IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

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All photos by
Jeanne Christie, ASWM

   


Dear Wetlanders,

“I have a dream” is perhaps one of the most well-known and cherished quotes from American history ever. Probably because it’s something we all can relate to; we all have dreams – some large and some small. Not everyone is lucky enough to realize their dreams, but sometimes, even just knowing someone who has, is inspiration enough to keep trying. This is what happened in our office last week, when Jeanne Christie, our Executive Director, arrived to find several emails from her colleagues congratulating her on being quoted by the New York Times in an article they published entitled “The ‘Rewilding’ of a Century-Old Cranberry Bog.” Jeanne confessed that she had always dreamed of being interviewed by the New York Times – finally her dream had come true. The article is about an amazing wetland restoration project in Massachusetts that is turning an old, toxic cranberry bog back into a coastal wetland. Projects such as this one require a tremendous amount of ingenuity and hard work - if Jeanne’s excitement wasn’t inspiring enough, then this article should really do the trick.

Related to this theme of inspiration, in the National News section of this edition of Wetland Breaking News you will find a story about how “U.S. Mayors Back 100% Renewable Energy, Vow to Fill Climate Leadership Void.” This bipartisan effort is a breath of fresh air in contrast to the intense political divide found in the U.S. Congress these days. And in State News, you’ll find stories about: a local effort to save a rare wetland on school property in Illinois; restoration work happening on part of Plumtree Run in Maryland; bald eagle populations thriving in New York; and in Oklahoma, a recent land purchase finally completed the Drummond Flats Wildlife Management Area which will facilitate future restoration efforts of wetlands in that area.

As we navigate our way through what often seems like a barrage of negative news every month, I have found it is increasingly important to recognize and share positive news stories. And there are lots of them if you look hard enough. If you have inspiring news stories to share, please let us know by emailing them to us at . Just be sure that you include a link to an original online story that we can use. All of us at ASWM know that all of you are doing amazing work and we are deeply inspired by each of you, so keep up the good work, and “keep on keepin’ on!”

Best regards,
Marla J. Stelk
Editor, Wetland Breaking News

   
             
             

Trump analysis slashes WOTUS's economic benefits

Ariel Wittenberg – E&E News – July 7, 2017
U.S. EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers are disputing their own economic analysis of the 2015 Clean Water Rule, now saying most benefits they previously ascribed to the Obama-era regulation can no longer be quantified. The agencies criticize their previous calculations in a new analysis of the economic impacts of repealing the Clean Water Rule, which seeks to clarify which wetlands and small waterways are protected by the Clean Water Act. The Trump administration has made repealing the Clean Water Rule, also known as the Waters of the U.S. (WOTUS) rule, a priority. For full story, click here.

The ‘Rewilding’ of a Century-Old Cranberry Bog

By Jess Bidgood – The New York Times – July 4, 2017
The alewife, a type of river herring, wriggled against the current, a 10-inch streak that disappeared from view as it rounded a bend in the stream. It was a normal springtime pilgrimage for the fish, which lives in the ocean but swims upstream to spawn. But this time it was happening in a surprising place — a waterway that was not here two years ago. For more than a century, this place, called Tidmarsh Farms, was the site of a cranberry bog, a thick carpet of the fruit’s vines atop a bed of sand with straight water channels. But commercial cranberry farming, which began in Massachusetts, has flagged here in recent years as prices dropped and different farming methods emerged elsewhere. Unfolding here now is an ambitious project: turning a cranberry bog back into the coastal wetland it once was. For full story, click here.

Court Blocks E.P.A. Effort to Suspend Obama-Era Methane Rule

By Lisa Friedman – The New York Times – July 3, 2017
Dealing a legal blow to the Trump administration, a federal appeals court ruled on Monday that the Environmental Protection Agency cannot suspend an Obama-era rule to restrict methane emissions from new oil and gas wells. The 2-to-1 decision from the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit is a legal setback for Scott Pruitt, the E.P.A. administrator, who is trying to roll back dozens of Obama-era environmental regulations. The ruling signals that the Trump administration’s efforts to simply delay environmental and public health actions are likely to face an uphill battle in the courts and require a more painstaking process. For full story, click here.

EPA, U.S. Army Move to Rescind 2015 "Waters of the U.S."

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – June 27, 2017
The Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Army, and Army Corps of Engineers (the agencies) are proposing a rule to rescind the Clean Water Rule and re-codify the regulatory text that existed prior to 2015 defining "waters of the United States" or WOTUS. This action would, when finalized, provide certainty in the interim, pending a second rulemaking in which the agencies will engage in a substantive re-evaluation of the definition of "waters of the United States." The proposed rule would be implemented in accordance with Supreme Court decisions, agency guidance, and longstanding practice. "We are taking significant action to return power to the states and provide regulatory certainty to our nation's farmers and businesses," said Administrator Scott Pruitt. "This is the first step in the two-step process to redefine 'waters of the U.S.' and we are committed to moving through this re-evaluation to quickly provide regulatory certainty, in a way that is thoughtful, transparent and collaborative with other agencies and the public." For full news release, click here.

 


 

 

Trump Has Secretive Teams to Roll Back Regulations, Led by Hires With Deep Industry Ties

By Robert Faturechi, ProPublica, and Danielle Ivory – The New York Times – July 11, 2017
President Trump entered office pledging to cut red tape, and within weeks, he ordered his administration to assemble teams to aggressively scale back government regulations. But the effort — a signature theme in Trump’s populist campaign for the White House — is being conducted in large part out of public view and often by political appointees with deep industry ties and potential conflicts. Most government agencies have declined to disclose information about their deregulation teams. But ProPublica and The New York Times identified 71 appointees, including 28 with potential conflicts, through interviews, public records and documents obtained under the Freedom of Information Act. For full story, click here.

Chesapeake Bay restoration funding likely to be restored

By John Vogel – American Agriculturist – July 7, 2017
Despite the political “wailing and gnashing of teeth” over President Donald Trump’s skinnied-down fiscal 2018-19 budget proposal, Pennsylvania Ag Secretary Russell Redding came out of a recent congressional Chesapeake Bay Watershed Caucus meeting much relieved. “The Chesapeake Bay cleanup efforts will not go unfunded. I’m more confident of that after this meeting. We’ll be able to continue the progress made by the agriculture sector.” For full story, click here.

Drinking water at risk with new EPA proposals

By Josephine Peterson – Colorado News Connection – The Durango Herald – July 5, 2017
The American public will have 30 days to comment on the Trump administration’s plan to repeal and replace the 2015 Clean Water Rule, once it’s published in the Federal Register. Jan Goldman-Carter, wetlands and water resources director for the National Wildlife Federation, said the move would remove pollution limits from streams and wetlands that supply a third of the nation’s drinking water and which also are home to countless fish and wildlife species. “The American public has long thought – since the 1972 act – that their water is protected, their wetlands are protected, their streams are protected from pollution,” she said. “None of us can really take that for granted anymore.” The Clean Water Rule restored protections under the Clean Water Act for headwaters, streams and wetland habitat that had been left uncertain because of convoluted U.S. Supreme Court rulings. Current Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt has argued that rolling back the measure will provide certainty to farmers and other businesses by returning regulatory authority to states. For full story, click here.

Science office a shadow of its former self

By Christa Marshall – E&E News – July 3, 2017
The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy currently has 35 staffers, an administration official said today. That's about a third of the number of employees during the Obama administration. The unnamed official released the number in response to E&E News inquiries about a report from CBS News that the last three OSTP science division workers departed Friday. Under Obama, the science division had nine members and worked in tandem with a separate energy and environment division. It led efforts on antibiotics and diseases like Ebola. The official did not confirm or deny that OSTP's science division is fully unstaffed but added that 12 OSTP aides continue to work on "science." For full story, click here.

Trump will try to sidestep science in rolling back clean water rule

Ariel Wittenberg – E&E News Science Magazine – June 28, 2017
The Trump administration's 42-page proposal for repealing former President Obama's Clean Water Rule largely builds its case on a 2009 split decision by the Supreme Court on federal regulation of swear words on television. In FCC v. Fox Television Stations, the high court ruled, 5-4, that an agency can change regulations without the move being considered arbitrary or capricious under the Administrative Procedures Act as long as it provides a "reasoned explanation" for the change. For full story, click here.

U.S. Mayors Back 100% Renewable Energy, Vow to Fill Climate Leadership Void

By Nicholas Kusnetz – InsideClimate News – June 26, 2017
As the nation's mayors closed their annual meeting on Monday in Miami Beach, they sent a clear signal that cities are looking for action on climate change and are eager to fill a policy gap created by the Trump administration. The United States Conference of Mayors, which includes both Republican and Democratic mayors from cities across the nation, adopted a series of resolutions that are far more assertive than federal climate policy, including a pledge supporting cities' adoption of 100 percent renewable energy by 2035. For full story, click here.

New Federal and Junior Duck Stamps now on sale

BirdWatchingDaily.com – June 24, 2017
The new Federal Duck Stamp is now on sale. The 83rd Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp debuted Friday, June 24, at a special event hosted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at Bass Pro Shops’ flagship retail store in Springfield, Missouri. The stamp features a pair of Trumpeter Swans in flight. The painting is the work of wildlife artist Joseph Hautman, of Plymouth, Minnesota, winner of last fall’s Federal Duck Stamp Art Contest, held in West Virginia. It was Hautman’s fifth Federal Duck Stamp Contest win, tying him as the leading Duck Stamp artist of all time. For full blog post, click here.

EPA Staff Up Moves Forward

By Anthony R. DeRosa – ASDWA – The Source News Blog – June 23, 2017
Earlier this week, ASDWA was informed that Dennis Lee Forsgren has been named as the new Deputy Assistant Administrator for the Office of Water. That Office has both a political and career Deputy AA positions – Forsgren, who has extensive experience in the areas of water, resources, and natural resources management, steps into the political slot and Benita Best-Wong will continue as the acting career deputy. Finally, our colleague Mike Shapiro continues as the Acting Assistant Administrator for Water. Should that slot be filled, Mike would return to his position as Principal Deputy Assistant Administrator. For full blog post, click here.

Trump Inspires Scientist to Run for Congress to Fight Climate Change

By Chelsea Bailey and Matt Toder – NBC News – June 22, 2017 – Video
Volcanologist Jess Phoenix would agree with President Donald Trump on one thing: There's something wrong with Washington, D.C. "We need science in our everyday lives," she said, speaking in April at the Los Angeles March for Science. "Ignorance is the disease." The cure is more scientists who hold political office, Phoenix said. She's running for the House of Representatives as a Democrat in California's 25th Congressional District, with a pledge bring "good science" to Washington. The seat is currently held by a Republican. Before November, Phoenix, the daughter of FBI agents, said she was content with her life as a volcanic scientist. She had dedicated her career to studying the world's harshest environments in the hope of revealing how humans are driving climate change. But President Donald Trump's electoral upset shocked the scientist and moved her to action. For full story and to view video, click here.

EPA plans to buy out more than 1,200 employees this summer

By Brady Dennis – The Washington Post – June 20, 2017
The Environmental Protection Agency plans on shedding more than 1,200 employees by early September through buyouts and early retirements, as part of a broader push by the Trump administration to shrink a government entity the president once promised to eliminate “in almost every form.” The departures would amount to about 8 percent of the current 15,000-person workforce of the EPA, where a hiring freeze also remains in effect. The Trump administration has proposed a 31 percent cut to its budget, the largest percentage reduction of any agency and one that could mean several thousand job losses. For full story, click here.

38 science advisers get pink slips — internal email

By Sean Reilly – E&E News – June 20, 2017
U.S. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt continues to clear out a key advisory committee, signaling plans to drop several dozen current members of the Board of Scientific Counselors (BOSC), according to an email yesterday from a senior agency official. All board members whose three-year appointments expire in August will not get renewals, Robert Kavlock, acting head of EPA's Office of Research and Development, said in the email, which was obtained by E&E News. Because of the need to reconstitute the board, EPA is also canceling all subcommittee meetings planned for late summer and fall, Kavlock said. For full story, click here.

Trump’s ‘puddle and ditch’ order will have destructive ripple effect

By Jane Kay – Reveal News – June 20, 2017
As President Donald Trump signed one of his first executive orders, he was surrounded by smiling, clapping homebuilders, farmers and other supporters eager to see the new president rein in a 45-year-old law protecting the nation’s waterways. The Environmental Protection Agency has “truly run amok” by saving “nearly every puddle or every ditch on a farmer’s land,” Trump told the gathering. Calling it a “massive power grab,” he added, “if you want to build a new home … you have to worry about getting hit with a huge fine if you fill in as much as a puddle – just a puddle – on your lot.” But these so-called puddles and ditches, according to scientists across the country, are fundamental to the nation’s drinking water supplies and to wildlife, including many rare animals and plants. For full story, click here.

USDA Aims to Work with Landowners to Restore 400,000 Acres of Longleaf Pine Forests on Private Lands

Contact: Sylvia Rainford – USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service – June 21, 2017
The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) today released a two-year implementation strategy to help private landowners restore and protect 400,000 acres of longleaf pine forests, a unique but imperiled landscape of the Southeast. Through the strategy, NRCS furthers its ongoing effort to use existing Farm Bill programs and other resources to increase the abundance and improve the health of longleaf pine forests in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia. For full news release, click here.

A new take on political science: Training researchers to run for office

By Melissa Healy – Los Angeles Times – June 15, 2017
They have built careers isolating cells, designing integrated circuits and mastering computer languages. Now they are knocking on doors, being interviewed on TV and asking perfect strangers to give them money. Across the country, scientists — card-carrying members of an elite that prizes expertise — are exiting their ivory towers to enter the political fray. There’s the cancer researcher from Mississippi, the integrated circuit designer from New York, the physician from Utah and the stem cell biologist from Southern California, among dozens of others. It’s a move that appears to defy the first principle of their profession: logic. Unlike a law degree, a Ph.D. does not provide a well-worn path to politics. And while 79% of Americans believe that science has made life easier, their esteem for the scientific enterprise has been on a steady decline, according to the Pew Research Center. But even amidst signs that science is losing its power to persuade, a new crop of office-seekers is anything but discouraged. In districts blue and red, working scientists are putting two hypotheses to the test. For full story, click here.

Congress to Pruitt: We’re Not Cutting EPA Budget to Trump’s Levels

By Marianne Lavelle – InsideClimate News – June 15, 2017
Members of the congressional committee responsible for the Environmental Protection Agency's budget—Republican and Democrat alike—made clear Thursday they have no intention of approving the White House's proposal to slash the agency's spending. In a hearing, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt defended the Trump administration's budget plan for the first time on Capitol Hill, insisting that the agency he leads could fulfill its mission under a plan that cuts its budget more than any other federal agencies. On climate change, the committee members divided along party lines on whether they supported the Trump administration's decision to exit the Paris accord. Pruitt, who was a chief proponent of the move, claimed that President Donald Trump would "continue engagement" on the subject. But most of the hearing focused on other issues, with members of both parties driving home the point that Congress will not pass a budget that cuts the EPA's funding by 31 percent and eliminates nearly 50 of the agency's programs. For full story, click here.

 
 

CA: The California Drought Isn’t Over, It Just Went Underground

By Mark Grossi – News Deeply – July 12, 2017
Evelyn Rios wept in 2014 when the well went dry at her home of 46 years – the home where she and husband Joe raised five children on farm-worker wages. They cannot afford another well, so they do without. Her angst only grew as California’s five-year drought dragged on. Finally, after one of the wettest winters on record, Gov. Jerry Brown announced in April that the drought had ended. But the situation remains grim, says Rios, 80, who lives in rural Madera County in California’s San Joaquin Valley. She thought she was being hooked up to the city of Madera’s water system. Now the emergency money for such projects has dried up. For full story, click here.

CA: California to list herbicide as cancer-causing; Monsanto vows fight

By Karl Plume – June 26, 2017
Glyphosate, an herbicide and the active ingredient in Monsanto Co's popular Roundup weed killer, will be added to California's list of chemicals known to cause cancer effective July 7, the state's Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) said on Monday. Monsanto vowed to continue its legal fight against the designation, required under a state law known as Proposition 65, and called the decision "unwarranted on the basis of science and the law." For full story, click here.

CO: New Mexico suit against Colorado in Gold King Mine spill fails

By Jonathan Romeo – The Durango Herald – June 26, 2017
New Mexico’s petition to hold Colorado responsible for the Gold King Mine spill nearly two years ago was denied Monday by the U.S. Supreme Court. “Because it was the EPA and not Colorado that caused the Gold King Mine disaster, I have said from the beginning that New Mexico should not have sued Colorado in the Supreme Court,” Colorado Attorney General Cynthia Coffman said in a prepared statement. “Now that my office has won the Supreme Court case, I hope the conversation can focus on the EPA and its promise to take full responsibility for its actions.” For full story, click here.

DE: DNREC produces wetlands report card on Leipsic River Watershed’s health and management recommendations

Contact: Joanna Wilson – Delaware.gov – June 22, 2017
DNREC’s Wetland Monitoring and Assessment Program announced that its final report on the health of wetlands located in Kent County’s Leipsic River Watershed and Little Creek area – the eighth in a series of watershed-specific wetland health reports – has been given a C+ grade for their current condition, with opportunity for improvement. Tidal wetlands in the watersheds were in the best health of the four types evaluated, and received a B- grade overall, mostly as a result of a lack of grid ditching and undeveloped buffers. For full story, click here. To view report and other information, click here.

FL: Two Sad Ironies in Florida Passing Its 'Anti-Science' Law

By Marshall Shepherd – Forbes – July 1, 2017
It is officially called Florida House Bill 989, and it was signed into law by Florida Governor Rick Scott on June 26th, 2017 after passing both chambers of the house. According to the National Center for Science Education's website:

With the law now in place, any county resident — not just any parent with a child in the country's public schools, as was the case previously — can now file a complaint about instructional materials in the county's public schools, and the school will now have to appoint a hearing officer to hear the complaint.

Does this mean that some "Joe or Jane" public can file a complaint if they think schools should be teaching that the Earth is flat and not an oblate spheroid? Many of the affidavits filed in support of the bill complained about evolution and climate change being taught. For full story, click here.

FL: Rising Seas, Tropical Storm Cindy Prompt Florida Officials to Condemn Townhomes

Weather Underground – July 5, 2017
Coastal erosion from rising sea levels coupled with last month's Tropical Storm Cindy has prompted county officials to condemn townhomes at a subdivision along St. Joseph Peninsula on Florida's Gulf Coast. Battered by Cindy's 6- to 8-foot waves and heavy rains, the Cape Shoals subdivision of townhomes, located about halfway down Cape San Blas, was condemned last week, making it Gulf County's first victim of receding shorelines, reports the Port St. Joe Star. For full story, click here.

GA: Ala. cities sue Georgia manufacturers over polluted water

By Chris Joyner – The Atlanta Journal-Constitution - AJC.com – June 16, 2017
Centre, Ala., has become the latest to sue over drinking water allegedly polluted by Georgia’s carpet industry. At issue are the chemical compounds perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluoroctane sulfonate, known as PFOA and PFOS, which were used for decades to make carpets resistant to stains. They also were used in a variety of consumer goods from cookware to fast food wrappers. Manufacturers began phasing them out when scientific studies linked the compounds to health problems from low fetal birthrate to cancer, but the inorganic chemicals have infiltrated the ground, air and water of communities around the nation where they were used in manufacturing. For full story, click here.

IL: Activists push to save rare wetland on school property

By The Associated Press – The State Journal-Register – June 25, 2017
Students, environmentalists and others are trying to convince officials at an Illinois junior college not to sell school property that includes a rare type of wetland to a developer who hopes to extend a road — an effort that comes at a time when the state’s budget crisis has higher education institutions scrambling to raise money. According to The Daily Southtown, the group wants to preserve what’s called a fen — a wetland where water seeping through limestone becomes alkaline and limits the number of plant species that can grow there. It argues that the area is threatened by a developer’s plans to build a mall on 265 acres near property owned by Joliet Junior College. For full story, click here.

LA: 'Our culture is dying': Rising waters menace more than land in Louisiana

By Ellen Wulfhorst – Thomson Reuters Foundation News – July 5, 2017
Louise St. Pierre paints pictures of shacks and swamps on the insides of oyster shells - tiny scenes of Cajun culture she sees washing away amid the rising saltwater and periodic floods inundating southern Louisiana. "Our culture is dying," said St. Pierre, who lives in Lafourche Parish, where cypress trees are hung with lacy strands of Spanish moss and alligators lurk in bayous, the region's slow-moving swamp waterways. "It's not like it was." People are moving away from the parish, or county, some 60 miles (97 km) southwest of New Orleans, faced with growing flood risks and unable to pay for insurance, which can reach thousands of dollars and is required by mortgage banks in high-risk areas. For full story, click here.

LA: ICYMI: Prayer and Resistance Camp Launches in Louisiana to Challenge Pipeline Connected to DAPL

By Yessenia Funes – Colorlines – June 26, 2017 – Video
A new resistance camp, called L’eau Est La Vie (Water Is Life), opened over the weekend, on June 24. Based in southern Louisiana, the camp is against the 163-mile long Bayou Bridge Pipeline. The camp, according to a press release emailed to Colorlines, is made up of indigenous and environmental justice communities. Described as a “floating camp,” it sits among Louisiana’s wetlands and contains numerous indigenous art structures that are on rafts. The camp’s name, L’eau Est La Vie, is in the indigenous-colonial Houma French language. The United Houma Nation is one of the tribes whose members are challenging the pipeline. For full story and to view video, click here.

LA: A reviled plant could solve Louisiana's wetland-killing pest problem

By Tristan Baurick NOLA – The Times-Picayume – June 16, 2017 – Video
The plague of foreign insects wiping out wetlands in southeast Louisiana has so far produced more wonder and fear than solutions. But one scientist might have a simple fix. LSU ecologist Jim Cronin discovered last week that the Asian bug killing roseau cane in the Mississippi River Delta appears to avoid a particular European strain of the sturdy, erosion-resistant grass. Roseau is considered the backbone of the south delta, but thousands of acres have been lost since a type of scale or mealybug appeared on the cane last year -- with devastating effect: As the cane dies, there's little to hold soils in place, speeding the delta's already dire erosion problem. For full story and to view video, click here.

ME: Interior secretary sees potential for other uses of Kathadin national monument

By Kevin Miller – Portland Press Herald – June 15, 2017
The head of the Department of the Interior said Thursday that federal ownership of Maine’s Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument is “settled” and suggested transitioning to a national park was still a possibility. Yet Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke also touted opportunities for more public access and “traditional uses” – including timber harvesting – on the federal land, offering reasons for optimism to both monument supporters and opponents after his tour of the Katahdin region. For full story, click here.

MD: Bel Air begins restoration of southern part of Plumtree Run

By Erika Butler – The Baltimore Sun – July 7, 2017
The Town of Bel Air is continuing its efforts to reduce pollution going into the Chesapeake Bay by restoring another part of Plumtree Run. Working from a grant from the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the stream in the woods between Atwood Road and Brightview of Bel Air Assisted Living will be restored to "slow down erosion," Stephen Kline, the town's public works director, said Thursday. For full story, click here.

MD: Charles County, MD, restricts development in Mattawoman watershed

By Rona Kobell – The Bay Journal – July 4, 2017
After six years of heated debate, the Charles County Board of Commissioners voted to restrict development in one of Maryland’s fastest-growing counties to protect one of the state’s healthiest — and most threatened — water bodies, Mattawoman Creek. By a vote of 3–2, the commissioners approved a Watershed Conservation District, which will reduce potential development in the Mattawoman drainage basin and the headwaters of the Port Tobacco River. The vote follows an intense, nearly yearlong debate after the county adopted a new comprehensive growth plan that called for protecting the creek, a Potomac River tributary just 20 miles from Washington, D.C. For full story, click here.

MD: Over $800,000 Announced to Support Local Green Infrastructure Projects to Improve Communities and Provide Jobs

Maryland Department of Natural Resources – June 29, 2017
Today the Chesapeake Bay Trust in partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR), and the City of Baltimore Office of Sustainability announce $843,486 in funding for the Chesapeake Bay Green Streets-Green Jobs-Green Towns Grant Program. The goal of the grants is to help communities develop and implement plans that reduce stormwater runoff, increase the number and amount of green spaces in urban areas, improve the health of local streams and the Chesapeake Bay, create “green jobs,” and enhance livability in cities and communities. Community-led restoration efforts support healthy neighborhoods, local jobs, and increased capacity to implement green infrastructure that supports clean water goals. For full story, click here.

MI: Jackson Community Foundation Helps The Nature Conservancy Restore Rare Habitat

Contact: Melissa Molenda – The Nature Conservancy – June 22, 2017
A grant of $10,000 from Jackson Community Foundation will help restore fens and savannas in southern Michigan managed by The Nature Conservancy. The funding will support restoration management work at Jackson County Parks and Recreation's Burn Park, which covers about 130 acres adjacent to the Conservancy’s Grand River Fen Preserve in Liberty. Fens are unusual and increasingly rare wetlands that receive water from underground alkaline springs rather than from precipitation. The fens and associated swamp and upland forest communities, including the savannas, harbor a regionally significant and diverse fauna and flora including seven globally rare and eight state-rare species. For full story, click here.

MI: Lake Erie 'impaired' listing not important, says Michigan ag chief

Michigan Live – June 19, 2017 – Video
Michigan's agriculture chief dismissed the state's decision to formally acknowledge the ecological sickness of Lake Erie, saying she doesn't believe an impairment designation made last fall "makes that much difference" toward improving the water quality in the algal bloom-stricken Great Lake. For full story and to view video, click here.

MN: Minn. loons could get aid from BP oil spill cleanup funds

Kirsti Marohn – MPR News – July 3, 2017
Kevin Woizeschke peered through binoculars at a pair of loons gliding across the water.
Woizeschke, a nongame wildlife biologist for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, was in a boat on West Fox Lake about 30 miles north of Brainerd, Minn. He was looking for loons wearing a silver leg band that holds a tiny geolocator tag. "These geotags are $700 each," Woizeschke said. "The information that is on them is even way more valuable than that." That information includes estimates of the bird's location and how deep it's been diving. For scientists trying to learn more about where loons are spending their time, that knowledge is priceless. Researchers have been trying to figure out whether Minnesota's beloved loons were affected by the BP oil spill seven years ago in the Gulf of Mexico. They think they've established the connection. For full story, click here.

MN: DNR Strips Public Status from 640 Miles of Minnesota Streams

By Tyler Berg – 5 Eyewitness News/KSTP-TV – June 18, 2017
The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has abruptly removed 640 miles of streams, rivers and ditches from its inventory of public water. The DNR issued the order quickly after it uncovered a procedural error made in the 1980s. The Minnesota Center of Environmental Advocacy has since filed an appeal with the state Court of Appeals in an effort to reverse the DNR's decision. The MCEA argues the action puts actual public water at risk of being dammed, drained or polluted without a permit. Leigh Currie, an attorney for MCEA, said the impacted waters lie in 71 counties. For full story, click here. 

MO: Exports to Asia threatening turtle population

By Margaret Slayton – News-Press Now – July 1, 2017
The Missouri Department of Conservation is considering restricting the commercial harvest of three wild turtle species in the state due to concerns the practice is lowering population numbers. Jeff Briggler, resource scientist, said the changes will reflect concerns that more turtles are being removed from the landscape than is sustainable for the species. Most turtles in the United States are shipped overseas as part of international trade. The turtles are often sold to Asia for consumption and they are used in traditional Chinese medicine. For full story, click here.

NV: New species of toad discovered in U.S. for 1st time in 50 years

By Doylee Rice – USA Today – KHOU.com – July 7, 2017
For the first time in 50 years, a new species of toad has been discovered in the United States.
Scientists this week announced the discovery of the Dixie Valley toad that lives only in a small, 2-square-mile area of Churchill County in northern Nevada. The critter lives near where thermal springs bubble up, which has created a rare wetland area in an otherwise extremely arid landscape. Along with the discovery, scientists in the study said the new species is already threatened by the proposed development of a nearby geothermal energy facility, the Dixie Meadows Geothermal Utilization Project. For full story, click here.

NJ: Millions in environment settlements could be diverted under Christie's stealth veto

By Scott Fallon – North Jersey.com – July 5, 2017 – Video
Gov. Chris Christie quietly took language out of the state budget that would have ensured millions of dollars from legal settlements with polluters would go to environmental restoration instead of being diverted to other areas, officials confirmed Wednesday. After a tense budget impasse that saw the state government shut down for three days, Christie used his line-item veto early Tuesday to strike language that dedicated half of environmental settlements to “remediation, restoration, and clean up.” The move could have significant consequences for a $225 million state settlement with Exxon Mobil Corp. that could be approved by a judge this fall. Under the budget that was signed by Christie, only $50 million would go to a state fund used to restore land and water that have been affected by hazardous waste. For full story and to view video, click here.

NJ: After years of waiting, contaminated sediment finally dredged from Pompton Lake

By James M. O’Neill – North Jersey.com – July 5, 2017 – Video
A mucky gray mix of gravel, sediment and peat rolls up conveyor belts and plops onto piles along the shore of Pompton Lake each day, waiting for dump trucks to haul it away to a landfill in Pennsylvania.
Since June 5, the largest phase of a long-anticipated three-year project to remove contaminated sediment from a 36-acre portion of Pompton Lake has been in full swing, and local and federal officials say they are pleased with the progress. During a recent visit to the site, Catherine McCabe, the Environmental Protection Agency’s acting regional administrator, said that even if the steep budget cuts proposed for the EPA by President Donald Trump come to pass, the Pompton Lake project will not be halted or delayed, since Chemours, the company responsible for the cleanup, is paying the bulk of the costs. For full story and to view video, click here.

NY: Bald eagles thriving in record numbers in NY

By John Ferro – Poughkeepsie Journal – July 6, 2017 – Video
It's never been a better time to be a bald eagle in New York. At least, that's what the latest numbers from the state Department of Environmental Conservation show. This week, the DEC announced there are an estimated 323 breeding pairs in New York, a record. “New York state has been a leader in the restoration and recovery of the bald eagle in the northeastern United States," DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos said in a statement, "and this news confirms that our rivers, lakes and forests are capable of supporting our nation's symbol for generations to come.” For full article and to view video, click here.

NY: EPA Provides Environmental Programs in N.Y. with $5.7 Million to Improve Water Quality

Contact: Elias Rodriguez – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – June 20, 2017
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awarded the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation a Performance Partnership grant of $5.7 million to administer water quality programs. “The EPA is protecting the environment by engaging our state partners,” said Administrator Scott Pruitt. “This grant should help New York meet their local environmental needs.” “EPA has no more basic responsibility than to help states secure and protect our nation’s water,” said Acting EPA Regional Administrator Catherine McCabe. “This grant allows New York to conduct the day-to-day work necessary to run its water programs.” The funds will go toward the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s operation of its continuing environmental programs while giving it greater flexibility to address its highest environmental priorities, improve environmental performance and strengthen its partnership with EPA. For full news release, click here.

OH: The Company Behind the Dakota Access Pipeline Has Another Big Problem in Ohio

By Catherine Traywick – Bloomberg – June 22, 2017
Energy Transfer Partners LP is making a mess of its biggest project since the Dakota Access pipeline.
Construction of the $4.2 billion Rover natural gas line has caused seven industrial spills, polluted fragile Ohio wetlands and angered local farmers. The company owes $1.5 million in restitution after demolishing an historic house. The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency is furious and a federal energy regulator has launched a rare public investigation that threatens to delay the pipeline’s scheduled Nov. 1 completion. For full story, click here.

OH: Cuyahoga River through the years, from fires to revival

By John Petkovic – Cleveland.com – June 22, 2017
For decades, the Cuyahoga was regarded an ecological disaster, a piece of slimy gunk on Cleveland's reputation and an easy punchline for comedians across the country. Haha, remember when the river caught on fire in Cleveland? The Day the River Burned -- June 22, 1969? When some oil-drenched debris led to a 20-mnute blaze that made Cleveland the butt of a never-ending joke? On the anniversary of the Fire of '69, that dark day 48 years ago seems like ancient history. The river has transitioned from a transportation artery for industry to a lifestyle amenity -- where people have come to see it as part of an accessible landscape and recreational destination. For full story, click here.

OK: Land Purchase Completes Drummond Flats Wetland Basin

Playa Lakes Joint Venture – June 27, 2017
Ducks Unlimited recently purchased the last two parcels of land needed to completely protect the historic 4,000-acre Drummond Flats wetland basin in north central Oklahoma. A 2017 PLJV ConocoPhillips grant helped Ducks Unlimited acquire the 125 acres, which will become part of Drummond Flats Wildlife Management Area (WMA). “It was essential that these properties be secured and incorporated into this special public land,” says Eric Held, Manager of Conservation Programs for Ducks Unlimited. “Having all the land within the basin will facilitate future restoration efforts of the wetlands.” For full story, click here.

PA: Pa. bill would allow private sector companies to bid on bay cleanup efforts

By Mike Parker – abc27 – The Sentinel News – July 7, 2017
As Pennsylvania continues to fall behind on federal mandates to reduce pollutants entering the Chesapeake Bay, a state lawmaker believes private sector companies could offer a solution. Sen. Rich Alloway, R-Franklin County, has introduced Senate Bill 799, which would open up bidding on pollution-reducing efforts to private firms. Alloway says the goal is to both reduce the amount of pollutants entering local waterways and lower costs to taxpayers. For full story, click here.

PA: Report Shows PA Missing Clean Water Goals

BCTV.org – June 26, 2017
Chesapeake Bay is getting cleaner, but Pennsylvania is falling significantly short of meeting some of its goals for reducing pollution flowing into the bay. Under the Chesapeake Bay Clean Water Blueprint, watershed states are required to implement 60 percent of practices to reduce nutrient pollution and sediments flowing into the bay by this year, and 100 percent by 2025. Bill Chain, senior agriculture program manager at the foundation's Pennsylvania office, says the foundation's latest two-year milestone assessment shows some progress in the state. For full story, click here.

TX: Study of oil and gas drilling finds pollution and connections to earthquakes

By David Hunn – Houston Chronicle – June 18, 2017
Oil and gas drilling in Texas shale pollutes the air, erodes soil and contaminates water, while the disposal of millions of gallons of wastewater causes earthquakes, a consortium of the state's top scientists concluded. In the most comprehensive analysis of the environmental and social impacts of drilling and hydraulic fracturing, The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas found that the shale oil boom that delivered so much prosperity to Texas also has degraded natural resources, overwhelmed small communities and even boosted the frequency and severity of traffic collisions as workers and equipment rush to oil fields. For full story, click here.

VA: Despite worry over funding, officials celebrate Lafayette River progress

By Sean Davis – Southside Daily – July 8, 2017
Local, state and federal leaders gathered to celebrate the revitalization of oyster populations in the Lafayette River Friday morning. After a brief series of remarks, Norfolk Mayor Kenny Alexander, Reps. Scott Taylor and Bobby Scott and representatives from several federal agencies set sail to help dump buckets of baby oysters onto a newly constructed section of reef. The event, organized by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation and the Elizabeth River Project was held to celebrate a milestone. After the current 4.5-acre project is completed, the river will be home to a total of 75 acres of oyster habitat, just five short of the Chesapeake Bay Program’s goal. For full story, click here.

VA: State Programmatic General Permit (SPGP) Update: Final 2017 SPGP Released

The Wetland Studies and Solutions, Inc. – Field Notes – July 6, 2017
On June 29, 2017, the Norfolk District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) announced the issuance of the 2017 State Program General Permit (17-SPGP-01), effective immediately. This permit supersedes and replaces all previous versions. The final 17-SPGP-01 did not include major changes since the draft 17-SPGP-01 was released on April 13, 2017. For a refresher on what has changed from the previous 12-SPGP-01, please see April 18, 2017 Field Notes. To read more, click here.

VA: Coalition implores McAuliffe, DEQ to protect Virginia waters

Augusta Free Press – June 29, 2017
The Southern Environmental Law Center, Shenandoah Valley Network, Virginia Conservation Network and more than 75 other environmental, conservation, and public advocacy groups that represent tens of thousands of Virginians have signed on to a letter urging the Commonwealth to require individual 401 certification review for wetland and stream crossings in the paths of the Mountain Valley and Atlantic Coast pipelines. Currently, the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality plans to rely solely on a cursory review by the Army Corps of Engineers that will not ensure protection of Virginia’s water quality and aquatic environment. For full story, click here.

WA: Banking on wetland restoration

By Troy Brynelson – The Columbian – June 25, 2017
An empty field in the northeast corner of Vancouver, one that looks ripe for a new subdivision, has become one construction firm’s asset precisely because it will never be developed. The 113-acre former peat bog near the corner of Northeast Fourth Plain Boulevard and Northeast 162nd Avenue, is now known as Terrace Mitigation Bank. It will be rehabbed over the next decade and conserved for the foreseeable future. Its owner, Terrace Mitigation Bank LLC, stands to generate millions in revenues by restoring it and selling those efforts as credits to local developers, whose projects may cause ecological damage. “It’s very unique in that what we’re selling is not a good or service,” said Cornell Rotschy, co-owner of the bank and a co-owner of Rotschy Inc., a construction firm in Clark County. Wetland banks like these are privately owned restoration efforts, overseen by the state Department of Ecology. As a wetland is restored, the agency doles out credits to be sold to public or private developers. For full story, click here.

WV: Judge wants changes to WV water crisis legal settlement

By Ken Ward, Jr. – Charleston Gazette-Mail – July 6, 2017
A federal judge late Thursday refused to grant preliminary approval to a $151 million settlement of the class-action litigation over the January 2014 Kanawha Valley water crisis, saying he wants changes made to the deal before it is published for review by the thousands of residents and businesses covered by it. U.S. District Judge John Copenhaver outlined his concern about the settlement in a 93-page order issued a little more than two months after detailed terms of the deal with West Virginia American Water Co. and Eastman Chemical were made public in court filings by the parties. For full story, click here.

WI: CDC Reports 2600% Increase in Tick-Borne Babesiosis Infections in Wisconsin in 12 Years

By Cynthia Wallentine – Invisiverse – July 6, 2017
It is not just a bad summer for ticks — it has been a bad decade for the spread of tick-borne infections. New surveillance from the CDC reports rapid expansion and increase in cases of babesiosis, a sometimes life-threatening disease, in Wisconsin. The black-legged tick Ixodes scapularis transmits the Babesiosis bacteria. This is the same tick that spreads Lyme disease, anaplasmosis, and recently the more immediately deadly Powassan virus. For full story, click here.

WI: Watch for giant hogweed in your wetland

Wisconsin Wetlands Association – June 26, 2017
The tall invasive plant giant hogweed was first found in Wisconsin in 2004 and has been confirmed in Iron, Portage, and Manitowoc Counties. It was recently found in Sheboygan. A single plant produces thousands of seeds, which can be dispersed by gravity, vehicles and gear, flowing water, or animals. Giant hogweed prefers moist shady areas. For full story, click here.

WI: Clean Wisconsin challenges frac sand company's permit to fill wetlands in rare forest

Wisconsin Gazette – June 20, 2017
Clean Wisconsin on June 19 filed a challenge to a wetland fill permit in northern Monroe County because it would allow an out-of-state logging and frac sand company to permanently destroy more than 16 acres of a rare and valuable wetland forest. “The Department of Natural Resources has found that this wetland provides ‘exceptional’ value to people and the surrounding ecosystem, and yet they’re allowing for it to be destroyed by issuing this permit,” Evan Feinauer, Clean Wisconsin staff attorney, said in a news release. “If a wetland of this rare quality is allowed to be destroyed, it could spell disaster for other rare wetlands across the state.” For full story, click here.

 

It's a Mistake to Focus Just on Animal Extinctions

By Ed Young – The Atlantic – July 10, 2017
Imagine if every animal and plant on the planet collapsed into a single population each, says ecologist Gerardo Ceballos. If lions disappeared except from one small corner of Kenya, the prey they keep in check would run amok everywhere else. If sparrows were no more except in one Dutch forest, the seeds that sparrows disperse would stay in place everywhere else. If honeybees became isolated to one American meadow, the flowers that they pollinate would fail to reproduce everywhere else. None of those species would be extinct per se, “but we’d still be in very bad shape,” says Ceballos. He uses this thought experiment to show that fixating on the concept of extinction can lead scientists to overestimate the state of the planet’s health. For full story, click here.

Seven right whales found dead in 'devastating' blow to endangered animal

By Ashifa Kassam – The Guardian – July 8, 2017
Seven north Atlantic right whales have been found floating lifelessly in the Gulf of St Lawrence, off Canada, in recent weeks, in what is being described as a “catastrophic” blow to one of the world’s most endangered whales. The first whale carcass was reported in early June. Within a month, another six reports came in, leaving marine biologists in the region reeling. “It’s devastating,” said Tonya Wimmer of the Marine Animal Response Society, a charitable organization dedicated to marine mammal conservation in the region. “This is, I think, the largest die-off they’ve ever had for this particularly species, at once.” The global population of north Atlantic right whales – which live along the eastern seaboard of Canada and the US and can reach up to 16 meters (50ft) in length – is thought to be around 525, meaning that more than 1% of the population has died in the past month. “So it is catastrophic in terms of potential impact to this population.” For full story, click here.

2 New Studies Undermine Climate Denial Arguments

By John H. Cushman, Jr. – InsideClimate News – July 5, 2017
Two new studies published this month are helping resolve lingering differences between what climate models have predicted and what actual measurements have recorded. In doing so, they undermine two of the timeworn arguments used by those who question the prevailing scientific consensus on global warming. One study, released today, took a fresh look at the vexing question of how sensitive global temperatures will be to the buildup of carbon dioxide around the earth. It reaffirmed the basic understanding that any doubling of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases will result in significant planetary warming. The other paper reexamined satellite observations of one layer of the atmosphere and showed that the space-based warming data does not collide, as dissenters frequently contend, with temperature measurements taken at the surface of the Earth. Instead, the satellite data shows a much more intense warming than before. For full story, click here.

Study: Maintaining forests vital to health of Chesapeake Bay

August Free Press – July 6, 2017
Virginia and Pennsylvania have completed a two-tier analysis of the economic benefits of meeting the Chesapeake Bay clean-up goals through the retention of forestland. The effort first tested alternative growth scenarios to see the impact of retaining more forestland. The results prove the validity of models that will help localities implement policy changes and financial incentives to better protect the Chesapeake Bay. This was followed-up by extensive discussions over the past year with local officials and other stakeholders and the project’s sponsors: the Department of Forestry and the Rappahannock River Basin Commission in Virginia, and, in Pennsylvania, the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, to determine how to make it happen. For full story, click here.

A dam could derail the Chesapeake Bay cleanup

By Darryl Fears – The Washington Post – July 4, 2017
The $19 billion bid to clean the Chesapeake Bay and restore its health rests on a simple plan: cut the amount of nutrient waste — involving nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment — that causes most of the bay’s pollution. For nearly seven years since the cleanup started, the federal government and six states in the bay’s watershed have reduced municipal sewer overflows that pour nitrogen and phosphorus into rivers that feed into the bay, and cut the fertilizers and other nutrients that run off from hundreds of farms. They also counted on the Conowingo Dam to block massive amounts of sediment in the Susquehanna River from smothering bay grasses that nurture marine life. But that part of the plan has gone very wrong. For full story, click here.

Speedier sea ice in warming Arctic could spread pollution farther

By Kelsey Lindsey – Alaska Dispatch News – July 4, 2017
In the Arctic, bad news for one country could mean bad news for all. As the region warms faster than the rest of the planet, new research demonstrates how pollution — from oil spills to organic contaminants — could be passed from one Arctic neighbor to another. In a new study released in the journal Earth's Future, scientists from Columbia and McGill universities examined the movement of sea ice from country to country in the Arctic Ocean. Comparing data from 1988 to 2014, they found that sea ice is moving faster between destinations, increasing the number of international ice-based exchanges. For full story, click here.

Backyard weed-killer can ‘supercharge’ cane toads

By Daniel Bateman – Cairns Post – July 4, 2017 – Video
A cinnib household weed-killer has been found to supercharge cane toads, stimulating them to produce more venom. Hungarian researchers have discovered that toad tadpoles, when exposed to glyphosate - also known as Round-Up - produces an unexpected side effect when the amphibians turn into adults. The new study, published this week, found that exposure to glyphosate-based herbicides, the most widespread agriculture chemicals worldwide, stimulated the production of bufadienolides - the main compounds of chemical defence in toads. The researchers say that in Australia, this could make the cane toad even more deadly to its predators. For full story and to view video, click here.

Dragonflies reveal how biodiversity changes in time and space

By Jade Boyd – Rice University – June 30, 2017 – Video
An ecological filter in a pond, such as voracious fish that feed on dragonflies and damselflies, can help ecologists predict how biodiversity loss may impact specific habitats, according to Rice University researchers who spent four years studying seasonal changes in ponds across East Texas. In one of the first studies of its kind, the scientists show that strong environmental “filters” — in this case, predatory fish — cause dragonfly and damselfly communities to vary regularly from year to year and season to season in ponds across East Texas. The results, which appear online in the journal Ecology Letters, show how an ecological filter can help ecologists predict how biodiversity loss may impact specific habitats. For full report and to view video, click here.

Pesticides Are Harming Bees — But Not Everywhere, Major New Study Shows

By Dan Charles – The Salt – June 29, 20176
In the global debate over neonicotinoid pesticides, the company that makes most of them has relied on one primary argument to defend its product: The evidence that these chemicals, commonly called "neonics," are harmful to bees has been gathered in artificial conditions, force-feeding bees in the laboratory, rather than in the real world of farm fields. That company, Bayer, states on its website that "no adverse effects to bee colonies were ever observed in field studies at field-realistic exposure conditions." For full story, click here.

The common insecticide poisoning our rivers and wetlands

By Vincent Pettigrove – PHYS.org – June 28, 2017
Urban streams and wetlands play an important role in the proper functioning of our cities. They protect our houses from floods, provide green spaces for recreation, trap and breakdown pollutants and provide valuable habitats for many native plants, insects, reptiles, amphibians and birds. In Melbourne, like in many cities across the world, much of our native wetland has been drained for housing and other infrastructure, and our creeks and rivers turned into concrete channels. But in recent decades, as the value of these habitats has become clear, there has been a concerted effort to reverse this trend, and hundreds of 'constructed' wetlands have been built. Protecting these wetlands and the life they support is vital, but our research has uncovered a nearly four-fold rise in the last five years in the presence of a particularly toxic chemical in wetland sediments. Moreover it would seem the chemical, bifenthrin, an insecticide, is killing our aquatic life. For full story, click here.

UT among researchers seeking way to diagnose exposure to algal toxins

By Tom Henry – The Blade – June 28, 2017
With western Lake Erie’s 2017 algae bloom likely to start forming in mid to late-July, experts continue their push for closing research gaps while also trying to convince the Trump Administration to continue funding for Great Lakes programs. One of the lesser-known issues involves an emerging public health threat — the simple act of diagnosing who’s been exposed to algal toxins. There’s never been a clinical way developed for physicians to make those diagnoses. For full story, click here.

Report finds decline in Chesapeake Bay blue crab population

By Kate Amara – WBLA TV – June 27, 2017 – Video
An annual report has found the overall population of blue crabs in the Chesapeake Bay has declined and it recommends limiting the number harvested in the fall. The annual Blue Crab Advisory Report was released Monday. It was developed by scientists and other experts and will be used by state officials in Maryland and Virginia and the Potomac River Fisheries Commission to develop crab-management strategies. For full story and to view video, click here.

Sea level rise isn’t just happening, it’s getting faster

By Chris Mooney – The Washington Post – June 26, 2017
In at least the third such study published in the past year, scientists have confirmed seas are rising, and the rate of sea level rise is increasing as time passes — a sobering punchline for coastal communities that are only now beginning to prepare for a troubling future. What was a 2.2 millimeter per year rise in 1993 was a 3.3 millimeter rise in 2014, based on estimates of the mass changes of a number of key components of sea level rise, such as the melting of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, the study in Nature Climate Change found. That’s the difference between 0.86 and 1.29 inches per decade — and the researchers suggest further sea level acceleration could be in store. For full story, click here.

Monitoring changes in wetland extent can help predict the rate of climate change

University of Exeter – June 26, 2017
Permafrost - frozen ground - holds huge amounts of carbon which may be released into the atmosphere as the climate warms and these soils thaw. For this reason it is critically important to know where thaw is taking place and how much carbon is being exposed. But a new study says that the effects of thaw on the release of the powerful greenhouse gas, methane, may be better predicted by monitoring changes in the area of wetlands rather than by investigating how much carbon is being exposed. For full story, click here.

Climate Change Drives Lakes Toward Ecological Tipping Points

By Bob Berwyn – InsideClimate News – June 23, 2017
When rising temperatures brewed up a perfect storm of excessive rainfall and extreme heat in the summer of 2014, the fallout hit home. The impacts were felt by at least half a million people in Ohio when a super-bloom of cyanobacteria, a toxic blue-green algae, shut down drinking water supplies for several days. The algae feasted on fertilizers washed in from farm fields, and the warming may have pushed the lake past an environmental tipping point. In warming waters, the cyanobacteria thrived and spread in a slimy green froth across hundreds of square miles. For full report, click here.

Yellowstone Grizzly Bears to Lose Endangered Species Protection

By Laura Zuckerman – Scientific American – June 23, 2017
Grizzly bears in and around Yellowstone National Park will be stripped of Endangered Species Act safeguards this summer, U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke announced on Thursday in a move conservation groups vowed to challenge in court. Dropping federal protection of Yellowstone's grizzlies, formally proposed in March 2016 under the Obama administration, was based on the agency's findings that the bears' numbers have rebounded sufficiently in recent decades. For full story, click here.

Turtle comeback in Cuba at risk from climate change

By Jenny Staletovich – The Miami Herald – June 23, 2017
Turtle conservation efforts in Cuba may be winning the battle only to lose the war. A new study published this month in the journal Chelonia found that over the last 18 years, the number of loggerheads nesting in Cuba, a centrally located turtle nursery for the entire Caribbean, has increased. Scientists credit the jump to a local project to educate fisherman and nearby communities, where turtle meat is still consumed. Poaching fell by 80 percent. At the same time, the number of eggs in clutches dropped and nesting seasons grew shorter, a troubling pattern likely linked to climate change. For full story, click here.

Restoration Spotlight: Monarchs and communities share common ground

By Will Parson – Chesapeake Bay Program – June 23, 2017 – Video
At many points on its famously long eastern migration route from central Mexico to Canada, the monarch butterfly faces the perils of habitat loss. As a result, its population has declined by over 90 percent since the 1990s. Efforts to save the striking orange insect range from the unique forests of the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve in Michoacàn to the “Monarch Highway” in the Midwest—and all the way to the urban communities of South Baltimore. For full blog post and to view video, click here.

Kresge-backed climate change work accelerating in U.S. communities

The Kresge Foundation – June 22, 2017
Community organizations across the nation are redoubling their efforts to address climate change in their cities and neighborhoods in response to the federal government’s abdication of its role on the matter, said advocates at The Kresge Foundation’s Climate Resilience and Urban Opportunity (CRUO) Initiative convening last week. More than 100 persons – many of them representatives of the 15 nonprofit collaborations funded under the Kresge CRUO Initiative – shared experiences, lessons learned, and encouraging stories from their work in fostering climate-smart polices in their cities during the three-day meeting in Detroit. For full story, click here.

Dugong Numbers on the Rise Again in the Great Barrier Reef

Helen Nolan – Planet Ark – June 22, 2017
This World Oceans Day (June 8, 2017) focused on encouraging solutions towards the prevention of plastic ocean pollution with its theme of ‘Our Oceans, Our Future’. Oceans cover more than 70 percent of our earth’s surface and are home to up to two million species, including populations of dugongs throughout the southern region of the Great Barrier Reef. Dugongs – or sea cows – are the only marine mammals that live mostly on plants, grazing on seagrass, which forms meadows in sheltered coastal waters. Dugongs grow up to three meters in length and weigh up to 400 kilograms. The world’s largest population resides in northern Australia where their numbers are surging according to recently released aerial surveys. Part of the reason for the boom in dugong numbers is that seagrass meadows (the herbivores’ favorite food) have revived along the shorelines after powerful Cyclone Yasi depleted the meadows in 2011. The marine plant provides ample amounts of nutrients if eaten in large quantities, which female dugongs particularly need for successful reproduction. For full story, click here.

Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone Expected to Be Size of New Jersey This Summer; Shrimping Industry May Take Hit

By Eric Chaney – The Weather Channel – June 22, 2017
Every summer in the Gulf of Mexico a dead zone develops, and this year, scientists say, the low-oxygen area caused by excess nutrient pollution and an overgrowth of algae that can kill fish and other marine life will be about the size New Jersey. NOAA officials expect this summer’s dead zone will be the third largest since monitoring began 32 years ago. It'll be roughly 8,185 square miles, compared to the average of 5,309 square miles. “This year’s predicted large size is due mainly to heavy May stream flows, which were about 34 percent above the long-term average and carried higher-than-average nutrient loads,’ the agency said in a press release. “The USGS estimates that 165,000 metric tons of nitrate – about 2,800 train cars of fertilizer – and 22,600 metric tons of phosphorus flowed down the Mississippi and Atchafalaya rivers into the Gulf of Mexico in May.” For full story, click here.

Coral Bleaching Subsiding After 3 Extreme Years, but Recovery Could Take Decades

By Bob Berwyn – InsideClimate News – June 21, 2017
The longest and most widespread coral bleaching event on record is abating. As the powerful 2015-2016 El Niño faded, the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans remained warmer than average, but they at least cooled to levels that may enable some reefs to start recovering from extreme ocean heat, according to an update from U.S. coral reef experts. Some of the less-affected reefs are bouncing back, but areas that were hit repeatedly lost so much coral that it could take decades or centuries for the reefs to recover, and only if greenhouse gas emissions are cut to slow global warming. For full story, click here. 

Warming temperatures threaten sea turtles

Swansea University – June 21, 2017
The study by Dr. Jacques-Olivier Laloë of the University’s College of Science and published in the Global Change Biology journal, argues that warmer temperatures associated with climate change could lead to higher numbers of female sea turtles and increased nest failure, and could impact negatively on the turtle population in some areas of the world. For full story, click here.

Constructed Wetlands Show Promise in Managing Nutrients

By NCGA KTIC Radio – June 21, 2017
Wetlands are among the most productive ecosystems in the world, comparable to rainforest and coral reefs. Now, modern agriculture is trying to capture some of nature’s wetland magic as a means to manage nutrients on the farm. State and national corn organizations’ staff that work on water quality issues recently toured the Franklin Research & Demonstration Farm near Lexington, Illinois, to learn more about how research into “constructed wetlands” might provide another serious tool to help farmers manage nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorous. For full story, click here.

Why the World’s Rivers Are Losing Sediment and Why It Matters

By Jim Robbins – Yale Environment 360 – June 20, 2017
In September 2011, after 20 years of planning, workers began dismantling the Elwha and Glines dams on the Elwha River in northwestern Washington State. At the time, it was the largest dam removal project in U.S. history, and it took nearly three years for both barriers to be dismantled and for the river to once again flow freely. Over the course of their nearly century-long lives, the two dams collected more than 24 million cubic yards of sediment behind them, enough to fill the Seattle Seahawks football stadium eight times. And since their removal, the Elwha has taken back the trapped sediment and distributed it downstream, causing the riverine ecosystem to be rebuilt and transformed. Massive quantities of silt, sand, and gravel have been carried to the coast, resurrecting a wetlands ecosystem long deprived of sediment. For full story, click here.

Accidentally Made Urban Wetlands May Benefit Your Backyard

By Olivia Trani – Inside Science – June 19, 2017
Monica Palta always tries to grab the window seat. When flying between cities, the wetland ecologist from Arizona State University in Tempe likes to peek out from the clouds and search for man's swampy mistakes. Palta studies "accidental wetlands," the ponds, bogs and marshes unintentionally made by human activity, which she and other wetland researchers have found can be beneficial to local ecosystems. For full story, click here.

Rick Perry Denies Climate Change Role of CO2

By Marianne Lavelle – InsideClimate News – June 19, 2017
Energy Secretary Rick Perry said Monday he does not believe carbon dioxide emissions are the main driver of the earth's record-setting warming, a core finding of climate science. Instead, Perry said, the driver is most likely "the ocean waters and this environment that we live in." Perry became the second of President Donald Trump's cabinet members to go on television to publicly dismiss the importance of CO2 in global warming, ignoring the scientific evidence. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt rejected its role in answer to essentially the same question in March, also on CNBC's "Squawk Box." For full story, click here.

NRCS Soil Survey Manual Updated

USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service – 2017
The 2017 Soil Survey Manual has been printed and is ready for distribution. The newly updated Soil Survey Manual, USDA Handbook No. 18, provides the major principles and practices needed for making and using soil surveys and for assembling and using related data. The Manual serves as a guiding document for activities of the National Cooperative Soil Survey (NCSS). Previously published in 1937, 1951, and 1993, the Soil Survey Manual is one of the defining documents for soil survey in the world. To read more and download Manual, click here.

Wildfires used to be rare in the Great Plains. They’ve more than tripled in 30 years

By Chris Mooney – The Washington Post – June 16, 2017
The grasslands of U.S. Great Plains have seen one of the sharpest increases in large and dangerous wildfires in the past three decades, with their numbers more than tripling between 1985 and 2014, according to new research. The new study, published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, found that the average number of large Great Plains wildfires each year grew from about 33 to 117 over that time period, even as the area of land burned in these wildfires increased by 400 percent. For full story, click here.

Is Trump White House blinking on clash over California’s clean air rules?

By Dale Kasler – The Sacramento Bee – June 15, 2017
California’s air pollution standards are the toughest in the nation, for a reason: More Californians breathe dirty air than people elsewhere in the country. Now the Trump administration appears to be backing away – at least for now – from a legal fight over California’s right to impose stricter rules on air quality. Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, said Thursday his agency isn’t reviewing the waiver that has given California that right since the federal Clean Air Act was passed in 1970. For full story, click here.

Billion-dollar dams are making water shortages, not solving them

By Fred Pearce – New Scientist – June 15, 2017
Dams are supposed to collect water from rivers and redistribute it to alleviate water shortages, right? Not so fast. It turns out that in most cases they actually create water scarcity, especially for people living downstream. Almost a quarter of the global population experiences significant decreases in water availability through human interventions on rivers, says Ted Veldkamp at Vrije University in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Those interventions primarily involve dams that take water for irrigation or cities, or to generate hydroelectricity. For full story, click here.  

 

Algal Indicators in Streams: A Review of Their Application in Water Quality Management of Nutrient Pollution

Michael J. Paul – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – June 2017
This paper summarizes the application of algae as indicators of nutrient pollution in water quality management. It describes the use of algal indicators to develop water quality diagnostics for nutrient pollution in the United States (U.S.) and then reviews scientific developments in the use and application of algal indicators across the world. The paper is intended as a technical resource for the water quality manager/practitioner seeking to utilize algae to detect the presence of nutrient pollution and to estimate the risks of nutrient pollution in adversely affecting the condition of stream ecosystems. For full paper, click here.

The Beaver Restoration Guidebook 2.0

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – June 30, 2017
The goal of this guidebook is to provide an accessible, useful resource for anyone involved in using beaver to restore streams, floodplains, wetlands, and riparian areas. It provides a practical synthesis of the best available science, an overview of management techniques, and case studies from throughout the western U.S. During the winter and spring of 2015, five interactive workshops focused on the use of beaver in aquatic restoration were conducted to solicit input from land owners/managers, restoration funders, reviewers, and practitioners actively involved in beaver restoration and management. It was updated June 2017 to include a new chapter on urban beaver management. To view the Guidebook, click here.

Financing Natural Infrastructure for Coastal Flood Damage Reduction

By Charles S. Colgan and M. W. Beck, S. Narayan – Lloyd’s Tercentenary Research Foundation, London – June 2017
The report 'Financing Natural Infrastructure for Coastal Flood Damage Reduction' reviews new and emerging funding opportunities for natural defenses. It also identifies the barriers that prevent the broader funding of natural defenses, and proposes a framework that helps identify when and where there may be opportunities to finance natural infrastructure. For full report, click here. 

 

The unappreciated urban wilds

By Brandon Keim – Anthropocene Magazine – July 5, 2017
In many parts of the world, urban nature is experiencing a renaissance. Stories abound of biodiversity in cities, vegetated infrastructure, the psychological benefits of greenery. But one aspect of urban nature remains underappreciated: wildness. Places where nobody is telling nature what to do. Where it’s not landscaped or improved or turned to human ends. “There is not a lot of awareness of these wild spaces in cities,” says Dave Kendal, an ecologist at the University of Melbourne, “so hopefully this paper will raise awareness a bit more.” The paper to which Kendal refers, published in the journal Urban Forestry & Urban Greening and co-authored with fellow Melbourne ecologist Caragh Threlfall, is a review of the ecological and social roles played by wildness in cities. For full article, click here.

Does Scott Pruitt have a solid case for repealing the Clean Water Rule?

The Conservation – July 5, 2017
On June 27, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt signed a proposed rule rescinding the Obama administration’s “Clean Water Rule.” This regulation is designed to clarify which streams, lakes, wetlands and other water bodies fall under the protection of the Clean Water Act. EPA developed the Clean Water Rule in an attempt to resolve uncertainty created by a fractured 2006 Supreme Court decision, Rapanos v. United States. The Rapanos ruling caused widespread confusion about which waters were covered, creating uncertainty for farmers, developers and conservation groups. Efforts to clarify it through informal guidance or congressional action had failed, and EPA acted under mounting pressure from various quarters, including some members of the court. For full story, click here.

Walking Trees Terrorize Marshes

By Asher Elbein – Hakai Magazine – July 5, 2017
In the shadow of the Kennedy Space Center, in Florida’s Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a quiet invasion is taking place. Amid the brackish water and rustling grass that dominate this salt marsh ecosystem, thickets of mangroves—known locally as “walking trees” for their spindly wooden “legs”—are putting down roots. Mangrove forests are critical tropical habitat and are disappearing worldwide. But in Florida, mangroves are booming. For full article, click here. 

Construction on wetlands ramps up water stress in Zimbabwe

By Jeffrey Moyo – Thomson Reuters Foundation News – June 27, 2017
Unspooling the rope tied to a metal bucket, Shylet Nhari listens to the repeated clangs of the tin striking the walls of the well as her bucket makes its way down. When the 46-year-old pulls the container back up, she finds it filled with undrinkable muddy water. Water levels in the well are dwindling fast and not being replenished, she says. Nhari lives in Westlea, a middle-class suburb of the Zimbabwean capital and an area built on wetlands. Like many residents, she has no piped water and relies on the well, which has become more erratic in the face of longer drought. For full story, click here.

A wetland laid to waste

By Alessandro Marazzi Sassoon and Kong Meta – The Phnom Penh Post – June 23, 2017
Sitting in her father’s shop, Din San Tana, 10, speaks softly when she’s asked about the forest fires last year that threatened her village and shut down school for 10 days. “I was afraid to go to class,” she said. “I was afraid it would burn my house.” Tana and all 2,619 families in Prek Toal village in Ek Phnom district’s Koh Chivaing commune live on floating homes. Located 25 kilometres from Siem Reap on the estuary of the Sangke River, which flows through Battambang town and spills onto the Tonle Sap Lake, the floating settlement is at the heart of what is – or was – the most important breeding ground for water birds in Southeast Asia. Brought on by a record-breaking El Niño that precipitated drought, heat waves and low water levels last year, unprecedented fires ripped through the seasonally flooded wetland forests that surround the great Tonle Sap Lake. From March to July, when late rains finally arrived and extinguished the blazes, the fires consumed an estimated third of the 640,000 hectares of the Unesco designated wetland conservation area known as the Tonle Sap Biosphere. For full story, click here.

Three Lessons for Land-Conservation Loans

By Abby Martin – Conservation Finance Network – June 21, 2017
Timing can make or break a conservation deal. Land trusts and other conservation groups often work with motivated sellers who must divest property by a certain date or are otherwise eager to close deals quickly. The organizations must either gather the required financing on the sellers’ short timelines or forego the projects. When organizations are short on cash but deem projects too important to ignore, conservation loans can bridge the financing gaps. For full story, click here.

Neuse and Cape Fear Rivers Need Floodplain Protection

By Peter Raabe – American Rivers – June 21, 2017
North Carolina’s Neuse and Cape Fear rivers are threatened by untreated animal waste that is stored in the floodplains of the rivers and can be washed into the river during flood events like what occurred after Hurricane Matthew in 2016. For full story, click here.

Auditing the Blue Blood Bank

By Steve De Neef and Meigan Henry – Hakai Magazine – June 20, 2017 – Video
Humans aren’t the only species that donate their blood for the greater good. The blue blood of horseshoe crabs is used by the biomedical industry to test for toxins in things such as implants, vaccines, and medical implements. When you give blood, you donate about 10 percent of your blood volume, but horseshoe crabs are drained (without the voluntary donation part) of about 30 percent of theirs. The crab bleeding industry says that bloodletting is not lethal, and that the crabs survive just fine once released, but there’s no doubt that populations are dropping on the Atlantic coast. For full article and to view video, click here.

One million sign petition for EU weedkiller ban

France 24 – June 15, 2017
More than one million people have signed a petition demanding the EU ban the Monsanto weedkiller glyphosate over fears it causes cancer, campaigners said Thursday. The petition comes as the European Union is deciding whether to renew the license of the controversial herbicide produced by the US agro-chemicals giant. Glyphosate is used in the best-selling herbicide Roundup. "In less than five months, more than one million EU citizens have joined our call for a glyphosate ban," said David Schwartz, coordinator at the European Citizens Initiative, which is behind the petition. "European citizens aren't fooled by the pesticide industry's lobbying efforts or the faulty science it's peddling," he added. The group said it had attained the signature threshold to require a formal response from the European Commission -- one million names from at least seven countries -- in record time. For full story, click here.

Chesapeake Bay’s Misguided War on the Ray

By Jared Lloyd – Hakai Magazine – June 14, 2017
The state of Maryland has imposed a moratorium on a blood sport that had been taking place across its slice of the Chesapeake Bay for nearly a decade. Each year, contestants congregated with boats and bows and arrows. Their goal: to hunt and kill as many cownose rays as possible. Thousands of dollars in cash prizes were dished out for killing the most and biggest rays. Tournament organizers profited. And the otherwise plankton-rich emerald waters of the Chesapeake Bay turned red with blood in the name of misguided conservation. Welcome to The Cove, America. For full article, click here.

Intact mangroves worth twice as much as rice paddies

By Emma Bryce – Anthropocene – June 9, 2017
Conservationists frequently say that ecosystems are worth more when they’re left untouched. But to whom? Local communities who could potentially farm the land might wonder, what’s the real benefit of leaving wild areas intact? In the Bhitarkanika mangrove in Odisha, India, a group of Indian researchers grappling with this question have arrived at a surprising answer. By leaving the mangrove intact, they say, Bhitarkanika’s surrounding communities can in fact reap almost double the economic benefits they’d get from simply converting the mangrove to crops. For full story, click here.

Rising Seas May Wipe out These Jersey Towns, but They're Still Rated AAA

By Christopher Flavelle – Bloomberg – May 25, 2017
Few parts of the U.S. are as exposed to the threats from climate change as Ocean County, New Jersey. It was here in Seaside Heights that Hurricane Sandy flooded an oceanfront amusement park, leaving an inundated roller coaster as an iconic image of rising sea levels. Scientists say more floods and stronger hurricanes are likely as the planet warms. Yet last summer, when Ocean County wanted to sell $31 million in bonds maturing over 20 years, neither of its two rating companies, Moody’s Investors Service or S&P Global Ratings, asked any questions about the expected effect of climate change on its finances. For full story, click here 

 

WEBINARS

   

MEETINGS

 

TRAINING

 

SPECIAL EVENTS

 
WEBINARS
       
JULY 2017  
       
July 19, 2017
1:00 p.m. EDT
  AWRA Webinar: IWRM and the Floods Directive: What can the US learn from the EU?   
       
July 19, 2017
3:00 p.m. EDT
  Association of State Wetland Managers Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Mapping Wetland Inundation Dynamics Using Multi-Source Satellite Data  
       
July 19, 2017
3:00 p.m. EDT
  EPA to Host Drinking Water Preparedness Best Practice Webinar   
       
July 24, 2017
1:00 p.m. EDT
  Center for Climate and Energy Solutions Webinar: Financing Clean Infrastructure: Private Activity Bonds  
       
July 25, 2017
2:00 p.m. EDT 
  NEIWPCC: Stream & Wetland Buffers Webinar Series: Part 1: Restoration     
       
July 25, 2017
3:00 p.m. EDT 
  Association of State Floodplain Managers Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar: Integrated Stream and Wetland Restoration: A watershed approach to improved water
quality on the landscape
This webinar has been preapproved for 1 CEC for CFMs who participate individually in the entire event.
 
       
July 26, 2017
3:00 p.m. EDT
  Association of State Wetland Managers Hot Topics Webinar: Partnering with Beaver to Benefit Sage Grouse and Working Lands: Restoring Emerald Islands in the Sagebrush Sea   
       
 MORE JULY WEBINARS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
       
AUGUST 2017  
       
August 15, 2017
12:00 p.m. EDT
  Penn State Community Forestry Management Webinar:
The Sustainable Urban Forest: A Step-by-Step Approach
 
       
August 16, 2017
1:00 p.m. EDT
  AWRA Webinar: Changing Flood Risks in the California Central Valley under Climate Change   
       
August 22, 2017
2:00 p.m. EDT
  NEIWPCC: Stream & Wetland Buffers Webinar Series: Part 2: Education   
       
August 29, 2017
1:00 p.m. EDT
  Co-sponsored by the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org) and MEAM Webinar: Identification of Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Indicators using an Ecological Resilience Framework    
       
MORE AUGUST WEBINARS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
       
SEPTEMBER 2017  
       
September 13, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  AWRA Webinar: Groundwater Droughts - A Tale from a Few Aquifers   
       
September 13, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Stream Restoration: Where are we now?   
       
September 15, 2017
10:00 a.m. EST
  NEIWPCC: Stream & Wetland Buffers Webinar Series: Part 3: Legal Challenges   
       
September 19, 2017
12:00 p.m. EST
  Penn State Community Forestry Management Webinar:
A Novel Water Management Tool for Your Landscape Plantings
 
       
MORE SEPTEMBER WEBINARS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
       
OCTOBER 2017  
       
October 18, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Bringing Better Site Design into The 21st Century   
       
MORE OCTOBER WEBINARS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
       
NOVEMBER 2017  
       
November 15, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Modeling for Water Quality   
       
MORE NOVEMBER WEBINARS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
       
MEETINGS
 
JULY 2017
       
July 21-24, 2017
Franklin County, OH
  National Association of Counties: 2017 Annual Conference  
       
July 23-27, 2017
Long Beach, CA
  Hosted by International Water Association: 11th IWA International Conference on Water Reclamation and Reuse   
       
July 25-27, 2017
University of Alabama
Tuscaloosa, AL
  CUAHSI 2017 Conference: Hydroinformatics: Swimming in Data without Drowning in the Deluge  
       
July 25-27, 2017
Duluth, MN
  Michigan Technological University workshop: Science and Management of Ash Forests after Emerald Ash Borer  
       
July 31-August 2, 2017
Juniata College
Huntingdon, PA
  Mid-Atlantic Invasive Plant Council, co-hosted by the Society for Ecological Restoration, Mid-Atlantic Chapter Conference: Invasion Biology: Paths to Conservation and Restoration Success  
       
MORE JULY MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
AUGUST 2017
       
August 6-11, 2017
Portland, OR
  2017 ESA Annual Meeting: Linking biodiversity, material cycling and ecosystem services in a changing world
 
       
August 8-11, 2017
Puerto Iguazú,
Misiones, Argentina
  Ornithological Congress of the Americas  
       
August 14-17, 2017
Iselin, NJ
  Association of State Floodplain Managers: The National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop
 
       
August 14-17, 2017
Tulsa, OK
  Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals: 2017 Tribal Lands & Environment Forum   
       
August 20-23, 2017
Bergen, Norway
  3rd International Workshop on Trait-based Approaches to Ocean Life  
       
August 20-24, 2017
Tampla, FL
  American Fisheries Society 147th Annual Meeting: Fisheries Ecosystems: Uplands to Oceans  
       
August 21-25, 2017
Beijing, China
  12th International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL 2017 Beijing): Ecology and Civilization in a Changing World
 
       
August 22-26, 2017
Big Sky, MT
  7th International Symposium: Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control (WETPOL)  
       
August 24-26, 2017
Corum, Montpellier, France
  Biodiversity and Ecosystem Scenarios Network (ScenNet): Scenarios and Models of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Support of Decision Making  
       
August 26-30, 2017
New Orleans, LA
  National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration (NCER)
Proposals due by October 1, 2017
 
       
August 27-September 1, 2017
Stockholm, Sweden
  SIWI World Water Week: Water and Waste: Reduce and Reuse’   
       
MORE AUGUST MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
SEPTEMBER 2017
       
September 5-7, 2017
University of Leeds, UK
  7th International Conference on Flood Management (ICFM7)  
       
September 5-8, 2017
Long Beach, CA
  Floodplain Management Association Annual Conference: Creating Partnerships through Integration: Water, Environment, People  
       
September 10-13, 2017
Phoenix, AZ
  WateReuse: 32nd Annual WateReuse Symposium  
       
September 10-13, 2017
Loveland, CO 
  American Water Works Association Rocky Mountain Section: Annual Conference   
       
September 10-13, 2017
Duluth, MN
  ASCE Congress on Technical Advancement   
       
September 16-17, 2017
Toonton, Candad
  Sixth International Conference: Climate Change Adaptation 2017 (CCA 2017). Abstracts due by April 30, 2017.  
       
September 19-20, 2017
Duluth, MN
 

Great Lakes Commission 2017 Annual Meeting

 
       
September 20-22, 2017
Baltimore, MD
  Rhode Island Resource Institute: 8th Mid-Atlantic Stream Restoration Conference  
       
September 23-27, 2017
Albuquerque, NM
  Wildlife Society 24th Annual Conference  
       
September 28-29, 2017
Budapest, Hungary
  1st International Conference on Community Ecology (ComEc)  
       
MORE SEPTEMBER MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
OCTOBER 2017
       
October 10-12, 2017
Collins, CO
  Natural Areas Association: Natural Areas Conference

 
       
October 11-13, 2017
American Museum of Natural History
New York, NY
  Center for Biodiversity and Conservation and its partners: 2017 Student Conference on Conservation Science  
       
October 12, 2017
Linthicum, MD
  13th Annual Maryland Association of Floodplain and Stormwater Managers (MAFSM) Conference  
       
October 12-13, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  2017 Mid-Atlantic Water Resources Conference: Water Research: Building Knowledge and Innovative Solutions  
       
October 14, 2017
Westerville, OH
  Ohio Wetlands Association Wetlands Science Summit: Working Wetlands for Water Quality  
       
October 14-15, 2017
San Marcos, TX
  Texas State University, Department of Geography's Resilience and Bio-Geomorphic Systems: 48th Annual Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium. A field trip on October 13, 2017.  
       
October 17-19, 2017
University of California, Davis
  California Department of Water Resources, Urban Streams Restoration Program, Riparian Habitat Joint Venture: 2017 Riparian Summit - Confluence to Influence  
       
October 17-19, 2017
Buffalo, NY
  Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: 13th Annual Great Lakes Restoration Conference   
       
October 19-21, 2017
University of Oklahoma
  4th Life Discovery – Doing Science Biology Education Conference  
       
October 19-21, 2017
Rome, Italy
  4th World Conference on Climate Change: Today's Progress and Tomorrow's Climate Challenges  
       
October 22-25, 2017
Tampa, FL
  American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America will host: 2017 International Annual Meeting, "Managing Global Resources for a Secure Future"    
       
October 24-26, 2017
Atlantic City, NJ
  2017 NJAFM Annual Conference  
       
October 25-27, 2017
Boyne Falls, MI
  Michigan Aquatic Restoration Conference  
       
October 26-28, 2017
Denver, CO
  Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2017 National Land Conservation Conference  
       
MORE OCTOBER MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
NOVEMBER 2017
       
November 5-9, 2017
Portland, OR
  2017 AWRA Annual Conference  
       
November 5-9, 2017
Providence, RI
  Coastal Estuarine Research Federation (CERF) Conference: Coastal Science at the Inflection Point: Celebrating Successes & Learning from Challenges   
       
November 6-9, 2017
Green Bay, WI
  International Association for Great Lakes Research: State of Lake Michigan Conference  
       
November 8-9, 2017
Manhattan, KS
  Kansas Water Office Governor's Conference: Future of Water in Kansas  
       
MORE NOVEMBER MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
DECEMBER 2017
       
December 11-15, 2017
New Orleans, LA
  AGU Fall Meeting
Abstracts due by July 26, 2017
 
 
MORE DECEMBER MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
 
JANUARY 2018
       
January 11-13, 2018
College Park, MD
  Future Harvest CASA (Chesapeake Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture) Annual Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed Conference  
       
January 31-February 1, 2018
Wilmington, DE
  2018 Delaware Wetlands Conference
Abstracts accepted through November 1, 2017
 
       
MARCH 2018
       
March 8-9, 2018
University of Denver Sturm College
  Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute: 2018 Western Places/Western Spaces. Proposal deadline is August, 25, 2018  
       
MAY 2018
       
May 29-June 1, 2018
Denver, CO
  Society of Wetland Scientists 2018 Annual Meeting: Wetland Science: Integrating Research, Practice and Policy - An Exchange of Expertise   
       
JUNE 2018
       
June 12-15, 2018
Jyväskylä, Finland
  Scientific Committee of the Society for Conservation Biology Europe Section's 5th European Congress for Conservation Biology (ECCB 2018)  
       
TRAINING
       
JULY 2017
       
July 24-August 4, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Stream Ecology  
       
July 24-August 4, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Alpine Ecology  
       
July 24-August 5, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Forest Ecosystems of the Southern Appalachians  
       
July 25-27, 2017
Copper Harbor, MI
  Isle Royale & Keweenaw Parks Association: Keweenaw Plant I.D. Workshop  
       
July 25-28, 2017
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Wetland Delineators  
       
July 27, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: BMP Options for Stormwater Runoff  
       
July 30-August 5, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Mushroom Identification for New Mycophiles: Foraging for Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms  
       
July 30-August 5, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Art and Science of Photographing Insects and their Kin  
       
July 31-August 4, 2017
Loga, UT


  Utah State University, S.J. & Jessie E. Quinney College of Natural Resources Course: Sediment Transport in Stream Assessment and Design  
       
July 31-August 12, 201
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Southern Appalachian Mayflies, Stoneflies, & Caddisflies  
       
MORE JULY TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR   
   
AUGUST 2017
       
August 1-2, 2017
Keweenaw, PA
  Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Wetland Plants of the Upper Peninsula  
       
August 1-2, 2017
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Advanced Hydric Soils – 2017  
       
August 2-3, 2017
Davis, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: GIS for Watershed Analysis: Intermediate  
       
August 6-12, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Submersed and Floating Aquatic Plants  
       
August 6-12, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Independent Studies: Interesting and Challenging Saxicolous Lichens of North America  
       
August 7-8, 2017
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Hydrophytic Vegetation (Coastal Plain or Piedmont)  
       
August 7-11, 2017
Sagehen Field Station near
Lake Tahoe, CA
  UC Berkeley Course: Geomorphic & Ecological Fundamentals of River & Stream Restoration  
       
August 7-11, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  The Conservation Fund: Conservation Banking Training Course  
       
August 7-11, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Conservation Biology of Freshwater Mussels  
       
August 7-12, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Wetland Plant Communities  
       
August 7-18, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Ecology of Forests and Grasslands  
       
August 7-18, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Drone Remote Sensing of Freshwater Ecosystems  
       
August 7-18, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Course: Lake Ecology  
       
August 7-September 4, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment
This course will also be held on November 6th (4 weeks)
 
       
August 7-October 30, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training  
       
August 7-October 30, 2017
Online 
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator  
       
August 8, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Overview of Environmental Statistics  
       
August 9-11, 2017
Davis, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Using GIS to Manage, Analyze and Promote Sustainability  
       
August 11, 2017
Orono, ME
  Maine Association of Wetland Scientist (MAWS) Wetland Mitigation Workshop  
       
August 13-19, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Field Botany and Plant Ecology of the Eastern Maine Coast  
       
August 14-17, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Grasses, Sedges and Rushes  
       
August 14-18, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Workshop: Mushrooms of the Carolinas  
       
August 14-20, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Tidal Marsh Restoration: A Traveling Course from Rhode Island to Maine  
       
August 14-28, 2017
Online 
  The Swamp School On-Demand Workshop: What is a “Waters of the US?”  
       
August 14-November 6, 2017
Online 
  The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design  
       
August 15-17, 2017
Columbus, OH
  Ohio Sea Grant Lake Erie Island Wetland Plant Identification and Field VIBI Workshops  
       
August 15-17, 2017
Front Royal, VA
  EcoAgriculture Partners: Landscape Leadership Intensive Workshop  
       
August 15-18, 2017
Hays, KS
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Wetlands and Wetland Delineators  
       
August 17, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Planning and Mitigation on Tribal Lands  
       
August 20-26, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Identification, Biology, and Natural History of Ferns and Lycophytes  
       
August 20-26, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Banding/research Techniques for Studying Songbirds and Raptors  
       
August 21-22, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Evaluating Hydric Soils in the Field  
       
August 21-25, 2017
Alexandria Bay, NY
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Wetland Assessment, Restoration and Management  
       
August 23-25, 2017
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI
  CUAHSI and the University of Michigan Training Workshop: Sensor Network Bootcamp in an Urban Environment  
       
August 24-25, 2017
Denver, CO
  Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Floodplain Delineation using 2D HEC RAS Model  
       
August 25, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Vested Rights, Vesting Maps and Development Agreements  
       
August 27-September 2, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Better Birding: Passerines and Seabirds for Advancing Birders  
       
August 28-29, 2017
Arlington, WA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
MORE AUGUST TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
SEPTEMBER 2017
       
September 4-18, 2017   The Swamp School On-Demand Workshop: What is a “Waters of the US?”   
       
September 6-7, 2017
Duck Creek Conservation Area
Puxico, MO
  Wetland Management and Educational Services, Inc. Workshop: Moist-soil Management for Biologists and Managers  
       
September 6-December 13, 2017
Grasonville, MD
  Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center Course: Maryland Master Naturalist Program
Held on Wednesdays, from 9:30am-3:30pm and a Field Trip on September 13. 2017. Participants must be 18 years or older. Course fee: $250/person.
 
       
September 7-8, 2017
Whitefish, MT
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
September 11-15, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
September 12-13, 2017
Charleston, SC
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes  
       
September 12-26, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals  
       
September 12-26, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Habitat Conservation Plans  
September 12, 2017-December 4, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training    
       
September 12, 2017-December 4, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator | 2017  
       
September 13, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Land Use and Natural Resources Information Session  
       
September 13-14, 2017
McNary National Wildlife Refuge
Burbank, WA
  Wetland Management and Educational Services, Inc. Workshop: Moist-Soil Management for Maintenance Staff  
       
September 14-15, 2017
San Diego, CA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Riparian Habitat Restoration for the Arid Southwest  
       
September 14-15, 2017
Milville, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Vegetation Identification for Wetland Delineation: South   
       
September 18-19, 2017
Covington, LA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
September 18-21, 2017
Pittsburgh, PA
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training  
       
September 18-29, 2017
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute The Ecology and Conservation of Migratory Birds  
       
September 14-15, 2017
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species  
       
September 19-20, 2017
Arlington, VA
  Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Wetlands: Science and Regulatory Management  
       
September 20-21, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Habitat Site Restoration  
       
September 21-22, 2017
Poolesville, MD
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum - 2017  
       
September 25-26, 2017
Tuckerton, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants   
       
September 25-27, 2017
Bordentown, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Wetland Construction: Principles, Planning and Design   
       
September 28, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Exploring Wetland Wildlife  
       
 MORE SEPTEMBER TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
   
OCTOBER 2017
       
October 2-5, 2017
Hilliard, OH
  MBI (Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Wetland Delineation  
       
October 2-6, 2017
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
October 2-30, 2017
Online 
  The Swamp School Workshop: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment  
       
October 2-30, 2017
Online 
  The Swamp School Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments  
       
October 2-30, 2017
Online 
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Hydrology    
       
October 2-December 25, 2017
Online 
  The Swamp School Course: Basic Wetland Delineation Training  
       
October 9-13, 2017
Barcelona, Spain
  Transmitting Science, the Institut Catalá de Paleontologia Miquel, Crusafont and the Centre de Restauració i Interpretació Paleontològica Course: Comparative Approaches in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Science    
       
October 11, 2017
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Introduction to Wetland Identification   
       
October 12-14, 2017
Klamath Falls, OR
  Society for Ecological Restoration Northwest Workshop: Aquatic and Riparian Ecosystems: Interactions, Management, and Restoration East of the Cascades  
       
October 13, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Politics and Policymaking   
       
October 14-17, 2017
Iselin, NJ
  National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop  
       
October 16-27, 2017
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute Spatial Ecology, Geospatial Analysis and Remote Sensing for Conservation  
       
October 17-19, 2017
Boulder, CO
  CUAHSI and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Training Workshop: The Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System  
       
October 18, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Planning Tools to Create Healthy Communities  
       
October 18-19, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Workshop: Tree Identification  
       
October 20, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Land Use Planning for Non-Planners: An Introduction to Planning in California   
       
October 23, 2017
New Brunswick, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Understanding Advanced Stormwater Management Techniques  
       
October 23-27, 2017
Asheville, NC
  Resource Institute Course: Level I - Applied Fluvial Morphology  
       
October 26, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Building Stream Buffers  
       
October 26-27, 2017
Denver, CO
  Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Stormwater Green Drainage Design Using EPA SWMM-LID  
       
 MORE OCTOBER TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
   
NOVEMBER 2017
       
November 2-3, 2017
Charleston, SC
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
November 6-9, 2017
Columbus, OH
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: ACOE Wetland Delineation, Waters of the US and Regional Supplement Training  
       
November 6-December 4, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment   
       
November 6, 2017-January 29, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training   
       
November 6, 2017-January 29, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Botanist  
       
November 7-9, 2017
Gainseville, FL
  CUAHSI and the University of Florida 3-day Training Workshop: Using In-Situ Water Quality Sensors - Lagrangian and Eulerian Applications  
       
November 8, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Mitigation Measure Development and Monitoring  
       
November 8, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetland Pollinators  
       
November 13-14, 2017
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands, and Hydrology (Coastal Plain or Piedmont)  
       
November 15, 2017
Richmond, VA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: Regional Supplment Wetland Delineation Training. For other dates, go here.  
       
November 16-17, 2017; December 14-14, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Environmental Planning and Site Analysis   
 
MORE NOVEMBER TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
   
DECEMBER 2017  
   
December 1, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Water Quality Regulation and Permitting    
       
December 4-18, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals   
       
December 4-18, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Habitat Conservation Plans  
       
December 4, 2017-February 26, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator  
       
December 4, 2017-February 26, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design  
       
December 4, 2017-February 26, 2018
Online 
   The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training   
       
December 7, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetlands of the World   
       
December 8, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Habitat Conservation Planning  
       
December 13, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: POW! The Planning of Wetlands   
   
MORE DECEMBER TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
   
SPECIAL EVENTS
       
July 22, 2017
Huntington Beach, CA
  Wetlands Walk at Bolsa Chica Ecological Preserve  
       
September 12-16, 2017
Bloomfield Hills, NI
  Rouge River Water Festival  
       
September 23, 2017
Cape May, NJ
  Fall Migration Festival  
       
September 25, 2017
Valencia, PA
  5th Annual Wildbird Recovery: Fall Migration Festival  
       
October 13-15, 2017
Houma, LA
  2017 Voice of Wetlands Festival  
       
For more wetland events, meetings, conferences, and courses nationwide, visit the ASWM calendar.
       

       
INDEX      


EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • Trump analysis slashes WOTUS's economic benefits
  • The ‘Rewilding’ of a Century-Old Cranberry Bog
  • Court Blocks E.P.A. Effort to Suspend Obama-Era Methane Rule
  • EPA, U.S. Army Move to Rescind 2015 "Waters of the U.S."

NATIONAL NEWS

  • Trump Has Secretive Teams to Roll Back Regulations, Led by Hires With Deep Industry Ties
  • Chesapeake Bay restoration funding likely to be restored
  • Drinking water at risk with new EPA proposals
  • Science office a shadow of its former self
  • Trump will try to sidestep science in rolling back clean water rule
  • U.S. Mayors Back 100% Renewable Energy, Vow to Fill Climate Leadership Void
  • New Federal and Junior Duck Stamps now on sale
  • EPA Staff Up Moves Forward
  • Trump Inspires Scientist to Run for Congress to Fight Climate Change
  • EPA plans to buy out more than 1,200 employees this summer
  • 38 science advisers get pink slips — internal email
  • Trump’s ‘puddle and ditch’ order will have destructive ripple effect
  • USDA Aims to Work with Landowners to Restore 400,000 Acres of Longleaf Pine Forests on Private Lands
  • A new take on political science: Training researchers to run for office
  • Congress to Pruitt: We’re Not Cutting EPA Budget to Trump’s Levels

STATE NEWS

  • CA: The California Drought Isn’t Over, It Just Went Underground
  • CA: California to list herbicide as cancer-causing; Monsanto vows fight
  • CO: New Mexico suit against Colorado in Gold King Mine spill fails
  • DE: DNREC produces wetlands report card on Leipsic River Watershed’s health and management recommendations
  • FL: Two Sad Ironies in Florida Passing Its 'Anti-Science' Law
  • FL: Rising Seas, Tropical Storm Cindy Prompt Florida Officials to Condemn Townhomes
  • GA: Ala. cities sue Georgia manufacturers over polluted water
  • IL: Activists push to save rare wetland on school property
  • LA: 'Our culture is dying': Rising waters menace more than land in Louisiana
  • LA: ICYMI: Prayer and Resistance Camp Launches in Louisiana to Challenge Pipeline Connected to DAPL
  • LA: A reviled plant could solve Louisiana's wetland-killing pest problem
  • ME: Interior secretary sees potential for other uses of Kathadin national monument
  • MD: Bel Air begins restoration of southern part of Plumtree Run
  • MD: Charles County, MD, restricts development in Mattawoman watershed
  • MD: Over $800,000 Announced to Support Local Green Infrastructure Projects to Improve Communities and Provide Jobs
  • MI: Jackson Community Foundation Helps The Nature Conservancy Restore Rare Habitat
  • MI: Lake Erie 'impaired' listing not important, says Michigan ag chief
  • MN: Minn. loons could get aid from BP oil spill cleanup funds
  • MN: DNR Strips Public Status from 640 Miles of Minnesota Streams
  • MO: Exports to Asia threatening turtle population
  • NV: New species of toad discovered in U.S. for 1st time in 50 years
  • NJ: Millions in environment settlements could be diverted under Christie's stealth veto
  • NJ: After years of waiting, contaminated sediment finally dredged from Pompton Lake
  • NY: Bald eagles thriving in record numbers in NY
  • NY: EPA Provides Environmental Programs in N.Y. with $5.7 Million to Improve Water Quality
  • OH: The Company Behind the Dakota Access Pipeline Has Another Big Problem in Ohio
  • OH: Cuyahoga River through the years, from fires to revival
  • OK: Land Purchase Completes Drummond Flats Wetland Basin
  • PA: Pa. bill would allow private sector companies to bid on bay cleanup efforts
  • PA: Report Shows PA Missing Clean Water Goals
  • TX: Study of oil and gas drilling finds pollution and connections to earthquakes
  • VA: Despite worry over funding, officials celebrate Lafayette River progress
  • VA: State Programmatic General Permit (SPGP) Update: Final 2017 SPGP Released
  • VA: Coalition implores McAuliffe, DEQ to protect Virginia waters
  • WA: Banking on wetland restoration
  • WV: Judge wants changes to WV water crisis legal settlement
  • WI: CDC Reports 2600% Increase in Tick-Borne Babesiosis Infections in Wisconsin in 12 Years
  • WI: Watch for giant hogweed in your wetland
  • WI: Clean Wisconsin challenges frac sand company's permit to fill wetlands in rare forest

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • It's a Mistake to Focus Just on Animal Extinctions
  • Seven right whales found dead in 'devastating' blow to endangered animal
  • 2 New Studies Undermine Climate Denial Arguments
  • Study: Maintaining forests vital to health of Chesapeake Bay
  • A dam could derail the Chesapeake Bay cleanup
  • Speedier sea ice in warming Arctic could spread pollution farther
  • Backyard weed-killer can ‘supercharge’ cane toads
  • Dragonflies reveal how biodiversity changes in time and space
  • Pesticides Are Harming Bees — But Not Everywhere, Major New Study Shows
  • The common insecticide poisoning our rivers and wetlands
  • UT among researchers seeking way to diagnose exposure to algal toxins
  • Report finds decline in Chesapeake Bay blue crab population
  • Sea level rise isn’t just happening, it’s getting faster
  • Monitoring changes in wetland extent can help predict the rate of climate change
  • Climate Change Drives Lakes Toward Ecological Tipping Points
  • Yellowstone Grizzly Bears to Lose Endangered Species Protection
  • Turtle comeback in Cuba at risk from climate change
  • Restoration Spotlight: Monarchs and communities share common ground
  • Kresge-backed climate change work accelerating in U.S. communities
  • Dugong Numbers on the Rise Again in the Great Barrier Reef
  • Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone Expected to Be Size of New Jersey This Summer; Shrimping Industry May Take Hit
  • Coral Bleaching Subsiding After 3 Extreme Years, but Recovery Could Take Decades
  • Warming temperatures threaten sea turtles
  • Constructed Wetlands Show Promise in Managing Nutrients
  • Why the World’s Rivers Are Losing Sediment and Why It Matters
  • Accidentally Made Urban Wetlands May Benefit Your Backyard
  • Rick Perry Denies Climate Change Role of CO2
  • NRCS Soil Survey Manual Updated
  • Wildfires used to be rare in the Great Plains. They’ve more than tripled in 30 years
  • Is Trump White House blinking on clash over California’s clean air rules?
  • Billion-dollar dams are making water shortages, not solving them

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • Algal Indicators in Streams: A Review of Their Application in Water Quality Management of Nutrient Pollution
  • The Beaver Restoration Guidebook 2.0
  • Financing Natural Infrastructure for Coastal Flood Damage Reduction

POTPOURRI

  • The unappreciated urban wilds
  • Does Scott Pruitt have a solid case for repealing the Clean Water Rule?
  • Walking Trees Terrorize Marshes
  • Construction on wetlands ramps up water stress in Zimbabwe
  • A wetland laid to waste
  • Three Lessons for Land-Conservation Loans
  • Neuse and Cape Fear Rivers Need Floodplain Protection
  • Auditing the Blue Blood Bank
  • One million sign petition for EU weedkiller ban
  • Chesapeake Bay’s Misguided War on the Ray
  • Intact mangroves worth twice as much as rice paddies
  • Rising Seas May Wipe out These Jersey Towns, but They're Still Rated AAA

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

WEBINARS, MEETINGS, TRAINING

Webinars

  • AWRA Webinar: IWRM and the Floods Directive: What can the US learn from the EU?
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Mapping Wetland Inundation Dynamics Using Multi-Source Satellite Data
  • EPA to Host Drinking Water Preparedness Best Practice Webinar
  • Center for Climate and Energy Solutions Webinar: Financing Clean Infrastructure: Private Activity Bonds
  • NEIWPCC: Stream & Wetland Buffers Webinar Series: Part 1: Restoration
  • Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar: Integrated Stream and Wetland Restoration: A watershed approach to improved water quality on the landscape
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Hot Topics Webinar: Partnering with Beaver to Benefit Sage Grouse and Working Lands: Restoring Emerald Islands in the Sagebrush Sea
  • Penn State Community Forestry Management Webinar: The Sustainable Urban Forest: A Step-by-Step Approach
  • AWRA Webinar: Changing Flood Risks in the California Central Valley under Climate Change
  • NEIWPCC: Stream & Wetland Buffers Webinar Series: Part 2: Education
  • Webinar: Identification of Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Indicators using an Ecological Resilience Framework
  • AWRA Webinar: Groundwater Droughts - A Tale from a Few Aquifers
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Stream Restoration: Where are we now?
  • NEIWPCC: Stream & Wetland Buffers Webinar Series: Part 3: Legal Challenges
  • Penn State Community Forestry Management Webinar: A Novel Water Management Tool for Your Landscape Plantings
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Bringing Better Site Design into The 21st Century
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Modeling for Water Quality

Meetings

  • National Association of Counties: 2017 Annual Conference
  • 11th IWA International Conference on Water Reclamation and Reuse
  • CUAHSI 2017 Conference: Hydroinformatics: Swimming in Data without Drowning in the Deluge
  • Michigan Technological University workshop: Science and Management of Ash Forests after Emerald Ash Borer
  • Mid-Atlantic Invasive Plant Council Conference: Invasion Biology: Paths to Conservation and Restoration Success
  • 2017 ESA Annual Meeting: Linking biodiversity, material cycling and ecosystem services in a changing world
  • Ornithological Congress of the Americas
  • Association of State Floodplain Managers: The National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop
  • Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals: 2017 Tribal Lands & Environment Forum
  • 3rd International Workshop on Trait-based Approaches to Ocean Life
  • American Fisheries Society 147th Annual Meeting: Fisheries Ecosystems: Uplands to Oceans
  • 12th International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL 2017 Beijing): Ecology and Civilization in a Changing World
  • 7th International Symposium for Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control (WETPOL)
  • Biodiversity and Ecosystem Scenarios Network (ScenNet): Scenarios and Models of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Support of Decision Making
  • National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration
  • SIWI World Water Week: Water and Waste: Reduce and Reuse’
  • 7th International Conference on Flood Management (ICFM7)
  • Floodplain Management Association Annual Conference: Creating Partnerships through Integration: Water, Environment, People
  • WateReuse: 32nd Annual WateReuse Symposium
  • American Water Works Association Rocky Mountain Section: Annual Conference
  • ASCE Congress on Technical Advancement
  • Sixth International Conference: Climate Change Adaptation 2017 (CCA 2017)
  • Great Lakes Commission 2017 Annual Meeting
  • Rhode Island Resource Institute: 8th Mid-Atlantic Stream Restoration Conference
  • Wildlife Society 24th Annual Conference
  • 1st International Conference on Community Ecology (ComEc)
  • Natural Areas Association: Natural Areas Conference
  • Center for Biodiversity and Conservation and its partners: 2017 Student Conference on Conservation Science
  • 13th Annual Maryland Association of Floodplain and Stormwater Managers (MAFSM) Conference
  • 2017 Mid-Atlantic Water Resources Conference: Water Research: Building Knowledge and Innovative Solutions
  • Ohio Wetlands Association Wetlands Science Summit: Working Wetlands for Water Quality
  • 48th Annual Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium
  • California Department of Water Resources, Urban Streams Restoration Program, Riparian Habitat Joint Venture: 2017 Riparian Summit - Confluence to Influence
  • Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: 13th Annual Great Lakes Restoration Conference
  • 4th Life Discovery – Doing Science Biology Education Conference
  • 4th World Conference on Climate Change: Today's Progress and Tomorrow's Climate Challenges
  • 2017 International Annual Meeting, "Managing Global Resources for a Secure Future"
  • 2017 NJAFM Annual Conference
  • 2017 ASBPA National Coastal Conference: Beaches, Bays and Beyond
  • Michigan Aquatic Restoration Conference
  • Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2017 National Land Conservation Conference
  • 2017 AWRA Annual Conference
  • Coastal Estuarine Research Federation (CERF) Conference: Coastal Science at the Inflection Point: Celebrating Successes & Learning from Challenges
  • International Association for Great Lakes Research: State of Lake Michigan Conference
  • Kansas Water Office Governor's Conference: Future of Water in Kansas
  • AGU Fall Meeting
  • Annual Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed Conference
  • 2018 Delaware Wetlands Conference
  • Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute: 2018 Western Places/Western Spaces
  • SWS 2018 Annual Meeting: Wetland Science: Integrating Research, Practice and Policy - An Exchange of Expertise
  • Scientific Committee of the Society for Conservation Biology Europe Section's 5th European Congress for Conservation Biology

Training

  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Stream Ecology
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Alpine Ecology
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Forest Ecosystems of the Southern Appalachians
  • Isle Royale & Keweenaw Parks Association: Keweenaw Plant I.D. Workshop
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Wetland Delineators
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: BMP Options for Stormwater Runoff
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Mushroom Identification for New Mycophiles: Foraging for Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Art and Science of Photographing Insects and their Kin
  • Utah State University, S.J. & Jessie E. Quinney College of Natural Resources Course: Sediment Transport in Stream Assessment and Design
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Southern Appalachian Mayflies, Stoneflies, & Caddisflies
  • Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Wetland Plants of the Upper Peninsula
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Advanced Hydric Soils – 2017
  • UC Davis Extension Course: GIS for Watershed Analysis: Intermediate
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Submersed and Floating Aquatic Plants
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Independent Studies: Interesting and Challenging Saxicolous Lichens of North America
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Hydrophytic Vegetation (Coastal Plain or Piedmont)
  • UC Berkeley Course: Geomorphic & Ecological Fundamentals of River & Stream Restoration
  • The Conservation Fund: Conservation Banking Training Course
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Conservation Biology of Freshwater Mussels
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Wetland Plant Communities
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Ecology of Forests and Grasslands
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Drone Remote Sensing of Freshwater Ecosystems
  • University of Montana’s Flathead Lake Biological Station Course: Lake Ecology
  • The Swamp School Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Overview of Environmental Statistics
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Using GIS to Manage, Analyze and Promote Sustainability
  • Maine Association of Wetland Scientist (MAWS) Wetland Mitigation Workshop
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Field Botany and Plant Ecology of the Eastern Maine Coast
  • Environmental Concern Course: Grasses, Sedges and Rushes
  • Highlands Biological Station Workshop: Mushrooms of the Carolinas
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Tidal Marsh Restoration: A Traveling Course from Rhode Island to Maine
  • The Swamp School On-Demand Workshop: What is a “Waters of the US?”
  • The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • Ohio Sea Grant Lake Erie Island Wetland Plant Identification and Field VIBI Workshops
  • EcoAgriculture Partners: Landscape Leadership Intensive Workshop
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Wetlands and Wetland Delineators
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Planning and Mitigation on Tribal Lands
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Identification, Biology, and Natural History of Ferns and Lycophytes
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Banding/research Techniques for Studying Songbirds and Raptors
  • Environmental Concern Course: Evaluating Hydric Soils in the Field
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Wetland Assessment, Restoration and Management
    • CUAHSI and the University of Michigan Training Workshop: Sensor Network Bootcamp in an Urban Environment
  • Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Floodplain Delineation using 2D HEC RAS Model
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Vested Rights, Vesting Maps and Development Agreements
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Better Birding: Passerines and Seabirds for Advancing Birders
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • The Swamp School On-Demand Workshop: What is a “Waters of the US?”
  • Wetland Management and Educational Services, Inc. Workshop: Moist-soil Management for Biologists and Managers
  • Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center Course: Maryland Master Naturalist Program
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Environmental Concern Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
  • The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
  • The Swamp School Course: Habitat Conservation Plans
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Land Use and Natural Resources Information Session
  • Wetland Management and Educational Services, Inc. Workshop: Moist-Soil Management for Maintenance Staff
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Riparian Habitat Restoration for the Arid Southwest
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Vegetation Identification for Wetland Delineation: South
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute The Ecology and Conservation of Migratory Birds
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Wetlands: Science and Regulatory Management
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Habitat Site Restoration
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum – 2017 – MD
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Wetland Construction: Principles, Planning and Design
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Exploring Wetland Wildlife
  • MBI (Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Wetland Delineation
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • The Swamp School Workshop: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment
  • The Swamp School Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Hydrology
  • The Swamp School Course: Basic Wetland Delineation Training
  • Course: Comparative Approaches in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Science
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Introduction to Wetland Identification
  • Society for Ecological Restoration Northwest Workshop: Aquatic and Riparian Ecosystems: Interactions, Management, and Restoration East of the Cascades
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Politics and Policymaking
  • National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Spatial Ecology, Geospatial Analysis and Remote Sensing for Conservation
  • CUAHSI and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)
  • Training Workshop: The Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Planning Tools to Create Healthy Communities
  • Highlands Biological Station Workshop: Tree Identification
  • UC Davis Extension Course Land Use Planning for Non-Planners: An Introduction to Planning in California
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Understanding Advanced Stormwater Management Techniques
  • Resource Institute Course: Level I – Applied Fluvial Morphology
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Building Stream Buffers
  • Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Stormwater Green Drainage Design Using EPA SWMM-LID
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Basic: Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum – SC
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: ACOE Wetland Delineation, Waters of the US and Regional Supplement Training
  • The Swamp School Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Botanist
  • CUAHSI and the University of Florida 3-day Training Workshop: Using In-Situ Water Quality Sensors - Lagrangian and Eulerian Applications
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Mitigation Measure Development and Monitoring
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetland Pollinators
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands, and Hydrology (Coastal Plain or Piedmont)
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Streambank Assessment and Restoration
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • UC Davis Extension Course Environmental Planning and Site Analysis
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Water Quality Regulation and Permitting
  • The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
  • The Swamp School Course: Habitat Conservation Plans
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
  • The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetlands of the World
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Habitat Conservation Planning
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: POW! The Planning of Wetlands

SPECIAL EVENT

  • Wetlands Walk at Bolsa Chica Ecological Preserve
  • Rouge River Water Festival
  • Fall Migration Festival
  • 5th Annual Wildbird Recovery: Fall Migration Festival
  • 2017 Voice of Wetlands Festival
       
Wetland Breaking News - July 2017
 
 

Wetland Breaking News - March 2016

The Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News (WBN) is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those working in water resources and related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published Wetland Breaking News - January 2017for over fifteen years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to .

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled and Edited by Marla Stelk, Editor; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors. Executive Director: Jeanne Christie. Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399 Fax: 207-892-3089
All photos by Jeanne Christie, ASWM
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