IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

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All photos by
Jeanne Christie, ASWM

   



Dear Wetlanders,

Summertime in southern Maine is off to a great start. I haven’t quite made it to the beach yet or for my first lobster bake of the season, but the warmer weather and sunny days certainly has me anxious to do so. Hundreds of thousands of tourists come to Maine each summer to enjoy our outdoor recreation opportunities, including hiking, biking, fishing, kayaking, boating, bird watching, etc. -- not only along our beautiful and diverse coastal shoreline, but also inland among our multiple lakes, ponds, rivers and mountains. Maine’s economy is fundamentally and explicitly supported by our abundant, healthy and diverse pool of natural resources, not only for tourism but also for our forestry and commercial fishing/shellfishing industries.

Although the unsubstantiated argument that we have to choose between a healthy environment and a healthy economy has popped up again and again over the last 3-40 years, I think fewer and fewer people are still falling for the idea that it’s an either-or situation. The continued refinement and use of ecosystem service valuation tools has improved our ability to engage in discussions and provide quantitative support for the value of our natural resources. I’ve included some articles in this month’s edition of Wetland Breaking News that illustrate how protecting our environment creates good jobs, supports healthy economies, and fosters resilient communities. For example, in my Editor’s Choice section, you’ll find an article about how stream restoration activities in coal country, made possible by the Clean Water Act, have created a multi-billion dollar industry that creates good paying local jobs and increases local economic activity. You’ll also find an article about how over 1,400 U.S. cities, state and businesses vow to meet the Paris Climate Commitments because doing so is good for business and their budgets.

In the National News section, you’ll find a story that discusses how sustainable investments in nature can really pay off for private investors. In State News, you’ll read about the ongoing discussions in California regarding the potential for carbon markets. You’ll also see a story on how California State Agencies are piloting a wildlife crossing mitigation credit system. And in Maine, where as I mentioned previously, our economy is heavily dependent on our stocks of natural resources for tourism and industry, a recent report warns us that the Gulf of Maine will become too warm to support many key fish species. Our country’s entire market system is built on two critical components: ingenuity and natural resources.

And at the end of the month, on June 28th, ASWM is hosting a Members Webinar titled, “The Price of Everything and the Value of Nothing: Is Ecosystem Valuation Worth It?” Ecosystem service valuation has proven to be a great tool for educating people about the value of nature, but it’s not a silver bullet. We hope you’ll join us to learn how to make sure that your ecosystem service valuation is done right.

Best wishes for a wonderful summer,

Marla J. Stelk
Editor, Wetland Breaking News

   
             
             

Playing the Long Game on Energy: Avoiding Pendulum Politics and Regulatory Risk

By Kyle Danish – Center for Strategic & International Studies – June 7, 2017
Last week, the Donald Trump administration announced its decision to leave the Paris Agreement. The decision was treated by many government and corporate leaders around the world as an immediate and abrupt abandoning of the global climate effort. In reality, the process for withdrawing from the agreement is lengthy, and the concrete steps for meeting the U.S. commitment under the agreement were already being targeted for reconsideration through the deregulatory agenda launched during the first 100 days. Indeed, the Trump administration has embarked on an ambitious agenda to roll back regulation that it considers “harmful to U.S. workers, energy production, and the U.S. economy.” This includes a long list of policy actions, among them dialing back methane emission regulations, modifying the Waters of the United States rule, revisiting greenhouse-gas emission standards for new motor vehicles and power plants, and revising the 2017–2022 oil and gas leasing program. For full story, click here.

Over 1,400 U.S. Cities, States and Businesses Vow to Meet Paris Climate Commitments

By Georgina Gustin – InsideClimate News – June 6, 2017
President Donald Trump may be yanking the United States from the Paris climate agreement, but states, cities and businesses are filling the vacuum by making their own commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions—and the numbers are mounting. On Monday, more than 1,000 companies and institutions, including more than a dozen Fortune 500 businesses, signed onto a statement—"We Are Still In"—saying they're committed to meeting the Paris targets. The statement calls Trump's decision "a grave mistake that endangers the American public and hurts America's economic security and diplomatic reputation." By Tuesday, the coalition's numbers had climbed past 1,400. A dozen states that together represent the world's third-largest economy and more than 200 cities had also committed to the Paris accord through various coalitions. For full story, click here

85 percent of the top science jobs in Trump’s government don’t even have a nominee

By Chris Mooney – The Washington Post – June 6 2017
Presidents invariably encounter key moments where they need to rely on scientific expertise. George W. Bush faced an anthrax attack after 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina. Barack Obama faced the Gulf of Mexico oil spill and the Ebola outbreak. Now President Trump has made a momentous decision about climate change. “When the crisis occurs, whether it’s an oil well blowout or an emerging disease or a tunnel collapse at a nuclear facility, that’s too late to get up to speed,” said Rush Holt, the chief executive of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. “You want people who are up to speed before the crisis occurs.” Trump is facing science-focused problems and issues with a key limitation: lack of staffing. For full story, click here

Revenue Stream: How An Environmental Law Creates Jobs in Coal Country

By Glynis Board – Ohio Valley Resource – March 31, 2017
When President Donald Trump visited Kentucky for a recent rally he returned to a common theme from his campaign: environmental regulations are job-killers. “I have already eliminated a devastating anti-coal regulation,” he said, referring to a measure he recently signed overturning a Department of Interior stream protection rule. “And that is just the beginning,” the president continued, pledging to turn the Environmental Protection Agency “from a job killer into a job creator.” But in parts of coal country, environmental regulations aren’t killing jobs, they’re creating them. Stream restoration made possible under the Clean Water Act is a multi-billion dollar industry and some former coal miners are finding work thanks to this revenue stream. For full story, click here.
 

 

 

The Standing Rock Sioux Claim ‘Victory and Vindication’ in Court

By Robinson Meyer – The Atlantic – June 14, 2017
A federal judge ruled in favor of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe on Wednesday, handing the tribe its first legal victory in its year-long battle against the Dakota Access pipeline. James Boasberg, who sits on D.C. district court, said that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers failed to perform an adequate study of the pipeline’s environmental consequences when it first approved its construction. In a 91-page decision, the judge cited the Corps’ study of “the impacts of an oil spill on fishing rights, hunting rights, or environmental justice” as particularly deficient, and he ordered it to prepare a new report on its risks. For full story, click here. 

Schuette ups the ante in Flint water crisis with new manslaughter charges

BY Ron Fonger – MLive – June 14, 2017
Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette says his Flint water crisis investigation is shifting to "the trial phase," but before it gets there, he's ramped up the stakes by charging five state and local officials with manslaughter for their actions related to the Flint water crisis. "Our team ... will continue to pursue and gather new evidence, and we will follow aggressively any tips, information and leads that may be presented," Schuette said during a news conference Wednesday, June 14. "But as we shift to the trial phase of this investigation, we will turn to the prosecution of the individuals that have been charged with crimes." For full story, click here. 

Zinke Says Tribes Are ‘Happy’ to Have Bears Ears Modifications; Tribes Disagree

By Rob Capriccioso – Indian Country Today – June 13, 2017
U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke is misrepresenting tribal positions about his plan to reduce a yet unspecified portion of the Bears Ears National Monument while increasing tribal co-management of the site, according to tribal officials and their lawyers. “I’ve met with the tribes, I’ve talked to tribes, and, quite frankly, I think the tribes, most importantly, desire co-management [of Bears Ears],” Zinke said in a press call hosted by Interior on June 12 after he issued an interim report with recommendations to President Donald Trump in response to Trump’s April 26 “Presidential Executive Order on the Review of Designations Under the Antiquities Act.” Trump’s order is aimed at reducing and rescinding the status of several national monuments throughout the country. “I think, talking to tribes, they’re very happy,” Zinke said of his proposal, adding that he “talked to all parties, and they’re pretty happy and willing to work with us.” For full story, click here. 

Charting Canada’s troubled waters: Where the danger lies for watersheds across the country

By Ivan Semeniuk – The Global and Mail – June 12, 2017
With a mere 0.5 per cent of the world’s population, Canada has jurisdiction over 20 percent of the global water supply – a vast and valuable resource that is largely taken for granted by those who depend on it. Yet, according to the first national assessment of Canada’s freshwater ecosystems in decades, there is plenty of cause for concern. Each of the country’s 25 major watersheds is facing multiple environmental threats, while the data needed to track changes and guide policy makers are surprisingly inaccessible or simply non-existent. For full story, click here.

Trump says environmental reports should shrink to ‘a few simple pages’

By Michael Laris – The Washington Post – June 9, 2017 – Video
After a day dominated by James B. Comey’s testimony and a week of persistent Democratic opposition to President Trump’s approach to infrastructure, Trump on Friday appeared before a friendly audience at the U.S. Department of Transportation to try to build some momentum for a signature campaign promise. Standing in a sunlit atrium, flanked by American flags and convoluted charts illustrating the permitting process, Trump said his administration will drastically speed up project approvals as part of his infrastructure initiative. He met earlier with state transportation officials. For full story and to view video, click here.

Grouse storm: Trump team launches protection plan review, vows greater flexibility for states and industry

By Bruce Finley – The Denver Post – June 7, 2017
Trump administration officials dove into the sticky details of pruning federal environmental protections in Western states, launching a review of hard-fought plans for managing the imperiled greater sage grouse — and igniting criticism that they are upending work that is based on science. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke on Wednesday said he wants to give states greater flexibility to allow more oil and gas development, try new tactics such as captive-breeding, and shift toward the use of grouse population targets rather than preserving habitat. Zinke also told reporters in a conference call that he expects reports in 60 days from an interagency team assessing the not-yet-implemented plans state and federal officials finalized in 2015 as a basis for not listing grouse an endangered species. And Zinke said he’s confident grouse will not be listed as endangered. For full story, click here.

U.S. Pays Farmers Billions To Save The Soil. But It's Blowing Away

By Dan Charles – NPR – The Salt – June 7, 2017
Neil Shook was relaxing at home in Woodworth, N.D., on a Saturday afternoon just over a week ago. "My wife was outside and she yelled at me to come outside and take a look at this," he recalls. A massive brown cloud covered the horizon to the west. It was a dust storm — although Shook, who's a scientist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, doesn't like to call it dust. "I like to refer to it as soil, because that's basically what it is," he says. "We saw this huge soil cloud moving from west to east across the landscape." That soil cloud is a result of farming practices — and of government policies. For full story, click here

Sessions bars settlement funds from going to outside groups

By Amanda Reilly – E&E News – June 7, 2017
The Justice Department will no longer require companies to donate to nongovernmental third parties as part of criminal and civil settlements, a move that could block money from going toward environmental projects. Attorney General Jeff Sessions sent a memo Monday to all department heads and U.S. attorneys ending the practice. Settlement funds should only be used to compensate victims, redress harm, and punish and deter unlawful conduct, Sessions said today in a statement. For full story, click here

Puerto Rico declares Zika epidemic to be over

By Lena H. Sun – The Washington Post – June 5, 2017
Puerto Rico’s Zika epidemic has ended, officials said Monday, noting substantially fewer new cases this spring. Only 10 cases have been reported in each four-week period since April, a dramatic decrease from the more than 8,000 cases reported in a four-week period at the peak of the epidemic last August, according to a health ministry statement. The island has been the part of the United States hardest hit by the mosquito-borne virus, with authorities counting more than 40,000 confirmed cases of Zika infection as of May 20, including 3,678 pregnant women. There have been 35 cases of Zika-related birth defects. For full story, click here

Threat of Wetland Deregulation Inspires Records Suit

By Daniel W. Staples – Courthouse News Service – June 5, 2017
Worried that federal regulators will weaken federal wetland protections, a nonprofit brought a federal complaint to expose whether outside groups influenced an executive order targeting the Clean Water Rule. “The Clean Water Act is our most important safeguard for the health of the nation’s waters and wetlands, so the public has a right to know why Trump’s EPA is doing the bidding of special-interest polluters,” Brett Hartl, government affairs director at the Center for Biological Diversity said in a statement about the group’s June 1 lawsuit. Filed with a federal judge in Washington, the complaint comes after the center has waited nearly three months for an answer to its records request under the Freedom of Information Act.  For full story, click here

Exxon's Climate Accounting a 'Sham' Under Rex Tillerson, New York’s AG Says

BY Nicholas Kusnetz – InsideClimate News – June 2, 2017
New York's attorney general has accused ExxonMobil of misleading investors by using two sets of numbers in its greenhouse gas accounting—one shown to investors, and a "secret" set used internally by the company. In a document filed in a New York court on Friday, Attorney General Eric Schneiderman says that Rex Tillerson, who was then the chief executive of Exxon and is now the U.S. secretary of state, approved of what "may be a sham." Schneiderman spelled out the evidence for the first time from documents and testimony already turned over by Exxon, and demanded more information under additional subpoenas in a probe that has been going on since 2015. The details of the allegation provide the most substantive evidence yet that the energy company may have misrepresented the financial risks posed to its business by climate change. For full story, click here.

EPA offers buyouts in a bid to cut employees

By Valerie Volcovic – St. Louis Post-Dispatch – June 1, 2017
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency initiated a buyout program on Thursday to reduce staff numbers as the agency seeks to refocus its agenda on reducing regulation, according to an internal memo to staff seen by Reuters. The memo was sent to all EPA employees on Thursday afternoon as EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt joined President Donald Trump at the White House where the Republican president announced the United States would withdraw from the Paris climate agreement. For full story, click here.

Analysis | Trump says goodbye to the Paris climate agreement. Here’s what that means.

By Joshua Busby – MSN – June 1, 2017
For months, “Will he or won’t he?” has been the parlor game among those wondering whether the Trump administration would withdraw from the 2015 Paris climate agreement. Today, we have the official answer: Yes, President Trump will withdraw the United States from the Paris Agreement. For full story, click here.

EPA halts Obama-era rule on methane pollution

By Devin Henry – The Hill – May 31, 2017
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has halted an Obama administration rule to cut down on pollution of methane, a greenhouse gas produced at oil and natural gas drilling wells. The EPA on Wednesday said it had issued a 90-day stay of agency rules designed to limit methane leaks at drilling sites, as well as rules setting standards for equipment and employee certification. President Trump ordered the EPA to reconsider the methane standards in March when he signed an executive order to repeal several Obama administration climate regulations. For full story, click here. 

Study: Water quality can improve by 20% — without cost

By Brita Moore – agrinews.com – May 27, 2017
A University of Minnesota research team has come up with a result that could be a big help for water quality planners. Derric Pennington, a research associate at the university's Institute on the Environment, recently led a study on Seven Mile Creek, an agricultural watershed in the Minnesota River basin. It is titled "Cost-effective Land Use Planning: Optimizing Land Use and Land Management Patterns to Maximize Social Benefits." The study's aim was to come up with a model of how agricultural practices can reduce sediment and phosphorus the most in a given watershed, without costing farmers agricultural income. For full story, click here

UPDATED: Trump Budget Would Still Increase Water Pollution

By Jon Devine – NRDC – May 25, 2017
The Trump administration released its more detailed budget proposal yesterday, following up on an outline that it announced in March. Even though its initial proposal appalled people across the political spectrum as a cruel attack on essential programs, the administration didn’t pay any attention. Yesterday’s version is just a more specific run-down of how comprehensively the administration wants to do away with initiatives that improve people’s health and well-being. For full story, click here.

House approves bill seeking to upend EPA pesticide rule

By Michael Biesecker - Associated Press – ABC News – May 24, 2017
The House on Wednesday passed a Republican-backed measure reversing an Environmental Protection Agency requirement that those spraying pesticides on or near rivers and lakes file for a permit. The chamber voted largely along party lines to approve the Reducing Regulatory Burdens Act of 2017. In the preceding floor debate, the bill's supporters said the rule requiring a permit under the Clean Water Act before spraying pesticides is burdensome and duplicative. EPA already regulates pesticide safety under a different law that gives the agency authority to place restrictions on when and where spraying can occur. For full story, click here.

Trump budget plan would squeeze states over environmental programs

By Ledyard King – USA Today – May 22, 2017 – Video
President Trump’s budget is a double-whammy for states: Not only would it cut grants to their environmental programs by nearly $500 million next year, states still would have to meet federal monitoring and compliance targets or face severe sanctions from Washington including the potential loss of highway aid. The environmental cuts are outlined in budget documents for the Environmental Protection Agency obtained by the National Association of Clean Air Agencies, the trade group that represents state agencies regulating air quality. For full story and to view video, click here.

Trump Budget Would Wallop EPA's Climate and Environment Programs

By Georgina Gustin and Marinanne Lavelle – InsideClimate News – May 20, 2017
Details of President Donald Trump's 2018 budget proposal, leaked this week, reveal that the administration appears determined to wallop environmental programs, including many that tackle climate change. It would cut Environmental Protection Agency funding by nearly one-third, slash spending on renewable energy innovation, and eliminate the Greenhouse Gas Reporting program, among other programs. For full story, click here.

Exclusive: House Science Committee members just sent a letter to President Trump insisting he stop relying on fake news

By Kendra Pierre-Louis – Popular Science – May 18, 2017
Members of the House of Representative Committee on Science, Space & Technology—including representative Don Beyer (VA), Jacky Rosen (NV), Mark Takano (CA), and a number of other Democrats—have signed and submitted a letter to President Trump expressing concern over the President's methods of receiving scientific information. The letter states that by failing to appoint a qualified director to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy or adequately staff the department, the President has left himself vulnerable to “misinformation and fake news,” noting that Trump has, “a tool at your disposal in this regard, should you wish to make use of it, in the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) which, under your administration, has been left largely unstaffed and without a director.” For full story, click here.

Reaching Higher Ground in the Face of Climate Change

By David Flores – CPR Blog – May 3, 2017
We’ve seen a flurry of news coverage in the last several weeks on climate migration, displacement, and relocation. In a new report published today, the Center for Progressive Reform explores these issues and examines tools and resources that communities can use when faced with the challenges of relocating out of harm’s way. For full blog post, click here.

Invitation for Nominations to the BOSC Executive Committee and Subcommittees

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – May 2, 2017
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is seeking nominations for technical experts to serve on its Board of Scientific Counselors (BOSC), a federal advisory committee to the Office of Research and Development (ORD). The deadline for nominations is June 30, 2017. Read more here. 

Conservation Finance – Where Wall Street Meets Nature

Fabian Huwyler – Credit Suisse – March 22, 2017 – Video
The more boring sustainable investment products in nature are, the better. That is one of the findings of the 4th Annual Conservation Finance Conference that was recently held at Credit Suisse in New York. Investing in such products can provide a good, stable, current yield. "The return on sustainable fish is staggering to someone from the world of compound interest rates," said Wilson Ervin, Vice Chairman in the Group Executive Office, when opening the 4th Annual Conservation Finance Conference at Credit Suisse. For full story and to view video, click here 

 
 


AK: Conservation groups prep for battle over drilling in NPR-A

By Herz Alaska – Dispatch News – June 10, 2017
Oil industry boosters and Alaska politicians are joining President Donald Trump's administration to push for more development in an area of the North Slope that could hold huge oil reserves — over the objections of environmental groups that want existing protections upheld. It might sound like the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, where efforts to gain access to the coastal plain for drilling have long stalled. It's also the case 100 miles to the west at the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska — the 23 million-acre, Indiana-sized tract that appears likely to be a major battleground over oil development during Trump's term. For full story, click here.

AK: 'Homework assignment' — how Pebble lobbied Trump's EPA

By Kevin Bogardus and Dylan – Brown E&E News – June 8, 2017
Developers of a controversial Alaskan mine set out early to lobby President Trump's U.S. EPA to reverse restrictions the Obama administration had proposed putting on the project. Peter Robertson, a top lobbyist for Pebble LP — the developer of the Pebble mine in Bristol Bay, Alaska — emailed and met with a senior EPA official to discuss the project, according to records released in response to a Freedom of Information Act request by the Natural Resources Defense Council. The documents illuminate that the latest push in Pebble's decadelong lobbying campaign bore fruit, as the company and EPA reached a deal last month to allow the project to enter permitting. For full story, click here.

AZ: Phoenix approves historic Colorado River conservation agreement

AZ Business Magazine – AZ Big Media – June 14, 2017
Mayor Greg Stanton and the Phoenix City Council unanimously approved an agreement with tribal, state, federal and philanthropic leaders to help protect the Colorado River and preserve water levels in Lake Mead. The agreement with State of Arizona, the Gila River Indian Community, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, and the Walton Family Foundation will save the equivalent of 35 percent of the Colorado River water used by Phoenix residents each year. Specifically, it will fund a contribution of 13 billion gallons of Colorado River water to system conservation in Lake Mead this year. For full story, click here

CA: China is now looking to California – not Trump – to help lead the fight against climate change

By Jessica Meyers – Los Angeles Times – June 6, 2017 – Video
Gov. Jerry Brown met with Chinese President Xi Jinping on Tuesday in a rare diplomatic coup that catapults California into quasi-national status as a negotiator with China following the decision last week by President Trump to pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate accord. Their encounter underlined the extent to which Trump, as he pursues an “America first” foreign policy, is being sidelined on the world stage. Xi spent nearly an hour talking to Brown, one of the administration’s loudest, most powerful critics on the environment. For full story, click here

CA: Can California Tap Carbon Markets To Save Its Delta (And Its Drinking Water)?

By Kelley Hamrick and Steve Zwick – Ecosystem Marketplace – May 3, 2017
Fifty miles inland from San Francisco, cows are grazing on lush grass, and small purple flowers seem to pop out of every bush. In the distance, a sailboat glides across the treetops – and it’s not a mirage. It’s because I’m looking up. This idyllic farmland is twenty feet below sea level, on a sinking island called Twitchell – one of many in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, where the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers converge. This region provides most of California’s drinking water, but the marshes have mostly been drained, and colossal earthen dikes now loom over lowland farms, guiding massive amounts of water towards the coast in man-made streams that crest above the roofs of farms that now cover most of the delta’s 738,000 acresFor full story, click here

CA: State Agencies Pilot Wildlife Crossing Mitigation Credit System

By California Department of Fish and Wildlife – YubaNet – April 19, 2017
California’s state wildlife and transportation departments signed a credit agreement on an innovative pilot project to create advanced mitigation credits for wildlife highway crossings. The mitigation crediting system developed for the Laurel Curve Wildlife Habitat Connectivity Project on Highway 17 in Santa Cruz County can be used to transition into a statewide program being developed through the new Regional Conservation Investments Strategies Program. Using the Laurel Curve project as a pilot, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) and the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) developed a model compensatory mitigation crediting system. For full story, click here 

FL: Cape man joins lawsuit claiming Roundup causes cancer

By Rachel Polansky – NBC-2.com – June 15, 2017 – Video
More than 1,000 people claim a product that's still on store shelves has given them cancer.
Multiple class action lawsuits plague the maker of the popular weed killer, Roundup. Monsanto vehemently denies its product makes people sick. But the NBC2 Investigators talked with a Cape Coral man who said the weed killer nearly killed him. For full story, click here

FL: Miami Wasted Thousands on Untested Pesticide That Didn't Kill Zika Mosquitos

By Jerry Iannelli – Miami News Times – June 14, 2017
When the Zika virus struck last year, Miami-Dade County Mosquito Control immediately began fogging with three pesticides: BTI, a group of bacteria that kills mosquito larvae; naled, a controversial chemical compound banned in Europe over links to developmental disorders in children; and permethrin, the active ingredient in home bug-killers such as Raid. Permethrin was sprayed at least seven times in Wynwood and five times in Miami Beach, but by the end of August, the county realized the poison had little effect and stopped using it. For full story, click here.

FL: Microplastics plague the lagoon

By Jim Waymer – Florida Today – May 26, 2017 – Video
The crabs and oysters we eat from the Indian River Lagoon harbor tiny bits of plastic, with unknown health risks to us and to them, new research suggests. University of Central Florida researchers say our old fraying boat ropes, fishing equipment, fibers from synthetic clothes and other broken-down plastic bits are the source. The so-called microplastics can harm oysters, crabs and other marine life, but long-term health and ecological effects remain uncertain. For full story and to view video, click here.

FL: Florida lawmakers introduce legislation to expedite all Everglades restoration projects

Treasure Coast
Florida lawmakers in both the U.S. House and Senate introduced legislation to expedite all Everglades-restoration projects that the Army Corps of Engineers has said are ready to begin. The move yesterday came just days after the Army Corps of Engineers began releasing water from Lake Okeechobee to the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee rivers. The legislation was introduced by a bipartisan group of federal legislators led by Florida U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and Reps. Alcee L. Hastings and Mario Diaz-Balart. For full story, click here

IL: Lake Michigan shoreline erosion could be getting worse, research shows

By Tony Briscoe and Nausheen Husain Chicago Tribune – May 30, 2017 – Video
Shoreline erosion along Lake Michigan in the northern suburbs has been an issue for decades, but new research indicates the situation could be getting worse. Eight decades' worth of aerial and satellite imagery taken over Illinois' northern lakefront, reveals that some stretches of shoreline are retreating at unprecedented rates, including Illinois Beach State Park, where acres of sprawling dunes and wetlands are now underwater. The northern stretch of the park's 61/2-mile long beach is arguably the hardest hit piece of coastline in the state. From 1939 to 2014, the shoreline has retreated more than 600 feet, the span of two football fields -- an average of 8 feet per year, according to state geologist Ethan Theuerkauf. In a little more than two years, from 2014 to 2016, erosion has accelerated dramatically, with the loss of 184 feet of beach. That's an average of 84 feet a year. For full story and to view video, – click here.

LA: New Map Highlights Sinking Louisiana Coast

The Geological Society of America – June 14, 2017
Researchers at Tulane University have developed a subsidence map of coastal Louisiana, putting the rate at which this region is sinking at just over one third of an inch per year. The map, published in GSA Today, has long been considered the "holy grail" by researchers and policy makers as they look for solutions to the coastal wetland loss crisis, the researchers said. "The novel aspect of this study is that it provides a map that shows subsidence rates as observed at the land surface," said Torbjörn Törnqvist, professor of geology and chair of the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Tulane University. "This sets it apart from previous attempts to map subsidence rates." For full news release, click here.

LA: Pace of Louisiana coastal restoration projects should quicken under bill passed by lawmakers

By Stephanie Riegel – Greater Baton Rouge Business Report – June 7, 2017
In a legislative session that has been marked by partisanship and deep disagreements over key issues, one little noticed piece of legislation that could have a significant impact on the future of coastal restoration projects quietly passed both chambers with bipartisan support. House Bill 596 by Rep. Walt Leger, D-New Orleans, enables the state Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority to engage in an alternative delivery model for coastal restoration projects as a way to better leverage existing dollars and, therefore, get projects moving more quickly. For full story, click here.

LA: Wetland plague concern spreads from scientists to business owners

By Tristan Baurick – NOLA.com – The Times-Picayme – May 31, 2017
Concerns about the rapid die-off of roseau cane in the lower Mississippi River Delta marshland has spread from scientists to local business leaders. Members of a Plaquemines Parish business group say the problem has developed into nothing short of a disaster. "We need to raise the level of attention on this," said Michael Van Haverbeke, chairman of the Plaquemines Association of Business and Industry. "Together, we're a voice. We can say, 'This is my way of life, my business, my home - and it's in jeopardy.'" The association hosted LSU wetland scientist Andrew Nyman at its monthly meeting Tuesday (May 30). Held at Myrtle Grove, the meeting drew about 45 members. They peppered Nyman with a questions about the foreign insect that has killed thousands of acres of roseau cane, a wetland grass that holds much of south Plaquemines together and buffers its small communities from coastal storms. For full story, click here.

ME: Gulf of Maine will become too warm for many key fish, report says

By Colin Woodard – Portland Press Herald – May 21, 2017
A new study by federal fisheries scientists predicts the warming of the Gulf of Maine will cause a dramatic contraction of suitably cool habitat for a range of key commercial fish species there. On the other hand, lobsters are more likely to find hospitable areas. The study by seven scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, used a high-resolution global climate model and federal fisheries survey data to model how key fisheries species would likely be affected by predicted warming over the next 80 years. For full story, click here.

MD: Maryland Natural Resources providing $10.5M in Waterway Improvement Fund grants

By Danielle Jackson – 47 abc – June 15, 2017
The Maryland Department of Natural Resources is giving $10.5 million in Waterway Improvement Fund grants to improve public boating access and navigation throughout the state. The funding which was passed by the Maryland General Assembly and signed by Governor Larry Hogan will go toward 49 projects in 18 counties from Allegany to Worcester. Funded projects involve the dredging of local navigation channels, preserving public boating access facilities, improving parking and upgrading existing infrastructure such as bulkheads, piers and ramps. For full story, click here.

MD: Maryland Oysters – Past Wars & Present Challenges

Maryland.gov – The Wetlands Web – May 17, 2017
An important chapter of Maryland history with relevance today is the Oyster Wars saga beginning around 1830 and featuring oyster pirates, boat chases, gun fights, and cannons. Through the nineteenth century, skirmishes pitting pirates against enforcement officers, and tongers against dredgers occurred fairly often and even resulted in fatalities. Today, having moved beyond the fierce Oyster Wars, watermen, environmental scientists, elected representatives, and Marylanders, still retain their deeply-held, and often conflicting, opinions about harvesting and restoring Bay oysters. Current trends are hopeful for the future of Maryland oysters. For full blog post, click here.

MI: Enbridge says pipeline portion ‘fit for service’

Michael Gerstein – The Detroit News – June 12, 2017
Canadian energy company Enbridge said the west leg of Line 5 running underneath the Straits of Mackinac is “fit for service,” after completing half of a pressure test Saturday. The oil transport company announced the results Monday morning and will conduct a federally required safety review of the east leg in the coming week before releasing its overall verdict about Line 5’s overall fitness. The tests come amid concern and intense scrutiny about pipeline integrity from environmentalists and lawmakers. For full story, click here

MN: Scientists planting 400 acres of Minnesota pines to survive climate change

By Josephine Marcotty – Star Tribune – May 23, 2017
If you want to plant a pine tree that might survive the climate upheavals that are already remaking northern Minnesota’s boreal forest, where should it go? Scientists from the Nature Conservancy and elsewhere now think they know. This summer they’re embarking on a project to plant 400 acres with cold-loving evergreens like jack pine and tamarack in carefully selected “conifer strongholds” — places that they predict will stay cooler or wetter or have better soil, increasing the chances that a few of each species will survive for the next generation as Minnesota grows warmer. For full story, click here.

MN: Program rewarding farmers who protect water quality small, but growing

Kristi Marohn – MPR News – May 23, 2017
At Dave Lochen's farm near Kimball, cows peer over a fence to see who the visitor is.
Just beyond the cow pen and down a slight hill is the shining water of Pearl Lake. It's a potentially risky place to raise beef cattle, and Lochen knows it. "I know people always questioned us: 'How do you have cattle and stuff so close?'" he said. "Well, our kids and we swim in the lake too. I don't want to be swimming in anything that's going in there that shouldn't be." Lochen is aware that fertilizer or manure could run off his farm and pollute the lake, so he's taken steps to keep that from happening. For full story, click here.

MN: Enbridge pipeline could cause more damage than alternatives, but it's not largest spill risk

By Mike Hughlett – StarTribune – May 15, 2017
Enbridge Energy's pathway for a new pipeline to replace its aging "Line 3" across northern Minnesota would likely cause more wildlife habitat loss and have more impact on wild rice lakes than any of four alternative routes being looked at by state regulators. But impacts on fish and wildlife would vary only slightly between the routes. And environmental and cultural resources would be hurt less by a spill on Enbridge's proposed new Line 3 route than in a spill on two alternative routes that run parallel to the current Line 3, according to a state environmental assessment released Monday. For full story, click here.

MT: Montana and the EPA: A Complicated Relationship

By Dillon Tabish – Flathead Beacon – May 30, 2017
From Libby to Columbia Falls, Kalispell to Butte, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency plays a prominent role in Montana. The Treasure State, with its extraction-industry allure, is home to some of the largest and worst contaminated sites in U.S. history, making “Superfund” a household term and thrusting the nation’s foremost hazardous waste cleanup program onto communities across the state since its inception in 1980. That has produced a unique and complicated relationship between the state and the EPA, which is in charge of protecting public health and the environment. Montanans have a love-hate relationship with the agency, many appreciative of its work and vital role as an environmental and public-health watchdog, yet others frustrated with its lingering presence, regulations and vexing protocol. For full story, click here.

MT: 'This was a scary-looking property. He dug everything up'

By Ariel Wittenberg – E&E News – May 19, 2017
A 2001 Clean Water Act conviction for diverting a Montana creek was just the start of David Allen Phillips' adventures. The developer escaped from federal prison and then spent four years on the lam in Mexico, playing country rock in Acapulco bars, before U.S. marshals nabbed him. Now 61, Phillips says he has no regrets. He ran, he said, to escape the tyranny of an overreaching U.S. EPA and Justice Department. "They think they are God almighty — and I'll tell you right now, as far as I'm concerned — they are," he told E&E News recently. Authorities who investigated and prosecuted Phillips say his case is representative of how the federal government pursues what it considers flagrant violators of the Clean Water Act's Section 404, which prohibits dredging and filling wetlands and waterways without a permit. For full story, click here.

NJ: Why are half of NJ's honeybees dying each year?

By Scott Fallon – North Jersey.com – June 16, 2017 – Video
Nearly half the honeybees in New Jersey die off each year, significantly outpacing the national average and perplexing scientists, who worry the losses could impact the state's agricultural industry. While bee populations have been in rapid decline throughout North America, losses in New Jersey surged ahead a few years ago and commercial as well as amateur beekeepers have been struggling with the losses. For full story and to view video, click here.

NJ: N.J. to stop notorious Meadowlands landfill from polluting Passaic River after years of delay

By Scott Fallon – North Jersey.com – June 12, 2017 – Video
A 94-acre landfill in the Meadowlands will be walled off to prevent oil, insecticides, sewage sludge and a slew of other toxic waste from leaching into the Passaic River under a $39.4 million project announced Monday by state officials. Workers will begin preparations this week to build a containment wall around the 1D landfill in Kearny. It will hold the tens of thousands of gallons of wastewater that leaches into the surrounding waterways every day. When the project is completed in two years, as much as 83,000 gallons of landfill wastewater, called leachate, will be collected daily under a newly built system. It will be sent to the Passaic Valley Sewerage Authority’s plant for treatment. Landfill gases like methane that now discharge to the air will be captured and burned to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions. For full story and to view video, click here.

NJ: Rising seas could be turning Jersey’s coastal cedars into ghost forests

By Frank Kummer – Philly.com–  May 22, 2017 – Video
Jennifer Walker picked her way through the swamp, avoiding the muck while ducking under branches and climbing over felled trees. To her left loomed one of the large “ghost forests” of the Jersey coastal plain: dead Atlantic white cedar trees, standing pale and bare at the edge of salt marshes. Scientists such as Walker, a 25-year-old doctoral candidate at Rutgers University, are looking to the ghost forests as a potential indicator of rising sea levels, exacerbated by climate change. For full story and to view video, click here.

NC: Insurers: We're off the hook, Duke Energy knew coal ash risk

By Emery P. Dalesio – abc news – June 14, 2017
Dozens of insurance companies say they're not obligated to help pay for Duke Energy Corp.'s multi-billion dollar coal ash cleanup because the nation's largest electric company long knew about but did nothing to reduce the threat of potentially toxic pollutants. The claim is in a filing by lawyers for nearly 30 international and domestic insurance companies that were sued by Duke Energy in March to force them to cover part of the utility's coal ash cleanup costs in the Carolinas. For full story, click here.

NC: Beaufort and Scientists Partner for Stormwater Study

By Jared Brumbaugh – Public Radio East – May 22, 2017
The coastal town of Beaufort is part of a collaborative research project with marine scientists to study the impact of stormwater on the Rachel Carson Reserve. Beaufort is the quintessential small seaside town, with boutiques, award winning seafood restaurants and maritime recreation. Its ties to Blackbeard and wild horses that roam Carrot Island make Beaufort memorable, earning the title “America’s Favorite Town” by Travel and Leisure Magazine. Beaufort has its challenges though. One struggle that town officials and marine scientists are addressing, the occasional flooding that occurs during heavy rain events and what happens when stormwater flows from Front Street, to Taylor's Creek. For full story, click here.

OH: How NW Ohio farmers are trying to shrink Lake Erie toxic algal blooms

By James F. McCarty – cleveland.com – June 11, 2017 – Video
Farmers in Northwest Ohio realize that runoff from their fields feeds the giant toxic algal blooms that grow in Lake Erie's western basin each summer, and that they share responsibility for reducing the annual outbreak. Many are attacking the problem using innovations in farm machinery, enhanced soil conservation practices and a return to some old-fashioned organic farming methods. Their objective is to reduce the amount of phosphorus that flows from their fertilizer and manure into creeks and drainage ditches, and eventually into the Maumee River. For full story and to view video, click here

OH: Ohio corn, wheat and soybean farmers urge Congress to fully fund Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

Norwalk Reflector – May 25, 2017
The Ohio Corn & Wheat Growers Association (OCWGA) and the Ohio Soybean Association (OSA) denounced the elimination of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI), as proposed by the 2018 budget released this week by the Trump Administration. Ohio’s corn, soy and wheat farmers have been strong supporters of the initiative. Since 2009 it has provided approximately $300 million annually in water quality improvement efforts and generated more than $2 billion for previously unfunded restoration work over the past eight years. These investments help not only agriculture, but other stakeholders that need support to improve water quality. For full story, click here.  

OR: Oil v. Culture: The Battle Goes on to Protect Columbia River 

By Richard Walker – Indian Country Today – June 15, 2017
Spring chinook were journeying up the Columbia River, returning to their natal streams to spawn. Lamprey were returning too, as Native leaders, elected officials and environmental warriors gathered at Mosier on June 3 to protest against crude-oil rail shipments along the great river The People know as Nch’i-Wana. On that day a year ago, a Union Pacific train carrying highly flammable crude oil derailed in Mosier. Firefighters battled for 14 hours to contain the fire. Residents and students at a nearby school were evacuated. An oil sheen spread on the river. The community of Mosier lost sewer and water service for days because of contamination. One year later, Mosier’s groundwater is still contaminated. For full story, click here.

PA: PA launches effort to write cleanup plan addressing Bay shortfall

By Karl Blankenship – Bay Journal – June 12, 2017
Pennsylvania's effort to write a more robust Bay cleanup strategy was launched last week in a packed hotel auditorium where more than 200 people gathered to offer their initial thoughts about what a new — and more implementable — plan would look like. The state is so far behind its Bay cleanup obligations that it is jeopardizing Chesapeake restoration efforts as a whole. All states in the Bay drainage have to write new Watershed Implementation Plans in the next year and a half to guide their efforts through the 2025 cleanup deadline, but the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has singled out Pennsylvania’s plan-writing process for increased scrutiny because of its shortfall. For full story, click here.

PA: Trump’s rural voters fighting to keep their land from a growing web of pipelines

By Stuart Leavenworth – McClatchy DC Bureau – May 22, 2017 – Video
Norm MacQueen would seem to fit the profile of a property owner comfortable with an oil and gas pipeline running through his land. A retired oil refinery employee, MacQueen worked amid risky conditions for more than 20 years, as a pipe fitter and a welder. But early last year, MacQueen learned that an oil company, Sunoco, was planning to install two more pipelines past his family’s home in eastern Pennsylvania, where one already runs. According to MacQueen, Sunoco’s agents told him the company will force his neighbors and him to sell the rights to some of their land – through a process called eminent domain – if they don’t agree to turn it over. For full story, click here.

VA: Major wetlands violations case headed to retrial

By Clara Vaughn – Delmarva Now, WVEC – 13 News Now – June 16, 2017
A Virginia landowner could face significant fines and jail time after upending several acres of local wetlands.
Benjamin Mathai of Manassas, Virginia, was found guilty of unpermitted encroachment into Northampton County’s Resource Protection Area, use of wetlands without a permit and unpermitted land disturbing activity in Northampton District Court on June 8. The court ruled the activity on Mathai’s land disturbed three environmentally sensitive areas — tidal wetlands, non-tidal wetlands and the Chesapeake Bay Resource Protection Area — and sentenced Mathai to 12 months, with 11 months and 10 days suspended, and five years of probation. Mathai appealed the conviction and is slated to appear for a new trial in Northampton Circuit Court on Sept. 11. For full story, click here.

WI: Wetland Restoration As A Business: Wisconsin’s Growing Mitigation Industry

By Rich Kremer – Wisconsin Public Radio – April 7, 2017
Wetlands and business have long been at odds with one another. As industry, housing and agriculture expand, there is pressure to fill swamps, marshes and bogs. But there are a growing number of companies whose business is restoring wetlands in Wisconsin to make up for what's been lost. Just outside of Cornell in Chippewa County lies a 100-acre, rectangular wetland called Foggy Acres. In early spring, the green shoots of native plants are just starting to emerge from the water and dark black soil while dozens of ducks and a pair of Sandhill Cranes chatter in the background. It doesn't look it, but this wetland was a farm field just seven years ago. And beyond the physical transformation, it's also now a business known as a wetland mitigation bank. For full story, click here 

 


  

Larger-than-normal dead zone expected in Chesapeake Bay this summer

By Brooks Hays – UPI – June 15, 2017
The latest forecasting models are predicting a larger-than-average dead zone in the Chesapeake Bay this summer. The dead zone, an area with little to no oxygen, is expected to reach a peak size of 1.89 cubic miles -- the equivalent of 3.2 million Olympic-size swimming pools. Dead zones are triggered by excess nutrient runoff from agriculture and wastewater. Precipitation totals play a large role in determining the size of seasonal dead zones. As in, more rain equals more runoff. Excess nutrients, like nitrogen and phosphorus, feed algae blooms in the Chesapeake, which rob the water of oxygen, making life untenable for other marine organisms. Dead zones can kills thousands of fish and other species. For full story, click here.

Researchers Document Widespread Melting on Antarctica’s Huge Ross Ice Shelf 

YaleEnvironment 360 – June 15, 2017
Large-scale melting of snow and ice on Antarctica’s massive Ross Ice Shelf, brought about by an unusually warm stretch of weather in the summer of 2016, is one of the first documented cases of widespread surface melting of the Ross Ice Shelf and other regions of West Antarctica, according to a new study. For full story, click here.

Intense storms may diminish protective ozone in Central U.S.

By Brian Bienkowski – The Daily Climate – June 8, 2017
More frequent, powerful storms in the Great Plains are penetrating deep into the atmosphere, risking ozone loss and increased dangerous UV radiation, scientists warn. The ozone layer in our atmosphere keeps much of the sun's ultraviolet radiation from hitting the surface. Too much of it gives people skin cancer and can destroy plants and crops. Harvard researchers found that this stratospheric ozone layer above the central U.S. gets depleted during the summer, most likely as intense storms send water vapor into the atmosphere. The vapor can cause the types of chemical reactions that have spurred ozone loss in Arctic and Antarctic regions. For full story, click here.

Can marine reserves help counteract climate change?

Mongabay – June 8, 2017
Even if all the world’s nations fully cooperated to reduce carbon emissions and limit climate change, elevated carbon dioxide levels will continue to harm our oceans in the coming decades. A new paper makes the case that marine protected areas (MPAs) are a cost-effective way to mitigate the worst oceanic consequences of climate change. MPAs, where fishing and human development are prohibited or greatly reduced, are usually touted for their ability to improve fish stocks and marine biodiversity. But the new paper, published this week in the journal PNAS, examines a different suite of positive effects. For full article, click here. 

A climate chain reaction: Major Greenland melting could devastate crops in Africa

By Chelsea Harvey – The Washington Post – June 6, 2017
As melting Greenland glaciers continue to pour ice into the Arctic Ocean, we have more than the rising seas to worry about, scientists say. A new study suggests that if it gets large enough, the influx of freshwater from the melting ice sheet could disrupt the flow of a major ocean current system, which in turn could dry out Africa’s Sahel, a narrow region of land stretching from Mauritania in the west to Sudan in the east. For full story, click here.

More plastic than fish? Oceans 'under threat as never before,' warns UN chief 

By Edith M. Lederer – Associated Press – Chicago Tribune – June 6, 2017
Secretary-General Antonio Guterres opened the first U.N. conference on oceans Monday with a warning that the seas are "under threat as never before," noting one recent study warns that discarded plastic garbage could outweigh fish by 2050 if nothing is done. The U.N. chief told presidents, ministers, diplomats and environmental activists from nearly 200 countries that oceans — "the lifeblood of our planet" — are being severely damaged by pollution, garbage, overfishing and the effects of climate change. For full story, click here.

New Ocean Reserve, Largest in Africa, Protects Whales and Turtles 

By Laura Parker – National Geographic – June 5, 2017
The central African nation of Gabon announced Monday the creation of Africa’s largest network of marine protected areas, home to a diverse array of threatened marine life, including the largest breeding populations of leatherback and olive ridley sea turtles and 20 species of dolphins and whales. The network of 20 marine parks and aquatic reserves will protect 26 percent of Gabon’s territorial seas and extend across 20,500 square miles (53,000 square kilometers). In creating the protected areas, the Gabon government also set up what scientists call the most sustainable fisheries management plan for West Africa—an area long known for rampant overfishing and abuses by foreign fleets. Separate zones have been established for commercial and artisanal fishing fleets, in an effort to restore sustainable fishing. For full story, click here.

An ambitious project begins to shed light on a mysterious Lake Erie fish 

By T.J. Pignataro – The Buffalo News – June 4, 2017
A door opened to scientists six years ago when a fisherman accidentally hooked a dinosaur-looking lake sturgeon in Buffalo Harbor. It proved that the lake’s longest-surviving native fish species endured. This spring, state and federal biologists captured and tagged about three dozen sturgeon in the channel between the U.S. Coast Guard Station in Buffalo and the city’s Outer Harbor breakwall as part of their continuing quest to learn more about eastern Lake Erie’s lake sturgeon population. The biologists pulled the last of the sturgeon from nets on Thursday. For full story, click here. 

Refuge for the Ridgway’s Rail

By Sonali Prasad – Hakai Magazine – June 2, 2017
For hours, Cory Overton has been wading through a vast expanse of orange marsh in Oakland, California, straining to pick out a distinctive call over the sound of his boots sticking in the muck. Spotting a quill next to what looks like a tiki hut for a gnome, he stops and waits. A shrill cackle carries over the wind—kek-kek-kek. Inching closer to inspect the source of the cry, Overton finally spots it: a tangerine bill, a cinnamon-hued breast, and long, scrawny legs—the chicken-sized bird known as the Ridgway’s rail. From California to western Mexico and into Arizona and Nevada, habitat destruction is causing the population of Ridgway’s rails to plummet. For full article, click here.

Throwing Dead Fish for Fun and Ecological Profit

By Frances Backhouse – Hakai Magazine – June 1, 2017
On a chilly January morning, four-year-old Eli Burger stands on the bank of Douglas Creek, on the outskirts of Victoria, British Columbia, hugging a dead salmon half as long as him against his red parka. He looks up at his father, Andrew Burger, who nods encouragingly. “Go ahead,” he says, “chuck it in.” Eli shuffles forward until his blue rubber boots touch the edge of the creek and heaves the fish as far as he can into the shallow water. It lands with a splash and drifts for a moment before settling against a boulder. “It’s floating!” Eli exclaims, his delight in the salmon’s buoyancy eliciting smiles from several nearby adults. For a moment, it’s almost as if the handsome coho could wriggle back to life. For full article, click here. 

Medications, pesticides, found in blood of sea turtles on Great Barrier Reef 

By Kathy McLeish and Krystal Gordon – ABC News – June 1, 2017
The discovery was made as part of a project led by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), which compared samples from turtles in urban areas to the more remote locations. Environmental chemist Amy Heffernan from the University of Queensland said she was surprised to see the chemicals in the sea-going turtles. "What you put down your sink, spray on your farms, or release from industries ends up in the marine environment and in turtles in the Great Barrier Reef," Dr. Heffernan said. Chemical exposure has been linked to stress and other side effects in wildlife, and the indications of inflammation and liver dysfunction were found in some green turtles. Dr. Heffernan said a cocktail of unknown chemicals present in the turtles' systems was even more concerning. For full story, click here.

Biodiversity moves beyond counting species 

By Rachel Cernansky – Nature – May 31, 2017
Emmett Duffy was about 5 meters under water off the coast of Panama, when a giant, tan-and-white porcupinefish caught his eye. The slow-moving creature would have been a prime target for predators if not for the large, treelike branches of elkhorn coral (Acropora palmata) it was sheltering under. The sighting was a light-bulb moment for Duffy, a marine biologist. He'd been to places in the Caribbean where corals were more abundant and more diverse, but smaller; the fish there were always small, too. Here, in the Bocas Del Toro archipelago, he was seeing a variety of big fish among the elkhorns. “The reason these large fish were able to thrive,” he says, “was that there were places for them to hide and places for them to live.” For full story, click here.

Professor proposes using artificial intelligence to predict aquatic ecosystem health

York University – May 31, 2017
Lassonde School of Engineering Professor Usman Khan‘s research on the measurement of aquatic ecosystem health has been published in the journal Water. In the paper, Khan proposes an approach based on artificial intelligence to predict dissolved oxygen in an urban river environment. Dissolved oxygen concentration in a water body is the most fundamental indicator of overall aquatic ecosystem health. Having a sophisticated measuring system to assess the health of these precious reserves is essential. For full story, click here.

Scientists warn US coral reefs are on course to disappear within decades 

By Oliver Milman – The Guardian – May 30, 2017
Some of America’s most protected corals have been blighted by bleaching, with scientists warning that US reefs are on course to largely disappear within just a few decades because of global warming. New research has shown that strict conservation measures in Hawaii have not spared corals from a warming ocean in one of its most prized bays, with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicting yet more bleaching is likely off Hawaii and Florida this summer. For full story, click here.

Lyme Isn’t the Only Disease Ticks are Spreading This Summer 

By Megan Molteni – WIRED – May 29, 2017
It started with vomiting and a fever. But a few days later, five-month-old Liam was in the emergency room, his tiny body gripped by hourly waves of seizures. X-rays and MRIs showed deep swelling in his brain. When an infectious disease specialist at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center diagnosed Liam with Powassan virus in November, he became the first recorded case in state history. Doctors think Liam picked up the rare neurological disease from a tick his father brought back after a deer hunting trip. The toddler survived with some scar tissue—but not everyone who gets Powassan, POW for short, is so lucky. With no treatment available, half of all people who contract the virus suffer permanent brain damage; 10 percent die. And while POW is nowhere near as prevalent as that other tick-borne summer scourge—Lyme—it is starting to show up more often. For full story, click here.

Greenland Glacier Melt Actually Warped Earth's Crust

By Scott Waldman, E&E News – Scientific America – May 26, 2017
When a Greenland glacier melted in the unusually hot summer of 2012, it pushed so much water through that it warped the Earth's crust and caused a massive wave of ice and water to push its way seaward. That wave is a newly identified phenomenon for climate researchers and represents a troubling new trend in the understanding of how current sea-level rise estimates may be underestimated, according to a new study published yesterday in Geophysical Research Letters. The wave caused the amount of ice typically lost from the Rink Glacier to increase by more than 50 percent, said Eric Ivins, a scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and a co-author of the study. For full story, click here.

Above-normal Atlantic hurricane season is most likely this year

NOAA – May 25, 2017 – Video
Forecasters at NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center say the Atlantic could see another above-normal hurricane season this year. For the upcoming Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June 1 through November 30, forecasters predict a 45 percent chance of an above-normal season, a 35 percent chance of a near-normal season, and only a 20 percent chance of a below-normal season. For full story and to view video, click here.

Effective restoration of aquatic ecosystems

Phys.org – May 25, 2017
Despite having increased human wellbeing in the past, intense modifications by multiple and interacting pressures have degraded ecosystems and the sustainability of their goods and services. For ecosystem restoration to deliver on multiple environmental and societal targets, the process of restoration must be redesigned to create a unified and scale-dependent approach that integrates natural and social sciences as well as the broader restoration community. For full story, click here.

Sequestering blue carbon through better management of coastal ecosystems

By Traci Hillyard – PHYS.org – May 20, 2017
Focusing on the management of carbon stores within vegetated coastal habitats provides an opportunity to mitigate some aspects of global warming. Trisha Atwood from Utah State University's Watershed Sciences Department of the Quinney College of Natural Resources and the Ecology Center has collaborated with several co-authors from Australia, including lead author Peter Macreadie from Deakin University, in an article published in the May 2017 issue of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. "If we are going to fight off climate change not only do we need to cut CO2 emissions," Atwood states. "But we also need to protect and restore natural carbon sinks like coastal wetlands." For full story, click here.

Domino Effect: The Myriad Impacts of Warming on an East Coast Estuary

By Ted Williams – YaleEnvironment 360 – May 17, 2017
The 140,000 acres of tidal wetlands in Delaware Bay sustain hundreds of aquatic and terrestrial species, including the second-largest population of shorebirds in North America. Yet, as sea level increases — now rising at about 1.2-inches per decade and expected to dramatically accelerate this century — this habitat is vanishing. Delaware Bay, one of the largest and richest estuaries in the United States, is a case study in how warming oceans, associated storms and sea-level rise are eroding wetlands, damaging water quality, and unraveling terrestrial and near-shore aquatic ecosystems in many parts of the world. For full story, click here.

Can shellfish adapt to ocean acidification?

By Delrdre Lockwood – c&en Chemical & Engineering News – May 15, 2017
If you’re an oyster aficionado living in the Pacific Northwest, you’ve likely tasted Chris Langdon’s scientific handiwork. Since 1996, his Molluscan Broodstock Program at Oregon State University has been breeding plump, fast-growing, and hardy oysters as stock for the $250 million West Coast oyster industry. But in the past several years, the program has taken on an additional goal: identifying and studying oysters that may be better prepared to thrive in an increasingly acidified ocean. For full story, click here.

 

 

 

 

Green Infrastructure in Parks: A Guide to Collaboration, Funding, and Community
Engagement

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – June 2017
Green infrastructure can help to maximize the environmental, economic, and social benefits of parks. This report includes recommendations on the types of projects that are most likely to attract positive attention and funding, and which provide a wide range of benefits. To read more and download the report, click here.

Natural & Nature-based Flood Management: A Green Guide

Environment & Disaster Management 
World Wildlife Fund (WWF), in partnership with the US Agency for International Development Office of US Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA), developed the Natural & Nature-based Flood Management: A Green Guide (Flood Green Guide) to support using natural and nature-based methods for flood risk management. The Flood Green Guide is an open-source resource that is supported by training and a resource library. To read more and download the Guide, click here.


 

 

 

Dangerous unproven treatments for ‘chronic Lyme disease’ are on the rise

By Lena H. Sun – The Washington Post – June 15, 2017
An increasing number of Americans with medically ambiguous symptoms are being misdiagnosed with “chronic Lyme disease” and prescribed dangerous and often expensive treatments that do not work, according to a new report. For full story, click here.

Multi-million dollar upgrade planned to secure 'failsafe' Arctic seed vault

By Damian Carrington – The Guardian – June 13, 2017
The Global Seed Vault, built in the Arctic as an impregnable deep freeze for the world’s most precious food seeds, is to undergo a multi-million dollar upgrade after water from melting permafrost flooded its access tunnel. No seeds were damaged but the incident undermined the original belief that the vault would be a “failsafe” facility, securing the world’s food supply forever. Now the Norwegian government, which owns the vault, has committed $4.4m (NOK37m) to improvements. For full story, click here.

The dishonest HONEST Act

Science Magazine – June 9, 2017
The Trump administration aims to eliminate many regulations and make it more difficult to adopt new ones. More subtle and dangerous are attempts in Congress to undermine public health and environmental protections by limiting the use of scientific evidence under the guise of increased transparency. This effort, which as envisioned by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) leadership would greatly reduce the amount of science used in decision-making, undermines the credibility and application of scientific evidence, weakens the scientific enterprise, and imperils public and environmental health. The Honest and Open New EPA Science Treatment (HONEST) Act, in the Senate after passing the House of Representatives in March, would prohibit the EPA from using studies for agency decision-making unless raw data, computer codes, and virtually everything used by scientists to conduct the study are provided to the agency and made publicly available online. For full story, click here.

The Future Is What We Make of It—But What Will That Be?

By Jeremy Lent – MAHB – June 6, 2017
Imagine a satellite being launched into orbit, but its controls aren’t working too well. If the trajectory gets too steep, it will break through Earth’s gravity field and soar into outer space. If it accelerates too rapidly, atmospheric resistance will cause it to come crashing down in a fiery ball. Only if everything is managed with great care will the satellite achieve a stable orbit. The trajectory of our civilization is a lot like that satellite. At the accelerating rate of technological innovation, artificial intelligence may soon transcend our own, and human DNA might be re-engineered to produce a genetically enhanced species—like the satellite leaving its home planet forever. For full story, click here.

In the Land of Lost Gardens

By Heather Pringle – Hakai Magazine – June 6, 2017
The neatness, the orderliness, the sheer scientific preciseness of the death lying at our feet is impressive. It is a sunny spring day near the mouth of the Big Qualicum River on British Columbia’s Vancouver Island; Nancy Turner is hard at work. With long, straight, graying hair tucked behind her ears, brow slightly furrowed, the 69-year-old ethnobotanist arranges hundreds of newly cut plants, 20 to a bunch, into two neat green lines along a gravel lane. Turner straightens, satisfied. The greenery arrayed below is death camas. Its teardrop-shaped bulb contains enough poison to kill a child, maybe even a small adult. For full article, click here.

Putting the Local in Marine Conservation

By Amorina Kingdon – Hakai Magazine – June 5, 2017
First, do no harm. It’s a guiding principal of all physicians and one that environmental researcher Nathan Bennett would also like marine conservationists to respect. The researcher, affiliated with both the University of British Columbia and the University of Washington, says the desire to protect the ocean can sometimes harm the people who rely on it. In a new paper, he and his coauthors call for a marine conservation code of conduct. For full article, click here.

The Missouri River: A great balancing act

By Sarah Dettmer – Great Falls Tribune – June 4, 2017 – Video
Right at the doorstep of Great Falls runs one of the nation's mightiest sources of water and life, the Missouri River. The United States' longest river spans 2,400 miles from Three Forks down to its convergence with the Mississippi River near St. Louis, Mo. In the course of its history, the river has picked up many names. The Mighty Mo, the Muddy Mo, Big Muddy and its most reverent title, the Center of Life for the Great Plains. All of these names point to the river's importance to many Americans. Even long before Lewis and Clark embarked on their westward journey along the Missouri River in 1804, the river has been seen as a valuable resource. But the river is not quite the wild provider it once was. For full story and to view video, click here.

New analysis shows national monument support dominates public comment period

By Aaron Weiss – Westwise – May 25, 2017
As 15-day public comment period on the designation of Bears Ears National Monument comes to a close, a new analysis of comments submitted and gathered so far reveals nearly unanimous support for the monument. For full story, click here.

The Unstable Landscape of US Conservation Funding

By Rand Wentworth – Conservation Finance Network – May 22, 2017
There is a high level of uncertainty about federal funding for land conservation over the next four years. The recently passed 2017 budget has kept many conservation-related programs and funds intact, but 2018 may be a different story. The administration’s proposed budget calls for broad cuts to conservation funding, but Congress makes the final decision on appropriations. For full op-ed, click here.

 

 

WEBINARS

   

MEETINGS

 

TRAINING

 

SPECIAL EVENTS

 
WEBINARS
       
JUNE 2017
       
June 28, 2017
12:00 p.m. EDT
 
  Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay and our Businesses for the Bay Networking Partner, Chesapeake Bay Program
Webinar: The Business of the Watershed
 
       
June 28, 2017
3:00 p.m. EDT
  Association of State Wetland Managers Members' Webinar: The Price of Everything and the Value of Nothing: Is Ecosystem Valuation Worth It?  
       
June 29, 2017
1:00 p.m. EDT
  The Swamp School: Wetland Wildflower Webinar  
       
MORE JUNE WEBINARS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
JULY 2017  
       
July 11, 2017
3:00 p.m. EDT
  Association of State Wetland Managers Members' Webinar: How to Connect with the Public to Protect Wetlands: Findings from ASWM’s Wetland Communications Case Study Project   
       
July 19, 2017
1:00 p.m. EDT
  AWRA Webinar: IWRM and the Floods Directive: What can the US learn from the EU?   
       
July 26, 2017
3:00 p.m. EDT
  Association of State Wetland Managers Hot Topics Webinar: Partnering with Beaver to Benefit Sage Grouse and Working Lands: Restoring Emerald Islands in the Sagebrush Sea   
       
 MORE JULY WEBINARS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
       
AUGUST 2017  
       
August 16, 2017
1:00 p.m. EDT
  AWRA Webinar: Changing Flood Risks in the California Central Valley under Climate Change   
       
MORE AUGUST WEBINARS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
       
SEPTEMBER 2017  
       
September 13, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  AWRA Webinar: Groundwater Droughts - A Tale from a Few Aquifers   
       
September 13, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Stream Restoration: Where are we now?   
       
MORE SEPTEMBER WEBINARS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
       
OCTOBER 2017  
       
October 18, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Bringing Better Site Design into The 21st Century   
       
MORE OCTOBER WEBINARS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
       
NOVEMBER 2017  
       
November 15, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Modeling for Water Quality   
       
MORE NOVEMBER WEBINARS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
       
MEETINGS
 
JUNE 2017
       
June 25-28, 2017
Tysons, VA
  2017 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: Climate Change Solutions: Collaborative Science, Policy and Planning for Sustainable Water Management
 
       
June 25-30, 2017
Lewiston, ME
  Gordon Research Conference: Crossing Boundaries and Seeking Synthesis in the Catchment Sciences  
       
June 27-29, 2017
New Orleans, LA
  US Water Alliance: One Water Summit 2017  
       
MORE JUNE MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
JULY 2017
       
July 9-13, 2017
Worcester, MA
 

North American Echinoderm Conference

 
 
       
July 10-14, 2017
New York, NY
  World Climate Research Program: Regional Sea Level Changes and Coastal Impacts Conference  
       
July 11, 2017
Davis, CA
  Sharing Technical and Scientific Knowledge About Extreme Precipitation  
       
July 12-16, 2017
Austin, TX
  Joint Meetings of Ichthyology and Herpetology  
       
July 18-19, 2017
Santa Fe, NM
  Law Seminars International 2017 Santa Fe Advanced Natural Resource Damages Conference  
       
July 21-24, 2017
Franklin County, OH
  National Association of Counties: 2017 Annual Conference  
       
July 23-27, 2017
Long Beach, CA
  Hosted by International Water Association: 11th IWA International Conference on Water Reclamation and Reuse   
       
July 25-27, 2017
University of Alabama
Tuscaloosa, AL
  CUAHSI 2017 Conference: Hydroinformatics: Swimming in Data without Drowning in the Deluge  
       
July 25-27, 2017
Duluth, MN
  Michigan Technological University workshop: Science and Management of Ash Forests after Emerald Ash Borer  
       
MORE JULY MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
AUGUST 2017
       
August 1- 2, 2017
Juniata College
Huntingdon, PA
  Mid-Atlantic Invasive Plant Council: Invasion Biology: Paths to Conservation and Restoration Success   
       
August 6-11, 2017
Portland, OR
  2017 ESA Annual Meeting: Linking biodiversity, material cycling and ecosystem services in a changing world
 
       
August 8–11, 2017
Puerto Iguazú,
Misiones, Argentina
  Ornithological Congress of the Americas  
       
August 14-17, 2017
Iselin, NJ
  Association of State Floodplain Managers: The National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop
 
       
August 14-17, 2017
Tulsa, OK
  Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals: 2017 Tribal Lands & Environment Forum   
       
August 20-23, 2017
Bergen, Norway
  3rd International Workshop on Trait-based Approaches to Ocean Life  
       
August 20-23, 2017
Tampla, FL
  American Fisheries Society 147th Annual Meeting: Fisheries Ecosystems: Uplands to Oceans  
       
August 21-25, 2017
Beijing, China
  12th International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL 2017 Beijing): Ecology and Civilization in a Changing World
 
       
August 22-26, 2017
Big Sky, MT
  7th International Symposium: Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control (WETPOL)  
       
August 24-26, 2017
Corum, Montpellier, France
  Biodiversity and Ecosystem Scenarios Network (ScenNet): Scenarios and Models of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Support of Decision Making  
       
August 27-September 1, 2017
Stockholm, Sweden
  SIWI World Water Week: Water and Waste: Reduce and Reuse’  
       
MORE AUGUST MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
SEPTEMBER 2017
       
September 5-7, 2017
University of Leeds, UK
  7th International Conference on Flood Management (ICFM7)  
       
September 5-8, 2017
Long Beach, CA
  Floodplain Management Association Annual Conference: Creating Partnerships through Integration: Water, Environment, People  
       
September 10-13, 2017
Phoenix, AZ
  WateReuse: 32nd Annual WateReuse Symposium  
       
September 10-13, 2017
Loveland, CO 
  American Water Works Association Rocky Mountain Section: Annual Conference   
       
September 16-17, 2017
Toonton, Candad
  Sixth International Conference: Climate Change Adaptation 2017 (CCA 2017). Abstracts due by April 30, 2017.  
       
September 20-22, 2017
Baltimore, MD
  Rhode Island Resource Institute: 8th Mid-Atlantic Stream Restoration Conference  
       
September 23-27, 2017
Albuquerque, NM
  Wildlife Society 24th Annual Conference  
       
September 28-29, 2017
Budapest, Hungary
  1st International Conference on Community Ecology (ComEc)  
       
MORE SEPTEMBER MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
OCTOBER 2017
       
October 10-12, 2017
Collins, CO
  Natural Areas Association: Natural Areas Conference

 
       
October 11-13, 2017
American Museum of Natural History
New York, NY
  Center for Biodiversity and Conservation and its partners: 2017 Student Conference on Conservation Science  
       
October 12-13, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  2017 Mid-Atlantic Water Resources Conference: Water Research: Building Knowledge and Innovative Solutions  
       
October 14, 2017
Westerville, OH
  Ohio Wetlands Association Wetlands Science Summit: Working Wetlands for Water Quality  
       
October 14-15, 2017
San Marcos, TX
  Texas State University, Department of Geography's Resilience and Bio-Geomorphic Systems: 48th Annual Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium. A field trip on October 13, 2017.  
       
October 17-19, 2017
University of California, Davis
  California Department of Water Resources, Urban Streams Restoration Program, Riparian Habitat Joint Venture: 2017 Riparian Summit - Confluence to Influence  
       
October 17-19, 2017
Buffalo, NY
  Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: 13th Annual Great Lakes Restoration Conference   
       
October 19-21, 2017
University of Oklahoma
  4th Life Discovery – Doing Science Biology Education Conference  
       
October 19-21, 2017
Rome, Italy
  4th World Conference on Climate Change: Today's Progress and Tomorrow's Climate Challenges  
       
October 22-25, 2017
Tampa, FL
  American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America will host: 2017 International Annual Meeting, "Managing Global Resources for a Secure Future"    
       
October 24-26, 2017
Atlantic City, NJ
  2017 NJAFM Annual Conference  
       
October 25-27, 2017
Boyne Falls, MI
  Michigan Aquatic Restoration Conference  
       
October 26-28, 2017
Denver, CO
  Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2017 National Land Conservation Conference  
       
MORE OCTOBER MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
NOVEMBER 2017
       
November 5-9, 2017
Portland, OR
  2017 AWRA Annual Conference  
       
November 5-9, 2017
Providence, RI
  Coastal Estuarine Research Federation (CERF) Conference: Coastal Science at the Inflection Point: Celebrating Successes & Learning from Challenges   
       
November 6-9, 2017
Green Bay, WI
  International Association for Great Lakes Research: State of Lake Michigan Conference  
       
November 8-9, 2017
Manhattan, KS
  Kansas Water Office Governor's Conference: Future of Water in Kansas  
       
MORE NOVEMBER MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
TRAINING
       
JUNE 2017
       
June 25-July 1, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Liverworts and Liverwort Ecology  
       
June 25-July 1, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Moths and Butterflies: Identification, Specimen Preparation, and Taxonomy  
       
June 26-27. 2017
Anchorage, AK
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum – 2017
 
       
June 26-30, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Endangered Species Recovery Planning and Implementation  
       
June 26-30, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  Conservation Leadership Network Training Course: Mitigation Banking & In-Lieu Fee Program Interagency Review Teams  
       
June 26-July 7, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Conservation Ecology  
       
June 26-July 8, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Conservation Biology in the Field  
       
June 26-July 20, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Field Ecology  
       
June 26-July 21, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Seminars in Ecology and Resource Management  
       
June 28, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Development Agreements, Public-Private Partnerships and Redevelopment 2.0  
       
June 28-29, 2017
Anchorage, AK
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Advanced Hydric Soils – 2017  
       
June 28-30, 2017
University of Washington, Seattle
  Washington Native Plant Society Course: Know Your Grasses: The Identification and Appreciation of Grass  
       
June 28-30, 2017
University of Minnesota
Saint Paul, MN
  Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education Workshop: Sustainability, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion    
       
June 28-30, 2017
University of Wisconsin La Crossee
La Crosse, WI
  Advanced Wetland Delineation Training Workshops
This workshop will also be held on August 10-11, 2017 in Siren, WI
 
       
MORE JUNE TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
JULY 2017
       
July 2-8, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Lichens and Lichen Ecology  
       
July 2-8, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Sedges and Rushes: Identification and Ecology  
       
July 2-8, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Dragonflies and Damselflies: Field Techniques and Identification  
       
July 6-19, 2017
Socorro, NM
  New Mexico Tech: Summer Field Hydrology Course  
       
July 9-15, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Native Bees as Pollinators: Diversity, Ecology, Conservation, and Habitat Enhancement  
       
July 9-15, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Finding Words in Nature: Creative Writing for Aspiring Authors ... Study Retreat  
       
July 9-15, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Nature Journaling: Black and White Illustration Techniques  
       
July 10, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Workshop: Certified Wetland Botanist
Also held on November 6, 2017
 
       
July 10-12, 2017
Circleville, WV
  Experience Learning, Inc.: Appalachian Watershed and Stream Monitors Professional Development Workshop    
       
July 10-13, 2017
Pittsburgh, PA
  The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design  
       
July 10-14, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Workshop: Gardening with Native Plants in Highlands  
       
July 10-21, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Landscape Ecology  
       
July 10-24, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School On-Demand Workshop: What is a “Waters of the US?"
This workshop will be presented in 2-parts and offered over the span of 2-weeks. Also offered: August 14-28, 2017; September 4-18, 2017;October 16-30, 2017
 
       
July 10-24, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments
This online course will also be held on October 2, 2017
 
       
July 10-21, 2017
Santa Barbara, CA
  National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis Training: Open Science for Synthesis: Gulf Research Program  
       
July 10-August 7, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Workshop: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment
This online workshop will also be held on October 2, 2017
 
       
July 11, 2017
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Endangered Species Act Overview  
       
July 11-12, 2017
La Crosse, WI
  University of Wisconsin La Crossee Course: Grasses, Sedges & Rushes   
       
July 12, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Special Status Amphibians and Reptiles of Northern California   
       
July 12-13, 2017
Laramine, WY
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
July 12-14, 2017
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Problematic Delineation Seminar  
       
July 13, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Wetlands Regulation and Mitigation  
       
July 15, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: An Introduction to Living Shorelines
 
       
July 16-22, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Boletes and Other Fungi of New England  
       
July 16-22, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Survey of Grasses: Their Structure, Identification, and Ecology  
       
July 17, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: International Wetland Identification and Delineation
This course will also be offered on October 2 and December 4, 2017
 
       
July 17-18, 2017
Denver, CO
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Advanced Hydric Soils – 2017  
       
July 17-21, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Restoration Policy, Planning, and Partnering  
       
July 17-21, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Wetland Plant Identification  
       
July 17-29, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Introduction to Southern Appalachian Fungi  
       
July 18-20, 2017
Raleigh, NC
  North Carolina University Stream Restoration Program River Course: 302 HEC-RAS for Stream Restoration  
       
July 23-28, 2017
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI
  Course: Making Meaning through Modeling: Problem solving in Biology  
       
July 23-29, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Wetlands Identification, Delineation, and Ecology  
       
July 23-29, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Spiders: Identification, Biology, and Ecology  
       
July 23-29, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Lichens, Biofilms, and Stone  
       
July 24-August 4, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Stream Ecology  
       
July 24-August 4, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Alpine Ecology  
       
July 24-August 5, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Forest Ecosystems of the Southern Appalachians  
       
July 25-27, 2017
Copper Harbor, MI
  Isle Royale & Keweenaw Parks Association: Keweenaw Plant I.D. Workshop  
       
July 25-28, 2017
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Wetland Delineators  
       
July 27, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: BMP Options for Stormwater Runoff  
       
July 30-August 5, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Mushroom Identification for New Mycophiles: Foraging for Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms  
       
July 30-August 5, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Art and Science of Photographing Insects and their Kin  
       
July 31-August 4, 2017
Loga, UT


  Utah State University, S.J. & Jessie E. Quinney College of Natural Resources Course: Sediment Transport in Stream Assessment and Design  
       
July 31-August 12, 201
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Southern Appalachian Mayflies, Stoneflies, & Caddisflies  
       
MORE JULY TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR   
   
AUGUST 2017
       
August 1-2, 2017
Keweenaw, PA
  Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Wetland Plants of the Upper Peninsula  
       
August 1-2, 2017
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Advanced Hydric Soils – 2017  
       
August 2-3, 2017
Davis, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: GIS for Watershed Analysis: Intermediate  
       
August 6-12, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Submersed and Floating Aquatic Plants  
       
August 6-12, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Independent Studies: Interesting and Challenging Saxicolous Lichens of North America  
       
August 7-8, 2017
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Hydrophytic Vegetation (Coastal Plain or Piedmont)  
       
August 7-11, 2017
Sagehen Field Station near
Lake Tahoe, CA
  UC Berkeley Course: Geomorphic & Ecological Fundamentals of River & Stream Restoration  
       
August 7-11, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  The Conservation Fund: Conservation Banking Training Course  
       
August 7-11, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Conservation Biology of Freshwater Mussels  
       
August 7-12, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Wetland Plant Communities  
       
August 7-18, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Ecology of Forests and Grasslands  
       
August 7-18, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Drone Remote Sensing of Freshwater Ecosystems
 
       
August 7-18, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Course: Lake Ecology  
       
August 7-Septebmer 4, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment
This course will also be held on November 6th (4 weeks)
 
       
August 8, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Overview of Environmental Statistics  
       
August 9-11, 2017
Davis, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Using GIS to Manage, Analyze and Promote Sustainability  
       
August 13-19, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Field Botany and Plant Ecology of the Eastern Maine Coast  
       
August 14-17, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Grasses, Sedges and Rushes  
       
August 14-18, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Workshop: Mushrooms of the Carolinas  
       
August 14-20, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Tidal Marsh Restoration: A Traveling Course from Rhode Island to Maine  
       
August 14-28, 2017
Online
 
  The Swamp School On-Demand Workshop: What is a “Waters of the US?”
This workshop will be presented in 2-parts and offered over the span of 2-weeks.
Also offered: July 10-24, 2017; September 4-18, 2017; October 16-30, 2017 
 
       
August 15-17, 2017
Front Royal, VA
  EcoAgriculture Partners: Landscape Leadership Intensive Workshop  
       
August 15-18, 2017
Hays, KS
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Wetlands and Wetland Delineators  
       
August 17, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Planning and Mitigation on Tribal Lands  
       
August 20-26, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Identification, Biology, and Natural History of Ferns and Lycophytes  
       
August 20-26, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Banding/research Techniques for Studying Songbirds and Raptors  
       
August 21-22, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Evaluating Hydric Soils in the Field  
       
August 21-25, 2017
Alexandria Bay, NY
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Wetland Assessment, Restoration and Management  
       
August 23-25, 2017
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI
  CUAHSI and the University of Michigan Training Workshop: Sensor Network Bootcamp in an Urban Environment  
       
August 24-25, 2017
Denver, CO
  Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Floodplain Delineation using 2D HEC RAS Model  
       
August 25, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Vested Rights, Vesting Maps and Development Agreements  
       
August 27-September 2, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Better Birding: Passerines and Seabirds for Advancing Birders  
       
August 28-29, 2017
Arlington, WA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
MORE AUGUST TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
SEPTEMBER 2017
       
September 6-7, 2017
Duck Creek Conservation Area
Puxico, MO
  Wetland Management and Educational Services, Inc. Workshop: Moist-soil Management for Biologists and Managers  
       
September 7-8, 2017
Whitefish, MT
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
June 9, 2017
Sacramento CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Understanding the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta: An Overview of Delta Governance and Regulation   
       
September 11-15, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
September 12-13, 2017
Charleston, SC
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes  
       
September 13-14, 2017
McNary National Wildlife Refuge
Burbank, WA
  Wetland Management and Educational Services, Inc. Workshop: Moist-Soil Management for Maintenance Staff
 
       
September 14-15, 2017
San Diego, CA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Riparian Habitat Restoration for the Arid Southwest  
       
September 14-15, 2017
Milville, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Vegetation Identification for Wetland Delineation: Sout  
       
September 18-19, 2017
Covington, LA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
September 18-21, 2017
Pittsburgh, PA
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training  
       
September 14-15, 2017
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species  
       
September 19-20, 2017
Arlington, VA
  Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Wetlands: Science and Regulatory Management  
       
September 20-21, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Habitat Site Restoration  
       
September 21-22, 2017
Poolesville, MD
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum - 2017  
       
September 25-26, 2017
Tuckerton, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants   
       
September 25-27, 2017
Bordentown, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Wetland Construction: Principles, Planning and Design   
       
September 28, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Exploring Wetland Wildlife  
       
 MORE SEPTEMBER TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
   
OCTOBER 2017
       
October 2, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrology   
       
October 2, 2017
Online 
  The Swamp School Online Workshop: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment  
       
October 2-5, 2017
Hilliard, OH
  MBI (Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Wetland Delineation  
       
October 2-6, 2017
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
October 9-13, 2017
Barcelona, Spain
  Transmitting Science, the Institut Catalá de Paleontologia Miquel, Crusafont and the Centre de Restauració i Interpretació Paleontològica Course: Comparative Approaches in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Science    
       
October 11, 2017
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Introduction to Wetland Identification   
       
October 14-17, 2017
Iselin, NJ
  National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop  
       
October 18, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Planning Tools to Create Healthy Communities  
       
October 18-19, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Workshop: Tree Identification  
       
October 23, 2017
New Brunswick, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Understanding Advanced Stormwater Management Techniques  
       
October 26, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Building Stream Buffers  
       
October 26-27, 2017
Denver, CO
  Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Stormwater Green Drainage Design Using EPA SWMM-LID  
       
 MORE OCTOBER TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
   
NOVEMBER 2017
       
November 2-3, 2017
Charleston, SC
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
November 6-9, 2017
Columbus, OH
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: ACOE Wetland Delineation, Waters of the US and Regional Supplement Training  
       
November 7-9, 2017
Gainseville, FL
  CUAHSI and the University of Florida 3-day Training Workshop: Using In-Situ Water Quality Sensors - Lagrangian and Eulerian Applications  
       
November 8, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetland Pollinators  
       
November 13-14, 2017
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands, and Hydrology (Coastal Plain or Piedmont)  
       
November 15, 2017
Richmond, VA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: Regional Supplment Wetland Delineation Training. For other dates, go here.  
 
MORE NOVEMBER TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
   
DECEMBER 2017  
   
December 4, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Delineator  
       
December 4, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design  
       
December 7, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetlands of the World   
       
December 13, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: POW! The Planning of Wetlands   
   
MORE DECEMBER TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
   
SPECIAL EVENTS
       
June 24, 2017
Rapids, MI
  2017 Grand River Water Festival  
       
Juy 15, 2017
Gransonville, MD 
  Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center: Paddlepalooza  
       
July 22, 2017
Huntington Beach, CA
  Wetlands Walk at Bolsa Chica Ecological Preserve  
       
September 12-16, 2017
Bloomfield Hills, NI
  Rouge River Water Festival  
       
September 23, 2017
Cape May, NJ
  Fall Migration Festival  
       
October 13-15, 2017
Houma, LA
  2017 Voice of Wetlands Festival  
       
For more wetland events, meetings, conferences, and courses nationwide, visit the ASWM calendar.
       

       
INDEX      


EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • Playing the Long Game on Energy: Avoiding Pendulum Politics and Regulatory Risk
  • Over 1,400 U.S. Cities, States and Businesses Vow to Meet Paris Climate Commitments
  • 85 percent of the top science jobs in Trump’s government don’t even have a nominee
  • Revenue Stream: How an Environmental Law Creates Jobs In Coal Country

NATIONAL NEWS

  • The Standing Rock Sioux Claim ‘Victory and Vindication’ in Court
  • Schuette ups the ante in Flint water crisis with new manslaughter charges
  • Zinke Says Tribes Are ‘Happy’ to Have Bears Ears Modifications; Tribes Disagree
  • Charting Canada’s troubled waters: Where the danger lies for watersheds across the country
  • Trump says environmental reports should shrink to ‘a few simple pages’
  • Grouse storm: Trump team launches protection plan review, vows greater flexibility for states and industry
  • U.S. Pays Farmers Billions To Save The Soil. But It's Blowing Away
  • Sessions bars settlement funds from going to outside groups
  • Puerto Rico declares Zika epidemic to be over
  • Threat of Wetland Deregulation Inspires Records Suit
  • Exxon's Climate Accounting a 'Sham' Under Rex Tillerson, New York’s AG Says
  • EPA offers buyouts in a bid to cut employees
  • Analysis | Trump says goodbye to the Paris climate agreement. Here’s what that means.
  • EPA halts Obama-era rule on methane pollution
  • Study: Water quality can improve by 20% — without cost
  • UPDATED: Trump Budget Would Still Increase Water Pollution
  • House approves bill seeking to upend EPA pesticide rule
  • Trump budget plan would squeeze states over environmental programs
  • Trump Budget Would Wallop EPA's Climate and Environment Programs
  • Exclusive: House Science Committee members just sent a letter to President Trump insisting he stop relying on fake news
  • Reaching Higher Ground in the Face of Climate Change
  • Invitation for Nominations to the BOSC Executive Committee and Subcommittees
  • Conservation Finance – Where Wall Street Meets Nature

STATE NEWS

  • AK: Conservation groups prep for battle over drilling in NPR-A
  • AK: 'Homework assignment' — how Pebble lobbied Trump's EPA 
  • AZ: Phoenix approves historic Colorado River conservation agreement
  • CA: China is now looking to California – not Trump – to help lead the fight against climate change
  • CA: Can California Tap Carbon Markets To Save Its Delta (And Its Drinking Water)?
  • CA: State Agencies Pilot Wildlife Crossing Mitigation Credit System
  • CO: Denver Water tree-thinning effort to protect watershed, prevent fires is expanded to private property
  • FL: Cape man joins lawsuit claiming Roundup causes cancer
  • FL: Microplastics plague the lagoon 
  • FL: Florida lawmakers introduce legislation to expedite all Everglades restoration projects
  • IL: Lake Michigan shoreline erosion could be getting worse, research shows
  • LA: New Map Highlights Sinking Louisiana Coast 
  • LA: Pace of Louisiana coastal restoration projects should quicken under bill passed by lawmakers 
  • LA: Wetland plague concern spreads from scientists to business owners 
  • ME: Gulf of Maine will become too warm for many key fish, report says 
  • MD: Maryland Natural Resources providing $10.5M in Waterway Improvement Fund grants
  • MD: Maryland Oysters – Past Wars & Present Challenges
  • MI: Enbridge says pipeline portion ‘fit for service’ 
  • MN: Scientists planting 400 acres of Minnesota pines to survive climate change 
  • MN: Program rewarding farmers who protect water quality small, but growing 
  • MN: Enbridge pipeline could cause more damage than alternatives, but it's not largest spill risk 
  • MT: Montana and the EPA: A Complicated Relationship 
  • MT: 'This was a scary-looking property. He dug everything up' 
  • NJ: Why are half of NJ's honeybees dying each year? 
  • NJ: N.J. to stop notorious Meadowlands landfill from polluting Passaic River after years of delay 
  • NJ: Rising seas could be turning Jersey’s coastal cedars into ghost forests
  • NC: Insurers: We're off the hook, Duke Energy knew coal ash risk 
  • NC: Beaufort and Scientists Partner for Stormwater Study 
  • OH: How NW Ohio farmers are trying to shrink Lake Erie toxic algal blooms 
  • OH: Ohio corn, wheat and soybean farmers urge Congress to fully fund Great Lakes Restoration Initiative
  • OR: Oil v. Culture: The Battle Goes on to Protect Columbia River 
  • PA: PA launches effort to write cleanup plan addressing Bay shortfall 
  • PA: Trump’s rural voters fighting to keep their land from a growing web of pipelines
  • VA: Major wetlands violations case headed to retrial 
  • WI: Wetland Restoration as a Business: Wisconsin’s Growing Mitigation Industry 

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • Larger-than-normal dead zone expected in Chesapeake Bay this summer
  • Researchers Document Widespread Melting on Antarctica’s Huge Ross Ice Shelf
  • Intense storms may diminish protective ozone in Central U.S.
  • Can marine reserves help counteract climate change?
  • A climate chain reaction: Major Greenland melting could devastate crops in Africa
  • More plastic than fish? Oceans 'under threat as never before,' warns UN chief
  • New Ocean Reserve, Largest in Africa, Protects Whales and Turtles
  • An ambitious project begins to shed light on a mysterious Lake Erie fish
  • Refuge for the Ridgway’s Rail
  • Throwing Dead Fish for Fun and Ecological Profit
  • Medications, pesticides, found in blood of sea turtles on Great Barrier Reef
  • Biodiversity moves beyond counting species
  • Professor proposes using artificial intelligence to predict aquatic ecosystem health
  • Scientists warn US coral reefs are on course to disappear within decades
  • Lyme Isn’t the Only Disease Ticks are Spreading This Summer
  • Greenland Glacier Melt Actually Warped Earth's Crust
  • Above-normal Atlantic hurricane season is most likely this year
  • Effective restoration of aquatic ecosystems
  • Sequestering blue carbon through better management of coastal ecosystems
  • Domino Effect: The Myriad Impacts of Warming on an East Coast Estuary
  • Can shellfish adapt to ocean acidification?

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • Green Infrastructure in Parks: A Guide to Collaboration, Funding, and Community
    Engagement
  • Natural & Nature-based Flood Management: A Green Guide

POTPOURRI

  • Dangerous unproven treatments for ‘chronic Lyme disease’ are on the rise
  • Multi-million dollar upgrade planned to secure 'failsafe' Arctic seed vault
  • The dishonest HONEST Act
  • The Future Is What We Make of It—But What Will That Be?
  • In the Land of Lost Gardens
  • Putting the Local in Marine Conservation
  • The Missouri River: A great balancing act
  • New analysis shows national monument support dominates public comment period
  • The Unstable Landscape of US Conservation Funding

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

WEBINARS, MEETINGS, TRAINING

Webinars

  • Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay and our Businesses for the Bay Networking Partner, Chesapeake Bay Program Webinar: The Business of the Watershed
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Members' Webinar: The Price of Everything and the Value of Nothing: Is Ecosystem Valuation Worth It?
  • The Swamp School: Wetland Wildflower Webinar
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Members' Webinar: How to Connect with the Public to Protect Wetlands: Findings from ASWM’s Wetland Communications Case Study Project
  • AWRA Webinar: IWRM and the Floods Directive: What can the US learn from the EU?
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Hot Topics Webinar: Partnering with Beaver to Benefit Sage Grouse and Working Lands: Restoring Emerald Islands in the Sagebrush Sea
  • AWRA Webinar: Changing Flood Risks in the California Central Valley under Climate Change
  • AWRA Webinar: Groundwater Droughts - A Tale from a Few Aquifers
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Stream Restoration: Where are we now?
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Bringing Better Site Design into The 21st Century
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Modeling for Water Quality

Meetings

  • 2017 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: Climate Change Solutions: Collaborative Science, Policy and Planning for Sustainable Water Management
  • Gordon Research Conference: Crossing Boundaries and Seeking Synthesis in the Catchment Sciences
  • US Water Alliance: One Water Summit 2017
  • North American Echinoderm Conference
  • World Climate Research Program: Regional Sea Level Changes and Coastal Impacts Conference
  • Sharing Technical and Scientific Knowledge About Extreme Precipitation
  • Joint Meetings of Ichthyology and Herpetology
  • Law Seminars International 2017 Santa Fe Advanced Natural Resource Damages Conference
  • National Association of Counties: 2017 Annual Conference
  • 11th IWA International Conference on Water Reclamation and Reuse
  • CUAHSI 2017 Conference: Hydroinformatics: Swimming in Data without Drowning in the Deluge
  • Michigan Technological University workshop: Science and Management of Ash Forests after Emerald Ash Borer
  • Mid-Atlantic Invasive Plant Council: Invasion Biology: Paths to Conservation and Restoration Success
  • 2017 ESA Annual Meeting: Linking biodiversity, material cycling and ecosystem services in a changing world
  • Ornithological Congress of the Americas
  • Association of State Floodplain Managers: The National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop
  • Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals: 2017 Tribal Lands & Environment Forum
  • 3rd International Workshop on Trait-based Approaches to Ocean Life
  • American Fisheries Society 147th Annual Meeting: Fisheries Ecosystems: Uplands to Oceans
  • 12th International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL 2017 Beijing): Ecology and Civilization in a Changing World
  • 7th International Symposium for Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control (WETPOL)
  • Biodiversity and Ecosystem Scenarios Network (ScenNet): Scenarios and Models of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Support of Decision Making
  • SIWI World Water Week: Water and Waste: Reduce and Reuse’
  • 7th International Conference on Flood Management (ICFM7)
  • Floodplain Management Association Annual Conference: Creating Partnerships through Integration: Water, Environment, People
  • WateReuse: 32nd Annual WateReuse Symposium
  • American Water Works Association Rocky Mountain Section: Annual Conference
  • Sixth International Conference: Climate Change Adaptation 2017 (CCA 2017)
  • Rhode Island Resource Institute: 8th Mid-Atlantic Stream Restoration Conference
  • Wildlife Society 24th Annual Conference
  • 1st International Conference on Community Ecology (ComEc)
  • Natural Areas Association: Natural Areas Conference
  • Center for Biodiversity and Conservation and its partners: 2017 Student Conference on Conservation Science
  • 2017 Mid-Atlantic Water Resources Conference: Water Research: Building Knowledge and Innovative Solutions
  • Ohio Wetlands Association Wetlands Science Summit: Working Wetlands for Water Quality
  • 48th Annual Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium
  • California Department of Water Resources, Urban Streams Restoration Program, Riparian Habitat Joint Venture: 2017 Riparian Summit - Confluence to Influence
  • Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: 13th Annual Great Lakes Restoration Conference
  • 4th Life Discovery – Doing Science Biology Education Conference
  • 4th World Conference on Climate Change: Today's Progress and Tomorrow's Climate Challenges
  • 2017 International Annual Meeting, "Managing Global Resources for a Secure Future"
  • 2017 NJAFM Annual Conference
  • Michigan Aquatic Restoration Conference
  • Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2017 National Land Conservation Conference
  • 2017 AWRA Annual Conference
  • Coastal Estuarine Research Federation (CERF) Conference: Coastal Science at the Inflection Point: Celebrating Successes & Learning from Challenges
  • International Association for Great Lakes Research: State of Lake Michigan Conference
  • Kansas Water Office Governor's Conference: Future of Water in Kansas

Training

  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Liverworts and Liverwort Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Moths and Butterflies: Identification, Specimen Preparation, and Taxonomy
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum – 2017
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Endangered Species Recovery Planning and Implementation
  • Conservation Leadership Network Training Course: Mitigation Banking & In-Lieu Fee Program Interagency Review Teams
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Conservation Ecology
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Conservation Biology in the Field
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Field Ecology
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Seminars in Ecology and Resource Management
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Development Agreements, Public-Private Partnerships and Redevelopment 2.0
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Advanced Hydric Soils – 2017
  • Washington Native Plant Society Course: Know Your Grasses: The Identification and Appreciation of Grass
  • Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education Workshop: Sustainability, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion
  • Advanced Wetland Delineation Training Workshops
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Lichens and Lichen Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Sedges and Rushes: Identification and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Dragonflies and Damselflies: Field Techniques and Identification
  • New Mexico Tech: Summer Field Hydrology Course
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Native Bees as Pollinators: Diversity, Ecology, Conservation, and Habitat Enhancement
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Finding Words in Nature: Creative Writing for Aspiring Authors ... Study Retreat
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Nature Journaling: Black and White Illustration Techniques
  • The Swamp School Online Workshop: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment
  • Experience Learning, Inc.: Appalachian Watershed and Stream Monitors Professional Development Workshop
  • The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • Highlands Biological Station Workshop: Gardening with Native Plants in Highlands
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Landscape Ecology
  • The Swamp School On-Demand Workshop: What is a “Waters of the US?”
  • National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis Training: Open Science for Synthesis: Gulf Research Program
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Endangered Species Act Overview
  • University of Wisconsin La Crossee Course: Grasses, Sedges & Rushes
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Special Status Amphibians and Reptiles of Northern California
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Problematic Delineation Seminar
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Wetlands Regulation and Mitigation
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: An Introduction to Living Shorelines
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Boletes and Other Fungi of New England
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Survey of Grasses: Their Structure, Identification, and Ecology
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Advanced Hydric Soils – 2017
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Restoration Policy, Planning, and Partnering
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Wetland Plant Identification
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Introduction to Southern Appalachian Fungi
  • North Carolina University Stream Restoration Program River Course: 302 HEC-RAS for Stream Restoration
  • Course: Making Meaning through Modeling: Problem solving in Biology
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Wetlands Identification, Delineation, and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Spiders: Identification, Biology, and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Lichens, Biofilms, and Stone
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Stream Ecology
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Alpine Ecology
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Forest Ecosystems of the Southern Appalachians
  • Isle Royale & Keweenaw Parks Association: Keweenaw Plant I.D. Workshop
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Wetland Delineators
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: BMP Options for Stormwater Runoff
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Mushroom Identification for New Mycophiles: Foraging for Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Art and Science of Photographing Insects and their Kin
  • Utah State University, S.J. & Jessie E. Quinney College of Natural Resources Course: Sediment Transport in Stream Assessment and Design
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Southern Appalachian Mayflies, Stoneflies, & Caddisflies
  • Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Wetland Plants of the Upper Peninsula
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Advanced Hydric Soils – 2017
  • UC Davis Extension Course: GIS for Watershed Analysis: Intermediate
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Submersed and Floating Aquatic Plants
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Independent Studies: Interesting and Challenging Saxicolous Lichens of North America
  •  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Hydrophytic Vegetation (Coastal Plain or Piedmont)
  • UC Berkeley Course: Geomorphic & Ecological Fundamentals of River & Stream Restoration
  • The Conservation Fund: Conservation Banking Training Course
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Conservation Biology of Freshwater Mussels
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Wetland Plant Communities
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Ecology of Forests and Grasslands
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Drone Remote Sensing of Freshwater Ecosystems
  • University of Montana’s Flathead Lake Biological Station Course: Lake Ecology
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Overview of Environmental Statistics
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Using GIS to Manage, Analyze and Promote Sustainability
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Field Botany and Plant Ecology of the Eastern Maine Coast
  • Environmental Concern Course: Grasses, Sedges and Rushes
  • Highlands Biological Station Workshop: Mushrooms of the Carolinas
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Tidal Marsh Restoration: A Traveling Course from Rhode Island to Maine
  • The Swamp School On-Demand Workshop: What is a “Waters of the US?”
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Wetlands and Wetland Delineators
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Planning and Mitigation on Tribal Lands
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Identification, Biology, and Natural History of Ferns and Lycophytes
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Banding/research Techniques for Studying Songbirds and Raptors
  • Environmental Concern Course: Evaluating Hydric Soils in the Field
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Wetland Assessment, Restoration and Management
  • CUAHSI and the University of Michigan Training Workshop: Sensor Network Bootcamp in an Urban Environment
  • Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Floodplain Delineation using 2D HEC RAS Model
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Vested Rights, Vesting Maps and Development Agreements
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Better Birding: Passerines and Seabirds for Advancing Birders
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Management and Educational Services, Inc. Workshop: Moist-soil Management for Biologists and Managers
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Understanding the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta: An Overview of Delta Governance and Regulation
  • Environmental Concern Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
  • Wetland Management and Educational Services, Inc. Workshop: Moist-Soil Management for Maintenance Staff
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Riparian Habitat Restoration for the Arid Southwest
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Vegetation Identification for Wetland Delineation: South
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Wetlands: Science and Regulatory Management
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Habitat Site Restoration
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum – 2017 – MD
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Wetland Construction: Principles, Planning and Design
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Exploring Wetland Wildlife
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrology
  • The Swamp School Online Workshop: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment
  • MBI (Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Wetland Delineation
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Course: Comparative Approaches in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Science
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Introduction to Wetland Identification
  •  National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Planning Tools to Create Healthy Communities
  • Highlands Biological Station Workshop: Tree Identification
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Understanding Advanced Stormwater Management Techniques
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Building Stream Buffers
  • Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Stormwater Green Drainage Design Using EPA SWMM-LID
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Basic: Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum – SC
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: ACOE Wetland Delineation, Waters of the US and Regional Supplement Training
  • CUAHSI and the University of Florida 3-day Training Workshop: Using In-Situ Water Quality Sensors - Lagrangian and Eulerian Applications
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetland Pollinators
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands, and Hydrology (Coastal Plain or Piedmont)
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetlands of the World
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: POW! The Planning of Wetlands

SPECIAL EVENT

  • 2017 Grand River Water Festival
  • Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center: Paddlepalooza
  • Wetlands Walk at Bolsa Chica Ecological Preserve
  • Rouge River Water Festival
  • Fall Migration Festival
  • 2017 Voice of Wetlands Festival
       
Wetland Breaking News - December 2015
 
 

Wetland Breaking News - March 2016

The Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News (WBN) is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those working in water resources and related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published Wetland Breaking News - January 2017for over fifteen years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to .

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled and Edited by Marla Stelk, Editor; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors. Executive Director: Jeanne Christie. Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399 Fax: 207-892-3089
All photos by Jeanne Christie, ASWM
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