IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

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All photos by
Jeanne Christie, ASWM

   


Dear Wetlanders,

It’s Thanksgiving on Thursday, and I am really looking forward to a long weekend of good family time, belly laughs, stimulating conversation, and let’s face it, a lot of really tasty food and drink. Living in Maine, I’m not a fan of our short days during the early winter months. Right now we only have 9.5 hours of day length and by the end of the month we’ll be down to only 9 hours. December 21st cannot come soon enough. But the holidays make it all palpable and remind me to count my blessings with, or without, the sun.

So in the spirit of Thanksgiving, I am highlighting some stories in this edition of Wetland Breaking News that have raised my spirits and make me grateful for all the good things and good people in this world. To begin with, I am grateful for turkey and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. In Editor’s Choice, you’ll find a great short article by the National Wildlife Refuge System on “Wild Facts About That Thanksgiving Bird” that has some fun trivia to share at the dinner table as well as good information on hunting opportunities to catch your own bird.

I am also grateful for landowners that are willing to voluntarily work with our federal and state agencies to create win-win situations for wetlands and farmers. For example, check out the story in the Editor’s section on “Landowners in Deep South Protect 700,000 Acres of Wetlands with USDA Help.” And for citizens who are willing to step up to help through citizen stewardship initiatives, such as the one offered by the Chesapeake Bay Program.

I am thankful for innovative and entrepreneurial minds who are developing solutions for some of our seemlingly insurmountable problems, such as the 11 year old girl who created a sensor that can detect lead levels in water better than traditional methods. And the folks at the community college in southeast Iowa who have created a wetland on campus to filter runoff from college-owned farmland and provide a learning tool for students and farmers.

There is truly so much to be grateful for. All of us at the Association of State Wetland Managers are thankful for all of you and hope that you and your loved ones have a wonderful Thanksgiving holiday!

Best regards,

Marla J. Stelk
Editor, Wetland Breaking News

P.S. By the way, if you’ve seen our beloved wetland creature please let us know. He is missing and we are all very concerned!

   
             


EPA and the Army Propose to Amend the Effective Date of the 2015 Rule Defining “Waters of the United States”

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – November 16, 2017
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Department of the Army (the agencies) are proposing to amend the effective date of the 2015 rule defining “waters of the United States.” The agencies are proposing that the 2015 rule would not go into effect until two years after today’s action is finalized and published in the Federal Register. This amendment would give the agencies the time needed to reconsider the definition of “waters of the United States.” “Today’s proposal shows our commitment to our state and tribal partners and to providing regulatory certainty to our nation’s farmers, ranchers and businesses,” said EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt. “This step will allow us to minimize confusion as we continue to receive input from across the country on how we should revise the definition of the ‘waters of the United States.’” For full news release, click here.

EPA Announces Appointment of Alexandra Dunn to Region 1 Administrator

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – November 16, 2017
Today, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt announced the appointment of Alexandra Dapolito Dunn to become Regional Administrator for Region 1. With over two decades of experience in environmental law, legislation, policy, and regulatory affairs, Ms. Dunn will oversee federal environmental protection efforts in: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. For full news release, click here.

Five Star and Urban Waters Restoration Grant Program 2018 Request for Proposals

National Fish and Wildlife Foundation 
The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) and the Wildlife Habitat Council (WHC), in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), USDA Forest Service (USFS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), FedEx and Southern Company are pleased to solicit applications for the 2018 Five Star and Urban Waters Restoration program. The Five Star and Urban Waters program will award approximately $2 million in grants nationwide. The Five Star and Urban Waters Restoration grant program seeks to develop community capacity to sustain local natural resources for future generations by providing modest financial assistance to diverse local partnerships focused on improving water quality, watersheds and the species and habitats they support. For more information, click here. Full Proposal Due Date: Wednesday, January 31, 2018 by 11:59 PM Eastern Time

Wild Facts About That Thanksgiving Bird

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service – November 6, 2017
Maybe you’re already dreaming about Thanksgiving: turkey, stuffing, all the pies. And maybe you thought you knew everything about turkeys. Think again. Wild turkeys are not hard to find – if you look in the right place. National wildlife refuges, managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, are great places to view wild turkeys or find the perfect hunt. Refuge trails generally are open sunrise to sunset, many even on Thanksgiving Day when refuge visitor centers will be closed. Free trail maps are often available outside a visitor center or at a refuge entrance kiosk. Find your trail online. To read more, click here.

 Nominate a Wetland Hero for the 2018 National Wetlands Awards!

Environmental Law Institute
The National Wetlands Awards are presented annually to individuals who have excelled in wetlands protection, restoration, and education. Through coordinated media outreach, educational events, and an awards ceremony on Capitol Hill, awardees receive national recognition and attention for their outstanding efforts. For more information, click here.

Landowners in Deep South Protect 700,000 Acres of Wetlands with USDA Help

U.S. Department of Agriculture – October 27, 2017
Private landowners in Arkansas, Mississippi and Louisiana have protected 700,000 acres of critical wetlands in the past 25 years, which accounts for one-third of all wetlands under USDA conservation easements in the country. USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and several conservation partners recently celebrated this milestone by visiting one of the landowners who used a conservation easement to restore and permanently protect the wetland. Conservation easements enable landowners to receive cost-share payments for wetland conservation that not only benefit the landscape, but also landowners by giving them opportunities to take less-profitable, marginal croplands out of production. For full blog post, click here.

An 11-year-old has become 'America's Top Young Scientist' for her sensor detecting lead in water

By Chris Weller – Business Insider – October 18, 2017
Gitanjali Rao, an 11-year-old from Lone Tree, Colorado, is the winner of this year's Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge for her sensor that can detect lead levels in water better than traditional methods. Rao, whose victory was announced late in the evening of Tuesday, October 17, will take home $25,000 for the idea, which she said she developed approximately five months ago in response to learning about the ongoing water crisis in Flint, Michigan. For full story, click here.  

 





Bay program survey unveils promise and challenges of citizen stewardship

By E.B. Furgurson, III – The Baltimore Sun – November 12, 2017
The Chesapeake Bay Program has released results of a comprehensive survey measuring the stewardship actions and attitudes of bay watershed residents that shows considerable progress yet much work ahead. The resulting Citizen Stewardship Index scored 24 out of 100, based on what actions people are taking and what portion of the public is volunteering in community efforts to improve bay health and participating in civic activities supporting the environment. For full story, click here.

Lessons from Hurricane Harvey: Houston’s Struggle Is America’s Tale

By Michael Kimmelman – The New York Times – November 11, 2017
The mayhem that Hurricane Harvey unleashed on Houston didn’t only come from the sky. On the ground, it came sweeping in from the Katy Prairie some 30 miles west of downtown. Water drains naturally in this stretch of Texas, or at least it used to. At more than 600 square miles, Houston has grown to be as big as Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit and Philadelphia combined, a giant spread of asphalt smothering many of the floodplains that once shuttled water from the prairies to the sea. When finished, the newest road to ring the city and propel its expansion, called the Grand Parkway, will encircle an area equivalent to all of Rhode Island. For full story, click here.

Market-Driven Strategies for Preventing Agricultural-Based Pollution in America’s Watersheds

Investing News – November 9, 2017
The proposed cutbacks to federal funding for the EPA’s Chesapeake Bay Initiative won’t derail the inevitable cleanup of the region’s polluted waters. On the contrary, it will help drive the adoption of a market-based strategy to engage the agriculture industry and the private sector, which will accelerate cleanup of the Bay and other U.S. waters. The impact of nutrient runoff from livestock production has reached crisis levels in the United States (and the world). Clean water strategies developed over the last decades are now unable to keep up with today’s pollution load. Declining water quality and escalating costs are forcing us to look for alternative solutions. Many livestock industry leaders, federal policymakers, state legislators and other stakeholders are supportive of market-driven solutions to address nutrient runoff. For full story, click here. 

Atmospheric rivers could increase flood risk by 80 percent

University of Oxford – November 3, 2017
The global effect and impact of atmospheric rivers on rainfall, flooding and droughts has been estimated for the first time – revealing that in some regions the risks can be enhanced by up to 80 percent. The work, of which Oxford University is a key partner, also considers the number of people affected by these atmospheric phenomena across the globe. Atmospheric rivers get their name because they look like rivers of vapour in the sky. NASA, a collaborator in the research, defines them as relatively long, narrow, jets of air that can carry vapour as water, far and wide across some of the planet’s oceans, on to the continents and as far as the Polar Regions. For full story, click here.

EPA Recognizes Excellence and Innovation in Clean Water Infrastructure

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – October 31, 2017
Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recognized 28 clean water infrastructure projects for excellence and innovation within the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) program. Honored projects include large wastewater infrastructure projects to small decentralized and agriculture projects. For full news release, click here.

NASA Ends Trailblazing Satellite Mission that Revealed Global Groundwater Trends

By Brett Walton – Circle of Blue – October 28, 2017
The unexpectedly long life of a pair of pioneering satellites that deepened scientific understanding of society’s influence on water and land is over. NASA and its project partners decided to end the GRACE satellite mission this week after the eighth of 20 battery cells on GRACE-2 failed. GRACE-1 was still working, but the mission, which measures fractional changes in Earth’s gravity based on the position of the satellites relative to each other, requires both to move in tandem. Losing one means losing all. Still, scientists on the project team and those who used its data celebrated the success of a $140 million mission that kept going and going and going, lasting a decade longer than anticipated. For full story, click here. 

Luc Hoffmann Medal now open for nominations – Wetlands International

Wetlands International – October 26, 2017
Wetlands International aims to promote the conservation and restoration of wetlands worldwide. As part of this, we award the Wetlands International Luc Hoffmann Medal for Wetland Science and Conservation to individuals who have shown outstanding leadership and accomplishment in an area of wetland research and conservation, or in sharing their passion for wetlands through raising public awareness. For more information, click here.

Investing In Nature 101: A Triple Win for Cities, Communities, and Developers

By Mark Tercek – Forbes – October 23, 2017
America has a big infrastructure problem. More precisely, it has a $3.6 trillion problem. That's what it will take to fix the country's aging roads, bridges, levees, water mains and other systems that sustain our communities and economy, according to the American Society of Civil Engineers. When you think of rebuilding America's infrastructure, bioswales, artificial wetlands and coral reefs probably don't spring to mind. But they should. For full story, click here.

Boosting Birds Through Contagious Conservation

Medium.com – October 18, 2107 – Video
The relationship between the conservation community and landowners has long been a complicated one. The two groups have often squared off over their differing views on how best to serve the land. But a new wind is rising across the Great Plains, bringing with it the philosophy of mutual cooperation for mutual benefit. “The concept of cooperative conservation between landowners, nonprofits, and government agencies is something that I see happening throughout the Great Plains…,” says Grady Grissom, a Colorado rancher who embraces the importance of conservation and uses it to enhance his work. “The majority of the ranchers and the mainstream of the conservation community are seeing eye-to-eye and are seeing common desired outcomes.” For full story and to view video, click here. 

Pruitt's promised directive rattles science advisers

By Hannah Northey and Sean Reilly – E&E News – October 18, 2017
U.S. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt's suggestion that he'd get rid of advisory committee members who also receive EPA grants has roiled the research community. Speaking at a Heritage Foundation event yesterday, Pruitt questioned the objectivity of scientists who serve on EPA advisory boards and also receive agency grants. He promised to issue a directive next week to "fix that." A Pruitt spokeswoman didn't reply to emailed requests for details on the forthcoming policy, such as whether it would require advisers who have received past or present EPA funding to step down. But the impact could be far-reaching. For full story, click here.

UVM Study: Warming Seas Could Lead to 70 Percent Increase in Hurricane-related Financial Loss

By Jeffrey R. Wakefield – The University of Vermont – October 11, 2017
If oceans warm at a rate predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the United Nation-sponsored group that assesses climate change research and issues periodic reports, expected financial losses caused by hurricanes could increase more than 70 percent by 2100, according to a University of Vermont study just published in the journal Sustainable and Resilient Infrastructure. The finding is based on the panel’s most severe potential climate change scenario – and resulting increased sea surface temperature – and is predicted at an 80 percent confidence level. For full story, click here.

United States-Mexico Agreement Increases Water Security in the West

By Barry Gold – Walton Family Foundation – September 28, 2017
In an arid land, no resource is more precious than water. Every drop counts. The almost 40 million people in the western United States who depend every day on a healthy Colorado River – for their drinking water, for agriculture, industry and recreation – have acquired an acute understanding of that reality. A 16-year drought has brought the Colorado River basin to the brink of shortages. With falling reservoir levels has come rising anxiety about the reliability of water supply. Even after last winter’s heavy snowpack in the Rockies, water levels at Lake Mead are hovering perilously close to 1,075 feet, the line at which Arizona and Nevada would begin facing official water shortages. That’s why we’re celebrating a new nine-year agreement reached between the United States and Mexico on how to manage the Colorado River’s water. The deal – technically known as Minute 323 – will increase water security for users in both countries and promote more efficient water management in a fast-growing, increasingly thirsty region. For full blog post, click here.

 
 

AK: AK: Senate votes to raise revenue by drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

By Juliet Eilperin – The Washington Post – October 19, 2017
The Senate rejected an amendment Thursday that sought to block a key panel from raising revenue through drilling in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, a move that could make it easier for future oil and gas drilling to take place there. The vote, which came before the Senate approved Republicans’ proposed budget, represented a victory for the GOP and a defeat for environmentalists. For full story, click here.

AZ: Major Water Rights Settlement for Arizona Tribe Goes to Congress

By Debra Utacia Krol – News Deeply Water Deeply – October 27, 2017
In what one economic development expert calls a “unique case” of a tribe’s water rights claims being backed by all players, Arizona senators John McCain and Jeff Flake on September 7 filed a new bill to ratify the Hualapai Tribe’s water settlement, an agreement negotiated between the tribe, Arizona, the federal government and others. The bill, S. 1770, would provide the Northern Arizona tribe of 2,300 members, whose lands encompass parts of the Grand Canyon, with sufficient water to not only meet the tribe’s residential needs but to bolster northwestern Arizona’s economy. For full story, click here.

CA: Tracing Water’s Path through the Santa Clara Valley Aquifer

By Sarah Witman – EOS – November 10, 2017
California governor Jerry Brown declared a drought state of emergency in January 2014, following years of wintertime rainfall levels dipping below historic averages. A lack of rainfall throughout 2015—precipitation was 20% below average—sustained the drought. Surface water levels got so low that residents had to increasingly tap into groundwater resources in order to meet agricultural, urban, and industrial needs. This usage put immense pressure on groundwater resources and made it extremely difficult to manage water resources across the state. These pressures can have long-term effects too. For example, rapid drawdown of groundwater resources can cause the land above it to sink. A new study examines groundwater levels and sinking land in California’s Santa Clara Valley in the context of the state’s widespread drought. For full story, click here.

IL: Team finds first wild alligator snapping turtle in Illinois since 1984

By Lisa Sheppard – Illinois.edu – November 13, 2017 – Video
Researchers report the first sighting in 30 years of a wild alligator snapping turtle in Illinois. The discovery may be a sign of hope for this state-endangered species, or the animal could be the last of its kind to have survived in Illinois without human intervention, the researchers say. The team reports the find in the journal Southeastern Naturalist. For full blog post and to view video, click here.

IA: Iowa college creates campus wetland to filter farm runoff

Associated Press – Star Tribune – October 23, 2017
A community college in southeast Iowa has created a wetland on its campus to filter runoff from college-owned farmland and provide a learning tool for students and farmers. The wetland on Southeastern Community College's West Burlington campus will typically be between 1.5 to 2 acres, The Hawk Eye reported . It could be as large as 9 acres during heavy rain, said Sabrina Pidgeon, an agriculture instructor at the college. The wetland is located on the school's agriculture field primarily used for corn and soybeans. "It's not the ideal location for a wetland in general, but it is the ideal location for educational purposes," Pidgeon said. For full story, click here.

LA: Funding will help protect Calcasieu wetlands from saltwater

By John Guidroz – American Press – November 4, 2017
The state Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority will get $25.6 million in funding to help protect 21,000 acres of wetlands in Calcasieu Parish from saltwater intrusion. The money — which came from fines paid after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill — will fund the Calcasieu River Salinity Control Project. U.S. Sen. John Kennedy, R-La., said in a news release that the project targets saltwater coming into the Calcasieu Ship Channel from the Gulf of Mexico. The impact has led to erosion of wetlands. For full story, click here.

LA: Resistance Builds to New Louisiana Oil Pipeline

By Sabrina Canfield – Court House News – November 1, 2017
Louisiana groups say they are fed up with environmental destruction wreaked by the oil industry and that in the very least the state should allow a third-party assessment of what’s at stake before a proposed pipeline is allowed to be built. They also want Louisiana to move to renewable energy, which is far safer and less toxic. The groups cite the most recent oil spills – two in October in a three-day span, including a platform explosion that injured seven men and a pipeline leak that dumped 672,000 gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Given the wretched history of the oil and gas industry in the state, they say it’s impossible for Gov. John Bel Edwards to promise the Bayou Bridge pipeline will be built right. For full story, click here.

LA: Louisiana faces unexpected shortfall in major source of funding for coastal protection

By Della Hasselle – The Lens – October 18, 2018
An unexpected shortfall in Louisiana’s share of offshore oil and gas royalties could force the state to delay or cancel coastal restoration projects scheduled to start as soon as 2019, according to the state’s Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority. Officials said Wednesday that the state’s share of revenue next year from the federal Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act, or GOMESA, will be about half of what they expected. Until recently, Louisiana anticipated a yearly payout of about $175 million, the maximum under the royalty-sharing agreement. The first major payment was to come next spring. Of that, $140 million would have gone to the coastal restoration authority. Now, the agency expects to receive just $60 million to $70 million. For full story, click here.

MD: Van Hollen bill would triple funding to protect Chesapeake Bay, other watersheds

By Jenna Portnoy – The Washington Post – November 16, 2017
Sen. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.) on Thursday will introduce legislation to increase funding for a program that keeps pollutants from running off farms and into the Chesapeake Bay and other sensitive watersheds across the country. The bill, called the Chesapeake Bay Farm Bill Enhancements Act of 2017, would increase to $300 million a pot of money to help farmers build things such as manure storage and stream buffers that prevent harmful nutrients from flowing into sensitive watersheds. There is currently $100 million in the fund, part of the Regional Conservation Partnership Program. For full story, click here.

MD: Project Could Save Acres of Marshland in Dorchester County

By Amy Lu – WBOC.com – November 3, 2017 – Video
Stomping through watery lands, one team of scientists is marching to save Mother Earth.
David Curson, of the Maryland Audubon Society and one of the team's members, says Farm Creek Marsh, located in Dorchester County, is dying. We have a lot to lose," Curson said. Curson says rising sea water is to blame. You can tell by the barren pine trees scattered across the area. For full story and to view video, click here.

MD: Hurricanes no match for Baltimore’s Harriet the Osprey on her fall trek

By Kathy Reshetiloff – Bay Journal – November 2, 2017
This spring, a pair of ospreys returned to a webcam nesting platform in Baltimore’s Masonville Cove.  The ospreys, named Frederick and Harriet by osprey cam followers, are determined birds. In 2016, a pair of Canada geese took over their nest. Although Frederick and Harriet built a nest at another platform and laid eggs, unusually cold wet weather in May caused them to abandon this nest. This year, the goose scenario repeated itself. The osprey pair came back to the platform only to be pushed out by a pair of geese. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service removed most of the nest material, forcing the geese to move on. For full article, click here.

MI: Michigan may weaken policy on ship ballast water treatment

By John Flesher – Associated Press – Star Tribune – November 8, 2017
Michigan lawmakers were poised Wednesday to weaken a policy that prohibits oceangoing cargo ships from releasing ballast water at the state's ports until it has been treated to kill invasive species. A Senate committee voted to revise a 2005 law requiring saltwater vessels to use state-approved cleansing technology before discharging ballast water, which provides stability in rough seas. Scientists believe dozens of the invasive species that have reached the Great Lakes in recent decades, including zebra and quagga mussels and round gobies, arrived in ballast water. For full story, click here.

MI: Superior Watershed Partnership reminds public of coastal reporting tool

Upper Michigan Source – November 2, 2017
Due to the recent storm events, the Superior Watershed Partnership (SWP) is reminding coastal landowners, coastal units of local government and the general public that they can report coastal erosion and property damage using the SWP Great Lakes Coastal Reporting Tool. With current high lake levels and recent record waves (28.8 feet) there has been a dramatic increase in both urban and rural coastal impacts. For full story, click here.

MN: Tow it? Blow it up? Tie it down? Massive bog still menacing Brainerd-area lake

By Jennifer Stockinger – Twin Cities Pioneer Press – October 18, 2017
The monster bog that broke off the shoreline a few weeks ago in Merrifield Bay on North Long Lake just outside of Brainerd continues to lurk around the bay, trying to find a permanent resting place. Initially it was reported the bog was about the size of a football field. After further review by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and after an aerial view of the bog, it is estimated to be about three football fields in size — about 200 feet by 800 feet. Homeowners around the lake have been watching the bog — a natural wetland consisting of marsh, dead plant materials, cattails and, in this case, a line of tamarack trees — floating around the bay and wondering where it will land permanently. Just when the bog seems to find a resting spot and landowners come up with a plan to manage it, the bog disappears and floats to a new location. For full story, click here.

MS: Celebrating Landowner-Led Restoration in the Mississippi River Bottomlands

By Morgan Snyder – Walton Family Foundation – October 20, 2017
When James Cummins started working over 25 years ago to restore forested wetlands in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley, more than 80% of the natural habitat had been converted to agriculture. It was far from certain that the seedlings being planted then would ever grow big enough to make a mark on the landscape. But this month, James is joining private landowners, government agencies and fellow conservationists to celebrate an unsung environmental success story – the revival of bottomland hardwood forests across the lower Mississippi River valley. For full blog post, click here.

NY: Land trust expands preserve by purchasing more than 300 acres on Goose Bay

By Marcus Wolf – Watertown Daily Times – November 17, 2017
The Thousand Islands Land Trust grew its largest single preserve, the Crooked Creek Preserve, beyond 2,000 acres this summer after purchasing an additional 300 acres on Goose Bay. The trust in June purchased the property on Route 12 and Kring Point Road from the Broudy Family for $300,000 using funds from the North American Wetland Conservation Act and donations, said Spencer T. Busler, director of land conservation for the trust. The land purchase, which has made the property tax-exempt, is the fourth largest TILT has made since it was established in 1985. Negotiations between the trust and property owner Dori Ann Broudy lasted about four years until she died earlier this year, and the deal was carried out by her daughters Kate and Berne. “The entire TILT staff and TILT community is excited to see this project come to fruition,” Mr. Busler said. “It was a long time in the making and to add that to our Crooked Creek Preserve makes it that much more special.” The preserve, home of the about three-mile Macsherry Trail, now consists of 2,075 acres of wetlands and forest along Crooked Creek and the St. Lawrence River in Alexandria and Hammond. For full story, click here.

OK: Floating wetlands project underway

By Joy Hampton – The Norman Transcrip – November 13, 2017
Wetlands provide unique wildlife habitats and serve as water purifiers, but if you think wetlands are exclusive to marshy areas along shorelines or low-lying areas, think again. Floating wetlands are trending now in local lakes and reservoirs and that will include Lake Thunderbird in the future. “There really are natural floating wetlands,” said restoration ecologist Steven Patterson with Bio x Design. “Floating wetlands are actually found on every continent except Antartica.” For full story, click here.

PA: Hellbender gets Senate OK as official Pennsylvania amphibian

Associated Press – November 15, 2017
The state Senate is advancing legislation to make the Eastern hellbender the official amphibian of Pennsylvania, as researchers say its population is shrinking because of pollution. The bill passed, 47-2, and heads to the House. For full story, click here.

PA: Ducks Unlimited to help with Plain Grove wetland restoration

By Mary Grzebieniak – New Castle News – November 3, 2017
Habitat for local ducks and other wildlife will be improved next year thanks to a partnership between two state agencies and a hunting/conservation group. Ducks Unlimited has agreed to partner with the Pennsylvania Game Commission to restore wetland habitat in four Pennsylvania counties, including Lawrence, the Game Commission confirmed Wednesday. The work will be funded through a $70,000 grant award from the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources to Ducks Unlimited for wetland restoration. For full story, click here.

PA: PA lawmakers cobble together budget - without needed boost for Bay, environment

By Donna Morelli – Bay Journal – November 3, 2017
Four months past the deadline for approving a state budget, Pennsylvania lawmakers have finally agreed on how to pay for the $32 billion spending plan they adopted in July. They did nothing, though, to bolster a budget that offers no new money for Chesapeake Bay restoration, drinking water protection and other environmental programs. In fact, they opened the door to siphoning money from special funds dedicated to conservation and pollution cleanup. For full article, click here.

PA: Pennsylvania projects get $5.8 million in grants for work to protect Chesapeake Bay

Lancaster Online – October 22, 2017
Federal and state officials gathered on a Lancaster County farm Friday to recognize Pennsylvania recipients of $5.8 million in grant funding to protect the Chesapeake Bay. The 16 projects will leverage matching funds of $10.4 million, amounting to a $16.2 million boost to conservation, officials said. The grants were awarded through the Chesapeake Bay Stewardship Fund, a partnership between the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and the Environmental Protection Agency’s Innovative nutrient and Sediment Reduction Grants Program. For full story, click here.

SD: Keystone pipeline shut down after spilling 5,000 barrels of oil in South Dakota

By Devin Henry – The Hill – November 16, 2107 – Video
The Keystone oil pipeline spilled more than 5,000 barrels of oil on Thursday before workers took it offline, a large spill that comes days before operators hope to secure a key permit for a sister project. A TransCanada crew shut down the Keystone pipeline at 6 a.m. Thursday morning after detecting an oil leak along the line, the company said in a statement. The leak was detected along a stretch of pipeline about 35 miles south of a pumping station in Marshall County, South Dakota. TransCanada estimates the pipeline leaked 5,000 barrels of oil, or about 210,000 gallons, before going offline. For full story and to view video, click here.

TX: Deepwater Horizon settlement funds to be used to improve Texas coastline

By Alex Stuckey – Houston Chronicle – October 18, 2017
More than $5 million in funds related to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill has been set aside for five projects in Galveston Bay, including restoration of 150 acres of marshlands, rehabilitation of oyster reefs and protection of bird habitats. The money comes from a 2016 settlement with BP, which leased the Deepwater Horizon oil rig that exploded in April 2010 and poured an estimated 3.19 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. The company is required to pay the trustees for Deepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment up to $8.8 billion over 15 years to make up for the natural resource damage along the Gulf Coast. For full story, click here.

TX: Harvey runoff menaces Texas’ coral reefs

Contact: David Ruth and Jade Boyd – Rice University – October 13, 2017
The more than 13 trillion gallons of floodwater from Hurricane Harvey have created a massive plume of freshwater in the Gulf of Mexico that is threatening the coral reefs of the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary about 100 miles offshore of Galveston. Harvey produced more than 13 trillion gallons of rain over southeast Texas, and that water is now flowing through the Gulf. The Texas Automated Buoy System, run by the Geochemical and Environmental Research Group (GERG) at Texas A&M University, is a network of buoys that monitors the waters off the Texas coast and relays real-time ocean data. On Sept. 28, the system measured a 10 percent drop in salinity at Buoy V in the Flower Garden Banks coral reefs. Next week a team of experts from Rice University, the University of Houston-Clear Lake, Texas A&M and Boston University will sail from Galveston on a five-day expedition to the reefs. They will work in collaboration with staff scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries to collect samples of water, microbes, sediment, corals and sponges to monitor the health of the reefs. For full story, click here.

VA: Menhaden vote a mixed bag for Virginia

By Tamara Dietrich – Daily Press– November 15, 2017– Video
There was measured praise and disappointment all around this week after a regional fisheries commission voted on a 2018-2019 management plan for Atlantic menhaden, often called the most important fish in the sea. or Virginia, too, it was a mixed bag. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission decided at an annual meeting in Linthicum, Md., to lower the Chesapeake Bay reduction fishery cap by 41.5 percent, from 87,216 metric tons to 51,000 metric tons. This pleases Virginia conservationists, but not the reduction fishery. For full story and to view video, click here.

VA: James River health improving overall, but more work needed, report says

By Tamara Dietrich – Daily Press – October 26, 2017 – Video
From reducing wastewater pollution to restoring the bald eagle, the James River watershed has come a long way. But the big tributary is struggling right now to support some key native species — freshwater grassbeds, for instance, and American shad. A new “State of the James” report issued Thursday gives the river a grade of B-minus for reaching an overall 62 percent of a suite of pollution reduction and habitat and wildlife improvement goals set by state and federal agencies. For full story and to view video, click here.

WA: With climate change, Mount Rainier floral communities could ‘reassemble’ with new species relationships, interactions

By James Urton – University of Washington – November 7, 2017 – Video
Central to the field of ecology is the mantra that species do not exist in isolation: They assemble in communities — and within these communities, species interact. Predators hunt prey. Parasites exploit hosts. Pollinators find flowers. Yet these interactions are built on more than just serendipity, because species adapt over generations to environmental cues. But when conditions shift due to climate change, species might change markedly in response — creating “reassembled” communities that might show disrupted interactions among species. For full story and to view video, click here.

WI: Legislature passes bill allowing utilities to fill wetlands

The Journal Times – November 7, 2017
The Wisconsin Legislature has passed a bill that would loosen wetland restoration requirements for public utilities. Current state law requires anyone looking to fill a wetland to obtain a permit from the Department of Natural Resources. The agency must require the restoration, enhancement, creation or preservation of other wetlands as a permit condition. For full story, click here.

 
 

New Research Could Predict La Niña Drought Years in Advance

Contact: Anton Caputo – UT News – November 16, 2017
Two new studies from The University of Texas at Austin have significantly improved scientists’ ability to predict the strength and duration of droughts caused by La Niña – a recurrent cooling pattern in the tropical Pacific Ocean. Their findings, which predict that the current La Niña is likely to stretch into a second year, could help scientists know years in advance how a particular La Niña event is expected to evolve. For full story, click here.

Species in the north are more vulnerable to climate change

Contact: Viktor Nilsson-Örtman – Lund University – November 16, 2017
For the first time, researchers have proposed the hypothesis that animals that live in climate zones at a safe distance from both the poles as well as the tropics have the most to gain from acclimating to changes in climate. The findings contradict previous research in the field. For full story, click here.

VIMS study identifies tipping point for oyster restoration

By David Malmquist, VIMS – WY Daily – November 16, 2017 – Video
We’re all familiar with tipping points, when crossing what might seem a minor threshold can lead to drastically different outcomes—the Super Bowl favorite that falls to last place with an injury to a single lineman, a tomato seedling that surges skyward the moment it tops the shadowy confines of its clay pot. Now, a study by researchers at William & Mary’s Virginia Institute of Marine Science identifies a tipping point in oyster restoration efforts, wherein reefs rebuilt to reach a foot or more above the bottom develop into healthy, self-sustaining ecosystems, while those rebuilt at lower heights are quickly coated and then buried by sediment. For full story and to view video, click here.

Low dose, constant drip: Pharmaceuticals & personal care products impact aquatic life

Cary Institute – November 14, 2017
Traditional toxicity testing underestimates the risk that pharmaceutical and personal care product pollution poses to freshwater ecosystems. Criteria that account for ecological disruption – not just organism death – are needed to protect surface waters, which are under pressure from a growing population and escalating synthetic chemical use. So reports a new study published this week in Elementa. Wastewater treatment plants are not designed to remove the chemicals found in pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Instead, these chemicals enter waterways where their effects on aquatic ecosystems are largely unknown. For full story, click here.

Study settles prehistoric puzzle, finds carbon dioxide link to global warming 22 million years ago

SMU – November 14, 2017
Fossil leaves from Africa have resolved a prehistoric climate puzzle — and also confirm the link between carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and global warming. Research until now has produced a variety of results and conflicting data that have cast doubt on the link between high carbon dioxide levels and climate change for a time interval about 22 million years ago. But a new study has found the link does indeed exist for that prehistoric time period, say researchers at Southern Methodist University, Dallas. For full blog post, click here.

Nutria Eradication Project Successful, More to be Done

By Amy Lu – WNOC.com – November 11, 2017 – Video
Searching through marshes taller than man, field specialist, Mario Eusi and his chocolate lab mix, Cain, were training on Tuesday at Blackwater Wildlife Refuge. Training to track nutria - an invasive rodent species. "A lot has changed in the last 15 and half years that I've been working here," Eusi said. Eusi and Cain have been doing the job almost everyday for years to get rid of nutria and with their black claws and orange teeth, the rodents have contributed to over 5,000 acres of lost marshland. For full story and to view video, click here.

Changing climate to bring more landslides on logged land WSU research shows

By Eric Sorensen – WSU News – November 9, 2017
Washington State University researchers say landslides on logged forests will be more widespread as the Northwest climate changes. In a study modelled on clear-cut lands on the Olympic Peninsula, they anticipate the climate of 2045 and conclude that there will be a 7-11 percent increase in the land that is highly vulnerable to landslides. The researchers say their findings are applicable to the Cascade Mountain Range area as well. The study, published in Engineering Geology, is the first to look at landslides and climate change in the Pacific Northwest. For full story, click here.

Global carbon dioxide emissions projected to rise after three stable years

By Owen Gaffney – Future Earth – November 8, 2017 – Video
By the end of 2017, global emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuels and industry are projected to rise by about 2% compared with the preceding year, with an uncertainty range between 0.8% and 3%. The news follows three years of emissions staying relatively flat. That’s the conclusion of the 2017 Global Carbon Budget, published 13 November by the Global Carbon Project (GCP) in the journals Nature Climate Change, Environmental Research Letters and Earth System Science Data Discussions. The announcement comes as nations meet in Bonn, Germany, for the annual United Nations climate negotiations (COP23). For full blog post and to view video, click here.

Eyes on the Coast—Video Cameras Help Forecast Coastal Change

USGS Daily – November 8, 2017
Coastal communities count on beaches for recreation and for protection from large waves, but beaches are vulnerable to threats such as erosion by storms and flooding. Whether beaches grow, shrink, or even disappear depends in part on what happens just offshore. How do features like shifting sandbars affect waves, currents, and the movement of sand from the beach to offshore and back? If we understand these processes well enough, scientists can include them in computer models of coastal change that can be used to forecast, for example, how the shoreline will react to severe storms and how it could change over years, decades, or even centuries. Coastal communities can use these forecasts to plan for storms, sea-level rise, changes in sand supply, and other threats. For full story, click here.

Use of glow sticks in traps greatly increases amphibian captures in study

By Jeff Mulhollem – PennState – November 7, 2017
With amphibian populations declining around the world and funds to find the causes scarce, a team of Penn State researchers has shown that an unorthodox tactic will make it easier and therefore less expensive to capture adult salamanders and frogs. The researchers demonstrated that glow sticks — cheap, self-contained, short-term light-sources — attract the creatures to traps set in vernal pools where they come to reproduce in the spring. The translucent plastic tubes contain isolated substances that, when combined, make light through chemiluminescence. Often used for recreation, glow sticks are sometimes relied upon for light during military, police, fire or emergency operations. However, they have not been widely used in wildlife research and their appeal to amphibians is not well understood, according to David Miller, assistant professor of wildlife population ecology, College of Agricultural Sciences. For full story, click here.

Crime-scene technique used to track turtles

University of Exeter – November 6, 2017
Scientists have used satellite tracking and a crime-scene technique to discover an important feeding ground for green turtles in the Mediterranean. University of Exeter researchers measured “stable isotope ratios” – a chemical signature also used by forensic scientists – to discover which foraging grounds turtles had come from to breed in Cyprus. They discovered that Lake Bardawil, on Egypt’s north coast, is now the most important foraging ground for turtles which breed at Alagadi in Cyprus. For full story, click here.

Saving seagrasses from dredging - new research finds solutions

QUT – November 3, 2017
Timing of dredging is the key to helping preserve one of the world's most productive and important ecosystems - seagrass meadows.
• Seagrass meadows are among the most underappreciated but most important ecosystems in the world
• Seagrasses are disappearing at the same rate as tropical rainforests and coral reefs
• New research can provide answers on when and how much to dredge via an 'ecological window'
• Modelling provides up to a fourfold reduction in time it takes for seagrass to recover
The study, published overnight in Nature Communications, was led by QUT researchers in collaboration with seagrass experts at Edith Cowan and James Cook universities. For full story and to view video, click here.

U of G Study First to Identify Cells Driving Gecko’s Ability to Regrow Its Tail

Contact: Prof. Mattew Vickaryous– University of Guelph – November 2, 2017
A U of G researcher is the first to discover the type of stem cell that is behind the gecko’s ability to regrow its tail, a finding that has implications for spinal cord treatment in humans. This new research was recently featured in Popular Science and MSN. Prof. Matthew Vickaryous found that the spinal cord in the tail contained a large number of stem cells and proteins known to support stem cell growth. For full story, click here. 

Urban-Based Evolution: Species Are Rapidly Adapting to City Habitats

Yale Environment 360 – November 2, 2017
Cities around the globe are fueling evolution among microbes, plants, and animals, driving physical mutations and altering gene flow, according to a new analysis in the journal Science. The projected spread of urbanization in coming decades will continue to reshape and create new species in unexpected ways, the study found. For full story, click here.

U.S. Report Says Humans Cause Climate Change, Contradicting Top Trump Officials

By Lisa Friedman and Glenn Thrush – The New York Times – November 2, 2017
Directly contradicting much of the Trump administration’s position on climate change, 13 federal agencies unveiled an exhaustive scientific report on Friday that says humans are the dominant cause of the global temperature rise that has created the warmest period in the history of civilization. Over the past 115 years global average temperatures have increased 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit, leading to record-breaking weather events and temperature extremes, the report says. The global, long-term warming trend is “unambiguous,” it says, and there is “no convincing alternative explanation” that anything other than humans — the cars we drive, the power plants we operate, the forests we destroy — are to blame. For full story, click here.

New 'atlas' reveals Earth's microscopic communities

By Sierra Sarkis – NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory – November 1, 2017
The planet is home to a vast number of microscopic living organisms - plants, animals, and bacteria- found from deep sea volcanoes to the highest mountain peaks. These organisms too small to be seen by the naked eye affect both human health and the health of the world’s ecosystems. Despite their centrality to life on Earth, scientists have a limited understanding of their fundamental structure. In an effort to better understand these communities or ‘microbiomes,’ NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological scientists took part in a massive global research collaboration known as the Earth Microbiome Project (EMP), which recently released the first reference database, or atlas, of microbes covering the planet. This guide, released online in Nature today, will allow scientists to collaborate on studies and catalogue microbial diversity at an unprecedented scale. For full story, click here.

Protecting Norfolk from Flooding Won’t Be Cheap: Army Corps Releases Its Plan

By Nicholas Kusnetz – InsideClimate News – October 30, 2017
The federal government has proposed a $1.8 billion plan to help protect Norfolk, Virginia, from rising seas and increasingly powerful coastal storms by ringing the city with a series of floodwalls, storm surge barriers and tidal gates. The low-lying city is among the most vulnerable to sea level rise, and it's home to the nation's largest naval base. The combination has made protecting the region a matter of national security for the federal government. For full story, click here.

VIMS study may add to resource managers’ toolbox

By David Malmquist – VIMS – October 29, 2017
A major study by researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science shows that many diverse species of Chesapeake Bay fishes—whether they eat zooplankton, other fishes, or bottom-dwelling invertebrates—exhibit similar year-to-year trends in a common measure of their overall health. VIMS Professor Rob Latour says the study provides “useful indicators of fish health at time and space scales appropriate to guide management efforts for the Bay.” For full story, click here.

No salmon return to Canada River, bringing New England fears

The Tribune – October 29, 2017
A conservation group's discovery that no wild Atlantic salmon have returned to a key river in New Brunswick is prompting concern for the fish's population health in the U.S. and eastern Canada. The New Brunswick-based Atlantic Salmon Federation has been monitoring the Magaguadavic River for the Canadian government since 1992. The group says this year is the first time since then that no wild salmon have returned to the river to spawn. For full story, click here.

Pollution and the Rise of the Orange Marsh Zombies

By Shanna Baker – Hakai Magazine – October 23, 2017
The drama playing out in a New England estuary has all the makings of a Hollywood thriller: unwitting characters carrying out pleasant lives against a bucolic backdrop of branched waterways and rustling grasses when—suddenly!—they’re overtaken by a potent parasite. They turn pumpkin orange and wander away from shelter in zombie-like confusion. Eventually, they’re gobbled whole by winged monsters. Yet unlike the movies, this story is very real. Talitrid amphipods, also known as marsh hoppers, in Massachusett’s Plum Island Estuary, are afflicted by Levinseniella byrdi. And the parasite—flourishing under rampant pollution—causes its victims’ descent into the scuttling undead. For full article, click here.

Climate Change Could Increase Sun’s Ability to Disinfect Lakes, Coastal Waters

Atmos News – October 20, 2017
One of the largely unanticipated impacts of a changing climate may be a decline in sunlight's ability to disinfect lakes, rivers, and coastal waters, possibly leading to an increase in waterborne pathogens and the diseases they can cause in humans and wildlife. A new study published in the journal Scientific Reports outlines how a rise in the amount of organic matter washed into bodies of water can stunt the ability of pathogen-killing ultraviolet rays from the Sun to penetrate the water's surface. For full story, click here.

Nature is one of the most under-appreciated tools for reigning in carbon

By Emma Bryce – Anthropocene Magazine – October 20, 2017
A new study shows that better global land stewardship—conserving and restoring wild habitats and practicing more sustainable farming—could get us more than one-third of the way to the Paris climate mitigation targets. Nature may not be the most sexy tool in the shed, but it has tremendous power to move the climate change needle. In principle, the authors say, natural climate solutions could remove 23.8 billion tons of carbon dioxide equivalent from the atmosphere each year. For full article, click here.

Wetlands basin prevents Lake Superior pollution

By Shelley Nelson – Superior Telegram – October 20, 2017
Superior is relying on nature to clean pollutants from stormwater runoff at the recently constructed Poplar Wetlands Basin. The basin was constructed in 2016 at the end of Poplar Avenue north of 12th Street as part of a larger project to manage stormwater coming from Belknap Street when reconstruction of the State Highway 2 from Hill to Banks Avenues is completed in 2018. And it's already showing results. For full story, click here.

Midwest Braces For Climate Change Migrations North

By Joyce Coffee – Triple Pundit – October 20, 2017
For the third straight year, Illinois lost more residents in 2016 than any other state. But could climate change alter that trend? Chicagoans are talking about how much better the Midwest region seems since Hurricanes Harvey and Irma left such a devastating swath from Texas to the Atlantic coast. A friend’s parents are reconsidering leaving Chicago to retire to Florida, and a neighbor’s family in Houston talked about moving the family hub north as they camped out in his Detroit guest room after Hurricane Harvey struck Houston. So, is a reverse migration to the Midwest out of the question? For full story, click here.

Taking Marsh Restoration to a New Level

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service – October 18, 2017
“But it’s not Yosemite!” friends sometimes blurt out when I speak glowingly of Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge. “No,” I respond, “it’s better.” Few places on Earth better convey nature’s timeless beauty, productivity … and fragility. Here at Blackwater, soft green marsh grasses spread toward a distant horizon; small salt-marsh birds dart in and out of view; tree islands and forest fringe frame views of the marsh and coastal rivers — all competing for attention with majestic eagles soaring in dramatic Chesapeake skyscapes. Not for nothing is Blackwater frequently called the “Everglades of the North.” For full blog post, click here.

How a forest with more mammals stores more carbon

By Brandon Keim – Anthropocene Magazine – October 18, 2017
To the many moral and practical reasons for protecting the creatures with whom we share this blue marble, add one more. They might help Earth safely store more carbon. Writing in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, ecologists led by Mar Sobral and José Fragoso of Stanford University describe a three-year-long study of mammals and carbon cycles in southeast Guyana. Previous research suggested links between biodiversity and carbon storage; the more species of plants and animals there are in a given ecosystem, the more CO2 it seems to absorb. Exactly how this works, though, is still being revealed. For full article, click here.

NASA Satellite Reveals Biggest Greenhouse Gas Spike in 2,000 Years

By Lorenzo Tanos – Inquisitr – October 15, 2017
NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) has come back with some new and troubling findings on a carbon dioxide leak that resulted in a dramatic greenhouse gas spike during the 2015-16 El Niño period. According to a report from Space.com, the OCO-2 satellite emerged as an important and unique tool for analyzing upticks in greenhouse gas, having been launched in 2014, right before the record-high greenhouse gas spike that took place during the recent El Niño event. Working together with the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, OCO-2 returned the biggest annual atmospheric carbon dioxide increases “in at least 2,000 years” in both 2015 and 2016. Furthermore, there were three tropical land regions that released an additional 2.5 gigatons of carbon or more into the atmosphere, as compared to data from 2011. For full story, click here. 

 

 


University of Georgia Report Showing USACE Savannah District is Failing to Meet No Net Loss for Streams Informs Potential Changes to Mitigation Program

Katie S. Hill, Jonathon W. Skaggs, Hunter L. Jones, et al – Georgia Environmental Restoration Association – 2017
A recently released report from the River Basin Center (RBC) at the University of Georgia has informed proposed changes to the Army Corps Savannah District’s standards for compensatory mitigation. The report, No Net Loss in the U.S. Army Corps Savannah District, presents the findings of an assessment of whether the Savannah District is meeting the important national policy of “no net loss” of aquatic resources through its Clean Water Act Section 404 permitting and mitigation program. Through an extensive permit review and GIS analysis of mitigation banks, RBC staff found that, while the Savannah District appears to be meeting no net loss for wetlands, it is failing to do so for streams. The report also includes recommendations for changes to the Savannah District’s mitigation standards, many of which were included in newly proposed standards released in late July. Importantly, the proposed standards were ostensibly designed to achieve a baseline 1:1 aerial (I.e., feet and acres) mitigation to impact ratio, and also include mechanisms to ensure that this minimum ratio is met when permittees acting under the new standards are purchasing credits from mitigation banks established under the old system (critical in Georgia where many river basins contain a glut of existing stream credits). If the proposed standards are adopted and administered with necessary oversight, they could greatly improve compensatory mitigation in Georgia. For more information, contact Katie Hill at the UGA River Basin Center at .

Environmental Markets and Stream Barrier Removal

Jessica Wilkinson, et al. – The Nature Conservancy – October 2017
American waterways bear the effects of more than 100 years of heavy and widespread development. As a result, less than 2% of U.S. rivers are free-flowing—constrained by dams, levees and road crossings and other obstructions. The aim of this paper is to explore opportunities provided by existing regulatory programs in the United States to improve stream health through the removal of these barriers to aquatic connectivity. For more information and to download this report, click here.

The state of the world’s mangroves in the 21st century under climate change

Ilka C. Feller, Daniel A. Friess, Ken W. Krauss, et al. – Springer – September 2017
Concerted mangrove research and rehabilitation efforts over the last several decades have prompted a better understanding of the important ecosystem attributes worthy of protection and a better conservation ethic toward mangrove wetlands globally. While mangroves continue to be degraded and lost in specific regions, conservation initiatives, rehabilitation efforts, natural regeneration, and climate range expansion have promoted gains in other areas, ultimately serving to curb the high mangrove habitat loss statistics from the doom and gloom of the 1980s. For full article, click here.

Sea Rising Solutions Sea Level Rise App – Marla – not sure what to put for this…can you help me out?

Wetlands Watch – Video
Wetlands Watch saw the crowd sourcing that sprung up after Hurricane Sandy and realized there was an opportunity to involve the public more deeply in the process of adaptation. With a grant from Blue Moon Fund, they developed a phone app and have it in the field now, with V2.0 just released. Their goal is to involve more people in reporting impacts and to provide more detailed information about when and where flooding occurs and do it in a cost effective way. For more information and to view video, click here and to download the App, click here.



World's largest constructed wetland treatment plant to be expanded in Oman

By Tom Freyberg – WWi Magazine – November 8, 2017
German engineering company Bauer Nimr will expand the world’s largest constructed wetland as part of a contract with oil and gas company Petroleum Development Oman (PDO). Originally completed in 2011, the project was expanded in 2014 to 115,000 m3/day but this latest expansion will take the capacity to 175,000 m3/day. Bauer Nimr will design, construct and operate the site until 2044, which includes a 25-year operational period following construction completion slated for the end of 2019. For full article, click here.

Interior Department takes aim at key environmental mitigation policy. Here's what's at stake.

By Eric Holst Environmental Defense Fund November 7, 2017
The next policy battle in the Trump administration’s war on the environment is ramping up – and this time they’re targeting a critical mitigation policy. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service just announced a plan to review and potentially revise net benefit goals in its compensatory mitigation policy. It came on the very anniversary of a presidential memorandum that created the standards two years ago. The move follows a White House executive order to modify or rescind such policies throughout the U.S. Department of Interior to facilitate energy development in ecologically sensitive areas on private and public lands. For full blog post, click here.

The Scientist Who Reads a Lost History in the Mud

By Ann Finkbeiner – Hakai Magazine – November 1, 2017 – Video
“Let’s drive to Soldiers Delight,” says Grace Brush. So out we go up Baltimore’s treeless Reisterstown Road and down county back roads through Maryland’s thick summer green. Suddenly, we’re among hills with sparse grass and a slightly scrubby forest. This is Soldiers Delight Natural Environment Area, a serpentine barren that looks out of place in this lush country. It’s a peculiar landscape and Brush is a paleoecologist, an expert in the history of landscapes. She views landscapes the way physicians view bodies: systems of interconnected parts, changing with time, resilient until they’re not. Brush is 86 years old, so we stump cautiously along paths that are interrupted by corrugated pavements of silvery gray-green serpentine rock. It’s a little hard for her to navigate, though she’s paying less attention to her balance than to the rock itself. Serpentine was born directly from the Earth’s mantle and when it weathers, she says, “you don’t get much soil.” The dirt that does weather out is shallow, low in plant nutrients, and doesn’t hold water, so few tree species grow here. Brush points out what does grow—blackjack and post oak, sassafras, greenbrier, grasses, and ferns—and stops to examine the individuals. Our progress is slow but relentless. For full article and to view video, click here.

Using Nature to Build a Stronger Coast

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – October 27, 2017
What would the East Coast be like without any wetlands, marshes, or estuaries? What if the coastline were just open water slapping against concrete seawalls, bulkheads, and rock barriers? This is exactly the kind of coast that researchers explored in a recently published study of how wetlands help protect coastal communities from flood damage. Using computer models to estimate the property damage that would have occurred during Hurricane Sandy if all wetlands on the East Coast didn’t exist, the study found that wetlands prevented $625 million in damage during the storm. For full blog post, click here.

Key to stream restoration success: location, location, location

By Timothy B. Wheeler – Bay Journal – October 22, 2017
With millions of dollars being poured into urban and suburban stream restoration projects across the Chesapeake Bay watershed, a recent study suggests location matters when trying to assess how effective those efforts have been. After surveying 13 Baltimore highly degraded suburban streams that had undergone makeovers, a pair of researchers found that aquatic insect populations were larger and more diverse in isolated headwaters than in larger downstream reaches. “If biodiversity is important, (gains are) more apparent in smaller streams. And smaller streams, I would think, are going to be much cheaper to restore,” said Christopher Swan, the study’s lead author and professor of geography and environmental sciences at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. For full article, click here.

A Hard Shore Is a Dead Shore

By Amorina Kingdon – Hakai Magazine – October 16, 2017
The land beneath Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the United States, is sinking. Couple that with climate change, and the sea level is rising twice as fast as the global average, chewing away at shorelines and drowning islands. Private landowners, who occupy about 85 percent of the shoreline, have responded with walls, rocks, and barriers, which have helped slow the losses. But evidence is growing that this coastal hardening may be insufficient at holding back future seas, and is doing serious damage to more than a dozen fish and crustacean species. Now, planners and landowners are hoping engineered living shorelines can solve both problems at once. For full article, click here. 

Baltic clams and worms release as much greenhouse gas as 20,000 dairy cows

Stockholm University – October 13, 2017
Baltic clams and worms release as much greenhouse gas as 20 000 dairy cows. Worms and clams enhance the release of methane up to eight times more compared to sea bottoms without animals, shows a study by scientists at Stockholm University and Cardiff University. While greenhouse gas emissions are increasing to unprecedented levels, the source and sink mechanisms for these emissions are still not yet fully understood. For full story, click here.

Legislative Overreach Aims to Thwart Salmon Recovery

By Wendy McDermott – American Rivers – October 9, 2017
Historically, over ten million Columbia River Basin salmon and steelhead existed, but the number plummeted to fewer than 1 million in 1995, precipitating into the listing of 13 different species or populations of Columbia and Snake River salmonids as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Salmon and steelhead have a complex and fascinating lifecycle, one that begins in freshwater streams, segues into the ocean for a period of time, and ends in the same stream in which it was born, where the ones who survive their often long and daunting migration return to spawn and die. These salmonids are a remarkable, resilient keystone species but they are vulnerable at every stage of that life cycle. For full story, click here.  

 

WEBINARS

   

MEETINGS

 

TRAINING

 

SPECIAL EVENTS

 

WEBINARS
       
NOVEMBER 2017
       
November 29, 2017
12:00 p.m. ET 
  PennState Extension Webinar: WikiWatershed: An Online Toolkit for Water Resource Managers   
       
November 29, 2017
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of Sate Wetland Managers Members' Wetland Webinar:  Restoration Outcomes and Reporting: An Assessment of Wetland Area Gains in Wisconsin   
       
November 30, 2017
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of Sate Wetland Managers: Invasive Species Webinar: Biological Control Strategies and Lessons Learned for Giant Salvinia, Water Hyacinth and Alligatorweed  
       
November 30, 2017
3:00 p.m. ET
  Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar: Minnesota’s Overall and Watershed Approach to Flood Risk Reduction & Protection of Lakes & Streams  
       
November 30, 2017 - Part 1
December 14, 2017 - Part 2
1:00 p.m. ET 
  The Swamp School: Wetland Tree Webinar (2 Parts)  
       
DECEMBER 2017
       
December 6, 2017
3:00 p.m. ET
  Great Lakes Phragmites Collaborative Webinar: Ecological effects of invasive Phragmites in a Lake Erie coastal marsh  
       
December 6, 2017
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of Sate Wetland Managers: Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Mapping Innovations at the Michigan DEQ: New approaches, tools and technologies  
       
December 7, 2017
2:00 p.m. ET
  Forester University Webinar: Voodoo Hydrology – The Pitfalls of Urban Hydrology Methods  
       
December 12, 2017
2:00 p.m. ET
  U.S. Forest Service is sponsoring the webinar: Conservation and Management of Amphibians and Reptiles of the Southwestern United States  
       
December 13, 2017
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of Sate Wetland Managers Members’ Wetland Webinar: Working their Way Up or Downstream and Destroying Wetlands  
       
December 14, 2017
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of Sate Wetland Managers Invasive Species Webinar: Managing Invasive Species in the Great Lakes: Establishing Goals & Objectives, Monitoring Programs, and Cooperative Management Areas in Michigan  
       
December 15, 2017
9:00 a.m. ET 
  SERNW Webinar: Planning riparian restoration with plant functional group approaches  
       
MEETINGS
 
NOVEMBER 2017
       
November 23-24, 2017
St. John's, Newfoundland & Labrador
  Geomatics Atlantic 2017

 

 
       
November 28-30, 2017
Sanya, China  
  International Symposium on Environmental and Sustainability Agriculture Development  
       
November 29-30, 2017
Washington, DC 
  Solving Infrastructure Challenges Through Partnerships  
       
DECEMBER 2017
       
December 1, 2017
Washington, DC
  EcoAgriculture Partners: Landscape Roundtable: Nutrition-Sensitive Landscapes – Strategies to strengthen resilience for vulnerable populations  
       
December 6, 2017
Edgewater, MD
  Patuxent River Conference: River Management Stories: Making the Leap from Information to Application    
       
December 8, 2017
Linthicum, MD
  Maryland Water Monitoring Council Annual Conference  
       
December 11, 2017
Mechanicsburg, PA
  Center for Watershed Protection: Integrating Stream Restoration into Pennsylvania’s PRPs and Phase III WIPs  
       
December 11-15, 2017
New Orleans, LA
  AGU Fall Meeting

 
       
December 12-15, 2017
Clovivs, NM
  New Mexico Environment Department: Wetlands Across Borders   
       
December 13, 2017
Linthicum Heights, MD 
  Chesapeake Water Environment Association Fall Seminar: Stormwater, Too Simple?    
       
December 18-19, 2017
San Diego, CA
  ICHA 2017: 19th International Conference on Harmful Algae
 
 
JANUARY 2018
       
January 4-6, 2018
Acme, MI
  Northern Michigan Waterways Hazardous Material Spill Planning Committee: 27th Annual No Spills Conference: New and Innovative Technology for Spill Prevention & Response  
       
January 4-7, 2018
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada 
  Canadian Conference for Fisheries Research: Making a Difference to Canada's Aquatic Resources   
       
January 5-9, 2018
Pacific Grove, CA
  American Society of Naturalists Conference  
       
January 11-13, 2018
College Park, MD
  Future Harvest CASA (Chesapeake Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture) Annual Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed Conference  
       
January 23-25, 2018
Washington, D.C.
  National Council for Science & the Environment (NCSE): The Science, Business, and Education of Sustainable Infrastructure: Building Resilience in a Changing World  
       
January 29, 2018-February 2, 2018
Bariloche, Argentina  
  Species Range Shifts & Local Adaptation: Challenging ecologcial and evolutionary ideas and assumptions

 
       
January 31-February 1, 2018
Wilmington, DE
  2018 Delaware Wetlands Conference

 
       
FEBRUARY 2018
       
February 1-4, 2018
Princess Royal
Ocean City, MD 
  Maryland Association for Environmental & Outdoor Education: Expand Your Influence! Empowering Citizens Action for the Environment  
       
February 5-7, 2018
Denver, CO
  International LiDAR Mapping Forum  
       
February 7-8, 2018
Saskatoon, SK
  2018 Native Prairie Restoration/Reclamation Workshop: Look to the Future, Learn from the Past  
       
February 11-16, 2018 
Portland, OR
  2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting

 
       
February 13-17, 2018 
Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada
  Society for Ecological Restoration Meeting: Restoration for Resilience Ecological Restoration in the 21st Century  
       
February 20-22, 2018
Oconomowoc, WI  
  Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Wetland Science Conference  
       
February 28-March 1, 2018
Oconomowoc, WI 
  ICWMM: International Conference on Water Management Modeling
Submit an abstract by December 31, 2017
 
       
February 28-March 2, 2018
Denver, CO
  Climate Leadership Conference  
 
MARCH 2018
       
March 3, 2018
Worcester, MA
  Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commissions (MACC) Annual Environmental Conference  
       
March 5-7, 2018
Edmonton, Canada
  Sustainable Development Solutions Network: 2018 Cities and Climate Change Science Conference  
       
March 6-8, 2018
Chapel Hill, NC
  2018 Southeast Biodiversity Conservation Forum  
       
March 7-9, 2018 
Riviera Maya, Mexico
  World Ocean Summit   
       
March 8-9, 2018
University of Denver Sturm College
  Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute: 2018 Western Places/Western Spaces. Proposal deadline is August, 25, 2018  
       
March 14-15, 2018
Raleigh, NC
  Water Resources Research Institute Conference
Abstracts due December 8, 2017
 
       
March 14-16, 2018
Chattanooga, TN
  Southeast Regional Conference for Community and Land Conservation   
       
March 18-21, 2018
Scottsdale, AZ
  21st Annual NFDA Conference  
       
March 18-23, 2018
Brasilia, Brazil
  World Water Council: World Water Forum  
       
March 21-22, 2018
Singapore City, Singapore
  International Convention on Global warming and Climate Change  
       
March 25-28, 2018
Seattle, WA
  American Water Works Association: Sustainable Water Management Conference

 
       
APRIL 2018
       
April 8-12, 2018
Chicago, IL 
  US-IALE 2018 Annual Meeting  
       
April 13-15, 2018
Burlington, VT
  The Northeast Natural History Conference
Abstract deadline: February 26, 2018
 
       
April 18-20, 2018
Stevens Point, WI
  2018 Wisconsin Lakes Partnership Convention & Water Action Volunteers Symposium   
       
April 20-21, 2018
University of California at Berkeley
  Climate Change: Impacts & Responses Research Network: 2018 Special Focus: Engaging with Policy on Climate Change  
       
April 20-21, 2018
Thompsonville, MI 
  Michigan Lake and Stream Association, Inc. 57th Annual Conference: Preserving Your Freshwater Gem: The Essentials of Lake Stewardship  
       
April 20-22, 2018
Stevens Point, WI
 
  Midwest-Great Lakes Chapter of the Society for Ecological Restoration: 2018 Annual Chapter Meeting. Submit an abstract by December 1, 2017.   
       
April 22-25, 2018
Orlando, FL
  2018 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference; GIS & Water Resources X: Spatial Analysis of Watersheds: Ecological, Hydrological, and Societal Responses
Deadline for abstracts is January 9, 2018.
 
       
April 23-25, 2018
Rochester, NY
  New York State Floodplain and Stormwater Managers Association: 18th Annual Meeting  
       
April 23-26, 2018
Coral Springs, FL
  University of Florida: 12th International Symposium on Biogeochemistry of Wetlands  
       
April 24-26, 2018
Forat Collings, CO
  Instream Flow Council: Flow 2018 Managing Rivers, Reservoirs and Lakes in the Face of Drought: Practical Tools and Strategies for Sustaining and Protecting Ecological Values of Water  
       
April 25-26, 2018
Glens Falls, NY
  NEIWPCC: 29th Annual Nonpoint Source Pollution Conference  
 
 MAY 2018
       
May 4-5, 2018
San Diego, CA
  P3 Water Summit: Solving Water Challenges Through Partnerships   
       
May 5-8, 2018
Tours, France
  International Conference Climate Change & Water  
       
May 7-8, 2018
Atlanta, GA 
  Water Environment Reuse Foundation: 2018 Research Conference: Advancing Reuse & Integrated Water  
       
May 8-11, 2017
Louisville, KY 
  National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Invest in the Environment   
       
May 15-17, 2017
Strömstad, Sweden
  Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology at University of Gothenburg Conference: Marine Evolution 2018  
       
May 20-24, 2018
Detroit, MI
  Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting: Navigating Boundaries in Freshwater Science  
       
May 24-25, 2018
Montreal, Canada
  ICEWW 2018: 20th International Conference: Environment, Water and Wetlands  
       
May 29-June 1, 2018
Denver, CO
  Society of Wetland Scientists 2018 Annual Meeting: Wetland Science: Integrating Research, Practice and Policy - An Exchange of Expertise   
       
May 30-June 1, 2018
San Antonio, TX
  Resource Institute, Inc: Southwest Stream & Wetland Restoratoin Conference  
       
JUNE 2018
       
June 4-6, 2018
Berkeley, CA 
  Berkeley Natural History Museums, the Berkeley Initiative for Global Change Biology, and iDigBio Second Annual Digital Data in Biodiversity Research Conference  
       
June 10-13, 2018
Washington, DC
  National Flood Conference   
       
June 10-15, 2018
Victoria, B.C., Canada 
  ASLO (Association for the Science of Limnology and Oceanography) 2018 Summer Meeting  
       
June 12-15, 2018
Jyväskylä, Finland
  Scientific Committee of the Society for Conservation Biology Europe Section's 5th European Congress for Conservation Biology (ECCB 2018)  
       
June 17-22, 2018 
Phoenix, AZ
  Association of State Floodplain Managers Annual Conference: Managing Floods Where Mountains Meet the Desert  
       
June 18-21, 2018 
Cape Town, South Africa
  5th International Climate Change Adaptation Conference
Call for abstracts deadline is January 15, 2018
 
 
JULY 2018
       
July 8-11, 2018
Broomfield, CO
  Natural Hazards Center: 2018 Natural Hazards Workshop  
       
July 10-12, 2018
Minneapolis, MN
  US Water Alliance: One Water Summit  
       
July 21-26, 2018
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  North American Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB): Conservation Science, Policy, & Practice: Connecting the Urban to the Wild
 
       
AUGUST 2018
       
August 5-10, 2018
New Orleans, LA
  2018 ESA Annual Meeting  
       
August 13-16, 2018
Asheville, NC
  North Carolina State University: EcoStream Conference

 
       
August 26-30, 2018
New Orleans, LA
  National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration (NCER)
Call for Session Proposals due by October 1, 2017
 
       
August 26-31, 2018
Stockholm, Sweden
  SIWI: World Water Week: Water, ecosystems and human development  
       
OCTOBER 2018
       
October 7-11, 2018
Cleveland, OH
  The Wildlife Society's 25 Annual Conference  
       
October 21-29, 2018
Dubai
  13TH Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands  
 
DECEMBER 2018
       
December 8-13, 2018
Long Beach, CA
  Restore America’s Estuaries Conference: 9th National Summit on Coastal and Estuarine Restoration and Management  
       
TRAINING
       
       
NOVEMBER 2017
       
November 29, 2017 
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: The General Plan in California  
       
November 30-December 1, 2017 
Tiburon, CA
  San Francisco Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve Course: Advanced Wetland Delineation
 
 
DECEMBER 2017
   
December 1, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Water Quality Regulation and Permitting    
       
December 4, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School: Wetland Basic Delineation Training  
       
December 4, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service: Introduction to Species Status Assessment  
       
December 4, 2017
Seattle, WA
  Society for Ecological Restoration Webinar: Ecological Restoration in International Environmental Law  
       
December 4-5, 2017
Washington, DC 
  American Law Institute Continuing Legal Education: Clean Water Act: Law and Regulation 2017    
       
December 4-18, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals   
       
December 4-18, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Habitat Conservation Plans  
       
December 4, 2017-
February 26, 2018

Online
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator  
       
December 4, 2017-
February 26, 2018

Online
  The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design  
       
December 4, 2017-
February 26, 2018
Online 
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training   
       
December 6-8, 2017
Davis, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems  
       
December 7, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetlands of the World   
       
December 8, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Habitat Conservation Planning  
       
December 11, 2017-March 5, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Botanist  
       
December 13, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: POW! The Planning of Wetlands   
       
December 13-15, 2017
Davis, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: GIS for Forestry Application  
       
December 14, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern, Inc.: WOW! WOW! Facilitator   
       
December 14, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Implementing Citizen Science In Your Outdoor Classroom  
       
JANUARY 2018
       
January 5-6, 2018
Saukville, WI
  College of Letters & Science Field Station Workshop: Ecology and Physiology of Plants in Winter  
       
January 8-April 2, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School: Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training  
       
January 8-April 2, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School: Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator 2018  
       
January 8-February 5, 2018
Online 
  The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2018  
       
January 15-18, 2018
Cardiff-by-the-Sea, CA
  The Swamp School Course: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training  
       
January 15-February 12, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School: Online Course: Ecological Risk Assessment 2018  
       
January 15-April 9, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Botanist  
       
January 17-19, 2018
Knoxville, TX
  NIMBioS Investigative Workshop: Modeling Ecotoxicological Dynamics Subject to Stoichiometric Constraints  
       
January 18, 2018
Davis, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: GIS for Watershed Analysis: Intermediate
 
       
January 22-23, 2018
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Educatin Course: Rutugers Identificatoin of Wetland Plants in Winter  
       
January 26, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: CEQA: A Step-by-Step Approach   
       
January 25-26, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Planning in California: An Overview
Also held on February 22-23, 2018
 
       
January 29, 2018
Online
  UC Davis Extension Course: Introduction to NEPA   
       
January 31, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Groundwater Law and Hydrology   
       
FEBRUARY 2018
       
February 5-8, 2018
Seagoville, TX 
  The Swamp School Course: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training  
       
February 5-April 30, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training  
       
February 5-April 30, 2018 
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist  
       
February 8-9, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Successful CEQA Compliance: An Intensive Two-Day Seminar   
       
February 8-9, 2018
Washington, DC 
  American Law Institute Course: Environmental Law 2018
 
 
       
February 12-13, 2018
New Orleans, LA
  EUCI Course: Endangered Species Act, Wetlands, Stormwater & Floodplain Regulatory Compliance for Energy and Utilities  
       
February 12-23, 2018
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology
 
       
February 12-26, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals 2018
 
       
February 15, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Overview of California Water Law and Policy   
       
February 19-March 19, 2018 
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Phase 1 Environmental Assessments 2018  
       
February 21-22, 2018
Oakland, CA
  National Living Shorelines Tech Transfer Workshop  
       
February 26-March 26, 2018 
Online 
  The Swamp School Online Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment 2018  
       
February 21-22, 2018
Oakland, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Endangered Species Regulation and Protection   
       
February 28-March 1, 2018
Mt. Vernon, WA
  Washington Department of Ecology Course: Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats   
       
MARCH 2018
       
March 2, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: CEQA Update, Issues and Trends   
       
March 5, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Botanist  
       
March 5-May 28, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design  
       
March 5-May 28, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training  
       
March 8-9, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Planning and Environmental Law   
       
March 9, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Sustainable Transportation   
       
March 12-16, 2018
Asheville, NC
  Resource Institute: Level 1 - Applied Fluvial Morphology
 
       
March 12-26, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Habitat Conservation Plans  
       
March 14, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Using Specific Plans to Create Great Communities   
       
March 14-18, 2018
Bermuda
  Earth Institute Center for Environmental Sustainability Course: Coral Reef Ecology: Bermuda
 
       
March 16, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: LAFCO: Planning and Regulating the Boundaries and Service Areas of Cities and Special Districts in California   
       
March 19-April 16, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2018  
       
March 19-23, 2018
Asheville, NC
  Resource Institute: Level II - River Morphology and Application  
       
March 22, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Mitigation and Conservation Bankin  
       
March 23, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Annual Land Use Law Review and Update  
       
March 24, 2018
Rockport, MA
  Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commissions (MACC) Course: Fundamentals of Wetlands Enforcement  
 
APRIL 2018
       
April 2-June 25, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training  
       
April 2-June 25, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School: Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator 2018  
       
April 9-May 7, 2018
Online 
  The Swamp School: Online Course: Ecological Risk Assessment 2018  
       
April 12-13, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Planning and Environmental Law   
       
April 16-20, 2018
Front Royal, VA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
April 16-20, 2018
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: Communication and Facilitation Skills for Conservation Managers  
       
April 23-26, 2018
Aliquippa, PA
  The Swamp School: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training
 
       
April 23-May 21, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Phase 1 Environmental Assessments 2018  
       
April 30-May 28, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment 2018  
       
MAY 2018
       
May 27-June 2, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Introduction to Bryophytes and Lichens  
       
May 27-June 2, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Marine Intertidal Community Ecology  
       
JUNE 2018
       
June 3-9, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Sterile Crustose Lichens Unveiled  
       
June 10-16, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Mosses: Structure, Ecology, and Identification  
       
June 11-17, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Plate Tectonics of the Appalachians: A Traveling Geology Course, Maine to Quebec  
       
June 17-23, 2018
Steuben, ME  
  Eagle Hill Institute: Scientific Illustration with Pen and Ink and Color Pencil   
       
June 17-23, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Freshwater and Diadromous Fishes of New England  
       
June 24-30, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Lichens and Lichen Ecology  
       
June 24-30, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Sedges and Rushes: Identification and Ecology  
       
June 25-July 6, 2018
University of Montana
  Flathead Lake Bio Station: Conservation Ecology  
       
June 25-July 20, 2018
University of Montana
  Flathead Lake Bio Station: Seminars in Ecology and Resource Management  
       
JULY 2018    
       
July 1-7, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Dragonflies and Damselflies: Field Techniques and Identification  
       
July 1-7, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Grasses: Identification and Ecology  
       
July 1-7, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Drawing and Painting Birds in Watercolor and Colored Pencil  
       
July 8-14, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Spiders: Identification, Biology, and Ecology  
       
July 8-14, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Native Bees: Biology, Ecology, Identification and Conservation   
       
July 15-21, 2018
Steuben, ME  
  Eagle Hill Institute: Wetland Identification, Delineation and Ecology   
       
July 15-21, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Photographing Plants and Plant Habitats: Classical and Modern Techniques  
       
July 16-20, 2018
Boston, University 
  Summer Course: Ecological Forecasting
 
 
       
July 22-28, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Maine Seaweeds: Identification, Ecology, and Ethnobotany  
       
July 22-28, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Microlepidoptera: Collection, Preparation, Dissection, Identification, and Natural History  
       
July 29-August 4, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Mushroom Identification for New Mycophiles: Foraging for Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms  
       
July 29-August 4, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Tracks and Sign of Insects and Other Invertebrates  
       
July 29-August 4, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: The Eastern Maine Ice Age Landscape as a Record Hemispheric Climate Change: The Last Deglaciation: The Pineo Ridge Moraine and Emerged Delta Complex  
       
AUGUST 2018
       
August 5-11, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Sphagnum Mosses and Ecology  
       
August 5-11, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Aquatic Entomology  
       
Augut 6-17, 2018
University of Montana
  Flathead Lake Bio Station: Stream Ecology  
       
Augut 12-18, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Witness to Nature: A Creative Writing Workshop  
       
Augut 12-18, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Plant Anatomy and Microtechnique  
       
Augut 19-25, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Mushroom Microscopy: An Exploration of the Intricate Microscopic World of Mushrooms  
       
Augut 19-25, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Banding Songbirds and Raptors: Livetrapping, In-hand Aging and Sexing, and Data Collection for Research  
       
Augut 26-September 1, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Mosses: Orthotrichaceae of Maine  
       
Augut 26-September 1, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Independent Study: Pyrenolichens
 
 
       
SEPTEMBER 2018
       
September 17-28, 2018
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: The Ecology and Conservation of Migratory Birds  
       
September 24-28, 2018
Aliquippa, PA
  The Swamp School: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training  
   
SPECIAL EVENTS
       
February 2, 2018   World Wetlands Day: Wetlands for a Sustainable Urban Future   
       
February 22-25, 2018
Port Aransas, TX 
  Whooping Crane Festival  
       
April 21, 2018   World Fish Migration Day: Working together for happy fish  
       
April 22, 2018   Earth Day  
    
       

 


EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • EPA and the Army Propose to Amend the Effective Date of the 2015 Rule Defining “Waters of the United States”
  • EPA Announces Appointment of Alexandra Dunn to Region 1 Administrator
  • Five Star and Urban Waters Restoration Grant Program 2018 Request for Proposals 
  • Wild Facts About That Thanksgiving Bird
  • Nominate a Wetland Hero for the 2018 National Wetlands Awards!
  • Landowners in Deep South Protect 700,000 Acres of Wetlands with USDA Help
  • An 11-year-old has become 'America's Top Young Scientist' for her sensor detecting lead in water

NATIONAL NEWS

  • Bay program survey unveils promise and challenges of citizen stewardship
  • Lessons from Hurricane Harvey: Houston’s Struggle Is America’s Tale
  • Market-Driven Strategies for Preventing Agricultural-Based Pollution in America’s Watersheds
  • Atmospheric rivers could increase flood risk by 80 percent
  • EPA Recognizes Excellence and Innovation in Clean Water Infrastructure
  • NASA Ends Trailblazing Satellite Mission that Revealed Global Groundwater Trends
  • Luc Hoffmann Medal now open for nominations – Wetlands International
  •  Investing In Nature 101: A Triple Win for Cities, Communities, and Developers
  •  Boosting Birds Through Contagious Conservation
  • Pruitt's promised directive rattles science advisers
  • UVM Study: Warming Seas Could Lead to 70 Percent Increase in Hurricane-related Financial Loss
  • United States-Mexico Agreement Increases Water Security in the West

STATE NEWS

  • AK: Senate votes to raise revenue by drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
  • AZ: Major Water Rights Settlement for Arizona Tribe Goes to Congress
  • CA: Tracing Water’s Path through the Santa Clara Valley Aquifer
  • IL: Team finds first wild alligator snapping turtle in Illinois since 1984
  • IA: Iowa College creates campus wetland to filter farm runoff
  • LA: Funding will help protect Calcasieu wetlands from saltwater
  • LA: Resistance Builds to New Louisiana Oil Pipeline
  • LA: Louisiana faces unexpected shortfall in major source of funding for coastal protection
  • MD: Van Hollen bill would triple funding to protect Chesapeake Bay, other watersheds
  • MD: Project Could Save Acres of Marshland in Dorchester County
  • MD: Hurricanes no match for Baltimore’s Harriet the Osprey on her fall trek
  • MI: Michigan may weaken policy on ship ballast water treatment
  • MI: Superior Watershed Partnership reminds public of coastal reporting tool
  • MN: Tow it? Blow it up? Tie it down? Massive bog still menacing Brainerd-area lake
  • MS: Celebrating Landowner-Led Restoration in the Mississippi River Bottomlands
  • NY: Land trust expands preserve by purchasing more than 300 acres on Goose Bay
  • OK: Floating wetlands project underway
  • PA: Hellbender gets Senate OK as official Pennsylvania amphibian
  • PA: Ducks Unlimited to help with Plain Grove wetland restoration
  • PA: PA lawmakers cobble together budget - without needed boost for Bay, environment
  • PA: Pennsylvania projects get $5.8 million in grants for work to protect Chesapeake Bay
  • SD: Keystone pipeline shut down after spilling 5,000 barrels of oil in South Dakota
  • TX: Deepwater Horizon settlement funds to be used to improve Texas coastline
  • TX: Harvey runoff menaces Texas’ coral reefs
  • VA: Virginia Launches Plan to Join East Coast Carbon Market, Cut Emissions 30%
  • VA: Menhaden vote a mixed bag for Virginia
  • VA: James River health improving overall, but more work needed, report says
  • WA: With climate change, Mount Rainier floral communities could ‘reassemble’ with new species relationships, interactions
  • WI: Legislature passes bill allowing utilities to fill wetlands

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • New Research Could Predict La Niña Drought Years in Advance
  • Species in the north are more vulnerable to climate change
  • VIMS study identifies tipping point for oyster restoration
  • Low dose, constant drip: Pharmaceuticals & personal care products impact aquatic life
  • Study settles prehistoric puzzle, finds carbon dioxide link to global warming 22 million years ago
  • Nutria Eradication Project Successful, More to be Done
  • Changing climate to bring more landslides on logged land WSU research shows
  • Global carbon dioxide emissions projected to rise after three stable years
  • Eyes on the Coast—Video Cameras Help Forecast Coastal Change
  • Use of glow sticks in traps greatly increases amphibian captures in study
  • Crime-scene technique used to track turtles
  • Saving seagrasses from dredging - new research finds solutions
  • U of G Study First to Identify Cells Driving Gecko’s Ability to Regrow Its Tail
  • Urban-Based Evolution: Species Are Rapidly Adapting to City Habitats
  • U.S. Report Says Humans Cause Climate Change, Contradicting Top Trump Officials
  • New 'atlas' reveals Earth's microscopic communities
  • Protecting Norfolk from Flooding Won’t Be Cheap: Army Corps Releases Its Plan
  • VIMS study may add to resource managers’ toolbox
  • No salmon return to Canada River, bringing New England fears
  • Pollution and the Rise of the Orange Marsh Zombies
  • Climate Change Could Increase Sun’s Ability to Disinfect Lakes, Coastal Waters
  • Nature is one of the most under-appreciated tools for reigning in carbon
  • Wetlands basin prevents Lake Superior pollution
  • Midwest Braces For Climate Change Migrations North
  • Taking Marsh Restoration to a New Level
  • How a forest with more mammals stores more carbon
  • NASA Satellite Reveals Biggest Greenhouse Gas Spike in 2,000 Years

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • University of Georgia Report Showing USACE Savannah District is Failing to Meet No Net Loss for Streams Informs Potential Changes to Mitigation Program
  • Environmental Markets and Stream Barrier Removal
  • The state of the world’s mangroves in the 21st century under climate change
  • Sea Rising Solutions Sea Level Rise App

POTPOURRI

  • World's largest constructed wetland treatment plant to be expanded in Oman
  • Interior Department takes aim at key environmental mitigation policy. Here's what's at stake.
  • The Scientist Who Reads a Lost History in the Mud
  •  Using Nature to Build a Stronger Coast
  • Key to stream restoration success: location, location, location
  • A Hard Shore Is a Dead Shore
  • Baltic clams and worms release as much greenhouse gas as 20,000 dairy cows
  • Legislative Overreach Aims to Thwart Salmon Recovery

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Webinars

November

  • PennState Extension Webinar: WikiWatershed: An Online Toolkit for Water Resource Managers
  • ASWM Members’ Wetland Webinar: Restoration Outcomes and Reporting: An Assessment of Wetland Area Gains in Wisconsin
  • Association of Sate Wetland Managers: Invasive Species Webinar: Biological Control Strategies and Lessons Learned for Giant Salvinia, Water Hyacinth and Alligator Weed
  • Hosted by the Association of State Floodplain Managers: Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar: Minnesota’s Overall and Watershed Approach to Flood Risk Reduction & Protection of Lakes & Streams
  • The Swamp School: Wetland Tree Webinar (2 Parts)

December

  • Great Lakes Phragmites Collaborative Webinar: Ecological effects of invasive Phragmites in a Lake Erie coastal marsh
  • Association of Sate Wetland Managers: Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Mapping Innovations at the Michigan DEQ: New approaches, tools and technologies
  • Forester University Webinar: Voodoo Hydrology – The Pitfalls of Urban Hydrology Methods
  • U.S. Forest Service is sponsoring the webinar: Conservation and Management of Amphibians and Reptiles of the Southwestern United States
  • ASWM Members’ Wetland Webinar: How to Keep Headcuts from Working their Way Up or Downstream and Destroying Wetlands
  • Association of Sate Wetland Managers Invasive Species Webinar: Managing Invasive Species in the Great Lakes: Establishing Goals & Objectives, Monitoring Programs, and Cooperative Management Areas in Michigan
  • SERNW Webinar: Planning riparian restoration with plant functional group approaches

Meetings

November

  • Geomatics Atlantic 2017
  • International Symposium on Environmental and Sustainability Agriculture Development
  • Solving Infrastructure Challenges Through Partnerships

December

  • EcoAgriculture Partners: Landscape Roundtable: Nutrition-Sensitive Landscapes – Strategies to strengthen resilience for vulnerable populations
  • Patuxent River Conference: River Management Stories: Making the Leap from Information to Application
  • Maryland Water Monitoring Council Annual Conference
  • Center for Watershed Protection: Integrating Stream Restoration into Pennsylvania’s PRPs and Phase III WIPs
  • AGU Fall Meeting
  • New Mexico Environment Department: Wetlands Across Borders
  • Chesapeake Water Environment Association Fall Seminar: Stormwater, Too Simple?
  • ICHA 2017: 19th International Conference on Harmful Algae

January

  • Northern Michigan Waterways Hazardous Material Spill Planning Committee: 27th Annual No Spills Conference: New and Innovative Technology for Spill Prevention & Response
  • Canadian Conference for Fisheries Research: Making a Difference to Canada's Aquatic Resources
  • American Society of Naturalists Conference
  • Future Harvest CASA Annual Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed Conference
  • National Council for Science & the Environment (NCSE): The Science, Business, and Education of Sustainable Infrastructure: Building Resilience in a Changing World
  • Species Range Shifts & Local Adaptation: Challenging ecological and evolutionary ideas and assumptions
  • 2018 Delaware Wetlands Conference

February

  • Maryland Association for Environmental & Outdoor Education Expand Your Influence! Empowering Citizens Action for the Environment
  • International LiDAR Mapping Forum
  • 2018 Native Prairie Restoration/Reclamation Workshop: Look to the Future, Learn from the Past
  • 2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting
  • Society for Ecological Restoration Meeting: Restoration for Resilience Ecological Restoration in the 21st Century
  • Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Wetland Science Conference
  • ICWMM: International Conference on Water Management Modeling
  • Climate Leadership Conference

March

  • Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commissions (MACC) Annual Environmental Conference
  • Sustainable Development Solutions Network: 2018 Cities and Climate Change Science Conference
  • 2018 Southeast Biodiversity Conservation Forum
  • World Ocean Summit
  • Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute: 2018 Western Places/Western Spaces
  • Water Resources Research Institute Conference
  • Southeast Regional Conference for Community and Land Conservation
  • 21st Annual NFDA Conference 
  • World Water Council: World Water Forum
  • International Convention on Global warming and Climate Change
  • American Water Works Association: Sustainable Water Management Conference

April

  • US-IALE 2018 Annual Meeting
  • The Northeast Natural History Conference
  • 2018 Wisconsin Lakes Partnership Convention & Water Action Volunteers Symposium
  • Climate Change: Impacts & Responses Research Network: 2018 Special Focus: Engaging with Policy on Climate Change
  • Michigan Lake and Stream Association, Inc. 57th Annual Conference: Preserving Your Freshwater Gem: The Essentials of Lake Stewardship
  • Midwest-Great Lakes Chapter of the Society for Ecological Restoration: 2018 Annual Chapter Meeting
  • 2018 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference; GIS & Water Resources X: Spatial Analysis of Watersheds: Ecological, Hydrological, and Societal Responses
  • New York State Floodplain and Stormwater Managers Association: 18th Annual Meeting
  •  University of Florida: 12th International Symposium on Biogeochemistry of Wetlands
  • Instream Flow Council: Flow 2018
  • NEIWPCC: 29th Annual Nonpoint Source Pollution Conference

May

  • P3 Water Summit: Solving Water Challenges Through Partnerships
  • International Conference Climate Change & Water
  • Water Environment Reuse Foundation: 2018 Research Conference: Advancing Reuse & Integrated Water
  • National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Invest in the Environment
  • Centre for Marine Evolutionary Biology at University of Gothenburg Conference: Marine Evolution 2018
  • Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting: Navigating Boundaries in Freshwater Science
  • ICEWW 2018: 20th International Conference: Environment, Water and Wetlands
  • SWS 2018 Annual Meeting: Wetland Science: Integrating Research, Practice and Policy - An Exchange of Expertise
  • Resource Institute, Inc.: Southwest Stream & Wetland Restoration Conference

June

  • Berkeley Natural History Museums, the Berkeley Initiative for Global Change Biology, and iDigBio Second Annual Digital Data in Biodiversity Research Conference
  • National Flood Conference
  • ASLO 2018 Summer Meeting
  • Scientific Committee of the Society for Conservation Biology Europe Section's 5th European Congress for Conservation Biology
  • Association of State Floodplain Managers Annual Conference: Managing Floods Where Mountains Meet the Desert
  • 5th International Climate Change Adaptation Conference

July

  • Natural Hazards Center: 2018 Natural Hazards Workshop
  • US Water Alliance: One Water Summit
  • North American Congress for Conservation Biology: Conservation Science, Policy, & Practice: Connecting the Urban to the Wild

August

  • 2018 ESA Annual Meeting
  • North Carolina State University: EcoStream Conference
  • National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration (NCER)
  • SIWI: World Water Week: Water, ecosystems and human development

October

  • The Wildlife Society’s 25 Annual Conference
  • 13TH Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands

December

  • Restore America’s Estuaries Conference: 9th National Summit on Coastal and Estuarine Restoration and Management

Training

November

  • UC Davis Extension Course: The General Plan in California
  • San Francisco Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve Course: Advanced Wetland Delineation

December

  • UC Davis Extension Course: Water Quality Regulation and Permitting
  • The Swamp School: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service: Introduction to Species Status Assessment
  • Society for Ecological Restoration Webinar: Ecological Restoration in International Environmental Law
  • American Law Institute Continuing Legal Education: Clean Water Act: Law and Regulation 2017
  • The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
  • The Swamp School Course: Habitat Conservation Plans
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
  • The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetlands of the World
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Habitat Conservation Planning
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Botanist
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: POW! The Planning of Wetlands
  • UC Davis Extension Course: GIS for Forestry Application
  • Environmental Concern, Inc.: WOW! WOW! Facilitator
  • Environmental Concern Course: Implementing Citizen Science In Your Outdoor Classroom

January

  • College of Letters & Science Field Station Workshop: Ecology and Physiology of Plants in Winter
  • The Swamp School: Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School: Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator 2018
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2018
  • The Swamp School Course: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School: Online Course: Ecological Risk Assessment 2018
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Botanist
  • NIMBioS Investigative Workshop: Modeling Ecotoxicological Dynamics Subject to Stoichiometric Constraints
  • UC Davis Extension Course: GIS for Watershed Analysis: Intermediate
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Rutgers Identification of Wetland Plants in Winter
  • UC Davis Extension Course: CEQA: A Step-by-Step Approach
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Planning in California: An Overview
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Introduction to NEPA
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Groundwater Law and Hydrology

February

  • The Swamp School Course: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Successful CEQA Compliance: An Intensive Two-Day Seminar
  • American Law Institute Course: Environmental Law 2018
  • EUCI Course: Endangered Species Act, Wetlands, Stormwater & Floodplain Regulatory Compliance for Energy and Utilities
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals 2018
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Overview of California Water Law and Policy
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Phase 1 Environmental Assessments 2018
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment 2018
  • National Living Shorelines Tech Transfer Workshop
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Endangered Species Regulation and Protection
  • Washington Department of Ecology Course: Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats

March

  • UC Davis Extension Course: CEQA Update, Issues and Trends
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Botanist
  • The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Planning and Environmental Law
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Sustainable Transportation
  • Resource Institute: Level 1 - Applied Fluvial Morphology
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Habitat Conservation Plans
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Using Specific Plans to Create Great Communities
  • Earth Institute Center for Environmental Sustainability Course: Coral Reef Ecology: Bermuda
  • UC Davis Extension Course: LAFCO: Planning and Regulating the Boundaries and Service Areas of Cities and Special Districts in California
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2018
  • Resource Institute: Level II - River Morphology and Application
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Mitigation and Conservation Banking
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Annual Land Use Law Review and Update
  • Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commissions (MACC) Course: Fundamentals of Wetlands Enforcement

April

  • The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School: Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator 2018
  • The Swamp School: Online Course: Ecological Risk Assessment 2018
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Planning and Environmental Law
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: Communication and Facilitation Skills for Conservation Managers
  • The Swamp School: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Phase 1 Environmental Assessments 2018
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment 2018

May

  • Eagle Hill Institute: Introduction to Bryophytes and Lichens
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Marine Intertidal Community Ecology

June

  • Eagle Hill Institute: Sterile Crustose Lichens Unveiled
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Mosses: Structure, Ecology, and Identification
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Plate Tectonics of the Appalachians: A Traveling Geology Course, Maine to Quebec
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Scientific Illustration with Pen and Ink and Color Pencil
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Freshwater and Diadromous Fishes of New England
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Lichens and Lichen Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Sedges and Rushes: Identification and Ecology
  • Flathead Lake Bio Station: Conservation Ecology
  • Flathead Lake Bio Station: Seminars in Ecology and Resource Management

July

  • Eagle Hill Institute: Dragonflies and Damselflies: Field Techniques and Identification
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Grasses: Identification and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Drawing and Painting Birds in Watercolor and Colored Pencil
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Spiders: Identification, Biology, and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Native Bees: Biology, Ecology, Identification and Conservation
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Wetland Identification, Delineation and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Photographing Plants and Plant Habitats: Classical and Modern Techniques
  • Summer Course: Ecological Forecasting
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Maine Seaweeds: Identification, Ecology, and Ethnobotany
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Microlepidoptera: Collection, Preparation, Dissection, Identification, and Natural History
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Mushroom Identification for New Mycophiles: Foraging for Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Tracks and Sign of Insects and Other Invertebrates
  • Eagle Hill Institute: The Eastern Maine Ice Age Landscape as a Record Hemispheric Climate Change: The Last Deglaciation: The Pineo Ridge Moraine and Emerged Delta Complex

August

  • Eagle Hill Institute: Sphagnum Mosses and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Aquatic Entomology
  • Flathead Lake Bio Station: Stream Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Witness to Nature: A Creative Writing Workshop
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Plant Anatomy and Microtechnique
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Mushroom Microscopy: An Exploration of the Intricate Microscopic World of Mushrooms
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Banding Songbirds and Raptors: Livetrapping, In-hand Aging and Sexing, and Data Collection for Research
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Mosses: Orthotrichaceae of Maine
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Independent Study: Pyrenolichens

September

  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: The Ecology and Conservation of Migratory Birds
  • The Swamp School: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training 

SPECIAL EVENT

  • World Wetlands Day: Wetlands for a Sustainable Urban Future
  • Whooping Crane Festival
  • World Fishgration Day: Working together for happy fish
  • Earth Day
       
Wetland Breaking News - September 2017
 
 

Wetland Breaking News - March 2016

The Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News (WBN) is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those working in water resources and related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published Wetland Breaking News - January 2017for over fifteen years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to .

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled and Edited by Marla Stelk, Editor; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors. Executive Director: Jeanne Christie. Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399 Fax: 207-892-3089
All photos by Jeanne Christie, ASWM
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