological Restoration in the 21st Century  
       
February 19-22, 2018
Las Vegas, NV
  World Aquaculture Society: Aquaculture America 2018  
       
February 20-22, 2018
Oconomowoc, WI  
  Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Wetland Science Conference  
       
February 21-22, 2018
Oakland, CA
  Restore America's Estuarie: 2nd National Linving Shorelines Technology Transfer Workshop  
       
February 28-March 1, 2018
Toronto, Canada
  ICWMM: International Conference on Water Management Modeling
Submit an abstract by December 31, 2017
 
       
February 28-March 2, 2018
Denver, CO
  Climate Leadership Conference  
 
MARCH 2018
       
March 3, 2018
Worcester, MA
  Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commissions (MACC) Annual Environmental Conference  
       
March 5-7, 2018
Edmonton, Canada
  Sustainable Development Solutions Network: 2018 Cities and Climate Change Science Conference  
       
March 6-8, 2018
Chapel Hill, NC
  2018 Southeast Biodiversity Conservation Forum  
       
March 6-8, 2018
Washington, DC
  2018 Great Lakes Commission Semiannual Meeting and Great Lakes Day
 
       
March 7-9, 2018 
Riviera Maya, Mexico
  World Ocean Summit   
       
March 8-9, 2018
University of Denver Sturm College
  Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute: 2018 Western Places/Western Spaces. Proposal deadline is August, 25, 2018  
       
March 14-15, 2018
Raleigh, NC
  Water Resources Research Institute Conference

 
       
March 14-16, 2018
Chattanooga, TN
  Southeast Regional Conference for Community and Land Conservation   
       
March 18-21, 2018
Scottsdale, AZ
  21st Annual NFDA Conference  
       
March 18-23, 2018
Brasilia, Brazil
  World Water Council: World Water Forum  
       
March 19-21, 2018
UK
  University of Hull: 14th Young Coastal Scientists and Engineers Conference  
       
March 21-22, 2018
Ames, IA
  Iowa State University: Iowa Water Conference  
       
March 21-22, 2018
Singapore City, Singapore
  International Convention on Global warming and Climate Change  
       
March 23, 2018
Plymouth, NH
  Plymouth State University: 2018 NH Water & Watershed Conference
Abstracts due on January 17, 2018
 
       
March 25-28, 2018
Seattle, WA
  American Water Works Association: Sustainable Water Management Conference  
       
March 26-30, 2018
Norfolk, VA
  Wildlife Management Institute: 83rd North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference  
       
March 29, 2018
University of California, San Diego
  Southwest Extreme Precipitation Symposiuim  
       
APRIL 2018
       
April 3-4, 2018
San Diego, CA
  P3 Water Summit: Solving Water Challenges Through Partnerships  
       
April 8-12, 2018
Chicago, IL 
  US-IALE 2018 Annual Meeting  
       
April 10, 2018
Online or
Linthicum Heights, MD
Fairfax County, VA
  Center for Watershed Protection: 2018 National Watershed and Stormwater Conference
 
       
Aptil 210-11, 2018
Watkins Glen, NY
  New York State Wetlands Forum Conference and Meeting: Growth and Resources – Finding the Balance  
       
April 13-15, 2018
Burlington, VT
  The Northeast Natural History Conference
Abstract deadline: February 26, 2018
 
       
April 18-20, 2018
Stevens Point, WI
  2018 Wisconsin Lakes Partnership Convention & Water Action Volunteers Symposium   
       
April 20-21, 2018
University of California at Berkeley
  Climate Change: Impacts & Responses Research Network: 2018 Special Focus: Engaging with Policy on Climate Change  
       
April 20-21, 2018
Thompsonville, MI 
  Michigan Lake and Stream Association, Inc. 57th Annual Conference: Preserving Your Freshwater Gem: The Essentials of Lake Stewardship  
       
April 20-22, 2018
Stevens Point, WI
 
  Midwest-Great Lakes Chapter of the Society for Ecological Restoration: 2018 Annual Chapter Meeting  
       
April 22-25, 2018
Orlando, FL
  2018 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference; GIS & Water Resources X: Spatial Analysis of Watersheds: Ecological, Hydrological, and Societal Responses
Deadline for abstracts is January 9, 2018.
 
       
April 23-24, 2018
Albany, NY
  Land Trust Alliance: 2018 New York Land Trust Symposium: Investing in Healthy Communities   
       
April 23-25, 2018
Rochester, NY
  New York State Floodplain and Stormwater Managers Association: 18th Annual Meeting  
       
April 23-26, 2018
Coral Springs, FL
  University of Florida: 12th International Symposium on Biogeochemistry of Wetlands  
       
April 24-26, 2018
Forat Collings, CO
  Instream Flow Council: Flow 2018 Managing Rivers, Reservoirs and Lakes in the Face of Drought: Practical Tools and Strategies for Sustaining and Protecting Ecological Values of Water  
       
April 25-26, 2018
Glens Falls, NY
  NEIWPCC: 29th Annual Nonpoint Source Pollution Conference  
 
 MAY 2018
       
May 5-8, 2018
Tours, France
  International Conference Climate Change & Water  
       
May 7-8, 2018
Atlanta, GA 
  Water Environment Reuse Foundation: 2018 Research Conference: Advancing Reuse & Integrated Water  
       
May 8-11, 2017
Louisville, KY 
  National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Invest in the Environment   
       
May 9-11, 2018
Sandusky, OH
  Ohio Stormwater Association: 2018 Ohio Stormwater Conference  
       
May 9-12, 2018
Agricultural Campus, Dallhousie
University Truro, Nova Scotia
  12th Bay of Fundy Science Workshop
Deadline to submit abstracts is January 31, 2018
 
       
May 14-17, 2017
Grand Rapids, MI
  National Working Waterfronts & Waterways Symposium
Abstract deadline is January 19, 2018
 
       
May 15-17, 2017
Strömstad, Sweden
  Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology at University of Gothenburg Conference: Marine Evolution 2018  
       
May 19-26, 2018
Flagstaff, AZ
  Northern Arizona University Mini-Symposium and Short Training Course: New Advances in Land Carbon Cycle Modeling  
       
May 20-24, 2018
Detroit, MI
  Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting: Navigating Boundaries in Freshwater Science  
       
May 24-25, 2018
Montreal, Canada
  ICEWW 2018: 20th International Conference: Environment, Water and Wetlands  
       
May 24-26, 2018
St. Jon's, Newfoundland
  Atlantic Canada Coastal and Estuarine Science Society: ACCESS 2018  
       
May 29-June 1, 2018
Denver, CO
  Society of Wetland Scientists 2018 Annual Meeting: Wetland Science: Integrating Research, Practice and Policy - An Exchange of Expertise   
       
May 30-June 1, 2018
San Antonio, TX
  Resource Institute, Inc: Southwest Stream & Wetland Restoratoin Conference  
       
JUNE 2018
       
June 4-6, 2018
Berkeley, CA 
  Berkeley Natural History Museums, the Berkeley Initiative for Global Change Biology, and iDigBio Second Annual Digital Data in Biodiversity Research Conference  
       
June 4-8, 2018
Washington, DC
  4th International Symposium: Effects of Climate Change on the World's Oceans  
       
June 10-13, 2018
Washington, DC
  National Flood Conference   
       
June 10-15, 2018
Victoria, B.C., Canada 
  ASLO (Association for the Science of Limnology and Oceanography) 2018 Summer Meeting  
       
June 12-13, 2018
Lansing, MI 
  Michigan Department of Environmental Quality: 2018 Michigan Environmental Compliance Conference  
       
June 12-15, 2018
Jyväskylä, Finland
  Scientific Committee of the Society for Conservation Biology Europe Section's 5th European Congress for Conservation Biology (ECCB 2018)  
       
June 13-15, 2018
Ajax, Ontario, Canada
  Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative  
       
June 17-22, 2018 
Phoenix, AZ
  Association of State Floodplain Managers Annual Conference: Managing Floods Where Mountains Meet the Desert  
       
June 18-21, 2018 
Cape Town, South Africa
  5th International Climate Change Adaptation Conference
Call for abstracts deadline is January 15, 2018
 
       
June 18-22, 2018
Toronto, Canada
  IAGLR 2018: Great Science for Tomorrow's Solutions
Deadline for abstracts is
January 19, 2018.
 
 
JULY 2018
       
July 8-11, 2018
Broomfield, CO
  Natural Hazards Center: 2018 Natural Hazards Workshop  
       
July 10-12, 2018
Minneapolis, MN
  US Water Alliance: One Water Summit  
       
July 21-26, 2018
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  North American Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB): Conservation Science, Policy, & Practice: Connecting the Urban to the Wild
 
       
July 23-26, 2018
Shepherdstown, WV
  Working Watersheds and Coastal Systems: Research and Management for a Changing Future
Submit an abstract by February 1, 2018
 
       
AUGUST 2018
       
August 5-10, 2018
New Orleans, LA
  2018 ESA Annual Meeting  
       
August 13-16, 2018
Asheville, NC
  North Carolina State University: EcoStream Conference

 
       
August 19-23, 2018
Albuquerque, NM 
  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: 20th Annual EPA Region 6 Stormwater Conference   
       
August 26-30, 2018
New Orleans, LA
  National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration (NCER)

 
       
August 26-31, 2018
Stockholm, Sweden
  SIWI: World Water Week: Water, ecosystems and human development  
       
SEPTEMBER 2018
       
September 24-30, 2018
New York, NY
  Climate Week NYC  
       
OCTOBER 2018
       
October 7-11, 2018
Cleveland, OH
  The Wildlife Society's 25 Annual Conference  
       
October 21-29, 2018
Dubai
  13TH Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands  
 
DECEMBER 2018
       
December 8-13, 2018
Long Beach, CA
  Restore America’s Estuaries Conference: 9th National Summit on Coastal and Estuarine Restoration and Management  
       
TRAINING
       
JANUARY 2018
       
January 5-6, 2018
Saukville, WI
  College of Letters & Science Field Station Workshop: Ecology and Physiology of Plants in Winter  
       
January 8-February 5, 2018
Online  
  The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2018   
       
January 8-April 2, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School: Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training  
       
January 8-April 2, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School: Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator 2018  
       
January 15-18, 2018
Cardiff-by-the-Sea, CA
  The Swamp School Course: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training  
       
January 15-February 12, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School: Online Course: Ecological Risk Assessment 2018  
       
January 15-April 9, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Botanist  
       
January 16-May 10, 2018
Online
  Eastern Kentucky University Division of Natural Areas Course: Wetland Design and Restoration  
       
January 17-19, 2018
Knoxville, TX
  NIMBioS Investigative Workshop: Modeling Ecotoxicological Dynamics Subject to Stoichiometric Constraints  
       
January 17-May 9, 2018
Online
  Landscape Genetics Graduate Student Course  
       
January 18, 2018
Davis, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: GIS for Watershed Analysis: Intermediate  
       
January 22-23, 2018
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Educatin Course: Rutugers Identificatoin of Wetland Plants in Winter  
       
January 22-25, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation Training  
       
January 22-March 9, 2018
Online
  Duke University – Nicholas School of Environment Course: Environmental Communication for Behavior Change  
       
January 23, 2018
Online
  Michigan State University Extension Course: Introduction to Lakes Online  
       
January 24-25, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training  
       
January 25-26, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Planning in California: An Overview
Also held on February 22-23, 2018
 
       
January 26, 2018
Sacramento, CA 
  UC Davis Extension Course: CEQA: A Step-by-Step Approach    
       
January 29, 2018
Online
  UC Davis Extension Course: Introduction to NEPA   
       
January 29-February 1, 2018
Pensacola, FL
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation Training  
       
January 31, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Groundwater Law and Hydrology   
       
January 31-February 1, 2018
Pensacola, FL
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training  
       
FEBRUARY 2018
       
February 5-6, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  D & D West Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species - 16 hours (lecture)  
       
February 5-8, 2018
New Orleans, LA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation Training  
       
February 5-8, 2018
Seagoville, TX 
  The Swamp School Course: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training  
       
February 5-April 30, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training  
       
February 5-April 30, 2018 
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist  
       
Febryar 7-8, 2018
New Orleans, LA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training  
       
February 8-9, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Successful CEQA Compliance: An Intensive Two-Day Seminar   
       
February 8-9, 2018
Washington, DC 
  American Law Institute Course: Environmental Law 2018
 
 
       
February 12-13, 2018
San Diego, CA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
February 12-13, 2018
San Diego, CA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018   
       
February 12-13, 2018
New Orleans, LA
  EUCI Course: Endangered Species Act, Wetlands, Stormwater & Floodplain Regulatory Compliance for Energy and Utilities  
       
February 12-23, 2018
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology
 
       
February 12-26, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals 2018
 
       
February 15, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Overview of California Water Law and Policy   
       
February 19-March 19, 2018 
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Phase 1 Environmental Assessments 2018  
       
February 21-22, 2018
Oakland, CA
  National Living Shorelines Tech Transfer Workshop  
       
February 22-23, 2018
Austin, TX
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training  
       
February 26-27, 2018
Charleston, SC
  D & D West Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement (Atlantic & Gulf Coastal Plain (16 hours (½ lecture, ½ field)  
       
February 26-March 2, 2018
Houston, TX
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
February 26-March 26, 2018 
Online 
  The Swamp School Online Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment 2018  
       
February 28, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Endangered Species Regulation and Protection   
       
February 28-March 1, 2018
Mt. Vernon, WA
  Washington Department of Ecology Course: Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats   
       
MARCH 2018
       
March 1-31, 2018
Online
  Duke University Marine Robotics and Remote sensing Lab Course: Drones for Conservation Research  
       
March 2, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: CEQA Update, Issues and Trends   
       
March 5-6, 2018
Houston, TX
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
March 5-6, 2018
Houston, TX
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018  
       
March 5-May 28, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Botanist  
       
March 5-May 28, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design  
       
March 5-May 28, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training  
       
March 7-8, 2018
Seattle, WA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training  
       
March 8-9, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Planning and Environmental Law   
       
March 9, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Sustainable Transportation   
       
March 12-16, 2018
Asheville, NC
  Resource Institute: Level 1 - Applied Fluvial Morphology  
       
March 12-26, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Habitat Conservation Plans  
       
March 12-April 27,. 2018
Online
  Duke University’s Nicholas School of the Environment Course: Writing for Environmental Professionals  
       
March 14, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Using Specific Plans to Create Great Communities   
       
March 14-18, 2018
Bermuda
  Earth Institute Center for Environmental Sustainability Course: Coral Reef Ecology: Bermuda  
       
March 16, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: LAFCO: Planning and Regulating the Boundaries and Service Areas of Cities and Special Districts in California   
       
March 16-17, 2018
Nashville, TN
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training  
       
March 19-23, 2018
Asheville, NC 
  Resource Institute: Level II - River Morphology and Application    
       
March 19-April 16, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2018  
       
March 20-23, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  D&D WEST Course: Basic Wetland Delineation - 40 hours (½ lecture, ½ field)  
       
March 22, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Mitigation and Conservation Bankin  
       
March 23, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Annual Land Use Law Review and Update  
       
March 24, 2018
Rockport, MA
  Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commissions (MACC) Course: Fundamentals of Wetlands Enforcement  
 
APRIL 2018
       
April 2-June 25, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training  
       
April 2-June 25, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School: Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator 2018  
       
April 3-4, 2018
Savannah, GA
  D & D West Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology - Coastal Plain - 16 hours (field)
 
       
April 9-May 7, 2018
Online 
  The Swamp School: Online Course: Ecological Risk Assessment 2018  
       
April 11-12, 2018
State College, PA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training  
       
April 12-13, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Planning and Environmental Law   
       
April 16-20, 2018
Front Royal, VA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
April 16-20, 2018
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: Communication and Facilitation Skills for Conservation Managers  
       
April 23-24, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
April 23-24, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018  
       
April 23-26, 2018
Aliquippa, PA
  The Swamp School: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training
 
       
April 23-May 21, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Phase 1 Environmental Assessments 2018  
       
April 30-May 28, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment 2018  
       
April 30-June 8, 2018
Online
  Duke University Nicholas School of the Environment Course: Podcasting for Environmental Communications  
       
MAY 2018
       
May 2-3, 2018
Anchorage, AK
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training  
       
May 3-4, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  D & D West Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species - 16 hours (lecture)  
       
Mary 7-10, 2018
Charleston, SC
  D&D West Course: Basic Wetland Delineation - 40 hours (½ lecture, ½ field)  
       
May 7-11, 2018
Great Bend, KS
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
May 13-26, 2018
Castleton, VT
  Northeast Section, The Wildlife Society: Wildlife Field Course  
       
May 15-17, 2018
Poolesville, MD
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation with Emphasis on Soils and Hydrology eSession with Field Practicum – 2018  
       
May 16-18, 2018
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) Tutorial, Applications of Spatial Data: Ecological Niche Modeling  
       
May 21-25, 2018   Eastern Kentucky University, Division of Natural Areas Field Course: Wetland Design and Restoration Techniques  
       
May 21-25, 2018
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
May 22, 2018
Charleston area, SC
  D & D West Course: Endangered Species Identification - 8 hours (field)   
       
May 22-24, 2018
Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge
Grand Chenier, LA
  McGraw Center for Conservation Leadership and the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries:  Workshop for Coastal Wetland Wildlife Managers  
       
May 27-June 2, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Introduction to Bryophytes and Lichens  
       
May 27-June 2, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Marine Intertidal Community Ecology  
       
May 28-29, 2018
Charleston, SC
  D & D West Course: Hydrophytic Vegetation - Coastal Plain - 16 hours (field)  
       
JUNE 2018
       
June 3-9, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Sterile Crustose Lichens Unveiled  
       
June 10-16, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Mosses: Structure, Ecology, and Identification  
       
June 11-12, 2018
Charleston, SC
  D & D West Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology - Coastal Plain- 16 hours (field)  
       
June 11-15, 2018
Mesquite, TX
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
June 11-17, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Plate Tectonics of the Appalachians: A Traveling Geology Course, Maine to Quebec  
       
June 11-22, 2018
University of Utah
  University of Utah IsoCamp Course: Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry and Ecology  
       
June 11-22, 2018
University of Utah 
  University of Utah Course: Isotopes in Spatial Ecology and Biogeochemistry  
       
June 13-14, 2018
Champaign, IL
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training  
       
June 17-23, 2018
Steuben, ME  
  Eagle Hill Institute: Scientific Illustration with Pen and Ink and Color Pencil   
       
June 17-23, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Freshwater and Diadromous Fishes of New England  
       
June 24-30, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Lichens and Lichen Ecology  
       
June 24-30, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Sedges and Rushes: Identification and Ecology  
       
June 25-July 6, 2018
University of Montana
  Flathead Lake Bio Station: Conservation Ecology  
       
June 25-July 6, 2018
University of Montana
  Flathead Lake Bio Station Course: Environmental Sensors: Designing, Building and Deploying the Field  
       
June 25-July 20, 2018
University of Montana
  Flathead Lake Bio Station: Seminars in Ecology and Resource Management  
       
June 27-28, 2018
Ann Arbor, MI
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training  
       
June 28-29, 2018
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
June 28-29, 2018
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018  
       
JULY 2018    
       
July 1-7, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Dragonflies and Damselflies: Field Techniques and Identification  
       
July 1-7, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Grasses: Identification and Ecology  
       
July 1-7, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Drawing and Painting Birds in Watercolor and Colored Pencil  
       
July 8-14, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Spiders: Identification, Biology, and Ecology  
       
July 8-14, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Native Bees: Biology, Ecology, Identification and Conservation   
       
July 9-20, 2018
University of Montana
  Flathead Lake Bio Station Course: Landscape Ecology  
       
July 9-20, 2018
University of Montana 
  Flathead Lake Bio Station Course: Aquatic Microbial Ecology
 
 
       
July 10-11, 2018
Laramie, WY
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
July 10-11, 2018
Laramie, WY
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018  
       
July 11-12, 2018
St. Paul, MN
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training   
       
July 15-21, 2018
Steuben, ME  
  Eagle Hill Institute: Wetland Identification, Delineation and Ecology   
       
July 15-21, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Photographing Plants and Plant Habitats: Classical and Modern Techniques  
       
July 16-20, 2018
Boston, University 
  Summer Course: Ecological Forecasting
 
 
       
July 22-28, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Maine Seaweeds: Identification, Ecology, and Ethnobotany  
       
July 22-28, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Microlepidoptera: Collection, Preparation, Dissection, Identification, and Natural History  
       
July 23-27, 2018 
University of Montana
  Flathead Lake Bio Station Course: Field Methods in Ornithology
 
 
       
July 23-August 3, 2018 
University of Montana
  Flathead Lake Bio Station Course: Alpine Ecology  
       
July 23-August 3, 2018
University of Montana 
  Flathead Lake Bio Station Course: Lake Ecology
 
       
July 29-August 4, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Mushroom Identification for New Mycophiles: Foraging for Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms  
       
July 29-August 4, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Tracks and Sign of Insects and Other Invertebrates  
       
July 29-August 4, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: The Eastern Maine Ice Age Landscape as a Record Hemispheric Climate Change: The Last Deglaciation: The Pineo Ridge Moraine and Emerged Delta Complex  
       
July 31-August 2, 2018
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Problematic Delineation Seminar – 2018  
       
AUGUST 2018
       
August 5-11, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Sphagnum Mosses and Ecology  
       
August 5-11, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Aquatic Entomology  
       
August 6-9, 2018
Savannah, GA 
  D&D West Course: Basic Wetland Delineation - 40 hours (½ lecture, ½ field)   
       
Augut 6-17, 2018
University of Montana
  Flathead Lake Bio Station: Stream Ecology  
       
Augut 6-17, 2018
University of Montana
  Flathead Lake Bio Station: Ecology of Forests and Grasslands
 
       
Augut 6-17, 2018
University of Montana
  Flathead Lake Bio Station: Drone Remote Sensing of Freshwater Ecosystems
 
       
August 809, 2018
Indianapolis, IN
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training  
       
Augut 12-18, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Witness to Nature: A Creative Writing Workshop  
       
Augut 12-18, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Plant Anatomy and Microtechnique  
       
Augut 13-14, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  D & D West Course: Hydrophytic Vegetation - Eastern Mountains/Piedmont - 16 hours (field)
 
       
August 15-16, 2018
Arlington, WA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
August 15-16, 2018
Arlington, WA 
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018   
       
Augut 19-25, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Mushroom Microscopy: An Exploration of the Intricate Microscopic World of Mushrooms  
       
Augut 19-25, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Banding Songbirds and Raptors: Livetrapping, In-hand Aging and Sexing, and Data Collection for Research  
       
August 20-24, 2018
Arlington, WA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
Augut 26-September 1, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Mosses: Orthotrichaceae of Maine  
       
Augut 26-September 1, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Independent Study: Pyrenolichens
 
 
       
August 31-September 1, 2018
Denver, CO
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training  
       
SEPTEMBER 2018
       
September 6-7, 2018
Whitefish, MT
 
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum   
       
September 6-7, 2018
Whitefish, MT
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018  
       
September 11-12, 2018
Charleston, SC
  D & D West Course: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes - 16 hours (field)  
       
September 12-13, 2018
Kansas City, MO 
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training  
       
September 17-18, 2018
Covington, LA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
September 17-18, 2018
Covington, LA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018  
       
September 17-28, 2018
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: The Ecology and Conservation of Migratory Birds  
       
September 24-28, 2018
Covington, LA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
September 24-28, 2018
Aliquippa, PA
  The Swamp School: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training  
       
September 24-28, 2018
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
September 28-29, 2018
Baton Rouge, LA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training  
       
OCTOBER 2018
       
October 9-12, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  D&D West Course: Basic Wetland Delineation - 40 hours (½ lecture, ½ field)  
       
October 10-11, 2018
Richmond, VA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
October 10-11, 2018
Richmond, VA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018  
       
October 23-24, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  D & D West Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species - 16 hours (lecture)  
       
NOVEMBER 2018
       
November 7-8, 2018
Charleston, SC
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
November 7-8, 2018
Charleston, SC
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018  
       
November 12-13, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  D & D West Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology – Piedmont - 16 hours (field)  
       
DECEMBER 2018
       
December 7-8, 2018
Tampa, FL
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training  
       
December 10-11, 2018
Charleston, SC
  D & D West Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement – Eastern Mountains/Piedmont) - 16 hours (½ lecture, ½ field)  
   
SPECIAL EVENTS
       
January 27, 2018
Abingdon, MD
  Anita C. Leight Estuary Center: World Wetlands Day Festival
 
 
       
February 2, 2018   World Wetlands Day: Wetlands for a Sustainable Urban Future   
       
February 22-25, 2018
Port Aransas, TX 
  Whooping Crane Festival  
       
April 21, 2018   World Fish Migration Day: Working together for happy fish  
       
April 22, 2018   Earth Day  
    
       

 


EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • Federal maps underestimate flood risk for tens of millions of people, scientists warn
  • Pay-for-Performance: Bringing the Best of the Private Sector to Realize Wetland Restoration
  • Decades-past logging still threatens spotted owls in national forests
  • Reducing How Much Nitrogen Enters a Lake Has Little Impact on Algal Blooms, Find Canadian Scientists
  • How much soil goes down the drain: New data on soil lost due to water
  • Belowground Fungal Interactions with Trees in Forests Help Explain Non-native Plant Invasions
  • Floods are necessary for maintaining healthy river ecosystems

NATIONAL NEWS

  • Mining giant to leave coal group over climate change stance
  • Canada Provides $45 Million for Great Lakes Protection
  • Exxon Agrees to Disclose Climate Risks Under Pressure from Investors
  • EPA Awards $1.345 Million to New England States to Help Protect Wetlands
  • Clean energy: experts outline how governments can successfully invest before it’s too late
  • Stopping the next wave of invasive species in Saskatchewan lakes
  • Trump shrinks two huge national monuments in Utah, drawing praise and protests
  • Farmer wins round in 31-year wetland legal battle
  • Bill expected to make Manitoba a leader in wetland protection
  • GOP crafts spending bill provisions aimed at speeding repeal of water protection rule
  • Great Lakes cleanup program celebrates 15 years of success
  • An Island Nation Turns Away from Climate Migration, Despite Rising Seas
  • Chesapeake Bay funding could get a big boost under new farm bills
  • 3 Western groups unite to promote 'common sense' land policy

STATE NEWS

  • CA: EPA says herbicide in Roundup weed killer doesn't cause cancer, contradicting California regulators
  • CO: Native fish species at risk following water removal from the Colorado River
  • IA: Wells Fargo gives funds to Ducks Unlimited wetland projects
  • LA: Federal tax bill would raise Louisiana's cap for oil revenue that pays for coastal restoration
  • LA: Local wetlands advocate receives award
  • MD: Maryland Announces Comprehensive Oyster Restoration Plan
  • MD: Biologist fighting uphill battle to get eelways built on Potomac dams
  • MN: Murray County to review aquatic invasive species plan
  • MO: Waterfowl area to see improvements
  • NC: In the Outer Banks, Officials and Property Owners Battle to Keep the Ocean at Bay
  • OH: Ohio EPA Says Rover Pipeline Caused More Wetland Spills
  • OH: State of Ohio Releases Latest Version of Plan to Reduce Nutrients in Lake Erie Basin
  • OR: Jackson Bottom Wetlands in Hillsboro getting a makeover
  • OR: Some county wetland designations based on faulty data, federal official says
  • PA: EPA Awards $3.7 Million to Pennsylvania for Chesapeake Bay Restoration
  • RI: URI researcher: Spotted turtles in trouble in Rhode Island
  • TX: After Harvey, some South Texans more wary than ever about plan to build landfill near floodplain
  • VT: Wetlands violation contested
  • VA: Virginia board approves first of two pipeline projects despite fervent opposition
  • VA: Dominion’s review of coal ash ‘alternatives’ still favors on-site storage
  • VA: Rappahannock River Property Donated Back to American Indian Tribe
  • WA: Clark County developer fined $17,000 for not protecting wetlands
  • WV: Reclaiming Appalachia: A Push to Bring Back Native Forests to Coal Country
  • WI: Wisconsin Passes “Mining for America” Bill
  • WI: Plans Afoot to Restore Small Wetland within Milwaukee’s Evolving Harbor District

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • Melting of East Antarctic Ice Sheet Could Cripple Major U.S. Cities
  • Human-Caused Warming Likely Intensified Hurricane Harvey's Rains
  • Arctic saw 2nd warmest year, smallest winter sea ice coverage on record in 2017
  • Cyanobacteria in lakes: Risks linked to loss of diversity
  • Saving Salamanders: Vital to Ecosystem Health
  • More frequent fires reduce soil carbon and fertility, slowing the regrowth of plants
  • Sustainable dams – are they possible? CSU expert weighs in
  • Transportation Replaces Power in U.S. as Top Source of CO2 Emissions
  • Texas A&M Team Making Models to Predict Droughts
  • Higher plant species richness may not be enough to protect ecosystems from the worst impacts of climate extremes
  • Soil Researchers Quantify an Important, Underappreciated Factor in Carbon Release to the Atmosphere
  • Study of Darwin’s finches reveals that new species can develop in as little as two generations
  • Flathead catfish, swimming under the radar for years, now raising concerns
  • Serene Sirens: USGS Sea Cow Science
  • Meadows beat out shrubs when it comes to carbon storage
  • Death by Killer Algae
  • Ribbed Mussels Could Help Improve Urban Water Quality
  • Seagrass is a key fishing ground globally
  • 'Time bomb' of wetland-killing bugs set to explode next year
  • Groundwater Depletion Could Be Significant Source of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • Environmental Markets and Stream Barrier Removal
  • Implementing nature-based flood protection

POTPOURRI

  • Fenced Nature Preserves Have Benefits Beyond Their Boundaries
  • Engineers create plants that glow
  • Coastal Kids’ Books to Cozy Up with This Season
  • What to do with invasive species? Put ‘em on the menu.
  • Rooftop wiretap aims to learn what crows gossip about at dusk
  • Contemplating wetland mitigation? You might want to consult an attorney
  • Raising a hellbender is rough, but rewarding
  • Why the world needs to rethink the value of water
  • Voluntary programs don’t provide enough incentive for utilities to reduce their emissions
  • An ‘impossible’ stream to restore
  • Farmers Can Help #SaveTheBay... But They Need Our Help

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Webinars

 January

  • USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service Webinar: Improving Soil Health Globally
  • Association of State Wetland Managers:  Future Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar:  Reaching Across the Border to Improve Water Supplies for People and Nature: The United States, Mexico, and the Colorado River
  • EBM Tools Network Webinar: Hurricane Irma Rapid Reef Assessment in South Florida and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary
  • The Swamp School Webinar: 2018 Wetland Status and Trends
  • Association of State Wetland Managers: Invasive Species Webinar: Managing Invasive Species in the Great Lakes: Establishing Goals & Objectives, Monitoring Programs, and Cooperative Management Areas in Michigan
  • Great Lakes Phragmites Collaborative Webinar: Multi-scale remote sensing methods for Phragmites detection in southwestern Ontario
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Webinar: EPA Tools and Resources Webinar: Urban Background Study 
  • Land Trust Alliance Webinar: Learning Landscapes: A Sustainable Education Program
  • Webinar: Decision Support Tools and Framework for Climate-Smart Restoration

Meetings

January

  • Northern Michigan Waterways Hazardous Material Spill Planning Committee: 28th Annual No Spills Conference: Protecting the Great Lakes: Ownership, Resurgence and Renewal
  • Society for Integrative & Comparative Biology: Annual Meeting
  • Canadian Conference for Fisheries Research: Making a Difference to Canada's Aquatic Resources
  • American Society of Naturalists Conference
  • Future Harvest CASA Annual Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed Conference
  • Geospatial World Forum
  • New England Water Environment Association (NEWEA) Annual Conference
  • National Council for Science & the Environment (NCSE): The Science, Business, and Education of Sustainable Infrastructure: Building Resilience in a Changing World
  • Species Range Shifts & Local Adaptation: Challenging ecological and evolutionary ideas and assumptions
  • 2018 Delaware Wetlands Conference

February

  • Maryland Association for Environmental & Outdoor Education Expand Your Influence! Empowering Citizens Action for the Environment
  • International LiDAR Mapping Forum
  • Tamarisk Coalition: Riparian Restoration Conference 
  • 2018 Native Prairie Restoration/Reclamation Workshop: Look to the Future, Learn from the Past
  • 2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting
  • Society for Ecological Restoration Meeting: Restoration for Resilience Ecological Restoration in the 21st Century
  • World Aquaculture Society: Aquaculture America 2018
  • Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Wetland Science Conference
  • Restore America’s Estuaries: 2nd National Living Shorelines Technology Transfer Workshop
  • ICWMM: International Conference on Water Management Modeling
  • Climate Leadership Conference

March

  • Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commissions (MACC) Annual Environmental Conference
  • Sustainable Development Solutions Network: 2018 Cities and Climate Change Science Conference
  • 2018 Southeast Biodiversity Conservation Forum
  • 2018 Great Lakes Commission Semiannual Meeting and Great Lakes Day
  • World Ocean Summit
  • Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute: 2018 Western Places/Western Spaces
  • Water Resources Research Institute Conference
  • Southeast Regional Conference for Community and Land Conservation
  • 21st Annual NFDA Conference
  • World Water Council: World Water Forum
  • University of Hull: 14th Young Coastal Scientists and Engineers Conference
  • Iowa State University: Iowa Water Conference
  • International Convention on Global warming and Climate Change
  • Plymouth State University: 2018 NH Water & Watershed Conference
  • American Water Works Association: Sustainable Water Management Conference
  • Wildlife Management Institute: 83rd North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference
  • Southwest Extreme Precipitation Symposium

April

  • P3 Water Summit: Solving Water Challenges Through Partnerships
  • US-IALE 2018 Annual Meeting
  • Center for Watershed Protection: 2018 National Watershed and Stormwater Conference
  • New York State Wetlands Forum Conference and Meeting: Growth and Resources – Finding the Balance
  • The Northeast Natural History Conference
  • 2018 Wisconsin Lakes Partnership Convention & Water Action Volunteers Symposium
  • Climate Change: Impacts & Responses Research Network: 2018 Special Focus: Engaging with Policy on Climate Change
  • Michigan Lake and Stream Association, Inc. 57th Annual Conference: Preserving Your Freshwater Gem: The Essentials of Lake Stewardship
  • Midwest-Great Lakes Chapter of the Society for Ecological Restoration: 2018 Annual Chapter Meeting
  • 2018 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference; GIS & Water Resources X: Spatial Analysis of Watersheds: Ecological, Hydrological, and Societal Responses
  • Land Trust Alliance: 2018 New York Land Trust Symposium: Investing in Healthy Communities
  • New York State Floodplain and Stormwater Managers Association: 18th Annual Meeting
  • University of Florida: 12th International Symposium on Biogeochemistry of Wetlands
  • Instream Flow Council: Flow 2018
  • NEIWPCC: 29th Annual Nonpoint Source Pollution Conference

May

  • International Conference Climate Change & Water
  • Water Environment Reuse Foundation: 2018 Research Conference: Advancing Reuse & Integrated Water
  • National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Invest in the Environment
  • Ohio Stormwater Association: 2018 Ohio Stormwater Conference
  • 12th Bay of Fundy Science Workshop
  • National Working Waterfronts & Waterways Symposium
  • Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology at University of Gothenburg Conference: Marine Evolution 2018
  • Northern Arizona University Mini-Symposium and Short Training Course: New Advances in Land Carbon Cycle Modeling
  • Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting: Navigating Boundaries in Freshwater Science
  • ICEWW 2018: 20th International Conference: Environment, Water and Wetlands
  • Atlantic Canada Coastal and Estuarine Science Society: ACCESS 2018
  • SWS 2018 Annual Meeting: Wetland Science: Integrating Research, Practice and Policy - An Exchange of Expertise
  • Resource Institute, Inc.: Southwest Stream & Wetland Restoration Conference

June

  • Berkeley Natural History Museums, the Berkeley Initiative for Global Change Biology, and iDigBio Second Annual Digital Data in Biodiversity Research Conference
  • 4th International Symposium: Effects of Climate Change on the World’s Oceans
  • National Flood Conference
  • ASLO 2018 Summer Meeting
  • Michigan Department of Environmental Quality: 2018 Michigan Environmental Compliance Conference
  • Scientific Committee of the Society for Conservation Biology Europe Section's 5th European Congress for Conservation Biology
  • Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative
  • Association of State Floodplain Managers Annual Conference: Managing Floods Where Mountains Meet the Desert
  • 5th International Climate Change Adaptation Conference
  • IAGLR 2018: Great Science for Tomorrow’s Solutions

July

  • Natural Hazards Center: 2018 Natural Hazards Workshop
  • California Extreme Precipitation Symposium: Sharing Technical and Scientific Knowledge About Extreme Precipitation
  • US Water Alliance: One Water Summit
  • Coastal Zone Canada Association 2018 Conference: Seeking Practical Solutions to Real Issues; Communities Adapting to a Changing World
  • North American Congress for Conservation Biology: Conservation Science, Policy, & Practice: Connecting the Urban to the Wild
  • Working Watersheds and Coastal Systems: Research and Management for a Changing Future

August

  • 2018 ESA Annual Meeting
  • North Carolina State University: EcoStream Conference
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: 20th Annual EPA Region 6 Stormwater Conference 
  • National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration (NCER)
  • SIWI: World Water Week: Water, ecosystems and human development

September

  • Climate Week NYC

October

  • The Wildlife Society’s 25 Annual Conference
  • 13TH Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands

December

  • Restore America’s Estuaries Conference: 9th National Summit on Coastal and Estuarine Restoration and Management

TRAINING

January

  • College of Letters & Science Field Station Workshop: Ecology and Physiology of Plants in Winter
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2018
  • The Swamp School: Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School: Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator 2018
  • The Swamp School Course: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School: Online Course: Ecological Risk Assessment 2018
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Botanist
  • Eastern Kentucky University Division of Natural Areas Course: Wetland Design and Restoration
  • NIMBioS Investigative Workshop: Modeling Ecotoxicological Dynamics Subject to Stoichiometric Constraints
  • Landscape Genetics Graduate Student Course
  • UC Davis Extension Course: GIS for Watershed Analysis: Intermediate
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Rutgers Identification of Wetland Plants in Winter
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  •  Duke University – Nicholas School of Environment Course: Environmental Communication for Behavior Change
  • Michigan State University Extension Course: Introduction to Lakes Online
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Planning in California: An Overview
  • UC Davis Extension Course: CEQA: A Step-by-Step Approach
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Introduction to NEPA
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Groundwater Law and Hydrology
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training

February

  • D & D West Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Course: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Successful CEQA Compliance: An Intensive Two-Day Seminar
  • American Law Institute Course: Environmental Law 2018
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
  • EUCI Course: Endangered Species Act, Wetlands, Stormwater & Floodplain Regulatory Compliance for Energy and Utilities
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals 2018
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Overview of California Water Law and Policy
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Phase 1 Environmental Assessments 2018
  •  National Living Shorelines Tech Transfer Workshop
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • D & D West Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement (Atlantic & Gulf Coastal Plain )
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment 2018
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Endangered Species Regulation and Protection
  • Washington Department of Ecology Course: Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats

March

  • Duke University Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab Course: Drones for Conservation Research
  • UC Davis Extension Course: CEQA Update, Issues and Trends
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Botanist
  • The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Planning and Environmental Law
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Sustainable Transportation
  • Resource Institute: Level 1 - Applied Fluvial Morphology
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Habitat Conservation Plans
  • Duke University’s Nicholas School of the Environment Course: Writing for Environmental Professionals
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Using Specific Plans to Create Great Communities
  • Earth Institute Center for Environmental Sustainability Course: Coral Reef Ecology: Bermuda
  • UC Davis Extension Course: LAFCO: Planning and Regulating the Boundaries and Service Areas of Cities and Special Districts in California
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training
  • Resource Institute: Level II - River Morphology and Application
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2018
  • D&D WEST Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Mitigation and Conservation Banking
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Annual Land Use Law Review and Update
  • Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commissions (MACC) Course: Fundamentals of Wetlands Enforcement

April

  • The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School: Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator 2018
  • D & D West Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology - Coastal Plain
  • The Swamp School: Online Course: Ecological Risk Assessment 2018
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Planning and Environmental Law
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: Communication and Facilitation Skills for Conservation Managers
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
  • The Swamp School: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Phase 1 Environmental Assessments 2018
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment 2018
  • Duke University Nicholas School of the Environment Course: Podcasting for Environmental Communications

May

  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • D & D West Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
  • D&D West Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Northeast Section, The Wildlife Society: Wildlife Field Course
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation with Emphasis on Soils and Hydrology eSession with Field Practicum – 2018
  • National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) Tutorial, Applications of Spatial Data: Ecological Niche Modeling
  • Eastern Kentucky University, Division of Natural Areas Field Course: Wetland Design and Restoration Techniques
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • D & D West Course: Endangered Species Identification
  • McGraw Center for Conservation Leadership and the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries: Workshop for Coastal Wetland Wildlife Managers
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Introduction to Bryophytes and Lichens
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Marine Intertidal Community Ecology
  • D & D West Course: Hydrophytic Vegetation - Coastal Plain

June

  • Eagle Hill Institute: Sterile Crustose Lichens Unveiled
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Mosses: Structure, Ecology, and Identification
  • D & D West Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology - Coastal Plain
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Plate Tectonics of the Appalachians: A Traveling Geology Course, Maine to Quebec
  • University of Utah IsoCamp Course: Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry and Ecology
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • University of Utah Course: Isotopes in Spatial Ecology and Biogeochemistry
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Scientific Illustration with Pen and Ink and Color Pencil
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Freshwater and Diadromous Fishes of New England
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Lichens and Lichen Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Sedges and Rushes: Identification and Ecology
  • Flathead Lake Bio Station: Conservation Ecology
  • Flathead Lake Bio Station Course: Environmental Sensors: Designing, Building and Deploying the Field
  • Flathead Lake Bio Station: Seminars in Ecology and Resource Management
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018

July

  • Eagle Hill Institute: Dragonflies and Damselflies: Field Techniques and Identification
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Grasses: Identification and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Drawing and Painting Birds in Watercolor and Colored Pencil
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Spiders: Identification, Biology, and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Native Bees: Biology, Ecology, Identification and Conservation
  • Flathead Lake Bio Station Course: Landscape Ecology
  • Flathead Lake Bio Station Course: Aquatic Microbial Ecology
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Wetland Identification, Delineation and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Photographing Plants and Plant Habitats: Classical and Modern Techniques
  • Summer Course: Ecological Forecasting
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Maine Seaweeds: Identification, Ecology, and Ethnobotany
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Microlepidoptera: Collection, Preparation, Dissection, Identification, and Natural History
  • Flathead Lake Bio Station Course: Field Methods in Ornithology
  • Flathead Lake Bio Station Course: Alpine Ecology
  • Flathead Lake Bio Station Course: Lake Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Mushroom Identification for New Mycophiles: Foraging for Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Tracks and Sign of Insects and Other Invertebrates
  • Eagle Hill Institute: The Eastern Maine Ice Age Landscape as a Record Hemispheric Climate Change: The Last Deglaciation: The Pineo Ridge Moraine and Emerged Delta Complex
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Problematic Delineation Seminar – 2018

August

  • Eagle Hill Institute: Sphagnum Mosses and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Aquatic Entomology
  • D&D West Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Flathead Lake Bio Station: Stream Ecology
  • Flathead Lake Bio Station: Ecology of Forests and Grasslands
  • Flathead Lake Bio Station: Drone Remote Sensing of Freshwater Ecosystems
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Witness to Nature: A Creative Writing Workshop
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Plant Anatomy and Microtechnique
  • D & D West Course: Hydrophytic Vegetation - Eastern Mountains/Piedmont
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Mushroom Microscopy: An Exploration of the Intricate Microscopic World of Mushrooms
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Banding Songbirds and Raptors: Livetrapping, In-hand Aging and Sexing, and Data Collection for Research
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Mosses: Orthotrichaceae of Maine
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Independent Study: Pyrenolichens
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training

September

  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
  • D & D West Course: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: The Ecology and Conservation of Migratory Birds
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • The Swamp School: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training

October

  • D&D West Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
  • D & D West Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species

November

  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
  • D & D West Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology – Piedmont

December

  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training
  • D & D West Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement – Eastern Mountains/Piedmont) 

SPECIAL EVENT

  • Anita C. Leight Estuary Center: World Wetlands Day Festival
  • World Wetlands Day: Wetlands for a Sustainable Urban Future
  • Orlando Wetland Festival
  • Whooping Crane Festival
  • World Fish Migration Day: Working together for happy fish
  • Earth Day
    
Wetland Breaking News - December 2017
 
 

Wetland Breaking News - March 2016

The Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News (WBN) is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those working in water resources and related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published for over fifteen years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to .

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled and Edited by Marla Stelk, Editor; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors. Executive Director: Jeanne Christie. Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399 Fax: 207-892-3089

All photos by Jeanne Christie, ASWM

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