WBN October 2018

                

IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

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WBN October 2018

 

WBN - Editor's NoteEditor's Note

Dear Wetlanders,

The mid-term elections are finally over, and Thanksgiving is right around the corner. I don’t know about all of you, but I’m especially thankful for the end of campaign ads this year. Of course, there is so much more to be thankful for, including
all the amazing work our members do each and every day to protect and restore wetlands. So thank you!!

As an example, I just got back from a joint wetlands meeting of the New England Biological Assessment Wetlands Workgroup (NEBAWWG) and the Mid-Atlantic Wetlands Workgroup (MAWWG), organized by the New England
Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission (NEIWPCC), in Cooperstown, NY. Participants 
included representatives from
state agencies, 
federal agencies,
tribes, 
academia, private consultants
and non-profit organizations. The high level of expertise, innovation and enthusiasm presented by participants in the form of presentations, discussions and participation in break out groups was truly impressive. I am honored to have been included in such
an amazing group of professionals.

We have a lot of great articles to
share with you in this
month’s edition of Wetland Breaking News. We hope you enjoy reading them and perhaps
they’ll spark a Thanksgiving dinner
conversation or two!

Happy Thanksgiving,

Marla J. Stelk
Editor
Wetland Breaking News

 
   
              


Editor's ChoiceWBN: October 2018


NFWF, NOAA Announce $28.9 Million in Grants for the 2018 National Coastal Resilience Fund

Contact: Rob Blumenthal, NFWF and Jerry Slaf, NOAA – NOAA – November 9, 2018
The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, NOAA and their partners today announced $28.9 million in new grants for the restoration or expansion of natural features such as coastal marshes and wetlands, dune and beach systems, oyster and coral reefs, mangroves, forests, coastal rivers, and barrier islands that help minimize the impacts of storms, rising sea levels and other extreme events on nearby communities and infrastructure in 22 states and Puerto Rico. The 35 grants will generate $38.3 million in matching contributions for a total conservation impact of $67.2 million. Read full story here.

Voters Just Elected Seven More Scientists to Congress

By Christina Maxouris and Brandon Griggs – CNN – November 8, 2018
The next Congress will include seven newly elected scientists, including a nuclear engineer and a biochemist. Their supporters say these new scientist-legislators, all of them Democrats, will bring a fact-based approach to public policy and impact such issues as nuclear disarmament and climate change. Read full story here.

Climate Change and the Elections: Five Takeaways

By Brad Plumer and Lisa Friedman – The New York Times – November 7, 2018
The results of Tuesday’s elections could have a significant influence on how the United States deals with global warming in several ways. In the Trump era, much of the action to fight climate change has been happening at the state level. On that front, the results were mixed: Several key climate policies on the ballot, including a carbon tax in Washington State and an aggressive renewable power target in Arizona, were defeated soundly. But Democrats who favor clean energy also took control of a number of key governorships and state legislatures, opening doors for expanded action. Read full story here.

Trump Signs the Water Infrastructure Act

By Emily Moon – Pacific Standard – October 23, 2018
President Donald Trump signed a bipartisan water infrastructure bill into law on Tuesday, authorizing billions of dollars for state-level projects aimed at improving the nation's rivers, harbors, and drinking water. The law will also defund programs Congress deems "inefficient," the Hill reports. Read full article here.

WBN: October 2018: Members' Webinars

 

National News 

 

Exclusive: At U.N. Climate Talks, Trump Team Plans Sideshow on Coal

By Timothy Gardner – Reuters – November 15, 2018
The Trump administration plans to set up a side-event promoting fossil fuels at the annual U.N. climate talks next month, repeating a strategy that infuriated global-warming activists during last year’s talks, according to three people with knowledge of the matter. As with the 2017 gathering in Bonn, Germany, the administration plans to highlight the benefits of technologies that more efficiently burn fuels including coal, the sources said. Read full story here.

Fishermen Sue Oil Companies Over Rising Ocean Temperatures

By Benjamin Hulac, E&E News – Scientific American – November 15, 2018
Commercial fishermen in California and Oregon sued dozens of oil and gas companies yesterday for hurting the fishing market in the Pacific Ocean by raising temperatures on Earth. The Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations (PCFFA) is seeking financial compensation for its losses from 30 companies, including oil and gas supermajors, according to the suit filed in a California state court. Read full article here.

New Resources Support Tribes in Preparing for Climate Change

By Michelle Ma, University of Washington – PHYS.org – November 15, 2018
Which Pacific Northwest streams will warm the most in the next 50 years, and where would restoration work make a difference for salmon? Where will wildfires and pests be most aggressive in forests as the Earth warms, and how can better management help? As the natural world responds to climate change, American Indian tribes across the country are grappling with how to plan for a future that balances inevitable change with protecting the resources vital to their cultural traditions. Read full story here.

Ocean at the Door: New Homes and the Rising Sea

Climate Central – November 13, 2018
In 2012, Hurricane Sandy slammed into New Jersey, producing a major storm surge and damaging or destroying many thousands of homes. Over the years that followed, builders put up new houses and reconstructed damaged ones — in many areas that will be vulnerable to more flooding in the future. The post-Sandy rebuilding was a striking example of a broader pattern. Across the United States, coastal communities have recently built tens of thousands of houses in areas at risk of chronic future flooding driven by sea level rise from climate change. That has put homeowners, renters, and investors in danger of steep personal and financial losses in the years ahead. And while municipalities are increasingly developing plans to cope with sea level rise, the pattern of actual recent construction may be a more robust guide to which places are taking the threat most seriously. Read full story here.

USGS: Florence Set at Least 28 Flood Records in Carolinas

Contact: Jason Burton – U.S. Geological Survey – November 13, 2018
The U.S. Geological Survey has confirmed what many residents of the Carolinas already suspected: Hurricane Florence’s rainfalls brought with them record flooding. Preliminary data indicates that 18 USGS streamgages in North Carolina and 10 in South Carolina registered record-setting water levels, called peaks of record. Another 45 streamgages in North Carolina and four in South Carolina recorded streamflows – the volume of water moving past a fixed point -- within the top five measured at those specific sites. The information comes from a new report that focused on peak streamflow and water level data measured at 84 U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in the Carolinas. These gauges all had water level records stretching back ten years or more, and they all recorded water levels during Hurricane Florence that were among the top five measured for that site. This report can be used by emergency managers and water resources engineers who often need to know the expected frequency and magnitude of peak streamflows observed during a flood. Decision makers can also use this information for city planning, to update building codes and to help prepare for future storms. Read full new release here. Read report here.

USACE Announces Lake Erie Wetland Restoration

November 6, 2018
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) announced plans to restore wetlands along Lake Erie’s shoreline in Port Clinton, Ohio. To be completed over the next five years, the project will restore 12 miles of coastal wetlands and add an additional 1.4 miles. Construction will begin within the next year and will help restore Port Clinton as a sub-habitat flyway for Mississippi and Atlantic migratory flyways, as well as improve storm water runoff quality. The restoration includes initial construction, invasive species treatment, native species revegetation, adaptive management and monitoring, as reported by the Port Clinton News Herald. The Ohio EPA, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, city of Port Clinton and USACE collaborated to secure the $1.3 million from the Great Lakes Fishery and Ecosystem Restoration and the OEPA Water Resource Restoration Sponsor Program. Read full story here.

Every President Since JFK Was Warned About Climate Change

By Benjamin Hulac – E&E News – November 6, 2018
John F. Kennedy was warned about "climate control" in February 1961, becoming perhaps the first American president to learn about people's impact on planetary temperatures. The warnings never stopped. Every president since then has been exposed to similar scientific findings. Sometimes it was called "climatic change," other times it was "air pollution." The history of cautionary messages with the West Wing is documented in hundreds of records submitted in Juliana v. United States, a court case against the federal government. The files show an arc of steadily improving climate science and a clearer picture of damages, even as presidents diverged on how to address the problem. Read full story here.

Dam Problems, Win-Win Solutions

University of Maine – PHYS.org – November 5, 2018
Decisions about whether to build, remove or modify dams involve complex trade-offs that are often accompanied by social and political conflict. A group of researchers from the natural and social sciences, engineering, arts and humanities has joined forces to show how, where and when it may be possible to achieve a more efficient balance among these trade-offs. Their work is featured in a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Read full story here.

Facing Climate Change, States and Cities Seek to Borrow Billions

By Amanda Albright – Bloomberg – November 5, 2018
Dan Gelber, the mayor of Miami Beach, Florida, says climate change will be a homeowners’ worst nightmare. "If you own a home and you find that your roof has a problem or you find out there’s a termite infestation, you have to take care of it," he said. "That’s what climate change is. Sea level rise has created challenges that have to be addressed. For local governments, they don’t go away unless you do something about them." That’s why Miami Beach, where frequent flooding prompted by high tides have illustrated the risks of climate change, is asking residents for the power to pump more money into environmentally-friendly sidewalks, parks, and neighborhood improvements. The $439 million bond bond proposal would use a fourth of the proceeds to address the effects of climate change. Read full story here.

Can Citizen Lawsuits Force Governments to Act on Climate Change?

By Fred Pearche – YaleEnvironment360 – November 1, 2018
Are the courts now the arena of last resort for citizens hoping to force governments to take serious steps to slow global warming? Over the past several weeks, as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) issued its most dire warning to date, courts on two continents have weighed in on the issue, with dramatically different results. Read full story here.

Oil and Gas Leasing Delayed in Sage Grouse Habitat

By Carl Segerstrom – High Country News – October 31, 2018
Throughout his tenure as Interior Department secretary, Ryan Zinke has tried to prime the pump for oil and gas leasing on public lands. Under his leadership, and in pursuit of the Trump administration’s “American Energy Dominance” directive, the Bureau of Land Management has increased the area offered for oil and gas leases and relaxed regulations for natural gas producers on public lands. But the BLM recently hit a snag in its push to lease more land for oil and gas production. In late September, a federal district court in Idaho issued a preliminary injunction stating that the Interior Department must hold off on energy leasing in sage grouse habitat to allow for more public participation. Because of the decision, oil and gas lease sales totaling more than 1 million acres and spanning six states have been delayed. Read full story here.

Recent Hurricanes Underscore Critical Need for Better Flood-Ready Infrastructure Standards

By Forbes Tompkins and Evan Chapman – PEW – October 19, 2018
While the full extent of damage caused in the past two months by hurricanes Florence and Michael is still being calculated, initial estimates suggest Florence is one of the 10 costliest hurricanes on record and marked the 12th 1,000-year rainfall event the country has suffered since the beginning of 2016. Meanwhile, Michael became one of the four most intense hurricanes on record to strike the United States. Read full story here.

A Great Lakes Pipeline Dispute Points to a Broader Energy DilemmaBy Douglas Bessette – The Conservation – October 17, 2018 – Video
A deal involving an aging oil pipeline in Michigan reflects the complex decisions communities across the country need to make to balance the needs for energy and safety with efforts to deal with climate change. Gov. Rick Snyder and Enbridge, a Canadian company, have reached an agreement over a leak-prone pipeline that runs beneath the Straits of Mackinac, the 4-mile-long waterway that divides Lake Michigan and Lake Huron. Rather than shut the 65-year-old pipeline down altogether, as environmentalists are demanding, or conduct routine maintenance, as Enbridge desired, Snyder is requiring Enbridge to replace the pipeline at an estimated cost of up to US$500 million without a deadline. Read full story here.

Watershed Groups Have a Positive Impact on Local Water Quality, Study Finds

By Chris Branam – PHYS.org – October 12, 2018
Economists have found that in the United States, watershed groups have had a positive impact on their local water quality. The study is published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. This is the first empirical evidence that nonprofit organizations can provide public goods, said Christian Langpap, an Oregon State University economist and study co-author with Laura Grant, an assistant professor of economics at Claremont McKenna College. In economics, a public good is a commodity or service that individuals cannot be effectively excluded from using, and where use by one individual does not reduce availability to others. For these reasons, public goods can't be provided for profit and nonprofits can play an important role. Read full story here.
 

 

 State News 

WBN:  October 2018: Visit ASWM

AK: The Trump Administration Just Approved a Plan to Drill for Oil in Alaska’s Federal Waters. It’s a Major First

By Darryl Fears – The Washington Post – October 24, 2018
Interior Department officials announced their approval Wednesday of a company’s plan to drill for oil six miles off the Alaskan coast in the shallow waters of the Beaufort Sea. If the development by Hilcorp Energy moves forward, it would be the first oil and gas production facility in federal waters in Alaska, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke said in the announcement, a major victory for the oil industry and a blow to conservation groups that fought it, fearing a possible leak in a sensitive and pristine natural environment. Read full story here. 

CA: U.S. Judge Bans Trump Administration from OKing Fracking Off California Coast 

By Bob Egelko – San Francisco Chronicle – November 9, 2018
A federal judge barred the Trump administration Friday from approving oil companies’ requests to use the high-pressure drilling technique known as fracking in offshore wells along the Southern California coast until a review of the possible effects on endangered species and state coastal resources. In lawsuits by the state and environmental groups, U.S. District Judge Philip Gutierrez of Los Angeles said federal agencies that issue underwater drilling permits must consult with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, about the possible impact of fracking chemicals on sea birds and otters, before approving any permits for its use off Santa Barbara, Ventura and Los Angeles counties. Read full story here. 

CA: New Hope for Southern California’s Besieged Wetlands 

By David Colgan – UCLA Newsroom – November 1, 2018
Under stress from development, pollution and a climate change-driven rise in sea level, California’s coastal wetlands are among the most threatened ecosystems on the planet. In fact, a UCLA study in February found that many large coastal wetlands, or salt marshes, could disappear entirely by the end of the century. Now, a new study has revealed a flicker of hope for the future of coastal wetlands in Southern California¬. We could actually end up with more wetlands than we have now — but only if swift action is taken. Read full story here. 

CO: When in Drought: States Take on Urgent Negotiations to Avoid Colorado River Crisis 

By Luke Runyon – NPR – October 14, 2018
In 2007, years into a record-breaking drought throughout the southwestern U.S., officials along the Colorado River finally came to an agreement on how they'd deal with future water shortages — and then quietly hoped that wet weather would return. But it didn't. Those states are now back at the negotiating table to hammer out new deals to avoid a slow-moving crisis on the river system that supports 40 million people in seven Western states. Read or listen to full story here.

CT: Connecticut's Marshes: Past, Present, and Uncertain Future 

By Elaina Hancock – UConn Today – November 15, 2018
A troubling report issued recently by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change states that Earth is just two decades away from disastrously high levels of carbon in the atmosphere. As we approach those levels, there has been an increased focus on developing and using technology to sequester carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Yet nature already has some effective means to accomplish this – wetlands and marshes. Two assistant professors in the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, Ashley Helton and Beth Lawrence, are studying the processes that occur in these complex ecosystems. “Globally, wetlands and marshes are one of the largest natural sinks for carbon,” Helton says. “We want to quantify what wetlands are doing in terms of how they impact various ecosystem functions.” Read full story here. 

FL: Why Won’t Red Tide Go Away? After Hurricane Michael, Toxic Algae Has Again Spread 

By Jenny Staletovich – Miami Herald – November 6, 2018 – Video
Just before Hurricane Michael made landfall last month, a ferocious red tide that had scoured Florida’s Gulf Coast for a year, depositing countless dead sea turtles, dolphin and other marine life on beaches before spreading to the Atlantic coast, had finally started to wane. In most places, with the wet season winding down and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers easing up on releasing polluted water from Lake Okeechobee, the toxic algae that had become a key election year campaign issue had dropped to relatively low levels. Fish kills were down and so were the coughing fits among beach-goers. But in the weeks following the storm, red tide that is already considered the worst in a decade has roared back. Read full story and view video here. 

FL: Before and After: Coastal Change Caused by Hurricane Michael 

Contact Jason Burton – USGS – October 18, 2018
The USGS Coastal Change Hazards Storm team is working on a detailed assessment of Hurricane Michael’s effects on Florida’s vulnerable shorelines. The team is currently comparing low-altitude, high angle oblique aerial photos taken by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in 2017 to similar NOAA photos collected a day after Hurricane Michael made landfall. The USGS scientists are analyzing the photos, which document the hurricane’s impact on the coast, to fine-tune coastal change forecasting models. Read full story here. 

ME: Consider the Lobster Tariffs 

By Willy Blackmore – The Nation – November 5, 2018
On a recent Saturday, a small outboard motorboat glided to a halt in the glassy waters just off the coast of Rockland, Maine. Idling next to a striped buoy, the fisherman began to pull up the line beneath it, a cage dangling with seaweed eventually emerging from the water. There was no lobster inside that trap, so he replaced the bag of herring bait and moved on to the next. He stopped the boat, pulled up the line, checked the trap, and grabbed the lobster that was inside, only to toss her—a female carrying eggs, which are illegal to keep—back into the water. For some coastal communities, including those on many of Maine’s offshore islands, lobstering isn’t seen as a good way to make a living; it’s the only way. That livelihood is now under threat. Read full story here. 

ME: Why is the Gulf of Maine Warming Faster Than 99% of the Ocean? 

By Laura Poppick – EOS – November 12, 2018
Late last month, four endangered sea turtles washed ashore in northern Cape Cod, marking an early onset to what has now become a yearly event: the sea turtle stranding season. These turtles—in last month’s case, Kemp’s ridley sea turtles—venture into the Gulf of Maine during warm months, but they can become hypothermic and slow moving when colder winter waters abruptly arrive, making it hard to escape. “They are enjoying the warm water, and then all of a sudden the cold comes, and they can’t get out fast enough,” said Andrew Pershing, an oceanographer at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute in Portland, Maine. Thanks to record-breaking summer water temperatures that quickly transition to cooler conditions, an expanded sea turtle stranding season is just one facet of a new normal for the Gulf of Maine, Pershing explained. And this new normal is a striking contrast to prior conditions. Read full story here. 

MD: Maryland Receives Funds for Shoreline, Wetland Protection 

November 2, 2018
The U.S. EPA awarded $348,648 to the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) to improve and stabilize living shorelines, and stream and wetlands restoration projects in non-tidal wetlands. “Despite their environmental and economic importance, coastal wetlands in the eastern U.S. are being lost at twice the rate they are being restored,” said EPA Regional Administrator Cosmo Servidio, “This work by the state of Maryland will serve as a model for the more focused protection strategies that we need to reverse this trend.” Read full story here. 

MS: Seeking Water from Above: Low-Level Helicopter to Fly Above Mississippi Alluvial Plain 

Contacts: Heidi Koontz – USGS News – October 25, 2018
Beginning in early November and lasting for several months, a low-level helicopter will begin flying over parts of seven states in the Mississippi Alluvial Plain, or MAP, to acquire a more robust picture of aquifers in the area. This high-resolution, airborne geophysical survey, coordinated by U.S. Geological Survey scientists in partnership with local agencies, will provide critical data for the evaluation and management of groundwater resources in the region. This survey represents the second phase of the study as initial flights and data acquisition over the MAP started in February using the same helicopter system. Read full story here. 

MS: Vital Barrier Islands are Becoming Increasingly Vulnerable 

By Anna Linhoss – Pacific Standard – October 11, 2018
When storms like Hurricane Michael make landfall, the first things they hit often are barrier islands—thin ribbons of sand that line the United States' Atlantic and Gulf coasts. It's hard to imagine how these narrow strips can withstand such forces, but, in fact, many of them have buffered our shores for centuries. Barrier islands protect about 10 percent of coastlines worldwide. When hurricanes and storms make landfall, these strands absorb much of their force, reducing wave energy and protecting inland areas. They also provide a sheltered environment that enables estuaries and marshes to form behind them. These zones serve many valuable ecological functions, such as reducing coastal erosion, purifying water, and providing habitat for fish and birds. Read full article here. 

NY: 3 Major Changes Will Transform Landscape of Staten Island’s West Shore 

By Annalise Knudson – Silive.com – November 8, 2018
Three major projects on Staten Island will transform Bloomfield -- a desolate neighborhood surrounded by marshlands previously used as dumping grounds. Two marshland projects -- at Saw Mill Creek and Old Place Creek -- will restore acres of wetlands, while the Matrix Global Logistics Park will operate four massive warehouses, including tenants like Amazon and Ikea. Read full story here. 

NC: Grant to Support Harbor Shoreline Work 

Coastal Review Online – November 14, 2018
The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and its partner organizations last week awarded the North Carolina Coastal Federation $1.1 million for work to protect harbor shorelines in two coastal communities. Through the grant, the federation will work with local contractors to stabilize and protect the eroding shorelines by building living shorelines tailored to each site. Read full story here. 

OH: Ohio’s Watershed Moment: How to Fix Lake Erie Algae 

By Maria Gallucci – Grist – November 12, 2018
The western tail of Lake Erie brims with life. Warm, shallow waters along the Ohio-Michigan border teem with bass, bluegill, and walleye, sustaining a billion-dollar fishing industry. Millions of people from Cleveland to Detroit draw their drinking water from this nook of the lake. Yet every summer, nasty blooms of toxic algae put the entire system at risk. Scummy blankets of blue-green algae, or cyanobacteria, have appeared at alarming scales since the early 2000s, killing plants and fish and straining water treatment facilities. Four years ago, algal blooms were so bad that residents of Toledo were told not to drink or use tap water for three days. Scientists say they know the primary source of the blooms: phosphorus and nitrogen that wash off farms in northwest Ohio and flow into the lake. What’s less clear is how policymakers and farmers will act to stem the nutrient pollution. Read full story here. 

PR: Puerto Rico Considers 100% Renewable Energy, But Natural Gas May Come First 

By Phil McKenna – InsideClimate News – November 2, 2018
As Puerto Rico rebuilds from last year's hurricanes, lawmakers on the island territory have introduced an ambitious clean energy bill that would commit Puerto Ric.to getting 100 percent of its electricity from renewable energy by 2050. Environmental advocates praised the proposed legislation's long-term target, but they are raising concerns about its emphasis on establishing privately owned natural gas power generation in the short-term, and about the beleaguered public utility's ability to meet the renewable energy goal. Read full story here. 

UT: At its End, Utahns Worry About Bear River’s Future 

By Leia Larsen – Standard-Examiner – November 4, 2018
The Bear is the longest North American river that doesn't end in the sea.
Its mouth is at the Great Salt Lake, America's Dead Sea, the bottom of a terminal basin. But even as it ends, the Bear River supports life and livelihoods. Its waters diffuse into abundant wetlands that support millions of migrating waterfowl and shorebirds. It has carved minerals from mountains over millennia, which have concentrated in the Great Salt Lake and now support multi-million-dollar extraction industries. Its nutrients feed algae in the lake, which in turn feed an abundance of brine shrimp. But mid-October this autumn, the river instead disappeared into a vast mudflat that used to be Bear River Bay. Read full story here. 

VA: Report Details the Cost of Recycling Coal Ash in Virginia 

AP News – November 14, 2018
Dominion Energy said in a long-awaited report on Wednesday that it would cost billions of dollars to recycle Virginia’s toxic coal ash or move it to lined landfills, an endeavor that customers would pay for over several years. Environmental groups and some lawmakers said the cost would be well worth the effort as some aging storage facilities leak chemicals or potentially lay vulnerable to hurricanes. Read full story here. 

WV: DEP Awards Stream Partner Grants 

The Register-Herald – November 13, 2018
The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) announced Tuesday the recipients of the 2019 Stream Partners Grants. The West Virginia Stream Partners Program is a cooperative effort between the Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Natural Resources, Division of Forestry and the Soil Conservation Agency. The program has $100,000 annually appropriated to award to watershed associations interested in protecting and restoring state streams. This year 23 organizations received funds up to $5,000. Read full story here. 

WV: WVU Researchers to Profile Wetlands to Set Water Standards 

By Conor Griffith – The Morgantown News – November 5, 2018
Equipped with federal grant funding, the WVU Institute of Water Security and Science will be able to develop and recommend wetland water quality standards for use by state and federal agencies. Through intensive research and analysis, the institute will assess and monitor more than 200 wetlands across the Mountain State, and in the process, establish numeric criteria for chemical constituents based on the type and location of the wetlands. The project is ultimately intended to figure out how to best identify and address pollution. Read full story here. 

WY: Group Effort to Preserve Wyoming’s Wetlands, Water Resources 

Buckrail – November 6, 2018 – Video
Water is scarce in Wyoming. Over the years, the arid state has lost more than a third of its wetland habitat. In an effort to conserve these important natural areas, three wildlife organizations came together to solve challenges facing wetlands. With the support of the Wyoming Bird Habitat Conservation Partnership, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department and Ducks Unlimited developed a shared full-time wetlands specialist position to get conservation projects off the ground. Read full story here.

 

 

WBN: October 2018: Wetland ScienceWetland Sciece News


Part of the Answer to Climate Change May Be America’s Trees and Dirt, Scientists Say

By Brad Plumer – The New York Times – November 14, 2018
When people think of potential solutions to global warming, they tend to visualize technologies like solar panels or electric cars. A new study published on Wednesday, however, found that better management of forests, grasslands and soils in the United States could offset as much as 21 percent of the country’s annual greenhouse gas emissions. At the high end of the projections, that would be roughly equivalent to taking every single car and truck in the country off the road. The paper, published in the journal Science Advances, identified a number of promising strategies, like replanting trees on degraded lands, changing logging practices to better protect existing forests and sequestering more carbon in farmland soils through new agricultural techniques. Read full story here.

New Study Reveals Natural Solutions Can Reduce Global Warming

Contact: Kirsten Ullman – The Nature Conservancy – November 14, 2018
Restoring the United States’ lands and coastal wetlands could have a much bigger role in reducing global warming than previously thought, according to the most comprehensive national assessment to date of how greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced and stored in forests, farmland, grasslands and wetlands. The peer-reviewed study in Science Advances from The Nature Conservancy and 21 institutional partners found that nature’s contribution could equal 21% of the nation’s current net annual emissions, by adjusting 21 natural management practices to increase carbon storage and avoid greenhouse emissions. The study is the first to include the climate benefits of coastal wetlands and grasslands in a comprehensive mix along with forests and agriculture. Read full story here.

Carbon Goes with the Flow

Michigan State University – PHYS.org – November 13, 2018
Many people see the carbon cycle as vertical—CO2 moving up and down between soil, plants and the atmosphere. However, new Michigan State University research published in the current issue of Geophysical Research Letters, adds a dimension to the vertical perspective by showing how water moves massive amounts of carbon laterally through ecosystems—especially during floods. These findings—which analyzed more than 1,000 watersheds, covering about 75 percent of the contiguous U.S. - have implications for climate change and water quality. Read full story here.

Shrinking Groundwater

By Harrison Tasoff – The Current – November 13, 2018
Groundwater, which has been used to irrigate crops, satiate livestock and quench thirst in general for thousands of years, continues to be a vital resource around the world. But according to research by Scott Jasechko and Debra Perrone, assistant professors at UC Santa Barbara, and their colleagues at the University of Saskatchewan and the University of Arizona, the world’s supply of fresh water may be more limited than previously thought. Read full story here.

Streamside Forests Store Tons of Carbon

Environmental News Network – November 12, 2018
Restoring degraded forests is a critical strategy for addressing climate change given the potential for forests to store significant amounts of carbon, both in the trees and the soil. However, despite extensive efforts to restore streamside forests globally, the carbon storage potential of these forests is often overlooked. In a new effort from Point Blue Conservation Science and Santa Clara University, researchers led by Dr. Kristen Dybala compiled carbon storage data from 117 publications, reports, and other data sets on streamside forests around the world. This inquiry is the first of its kind to evaluate global results on the potential carbon storage benefits of streamside forests. Read full story here.

Conservation Areas Help Birdlife Adapt to Climate Change

Environmental News Network – November 12, 2018
A warming climate is pushing organisms towards the circumpolar areas and mountain peaks. A recently conducted Finnish study on changes in bird populations reveals that protected areas slow down the north-bound retreat of species. As the climate warms up, the belts of current climate conditions move further north, forcing species to follow the climate suited to them. At the same time, environmental transformation by humans is causing problems. Species are experiencing great difficulties in adapting simultaneously to a decrease in the quality of their habitat and the pressure brought on by climate change. Read full story here.

Estimating the Vulnerability of Ocean Planning and Blue Economy to Climate Change

MEAM – November 5, 2018
Climate-related drivers of change – such as ocean warming, acidification, and deoxygenation – will alter ocean conditions and lead to changes in marine ecosystem structure and functioning, as well as the redistribution of the services that the oceans provide. As a consequence, human uses that rely on these services – fisheries, aquaculture, and tourism for example – will also undergo spatial and temporal changes at multiple scales. These changes will include local increases and decreases in intensity of uses and relocation of uses. Marine spatial planning (MSP) informs the distribution of ocean uses in space and time, and it will undoubtedly be affected by climate change at all scales ranging from global to local. MEAM discussed this with Catarina Frazão Santos, a research scientist with the Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre at the University of Lisbon. She is currently leading the research project OCEANPLAN to understand how marine spatial planning may be affected by and adapt to global climate change. Read more here.

Water-Harvesting and Arid-Adapted Agrobiodiversity

By Gary Paul Nabhan – Anthropocene Magazine – November 2018
Whenever I have a desire to be outside during the summer months as temperatures in Metro Tucson Arizona rise above 105 F, I select certain shady places where old trees offer me a break from the heat. Some are where old olive trees from north Africa were planted more than a century ago by agroecologist Robert Forbes, the first Dean of Agriculture at the University of Arizona. They are large and spreading, offering enough fruit each year for students to press their own delicious olive oil. Or I cross our now dry river—the Rio Santa Cruz—and sit in the shades of trees of quince, pomegranate and fig planted just seven years ago at Mission Gardens, ones which the first Spanish missionaries brought to the Sonoran Desert over three centuries ago. While global climate change and the urban heat island effect take their toll on the health of many humans as well as many annual crops, these resilient trees have stood the test of time. Heat and drought tolerant fruit trees have also stood the test of time in New Mexico, Baja California, the Canary Islands, Southern Spain, North Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia. Despite their ecological adaptations that may offer us resilience in a hotter, drier world, they are hardly ever mentioned in the same breath with words such as climate change, food security or community resilience. Read full article here.

How Much Danger Are We in When Chemicals Are Spilled in Local Rivers?

By Susan Olsen, Purdue University – PHYS.org – November 1, 2018
When a chemical spill in Elk River contaminated the drinking water of nearly 300,000 West Virginians in 2014, little was known about the contaminant MCHM, a type of methanol used industrially for cleaning coal. But now that it was in a local water source … is it a safety issue? Would exposure harm brain development in children? Jennifer Freeman, a Purdue University associate professor of toxicology, wanted to answer those questions, and her group conducted a toxicological assessment on the MCHM mixture that escaped Tank 396 that day. Read full story here.

Climate Change: ‘Wetlands Vital to Protect Cities’

By Navin Singh Khadka – BBC News – October 29, 2018
Cities around the world are frequently flooding during extreme weather, largely because they are fast losing the wetlands that work as a natural defense, experts warn. Wetlands are ecosystems like lakes, rivers, marshes and peatlands, as well as coastal marine areas including mangroves and coral reefs. The experts say wetlands work as a giant sponge that soaks up and stores extra rainfall and water from storm surges. Conservation of these water bodies in urban areas was the focus of an international meeting on wetlands that concluded in Dubai on Monday. Read full story here.

Dredging and Wetlands Creation—an Environmental Success Story

By Judith Powers and Sean Duffy – Waterways Journal – October 22, 2018
There are 6,800 acres of new marshland bordering the Passes of the Mississippi River—land that was created starting in 2011 by a coalition intent on stopping the loss of land in Louisiana at a rate once described as “a football field every hour.” The Mississippi River advocacy group Big River Coalition (BRC) has been working with the Corps and industry leaders to begin to reverse this trend in the birdfoot delta at the mouth of the river. The new marshland was created in the delta through beneficial use of maintenance-dredged material. An ongoing project at Head of Passes will create another 1,000 acres by the end of this year. Read full article here.

Climate Change Prompts a Rethink of Everglades Management

By Richard Blaustein – Science Magazine – October 19, 2018
Efforts to restore the rich ecology of the Florida Everglades have so far focused on fighting damage from pollutant runoff and reestablishing the natural flow of water. But now, an expert panel is calling for federal and state agencies to reassess their plans in light of threats from climate change and sea-level rise. A congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, released on 16 October, asks the managers of the 18-year-old Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) to conduct a “midcourse assessment.” The new evaluation should account for likely conditions in the wetlands in “2050 and beyond” and model how existing restoration projects would fare under various sea-level rise scenarios. Read full article here.

Greenland’s Ice Sheets Hold Clues to Global Sea-Level Rise

By Kristen Popoe – National Geographic – October 19, 2018
Word spread fast at the Kangerlussuaq International Science Support facility in Greenland: One of the bridges along Greenland’s longest road was now under the raging Watson River. Support facility in Greenland: One of the bridges along Greenland’s longest road was now under the raging Watson River. A research team was almost stranded on the far side of the bridge by the roaring water, and when they returned they warned Rutgers professor Åsa Rennermalm and her team, who were just about to head out to set up their field camp at the end of the road. Rennermalm opted to wait until the next morning when the temperature—and glacially fed river—would be lower to venture out to her research site. Read full article here.

Salty Water Causes Some Freshwater Harmful Algae to Release Toxins

Contacts: Barry Rose; Heather Dewar; Vic Hines – USGS – October 18, 2018
A new U.S. Geological Survey laboratory study of two potentially toxic types of freshwater cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae, found that exposure to salty water can damage the cyanobacteria cells’ walls, causing them to release their toxins into the water. The finding suggests that understanding the mixing of fresh and salt water, which takes place in many coastal water bodies around the world, will help researchers understand the toxic effects of these harmful algal blooms. Read full story here.

The Missing Turtles of the Anthropocene

By Brandon Keim – Anthropocene Magazine – October 17, 2018
When one thinks of Anthropocene signifiers—the things that distant-future archaeologists will recognize as markers of how Earth’s basic processes took on a distinctly human tint—it’s usually novelties that come to mind. Things that, for better or worse, have been added to the planet’s biogeochemistry: concrete, plastic, radioactive debris, cities, mines, radically elevated greenhouse gas levels, and so on. But the Anthropocene can also be marked by what is missing. Such as: turtles. “Turtles are struggling to persist in the modern world, and that fact is generally unrecognized or even ignored,” write biologists led by Jeffrey Lovich of the U.S. Geological Survey in the journal BioScience. Read full article here.


 

Resources and Publications


Cross-Ecosystem Carbon Flows Connecting Ecosystems Worldwide

Nature Communications – November 16, 2018
Ecosystems are widely interconnected by spatial flows of material, but the overall importance of these flows relative to local ecosystem functioning remains unclear. Here we provide a quantitative synthesis on spatial flows of carbon connecting ecosystems worldwide. Cross-ecosystem flows range over eight orders of magnitude, bringing between 10−3 and 105 gC m−2 year−1 to recipient ecosystems. Magnitudes are similar to local fluxes in freshwater and benthic ecosystems, but two to three orders of magnitude lower in terrestrial systems, demonstrating different dependencies on spatial flows among ecosystem types. The strong spatial couplings also indicate that ecosystems are vulnerable to alterations of cross-ecosystem flows. Thus, a reconsideration of ecosystem functioning, including a spatial perspective, is urgently needed. Read full story here.

Multiple Forest Attributes Underpin the Supply of Multiple Ecosystem Services

Nature Communications – November 16, 2018
Trade-offs and synergies in the supply of forest ecosystem services are common but the drivers of these relationships are poorly understood. To guide management that seeks to promote multiple services, we investigated the relationships between 12 stand-level forest attributes, including structure, composition, heterogeneity and plant diversity, plus 4 environmental factors, and proxies for 14 ecosystem services in 150 temperate forest plots. Our results show that forest attributes are the best predictors of most ecosystem services and are also good predictors of several synergies and trade-offs between services. Environmental factors also play an important role, mostly in combination with forest attributes. Read full story here.

Ecosystem-Based Adaptation: A Handbook for EbA in Mountain, Dryland, and Coastal Ecosystems

Krystyna Swiderska, Caroline King-Okumu, Md Monirul Islam – International Ecosystem Management Partnership – September 2018
This handbook provides practical guidance for planning and implementing community-led ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) in three vulnerable ecosystems: mountains, drylands and coastal areas. It is intended for project managers, practitioners and technical specialists. The guidance is structured around eight key steps in the project cycle and includes general implementation protocols for EbA in each target ecosystem. It also includes an introduction to EbA which is intended for a broader audience, including policymakers. Download the Handbook here.

 

PotpourriWBN: October 2018: Potpourri

Improved Water Quality Starts at Home

By Jennifer Allen –Coastal Review Online – November 8, 2018
Development is frequently associated with increased impervious land coverage, and that can often lead to more polluted runoff reaching ecologically sensitive streams, rivers and sounds. Hard surfaces such as pavement, roads, sidewalks and roofs affect water quality because the runoff, instead of soaking into the ground and being taken up by vegetation, quickly flows in greater amounts over the developed landscape and into surface waters, explained Lauren Kolodij, deputy director for the North Carolina Coastal Federation. This polluted stormwater runoff is often the primary cause of water quality degradation, which results in shellfishing waters failing to meet public health standards and why some coastal towns and counties post swimming advisories after it rains, she said. Read full story here.

As Courts Halt Keystone XL, Public Voices Opposition

NRDC – November 8, 2018
Within hours of the close of the State Department's public comment period on their rushed Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (DSEIS) for the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline, a federal court in Montana handed down a decision halting the project altogether and ordering the government to undertake a new, far more detailed look at the contentious project. The news came after more than 150,000 people once again voiced their opposition to the proposed Keystone XL tar sands pipeline. In public comments submitted in response the State Department’s DSEIS, commenters from across the country highlighted the unnecessary threats to endangered species, fresh water, farmland, and global climate posed by the pipeline. Read full story here.

How to Accelerate the Use of Natural Infrastructure to Aid Climate Change Adaptation

By Shannon Cunniff – Environmental Defense Fund – November 8, 2018
Florida and North Carolina are once again recovering from hurricanes – this time, from two of the largest storms to hit our coasts in a century. In a climate-driven world, an important aspect of recovery is rebuilding in ways that make communities safer and more resilient to storms. One strategy for reducing future flood risks is restoring natural features such as barrier islands, dunes, wetlands and floodplains. These natural infrastructure solutions help slow storm surge and hold flood waters, reducing the devastating impacts of storms. Yet, despite what we know about the effectiveness of these features, natural infrastructure is still an underutilized resilience strategy. Read full blog post here.

IPCC Report and the Missing Dialogue in US Environmentalism

By Khalil Shahyd – NRDC – November 6, 2018
The recent midterm elections will have far reaching implications with choices made on key ballot initiatives and between candidates who support plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) that cause climate change and those who have chosen to fight to preserve livelihoods based in industries rather than make the adjustments to cleaner future. Against the backdrop of the elections is the recently released Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) reminding us that urgent and systemic changes are needed to cap rising temperatures due to global warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius, or 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit above pre-industrial levels. The report warns that we are not yet doing enough to avoid disaster. Read full blog post here.

Alaska Case Could be Landmark in Water Rights Disputes

By Tony Francois, opinion contributor – The Hill – November 5, 2018
The fate of a moose hunter flying a hovercraft on an Alaska river will either protect or limit water uses across America, depending on how the Supreme Court rules after hearing argument today in Sturgeon v. Frost. This case involves John Sturgeon’s nearly decade-long legal battle with the National Park Service (NPS) over whether he can pilot his hovercraft upriver through Alaska’s remote national parks to access hunting grounds above them. Read full opinion here.

The Love and Lore of Lake Erie’s Wetlands

By James Proffitt WSKG November 2, 2018
By the time dawn’s first vermilion fingers tickle the east’s black sky, hunters in a dozen-plus marshes have slogged, sometimes chest-deep, through marshes to arrive at blinds – often constructed, sometimes mostly natural – to await the arrival of ducks, large and small, drab and bright, slow and fast. It’s the love of waterfowl, and the storied history of their hunting in Ohio’s marshes, and on water everywhere, really, that inextricably connects the pursuit of these birds to the preservation and restoration of the habitat that is necessary for their survival. Read full story here.

Most Underestimate Minorities’ Environmental Concerns—Even Minorities

By Susan Kelley – Cornell Chronicle – October 29, 2018
In a new study with implications for environmental organizations – and an indication that stereotypes are alive and well – most Americans underestimate just how concerned minorities and lower-income people are about environmental threats. This extends even to members of those groups: They themselves underestimate their peers’ concerns about environmental problems. Read full story here.

How the Farm Bureau’s Climate Agenda is Failing its Farmers

By Georgina Gustin, Neela Banerjee, John H. Cushman, Jr. – InsideClimate News October 24, 2018 Video
Donald J. Trump's inaugural crowd may not have been the biggest ever, but his parade drew lots of tractors that rumbled past the presidential reviewing stand in a farm lobby phalanx. "The farmers and ranchers and the people in the Rust Belt came out and paved the road for President-elect Trump to make it to the White House," he told a reporter from RFD-TV, the network that organized the cavalcade. "We are here reinforcing that strength that we showed The Farm Bureau is among the most potent political forces in Washington, skillfully parlaying the American farmer into an enduring influence machine. Its agenda encompasses taxes and trade, health insurance and school lunches. The group's lobbying also touches many environmental issues: water pollution, fracking, biofuels and biodiversity. Conservative to the core, it mirrors the Trump administration's ideology almost perfectly.in rural America when we went to the polls and helped send him here." Nowhere do their agendas align more completely—and with more profound consequences—than on the challenge of climate change. Read full story here.

How Can We Reduce Losses from Coastal Storms? Monitor the Health of Our Coasts.

By Natalie Peyronnin Snider – Environmental Defense Fund – October 17, 2018
With a rapidly changing climate and more frequent extreme events like floods and droughts, comprehensive environmental monitoring will be increasingly important for coastal planners, farmers and others invested in natural resource management. Read full blog post here.

How Monitoring Local Water Supplies Can Build Community

By John M. Carroll – The Conservation – October 17, 2018 – Video
Water insecurity is a touchstone for 2018. Our planet isn’t running out of water, but various kinds of mismanagement have led to local water crises across the planet, directly threatening millions of people. Ensuring water quality requires regular testing, protecting source water, monitoring and repairing distribution systems, treatment plants and other infrastructure, and developing the ability to recycle water and desalinate salt water. These activities require many types of specialists. But they can also benefit from the direct participation of engaged citizens, who themselves can also benefit from getting involved with this work. Read full story and view video here.

 

 

 Calendar of Events


WEBINARS
     
MEETINGS     
TRAINING  

 

WBN: October 2018

 Special Events

World Wetlands Day
February 2, 2019

Central Coast Watershed Wetlands Tour
The Wetlands Conservancy
Newport, OR

Shiver in the River
February 23, 2019
Richmond, VA

Wings Over the Rockies Festival
May 6-12, 2019

Bay Day Festival
May 18, 2019
Kemah, TX

WEBINARS  
             
NOVEMBER 2018  
             
November 28, 2018
12:00 p.m. ET 
        Society for Ecological Restoration Webinar: Spatial Ecology for Assessment of Landscape-level Conservation and Restoration   
             
November 28, 2018
3:00 p.m. ET
        Association of State Wetland Managers: Members Wetland Webinar: Planning Wetland Restoration at the Watershed Level  
             
November 28, 2018
3:00 p.m. ET
        National Water Quality Monitoring Council Webinar: Harmful Algal Bloom Detection  
             
November 29, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
        The Swamp School Webinar: Hydric Soil Indicators – 2018 Updates  
             
DECEMBER 2018  
             
December 5, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
        Association of State Floodplain Managers Webinar: Disaster Responsibilities Before, During and After a Flood  
             
December 6, 2018
2:00 p.m. ET
        NOAA/USFWS Webinar: The Little Rapids Restoration Project Webinar: A 25 year partnership to Improve Habitat in the St. Mary’s River Area of Concern  
             
December 14, 2018
2:00 p.m. ET
        ASWM-NRCS Wetland Training Webinar 4: Wetlands Ecology for Planners – Examples of Variation Across the United States  

 

December 14, 2018
2:00 p.m. ET
  Environmental Law Institute Webinar: Stream Compensatory Mitigation – The Watershed Approach
     
December 19, 2018
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of State Wetland Managers: Members Wetland Webinar: Using a Living Shorelines Prioritization Tool for Wetland Improvements
     
JANUARY 2019
     

January 9, 2019
2:00 p.m. ET

  Associaton of State Wetland Managers Compensatory Mitigation Webinar: An Ecological Framework for Reviewing Compensatory Mitigation Plans: Plan Review (Part 4 of 4)
     

January 16, 2019
3:00 p.m. ET

  ASWM-NRCS Wetland Training Webinar 5: Dealing with Reality: How to Work with Wetlands in Altered Landscapes 
     

January 24, 2019
12:00 p.m. ET

  Antioch University Webinar: Built Environment – Resilient Water Features
     
FEBRUARY 2019
     

February 1, 2019
2:00 p.m. ET

  Environmental Law Institute Webinar:  Stream Compensatory Mitigation -- Monitoring and Performance Standards
   
MEETINGS
 
NOVEMBER 2018 
     
November 25-29, 2018
Champions Gate, FL
  American Water Works Association, Florida Section: 2018 Fall Conference: Planning the Future of Water
     
November 26-27, 2018
Tokyo, Japan
  World Summit on Climate Change & Global Warming
 
DECEMBER 2018 
     
December 3-6, 2018 
Washington, DC
  2018 ACES Conference: A Community on Ecosystem Services 
     

December 4, 2018
Baltimore, MD

 

National Aquarium Lecture Series: Science Into Action 

     

December 5, 2018
Laurel, MD

  Patuxent River Conference: Climate Change & The Patuxent River: Local Implications of Global Issues 
     

December 7, 2018
North Linthicum, MD

  Maryland Water Monitoring Council Annual Conference: Science, Stewardship, and Citizen Involvement – Working Together for Clean Water 
     
December 7, 2018
Laconia, NH
  Actions for Wildlife in a Changing Climate 
     
December 8-13, 2018
Long Beach, CA
  Restore America’s Estuaries Conference: 9th National Summit on Coastal and Estuarine Restoration and Management
     
December 10-11, 2018
Carmel, IN 
  Midwestern States Environmental Consultants Association Conference: Environmental Liabilities, Risk Assessment, and Remediation  
     
December 10-14, 2018
Washington, DC 
  AGU Fall Meeting

     
December 11-13, 2018
Indianapolis, IN
  North Central Region Water Network: North Central Region One Water Action Forum
     
JANUARY 2019 
     
January 6-9, 2019
San Diego, CA
  International Soils Meeting: Soils Across Latitudes

     

January 7-10, 2019
Washington, DC

  National Council for Science and the Environment: 2019 Annual Conference: Sustainable Infrastructure & Resilience
     
January 10-12, 2019 
Miami, FL
  Sixth Evolutionary Demography Society Annual Meeting
     
January 11, 2019 
Thatcher, AZ
  Upper Gila Watershed Forum 
     

January 14-15, 2019
Chico, CA

  2019 Northern California Botanists Symposium: Research and Conservation of Northern California’s Vegetation Communities 
     
January 27-30, 2019 
Cape May, NJ
  2019 Delaware Estuary Science & Environmental Summit: Estuary 2029: Saving our System Through Collaboration
     

January 31-February 2, 2019
New Haven, CT

  Yale Chapter of the International Society of Tropical Foresters: Examining Tropical Changes: Resilience in the Context of Disturbance and Transgression
     
FEBRUARY 2019 
     
February 5-7, 2019
Phoenix, AZ
  Tamarisk Coalition and the Desert Botanical Garden: Riparian Restoration Conference
     
February 5-7, 2019
Osage Beach, MO
  Missouri Natural Resources Conference

     
February 5-7, 2019
Stevenson, WA
  River Restoration Northwest: Stream Restoration Symposium

     

February 7-10, 2019
Towson, MD

  2019 MAEOE Conference: Full Steam Ahead: Expanding the potential of Environmental Education 
     
February 11-15, 2019
Anchorage, AK
  Alaska Forum on the Environment

     
February 19-21, 2018
Madison, WI
  Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Wetland Science Conference

     
February 21-24, 2019
Oracle, AZ
  University of Arizona Conference: Crafting the Long Tomorrow: New Conversations & Productive Catalysts Across Science and Humanities Boundaries as the Global Emergency Worsens
     
February 23-
March 2, 2019 
San Juan, Puerto Rico
  Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography: Planet Water: Challenges and Successes 
     
February 27-28, 2018
Toronto, Canada
  International Conference on Water Management Modeling
     
MARCH 2019
     
March 2, 2019
Worcester, MA 
  Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commissions Annual Environmental Conference
     
March 11-22, 2019
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology
     
March 13-15, 2019
Ann Arbor, MI
  Michigan Stormwater Floodplain Association Conference
     
March 13-17, 2019
Raleigh, NC 
  CitSci 2019: Growing Our Family Tree 
     
March 20-22, 2019
Baltimore, MD 
  Climate Leadership Conference
     
March 25-29, 2019
Denver, CO
  5th Life Discovery – Doing Science Biology Education Conference: : Microbiomes to Ecosystems: Evolution and Biodiversity across Scale, Space, and Time
     

March 22, 2019
Berlin, CT

  Soil & Water Conservation Society Southern New England Chapter: 2019 Annual Winter Conference 
     
March 25-29, 2019
Denver, CO
  National Water Quality Monitoring Council: 11th Annual National Monitoring Conference
     
   APRIL 2019
     
April 4-6, 2019
Ashland, OH
  Ohio Wetlands Association Vernal Poolooza
     
April 22-25, 2019
Coral Springs, FL
  Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration: Science Advancing Everglades Resilience and Sustainability
     
April 23-25, 2019
Madison, WI
  National Adaptation Forum
     
April 29-May 2, 2019
Charleston, SC
  Center for Watershed Protection: 2019 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference 
     
MAY 2019   
     
May 2, 2019
Washington, DC
  Environmental Law Institute Conference: Clean Water Act: Law and Regulation 2019 
     

May 2-3, 2019
Saratoga Springs, NY

  Land Trust Alliance: New York Land Conservation Conference
     
May 2-22, 2019
Baltimore, MD 
  Choose Clean Water Coalition: 10th Annual Choose Clean Water Conference 
Proposals due by January 11, 2019 
     
May 6-10, 2019
Minneapolis, MN
  National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Connecting Policy, Practice, Business, Science & People
     
May 7, 2019
Washington, DC
  Environmental Law Institute 30th Annual National Wetlands Awards 2019 
     
May 19-23, 2019
Baltimore, MD
  2018 NAEP Conference: The Environmental Landscape in an Age of Infrastructure Modernization
     
May 19-24, 2019
Cleveland, OH
  Association of State Floodplain Managers 42nd Annual Meeting: Managing Floods Where the Mountains Meet the Desert 
     
May 28-31, 2019
Baltimore, MD
  Society of Wetland Scientists 2019 Annual Meeting: The Role of Wetlands in Meeting Global Environmental Challenges: Linking Wetland Science, Policy , and Society
     
May 29-June 2, 2019
Waikoloa, HI
  Ducks Unlimited National Convention
     
   JUNE 2019
     
June 4-6, 20, 2019
Bologna, Italy
  2nd International Conference on Community Ecology 
     
June 10-14, 2019
Brockport, NY 
  The College at Brockport, State University of new York: 62nd Annual Conference on Great Lakes Research: Large Lakes Research: Connecting People and Ideas 
     

June 13-14, 2019
Providence, Fl

 
  Land Trust Alliance: Seventh Symposium on Advanced Legal Topics in Land Conservation 
     
June 16-19, 2018
Sparks, NV
  2019 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: Improving Water Infrastructure Through Resilient Adaptation
     
June 17-20, 2019
Louisville, KY
  National Hydrologic Warming Council Conference
     
June 21-24, 2019
Cleveland, OH
  River Network: River Rally
     
AUGUST 2019   
     
August 11-16, 2019
Louisville, KY
  Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting
     

   

TRAINING/WORKSHOPS
 
NOVEMBER 2018
     
November 26-December 24, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment 
     
November 29, 2018
Belton, TX
  Urban Riparian and Stream Restoration Training
     
DECEMBER 2018
     

December 3-6. 2108
Atlanta, GA

  The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Delineation Training
     
December 3-31, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets
     
December 3, 2018-
February 25, 2019

Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018  
     
December 4-6, 2018
Portland, OR
  Portland State University Course: River Restoration Project Management
     
December 5-6, 2018
Tampa, FL
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training 
     
December 7, 2018

Petersburg, VA

  The Real Dirt on Dirt: A Workshop on Soil & Health  
     
December 7-8, 2018
Tampa, FL
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training
     
December 10-11, 2018
Charleston, SC
  D & D West Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement – Eastern Mountains/Piedmont) - 16 hours (½ lecture, ½ field)
     
December 10, 2018-April 2019
Pittsburgh, PA
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
     
December 12-13, 2018
Houston, TX 
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
     
December 13-14, 2018
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Education Course: Identification of Wetland Plants in Winter
     
December 17-31, 2018 
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
     
December 18, 2018
Raleigh, NC
  The Swamp School Workshop: Wetland Water Budget 
     

December 27, 2018-
January 16, 2019
Xpu-Ha Beach, Mexico

  Caribbean Ecosystem Field Studies Course 
     
December 28, 2018-January 16, 2019 
Costa Rica
  Organization for Tropical Studies and the University of Costa Course:  Field Ecology: Skills for Science and Beyond
     
JANUARY 2019
     
January 4-5, 2019
Saukville, WI
  University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Workshop: Ecology and Physiology of Plants in Winter
     

January 7, 2019
Online

 
  The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Delineation Training 2019 
January 9-April 26, 2019
Online
  Montana State University Online Course: Wetland & Riparian Ecology & Management
     

January 9-May 3, 2019
Auburn, AL

  School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences, Auburn University Course: Restoration Ecology
     
January 10-21, 2019
Kananaskis Valley
Alberta, Canada 
  University of Saskatchewan Centre for Hydrology / CWRA / Canadian Society for Hydrological Sciences Kananaskis Short Course: Principles of Hydrology  
     
January 13-18, 2019
Oracle, AZ
  CUAHSI Master Class: Advanced Techniques in Watershed Science 
     
January 14-17, 2019
Sacramento, CA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
     

January 15-16, 2019
Padilla Bay Reserve
Mt. Vernon, WA

  Washington State Department of Ecology: Coastal Training Program Course: Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
     

January 30, 2019
Tacoma, WA

  Washington State Department of Ecology: Coastal Training Program Course:  How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines   
     
FEBRUARY 2019
     

February 4-April 29, 2019
Online

 

The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2019

February 6, 2019
Lacey, WA

  Washington State Department of Ecology: Coastal Training Program Course:  Lower Your Risk: Taking the Mystery out of Cultural Resource Management
     

February 7-8, 2019
Washington, DC

  American Law institute Continuing Legal Education Course: Environmental Law 2019
     

February 13, 2019
Padilla Bay Reserve
Mt. Vernon, WA

  Washington State Department of Ecology: Coastal Training Program Course:  How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
     

February 20, 2019
Padilla Bay Reserve
Mt. Vernon, WA

  Washington State Department of Ecology: Coastal Training Program Course:  Tree and Shrub Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
     
MARCH 2019
     
March 18, 2019
Online 
  The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2019
     
JULY 2019
     
July 28-August 10, 2019
Bar Harbor, ME 
  College of the Atlantic Field Botany: Plants of New England
     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 INDEX 

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • NFWF, NOAA Announce $28.9 Million in Grants for the 2018 National Coastal Resilience Fund
  • Voters Just Elected Seven More Scientists to Congress
  • Climate Change and the Elections: Five Takeaways
  • Trump Signs the Water Infrastructure Act

NATIONAL NEWS

  • Exclusive: At U.N. Climate Talks, Trump Team Plans Sideshow on Coal
  • Fishermen Sue Oil Companies Over Rising Ocean Temperatures
  • New Resources Support Tribes in Preparing for Climate Change
  • Ocean at the Door: New Homes and the Rising Sea
  • USGS: Florence Set at Least 28 Flood Records in Carolinas
  • USACE Announces Lake Erie Wetland Restoration
  • Every President Since JFK Was Warned About Climate Change
  • Dam Problems, Win-Win Solutions
  • Facing Climate Change, States and Cities Seek to Borrow Billions
  • Can Citizen Lawsuits Force Governments to Act on Climate Change?
  • Oil and Gas Leasing Delayed in Sage Grouse Habitat
  • Recent Hurricanes Underscore Critical Need for Better Flood-Ready Infrastructure Standards
  • A Great Lakes Pipeline Dispute Points to a Broader Energy Dilemma
  • Watershed Groups Have a Positive Impact on Local Water Quality, Study Finds

STATE NEWS

  • AK: The Trump Administration Just Approved a Plan to Drill for Oil in Alaska’s Federal Waters. It’s a Major First
  • CA: U.S. Judge Bans Trump Administration from OKing Fracking Off California Coast 
  • CA: New Hope for Southern California’s Besieged Wetland
  • CO: When in Drought: States Take on Urgent Negotiations to Avoid Colorado River Crisis
 

INDEX


Editor's Choice


National News


State News


Wetland Science News


Resources & Publications


Potpouri


Calendar

  •  CT: Connecticut's Marshes: Past, Present, and Uncertain Future
  • FL: Why Won’t Red Tide Go Away? After Hurricane Michael, Toxic Algae Has Again Spread
  • FL: Before and After: Coastal Change Caused by Hurricane Michael
  • ME: Consider the Lobster Tariffs
  • ME: Why is the Gulf of Maine Warming Faster Than 99% of the Ocean?
  • MD: Maryland Receives Funds for Shoreline, Wetland Protection
  • MS: Seeking Water from Above: Low-Level Helicopter to Fly Above Mississippi Alluvial Plain
  • MS: Vital Barrier Islands are Becoming Increasingly Vulnerable
  • NY: 3 Major Changes Will Transform Landscape of Staten Island’s West Shore
  • NC: Grant to Support Harbor Shoreline Work
  • OH: Ohio’s Watershed Moment: How to Fix Lake Erie Algae
  • PR: Puerto Rico Considers 100% Renewable Energy, But Natural Gas May Come First
  • UT: At its End, Utahns Worry About Bear River’s Future
  • VA: Report Details the Cost of Recycling Coal Ash in Virginia
  • WV: DEP Awards Stream Partner Grants
  • WV: WVU Researchers to Profile Wetlands to Set Water Standards
  • WY: Group Effort to Preserve Wyoming’s Wetlands, Water Resources

WETLAND SCIENCE NEWS

  • Part of the Answer to Climate Change may be America’s Trees and Dirt, Scientists Say
  • New Study Reveals Natural Solutions Can Reduce Global Warming
  • Carbon Goes with the Flow
  • Shrinking Groundwater
  • Streamside Forests Store Tons of Carbon
  • Conservation Areas Help Birdlife Adapt to Climate Change
  • Estimating the Vulnerability of Ocean Planning and Blue Economy to Climate Change
  • Water-Harvesting and Arid-Adapted Agrobiodiversity
  • How Much Danger Are We in When Chemicals Are Spilled in Local Rivers?
  • Climate Change: ‘Wetlands Vital to Protect Cities’
  • Dredging and Wetlands Creation—an Environmental Success Story
  • Climate Change Prompts a Rethink of Everglades Management
  • Greenland’s Ice Sheets Hold Clues to Global Sea-Level Rise
  • Salty Water Causes Some Freshwater Harmful Algae to Release Toxins
  • The Missing Turtles of the Anthropocene

RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONS

  • Cross-Ecosystem Carbon Flows Connecting Ecosystems Worldwide
  • Multiple Forest Attributes Underpin the Supply of Multiple Ecosystem Services
  • Ecosystem-Based Adaptation: A Handbook for EbA in Mountain, Dryland, and Coastal Ecosystems

POTOURRI

  • Improved Water Quality Starts at Home
  • As Courts Halt Keystone XL, Public Voices Opposition
  • How to Accelerate the Use of Natural Infrastructure to Aid Climate Change Adaptation
  • IPCC Report and the Missing Dialogue in US Environmentalism
  • Alaska Case Could be Landmark in Water Rights Disputes
  • The Love and Lore of Lake Erie’s Wetlands
  • Most Underestimate Minorities’ Environmental Concerns—Even Minorities
  • How the Farm Bureau’s Climate Agenda is Failing its Farmers
  • How Can We Reduce Losses from Coastal Storms? Monitor the Health of Our Coasts.
  • How Monitoring Local Water Supplies Can Build Community

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Webinars

November

  • Society for Ecological Restoration Webinar: Spatial Ecology for Assessment of Landscape-level Conservation and Restoration
  • Association of State Wetland Managers: Members Wetland Webinar: Planning Wetland Restoration at the Watershed Level
  • National Water Quality Monitoring Council Webinar: Harmful Algal Bloom Detection
  • The Swamp School Webinar: Hydric Soil Indicators – 2018 Updates

December

  • Association of State Floodplain Managers Webinar: Disaster Responsibilities Before, During and After a Flood
  • NOAA/USFWS Webinar: The Little Rapids Restoration Project Webinar: A 25 year partnership to Improve Habitat in the St. Mary’s River Area of Concern
  • ASWM-NRCS Wetland Training Webinar 4: Wetlands Ecology for Planners – Examples of Variation Across the United States
  • Environmental Law Institute Webinar: Stream Compensatory Mitigation – The Watershed Approach
  • Association of State Wetland Managers: Members Wetland Webinar: Using a Living Shorelines Prioritization Tool for Wetland Improvements

January

  • Compensatory Mitigation Webinar: An Ecological Framework for Reviewing Compensatory Mitigation Plans: Plan Review (Part 4 of 4)
  • ASWM-NRCS Wetland Training Webinar 5: Dealing with Reality: How to Work with Wetlands in Altered Landscapes
  • Antioch University Webinar: Built Environment – Resilient Water Features

February

  • Environmental Law Institute Webinar: Stream Compensatory Mitigation -- Monitoring and Performance Standards

MEETINGS

November

  • American Water Works Association, Florida Section: 2018 Fall Conference: Planning the Future of Water
  • World Summit on Climate Change & Global Warming
  • 2018 ACES Conference: A Community on Ecosystem Services
  • National Aquarium Lecture Series: Science into Action
  • Patuxent River Conference: Climate Change & The Patuxent River: Local Implications of Global Issues
  • Maryland Water Monitoring Council Annual Conference: Science, Stewardship, and Citizen Involvement – Working Together for Clean Water

December

  • 2018 ACES Conference: A Community on Ecosystem Services
  • National Aquarium Lecture Series: Science into Action
  • Patuxent River Conference: Climate Change & The Patuxent River: Local Implications of Global Issues
  • Maryland Water Monitoring Council Annual Conference: Science, Stewardship, and Citizen Involvement – Working Together for Clean Water
  • Actions for Wildlife in a Changing Climate
  • Restore America’s Estuaries Conference: 9th National Summit on Coastal and Estuarine Restoration and Management
  • Midwestern States Environmental Consultants Association Conference: Environmental Liabilities, Risk Assessment, and Remediation
  • AGU Fall Meeting
  • North Central Region Water Network: North Central Region One Water Action Forum

January 2019

  • International Soils Meeting: Soils Across Latitudes
  • National Council for Science and the Environment: 2019 Annual Conference: Sustainable Infrastructure & Resilience
  • Sixth Evolutionary Demography Society Annual Meeting
  • Upper Gila Watershed Forum
  • 2019 Northern California Botanists Symposium: Research and Conservation of Northern California’s Vegetation Communities
  • 2019 Delaware Estuary Science & Environmental Summit: Estuary 2029: Saving our System Through Collaboration
  • Yale Chapter of the International Society of Tropical Foresters: Examining Tropical Changes: Resilience in the Context of Disturbance and Transgression

February 2019

  • Tamarisk Coalition and the Desert Botanical Garden: Riparian Restoration Conference
  • Missouri Natural Resources Conference
  • River Restoration Northwest: Stream Restoration Symposium
  • Alaska Forum on the Environment
  • Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Wetland Science Conference
  • University of Arizona Conference: Crafting the Long Tomorrow: New Conversations & Productive Catalysts Across Science and Humanities Boundaries as the Global Emergency Worsens
  • International Conference on Water Management Modeling

 March 2019

  • Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commission Annual Environmental Conference
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology
  • Michigan Stormwater Floodplain Association Conference
  • CitSci 2019: Growing Our Family Tree
  • Climate Leadership Conference
  • 5th Life Discovery – Doing Science Biology Education Conference: Microbiomes to Ecosystems: Evolution and Biodiversity across Scale, Space, and Time
  • Soil & Water Conservation Society Southern New England Chapter: 2019 Annual Winter Conference
  • National Water Quality Monitoring Council: 11th Annual National Monitoring Conference

April 2019

  • Ohio Wetlands Association Vernal Poolooza
  • Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration: Science Advancing Everglades Resilience and Sustainability
  • National Adaptation Forum
  • Center for Watershed Protection: 2019 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference

May 2019

  • Environmental Law Institute Conference: Clean Water Act: Law and Regulation 2019
  • Land Trust Alliance: New York Land Conservation Conference
  • Choose Clean Water Coalition: 10th Annual Choose Clean Water Conference
  • National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Connecting Policy, Practice, Business, Science & People
  • Environmental Law Institute 30th Annual National Wetlands Awards 2019
  • 2018 NAEP Conference: The Environmental Landscape in an Age of Infrastructure Modernization
  • Association of State Floodplain Managers 42nd Annual Meeting: Managing Floods Where the Mountains Meet the Desert
  • Society of Wetland Scientists 2019 Annual Meeting: The Role of Wetlands in Meeting Global Environmental Challenges: Linking Wetland Science, Policy, and Society
  • Ducks Unlimited National Convention

June 2019

  • 2nd International Conference on Community Ecology
  • The College at Brockport, State University of New York: 62nd Annual Conference on Great Lakes Research: Large Lakes Research: Connecting People and Ideas
  • Land Trust Alliance: Seventh Symposium on Advanced Legal Topics in Land Conservation
  • 2019 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: Improving Water Infrastructure Through Resilient Adaptation
  • National Hydrologic Warning Council Conference
  • River Network: River Rally

August 2019

  • Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting 

Training/Workshops

November

  • The Swamp School Online Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment
  • Urban Riparian and Stream Restoration Training

December

  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018
  • Portland State University Course: River Restoration Project Management
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Real Dirt on Dirt: A Workshop on Soil & Health
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training
  • D & D West Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement – Eastern Mountains/Piedmont)
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Education Course: Identification of Wetland Plants in Winter
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
  • The Swamp School Workshop: Wetland Water Budget
  • Caribbean Ecosystem Field Studies Course
  • Organization for Tropical Studies and the University of Costa Course: Field Ecology: Skills for Science and Beyond

January 2019

  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018
  • Portland State University Course: River Restoration Project Management
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Real Dirt on Dirt: A Workshop on Soil & Health
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training
  • D & D West Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement – Eastern Mountains/Piedmont)
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Education Course: Identification of Wetland Plants in Winter
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
  • The Swamp School Workshop: Wetland Water Budget
  • Caribbean Ecosystem Field Studies Course
  • Organization for Tropical Studies and the University of Costa Course: Field Ecology: Skills for Science and Beyond

February 2019

  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2019
  • Washington State Department of Ecology: Coastal Training Program Course: Lower Your Risk: Taking the Mystery out of Cultural Resource Management
  • American Law institute Continuing Legal Education Course: Environmental Law 2019
  • Washington State Department of Ecology: Coastal Training Program Course: How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
  • Washington State Department of Ecology: Coastal Training Program Course: Tree and Shrub Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats

March 2019

  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2019

July 2019

  • College of the Atlantic Field Botany: Plants of New England