WBN October 2018

                

IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

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Thank you for your continued interest.

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WBN October 2018

 

WBN - Editor's NoteEditor's Note

Dear Wetlanders,

With the recent devastation brought by Hurricane Michael last week, many of us are wondering if this is the new normal. The timing of the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate
Change (IPCC) report is remarkable – however, the debate continues as to whether, or not, climate change is in fact real and if it is, if it is caused by human activities. In fact, the argument extends to hurricanes as well and whether, or
not, the increase in the number and severity of hurricanes can be attributed to climate change.

Regardless of where you stand on this debate, the fact remains that we have shortsightedly built our cities, homes and infrastructure in harm’s way along our nation’s coasts and in our floodplains. And we have built based on past flood risk data, not looking toward the future. This approach to development must change. We need to incorporate consideration of the benefits of healthy, non-developed
floodplains and coastal areas and truly weigh the trade-offs we make in our land use decisions.

The Association of State Wetland Managers (ASWM) has long supported the study and science of wetland functions and values. Wetlands act as natural sponges, absorbing excess floodwater and filtering out the pollutants that get washed into them from floods. Coastal wetlands diminish storm surge and protect our coastal communities from hurricanes. The benefits of healthy, functioning wetlands are many and the services they provide are clear, including critical habitat for migratory birds and other wildlife, groundwater recharge, and carbon sequestration among others, and those already listed above. By focusing more of our efforts on pre-mitigation activities such as wetland, riparian and floodplain protection and restoration we can realize multiple benefits for communities and greatly reduce our risks from future hurricanes.

Best regards,

Marla J. Stelk
Editor
Wetland Breaking News

 
   
              


Editor's ChoiceWBN: October 2018


Protecting Wetlands Helps Communities Reduce Damage from Hurricanes and Storms

Siddharth Narayan and Michael Beck – The Conservation – October 11, 2018 – Video
2017 was the worst year on record for hurricane damage in Texas, Florida and the Caribbean from Harvey, Irma and Maria. We had hoped for a reprieve this year, but less than a month after Hurricane Florence devastated communities across the Carolinas, Hurricane Michael has struck Florida. Coastlines are being developed rapidly and intensely in the United States and worldwide. The population of central and south Florida, for example, has grown by 6 million since 1990. Many of these cities and towns face the brunt of damage from hurricanes. In addition, rapid coastal development is destroying natural ecosystems like marshes, mangroves, oyster reefs and coral reefs – resources that help protect us from catastrophes. Read full story and view video here.

Senate Overwhelmingly Passes Water Infrastructure Bill

By Tom Ichniowski, – Engineering News-Record, – October 10, 2018
Congress has approved major water infrastructure legislation that authorizes $3.7 billion for new Army Corps of Engineers civil-works projects and $4.4 billion for the Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water program. But those authorizations still would require annual appropriations before the Corps and local water agencies can let construction contracts begin. Final congressional approval for the America's Water Infrastructure Act came on Oct. 10, when the Senate passed the measure by an overwhelming 99-1 vote. The water legislation now goes to President Trump for his signature. Read full story here.

Interior Department ‘Open Science’ Directive Echoes EPA Effort

American Institute of Physics – October 10, 2018
The Interior Department has joined the Environmental Protection Agency in advancing policies to require its regulatory decisions be based on scientific studies for which the underlying data is publicly available. In a directive titled “Promoting Open Science” released late last month, the Department of the Interior outlined steps it plans to take to increase the transparency of its decision-making. Those steps include requiring the department’s offices to make the data from scientific studies they use to develop regulations publicly available, with certain exceptions for sensitive information. Read full story here.

Why North America’s Gangliest Bird is Hitching a Ride with the Coast Guard

By Jessica Leigh Hester – Atlas Obscura, – October 9, 2018
At five feet tall and a whopping 17 pounds, whooping cranes are one of North America’s biggest, heftiest birds. They have their majestic moments, but they’re also rather gangly and awkward. Their spindly legs trail after them in flight, their call sounds like a mangled bugle, and their black wingtips appear to splay out, like a gloved dancer’s spirit fingers. This week, 33 of the rare birds are migrating, but they’re not using those wingtips. They’re flying with the U.S. Coast Guard from Maryland to Louisiana, where they will settle into a new home at the Freeport-McMoRan Audubon Species Survival Center. (A handful of them will eventually reside at some Texas zoos.) Read full story here. WBN: October 2018: Members' Webinars

 

National News 


EPA Removes 22 Cleaned-Up Sites from Superfund List

By Timothy Cama – The Hill – October 10, 2018
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) removed more sites from its Superfund list in the last fiscal year than any year in more than a decade. The agency on Wednesday announced that it deleted 18 complete sites and four parts of sites from the Superfund list in fiscal 2018, the most since 2005. Deletion means that the EPA has formally declared that the contamination has been cleaned and monitoring has confirmed it. Read full story here.

The Hurricanes, and Climate Change Questions, Keep Coming. Yes, They’re Linked.

By Henry Fountain – The New York Times – October 10, 2018
Scientists are increasingly confident of the links between global warming and hurricanes. In a warming world, they say, hurricanes will be stronger, for a simple reason: Warmer water provides more energy that feeds them. Hurricanes and other extreme storms will also be wetter, for a simple reason: Warmer air holds more moisture. And, storm surges from hurricanes will be worse, for a simple reason that has nothing to do with the storms themselves: Sea levels are rising. Read full story here.

IPCC Says Limiting Global Warming to 1.5°C Will Require Drastic Action

By Jeff Tollefson – Nature – October 8, 2018
Limiting global warming to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels would be a herculean task, involving rapid, dramatic changes in how governments, industries and societies function, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). But even though the world has already warmed by 1°C, humanity has 10–30 more years than scientists previously thought in which to kick its carbon habit. Read full story here.

Clean Water Act Dramatically Cut Pollution in U.S. Waterways

By Karen Manke – UC Berkeley News – October 8, 2018
The 1972 Clean Water Act has driven significant improvements in U.S. water quality, according to the first comprehensive study of water pollution over the past several decades, by researchers at UC Berkeley and Iowa State University. The team analyzed data from 50 million water quality measurements collected at 240,000 monitoring sites throughout the U.S. between 1962 and 2001. Most of 25 water pollution measures showed improvement, including an increase in dissolved oxygen concentrations and a decrease in fecal coliform bacteria. The share of rivers safe for fishing increased by 12 percent between 1972 and 2001. Despite clear improvements in water quality, almost all of 20 recent economic analyses estimate that the costs of the Clean Water Act consistently outweigh the benefits, the team found in work also coauthored with researchers from Cornell University. Read full story here.

What Brett Kavanaugh on Supreme Court Could Mean for Climate Regulations

By Marianne Lavelle – InsideClimate News – October 6, 2018
In his dozen years on the federal appeals court that hears the most disputes over government regulatory power, Judge Brett Kavanaugh compiled an extensive record of skepticism toward the government's powers to act on climate change. In particular, while Kavanaugh has repeatedly voiced the belief that global warming is a serious problem, he challenged the argument that Congress has given the Environmental Protection Agency authority to do something about it. Read full story here.

Congress allows farm bill to lapse before reauthorization deadline

By Juliegrace Brufke – The Hill – October 1, 2018
Congress quietly allowed the farm bill to expire over the weekend despite House Republicans’ hopes they would come to a consensus and pass a reauthorization ahead of the Sept. 30 deadline. The expiration was blamed on discrepancies between the House and the Senate, as well as the parties, over key provisions, including most prominently over a House provision to attach work requirements to the food stamp benefits in the current Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Read full story here.

E.P.A. to Eliminate Office That Advises Agency Chief on Science

By Coral Davenport – The New York Times – September 27, 2018
The Environmental Protection Agency plans to dissolve its Office of the Science Advisor, a senior post that was created to counsel the E.P.A. administrator on the scientific research underpinning health and environmental regulations, according to a person familiar with the agency’s plans. The person spoke anonymously because the decision had not yet been made public. The science adviser works across the agency to ensure that the highest quality science is integrated into the agency’s policies and decisions, according to the E.P.A.’s website. The move is the latest among several steps taken by the Trump administration that appear to have diminished the role of scientific research in policymaking while the administration pursues an agenda of rolling back regulations. Read full story here.

American Farm Bureau Asks Federal Court to Halt WOTUS Rule Nationwide

Contact: Mace Thornton and Shiloh Perry – American Farm Bureau – September 26, 2018
The American Farm Bureau Federation and a broad coalition of business groups on Wednesday asked a federal district court in Georgia to expand its prior order delaying implementation of the flawed 2015 Waters of the U.S. rule in 11 states. The coalition asked that the United States District Court for the Southern District of Georgia extend its previous injunction to block the WOTUS rule in the remaining 22 states that are currently subject to the controversial and unlawful rule. AFBF’s motion was prompted by another court’s decision in August striking down an Environmental Protection Agency rule that had delayed application of the WOTUS rule nationwide pending the agency’s ongoing reconsideration of the rule. Read full story here. 

Congress Spars Over Environmental Permitting

By Randy Showstack – EOS – September 18, 2018
Republicans at a recent congressional hearing charged that delays and inefficiencies in the federal environmental review and permitting system for infrastructure projects are out of control and are causing economic hardships. Delaying infrastructure projects “hurts the economy and communities in need of modern improved infrastructure,” Rep. Greg Gianforte (R-Mont.) said at a 6 September hearing of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. Democrats shot back in response that there is bipartisan support for reducing red tape. However, they stressed that the Trump administration should not try to short-circuit the permitting process at the expense of environmental protection. Read full story here. 

 
 State News 

WBN:  October 2018: Visit ASWM

 

CA: As States Near Deal on Colorado River shortage, California Looks at Water Cuts of as Much as 8%

By Bettina Boxall – Los Angeles Times –October 10, 2018
After years of stop-and-go talks, California and two other states that take water from the lower Colorado River are nearing an agreement on how to share delivery cuts if a formal shortage is declared on the drought-plagued waterway. Under the proposed pact, California — the river’s largest user — would reduce diversions earlier in a shortage than it would if the lower-basin states strictly adhered to a water-rights pecking order. California’s huge river take would drop 4.5% to 8% as the shortage progressed. Read full story here.

CA: Should California Expand the Definition for the ‘Beneficial Use’ of its Water?

By Matt Weiser – Pacific Standard Magazine – October 10, 2018
Groundwater depletion is a big problem in parts of California. But it is not the only groundwater problem. The state also has many areas of polluted groundwater, and some places where groundwater overdraft has caused the land to subside, damaging roads, canals, and other infrastructure. Near the coast, heavy groundwater pumping has caused contamination by pulling seawater underground from the ocean. But if you wanted to obtain a permit from the state to manage these problems by recharging groundwater, you could be out of luck. Read full article here.

CO: In a Drying Climate, Colorado’s ‘Water Cop’ Patrols for Water Thieves

By Luke Runyon – NPR – October 10, 2018
Dave Huhn is a sheriff's deputy for Montezuma County, Colo., a stretch of sagebrush mesas and sandstone cliffs bordering Utah, Arizona and New Mexico, home to Mesa Verde National Park, where ancestral Puebloans' cliff dwellings still stand. Huhn specializes in the complex world of water law. His job has become more important in this region after a series of hot, dry summers have made farmers more desperate for water, and more willing to steal it or go to battle over it. Read full story here.

CT: Climate Corps Seek to Make Impact in Connecticut’s Communities

By Elaina Hancock – UConn Today – October 10, 2018
When President Franklin Roosevelt established the Civilian Conservation Corps as part of the New Deal, he saw it not only as a way to tap into a workforce eager to work, but as an opportunity to preserve open spaces. The Civilian Conservation Corps was a success, and the results of many of those projects are still in use nearly a century later. Today, UConn is applying a similar concept, enlisting students to help Connecticut communities respond and adapt to climate change through the UConn Climate Corps. Read full story here.

KY: 'You Just Don’t Touch That Tap Water Unless Absolutely Necessary’

By Kat Lonsdorf – NPR – October 3, 2018
Aleigha Sloan can't remember ever drinking a glass of water from the tap at her home. That is "absolutely dangerous," the 17-year-old says, wrinkling her nose and making a face at the thought. "You just don't touch that tap water unless absolutely necessary. I mean, like showers and things — you have to do what you have to do. But other than that, no," she says. "I don't know anybody that does." Americans across the country, from Maynard's home in rural Appalachia to urban areas like Flint, Mich., or Compton, Calif., are facing a lack of clean, reliable drinking water. At the heart of the problem is a water system in crisis: aging, crumbling infrastructure and a lack of funds to pay for upgrading it. Read full story here.

NJ: State’s Tidal Wetlands Could be Swamped by Rising Seas—Report

By Tom Johnson – NJSpotlight – October 1, 2018
Thousands of acres of tidal wetlands in the region, including in New Jersey, said to be at risk from effects of climate change. Roughly half the tidal wetlands in the metropolitan area are at risk of being submerged by the end of the century as sea levels rise, according to a new report by the Regional Plan Association. The report warns that climate change threatens the remaining 70,000 acres of tidal wetlands in the New Jersey, New York and Connecticut region, a prospect that could drown those natural areas. Read full story here.

NY: Columbia Researchers Help with Plan to Restore and Protect the Hudson River

By Renee Cho – State of the Planet – September 18, 2018
The Hudson River is not an ordinary river. Rather, it is an estuary, where salt water from the ocean mixes with freshwater for 153 miles, from New York Harbor to Troy, NY. During the 1950s, the Hudson was an open sewer, with industries discharging toxic chemicals, paints, heavy metals and other waste into the water. Fish were contaminated with PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) dumped from General Electric’s factories into the upper Hudson, and more than a century of dredging and filling devastated its ecosystems. Today the river is clean enough for fishing, boating and even swimming, mainly due to the work of environmentalists and clean water laws enacted in 1960s and 1970s. But there is still work to be done to improve the estuary’s water quality. Read full blog post here.

NY: New York City Area Wetlands May Be Unwitting Generator of Greenhouse Gases

Phys.org – October 9, 2018
New York City (NYC), located within the Hudson River Estuary, inputs over 100 billion liters of combined sewage overflow (CSO) into surrounding surface waters annually. Little is known, however, about the impact of CSOs on wetlands that act as carbon sinks and provide buffers against climate change. Now a new study in the Soil Science Society of America Journal from researchers at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York (GC/CUNY) and Queens College suggests that local wetlands are capable of using CSO inputs in a manner that actually increases greenhouse gas emissions such as carbon dioxide and methane. Read full story here.

NY: Urbanization is Cutting Off Life Support to NYC’s Wetlands

Earth Institute – Columbia University State of the Planet – September 24, 2018
Historically, salt marshes have not only served as ecological nurseries for fish, birds, and other wildlife—they’ve been stalwart defenses against coastal storms. But recently, coastal development coupled with accelerated sea level rise has threatened wetlands across the globe. Among them are the salt marshes in New York City’s Jamaica Bay, an 18,000-acre estuary bordered by Queens and Brooklyn. Using sediment cores to trace the evolution of Jamaica Bay’s wetlands, a team led by researchers within Columbia’s Earth Institute finds that urbanization is weakening the shoreline and starving the marshes of vital mineral sediment, causing their gradual but dramatic erosion. Read full blog post here.

NC: Floods. Wildfire. Yet Few Candidates Are Running on Climate Change

By Trip Gabriel – The New York Times – October 2, 2018
Dan McCready is a boyish ex-Marine, a solar energy entrepreneur and a favorite candidate of national Democrats hoping to nab a Republican seat in their battle for the House. His company, Double Time Capital, says its mission is to hasten “our country’s important transition to clean energy” because of climate change. But as a candidate in a conservative-tilting battleground district, Mr. McCready’s environmental message is much more muted. Climate change is not directly named among 13 top issues on his website. Read full story here.

NC: Coal Ash Spill Highlights Key Role of Environmental Regulations in Disasters

By Brian J. Gerber and Melanie Gall – The Conversation – September 20, 2018
Heavy rains following Hurricane Florence has led to the release of toxic materials in North Carolina. A breached dam caused the shutdown of a power plant and the release of coal ash – the byproduct of burning coal – stored at the plant into the Cape Fear River. The state of North Carolina has also said dozens of sites have released hog waste or are at risk of doing so. These types of events not only highlight the potential of harm to humans and the environment due to this type of uncontrolled pollution, but also the linkage between environmental regulations and the risks communities face when natural disasters occur. Read full story here.

NC: Florence Pushes Away from Carolinas but Rivers Keep Rising

By David Zucchino, Alan Blinder and Tyler Pager – The New York Times – September 17, 2018
The remnants of Hurricane Florence threatened more destruction on Tuesday as swollen rivers pushed higher in the Carolinas and flash flood advisories were issued for cities along the storm’s northeast trajectory, including Washington, New York and Boston. Across the Carolinas, residents struggled with the aftermath of a storm that drenched the region with record rainfall, damaged tens of thousands of homes and delivered floodwaters that may not recede for days. Read full story here.

SC: Science Teacher Transforms Detention Pond Into ‘Wetlands Laboratory’ for Environmental Education

By Andrew Moore – Greenville Journal – October 3, 2018
Wetlands are an important, yet often overlooked, resource. They not only provide critical habitat for a variety of plants and animals but also protect against flooding and storms. Unfortunately, in the last few hundred years, the United States has lost more than half of its wetlands to land conversion, according to a recent report by the U.S. Geological Survey. Now an Upstate middle school teacher is working to change that statistic — at least locally. Gina Varat, a fifth-grade science teacher at Christ Church Episcopal School, has launched a project that aims to connect students with Mother Nature and introduce them to the various environmental threats impacting natural resources throughout Greenville County. Read full story here.

TN: ‘Alarming’ Level of Microplastics Found in a Major U.S. River

By Sarah Gibbens – National Geographic – October 10, 2018
When Andreas Fath decided to conduct a survey to see what contaminants were lurking in the Tennessee River, he wanted to do it in a way that would get attention. “If you want to reach people, I've noticed that it's better to do something crazy,” says the German professor of medical and life science from Furtwangen University. Fath combined his two passions—”long-distance swimming and chemical research”—to swim the 652-mile Tennessee River over the course of 34 days last summer. It was inspired by a similar swim through the Rhine River in Germany he completed in 2014. Along the way he took water samples, and what he found doesn't bode well for the ecologically rich and biodiverse Tennessee River. Read full story here.

UT: Just in Time for Duck Season, Cows Improve Great Salt Lake Wetlands

By Leia Larsen – Standard-Examiner – October 9, 2018
A years-long battle against an invasive grass has improved hundreds of acres of wetland habitat near the Great Salt Lake, even as lake levels decline. Water-sucking phragmites moved into Utah wetlands decades ago and firmly took root. The non-native plant is notoriously hard to knock back, choking out native plants and wildlife. But just in time for duck hunting season, managers at Ogden Bay Waterfowl Management Area are gaining ground, fighting back phragmites with an unlikely weapon — cows. Read full story here.

WBN: October 2018VA: Breaking: Mountain Valley Pipeline Loses Authority to Cross Streams and Wetlands in Virginia

Contact: Doug Jackson and Jon Berman – Sierra Club – October 5, 2018
Today, at the request of a coalition of clean water advocates including the Sierra Club and Appalachian Mountain Advocates, the Army Corps of Engineers suspended a permit that the fracked gas Mountain Valley Pipeline (MVP) must have in order to build through waterways in Virginia. This action follows Tuesday’s federal court ruling throwing out MVP’s stream crossing permit for southern West Virginia, that would have allowed MVP to blast a trench through the important Gauley, Greenbrier, and Elk rivers. Now, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) must halt all work on the pipeline, as FERC's order approving the project requires that all permits be in place for construction to take place anywhere along its 303-mile route. Read full press release here.

WA: Tacoma City Council Facing Critical Crossroads for Tideflats Land-Use

By Eric de Place and Aven Frey – Sightline – October 10, 2018
Tacoma, long a center of heavy industry, is heir to a proud working-class legacy—and to enduring pollution. In particular, the city’s industrial port area, known as the Tideflats, is no stranger to dirty energy proposals. It was targeted in recent years for a large-scale petrochemical refinery, a fracked gas liquefaction center, oil trains, and more. Despite considerable progress by local leaders and ordinary residents alike, the city remains among the most at-risk Northwest communities for fossil fuel development. Read full story here.

WV: Model to Predict Greenhouse Gases, Carbon Storage in Coastal Wetlands Under Changing Conditions Developed at WVU

Contact: Mary C. Dillon – WVUToday – October 8, 2018
A pair of researchers from West Virginia University has developed a new model to reliably predict the greenhouse gas fluxes of carbon dioxide and methane in coastal wetlands under rising temperatures and changing environments. Omar Abdul-Aziz, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering, and Khandker S. Ishtiaq, a postdoctoral fellow, have developed the model, which was published in a recent edition of the American Geophysical Union’s “Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeoscience.” Coastal wetlands play an important role in mitigating the effects of GHGs by efficiently removing atmospheric carbon. However, climate change mitigation benefits have to be achieved through conservation and restoration of coastal wetlands. The developed model, which takes sunlight, soil temperature and salinity into account, is a novel and first-of-its-kind empirical tool that can be used for estimating and predicting GHG fluxes and carbon storage using a minimal amount of observational data. Read full story here.

 

WBN: October 2018: Wetland ScienceWetland Science News


How Drought and Other Extremes Impact Water Pollution

Phys.org – October 11, 2018
One in 10 Americans depends on the Colorado River for bathing and drinking. Last fall's record-high temperatures reduced Colorado snowpack in winter 2018 to 66 percent of normal, sparking concern over water shortages downstream and leaving water managers fearful of a repeat. Diminishing snowpack isn't all that affects water reserves. At many sites across the West where the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service measures the amount of water contained within snow, this snow-water equivalent was less than half of median values from 1981 to 2010. At the same time, snow is melting near the Colorado River's headwaters almost a month earlier than it did 25 years ago. This earlier melt alone has caused shifts in plant communities that function to absorb nutrients, process pollutants, and filter sediment as water moves downstream – increasing the odds that water quality, not just water supply, will be put at risk by a warming atmosphere. Read full story here.

Sea Level Rise Inevitable, But Just How High Will It Get?

By Kay Vandette – Earth.com News – October 10, 2018
Accurately predicting the extent of sea level rise is a difficult task, as researchers are continually faced with new challenges, variables, and inconsistencies when working to model a warming world. There are so many different factors that influence water levels, but climate models must find better ways to accurately estimate sea level rise for the at-risk coastal communities. Read full story here.

Climate Change Takes a Chronic Psychological Toll

By Sarah DeWeerdt – Anthropocene Magazine – October 9, 2018
Heat waves, stretches of wet weather, long-term climate warming, and hurricanes all take a toll on mental health, researchers reported yesterday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. All of these phenomena are expected to become more frequent and intense with climate change, suggesting a need to bolster our collective psychological as well as physical infrastructure to prepare. Read full article here.

Fertilizers Can Accumulate Over Time, Causing Water Quality Problems Decades Later

By Brooks Hays – UPI – October 8, 2018
Fertilizer can accumulate over time, causing environmental damage several decades later. In a new study, scientists quantified the maximum amount of nutrients land can hold before fertilizers overflow into downriver ecosystems. Their analysis suggests an average square mile of land can hold 1,800 pounds of phosphorus -- 2.1 metric tons per square kilometer. "Beyond this, further phosphorus inputs to watersheds cause a significant acceleration of phosphorus loss in runoff," researchers wrote in their paper, published this week in the journal Nature Geoscience. Nutrients like phosphorus help plants grow, but an abundance of nutrients can accelerate plant and algae growth unnaturally, disrupting ecosystems and causing environmental damage. Read full story here.

How Wildfires Are Polluting Rivers and Threatening Water Supplies

By Ed Struzik – YaleEnvironment 360 – October 2, 2018
Cameron Falls in Canada’s Waterton Lakes National Park runs cold and clear in summer, when as many as a half-million people come to canoe, fish, hike, and bike in this pristine Rocky Mountain landscape along the Alberta/Montana border. On very rare occasions, it runs a Pepto Bismol pink when heavy rains stir up argillite, a red mudstone that is found upstream. But on June 21, residents, tourists, and park officials were shocked to see the waterfalls suddenly running pitch black. Heavy rain had flushed in soot, ash, and charred tree debris from a fire that burned most of the 195-square-mile park the year before. Read full story here.

High CO2 Levels Cause Plants to Thicken Their Leaves, Which Could Worsen Climate Change Effects, Researchers Say

By James Urton – University of Washington News – October 1, 2018
Plant scientists have observed that when levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere rise, most plants do something unusual: they thicken their leaves. And since human activity is raising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, thick-leafed plants appear to be in our future. But the consequences of this physiological response go far beyond heftier leaves on many plants. Two University of Washington scientists have discovered that plants with thicker leaves may exacerbate the effects of climate change because they would be less efficient in sequestering atmospheric carbon, a fact that climate change models to date have not taken into account. Read full story here.

Invasive Plants Could Boost Blue Carbon Storage

Contact: Kristen Minogue – Smithsonian – October 1, 2018
When invasive species enter the picture, things are rarely black and white. A new paper has revealed that some plant invaders could help fight climate change by making it easier for ecosystems to store “blue carbon”—the carbon stored in coastal environments like salt marshes, mangroves and seagrasses. But other invaders, most notably animals, can do the exact opposite. Read full story here.

New Programme of Research Translation, Policy Advice, and Advocacy for Nature-Based Solutions to Climate Change

weADAPT – September 27, 2018 – Video
Climate change, biodiversity loss and poverty are inextricably linked. Not only do communities from the poorest nations suffer the worst effects of climate change, they also experience the highest rates of loss and damage to their natural ecosystems. However, nature is our best line of defense against harmful environment change. In particular, it is becoming increasingly clear that the protection and restoration of nature can be the most cost-effective way of dealing with both the causes and consequences of climate change. Read full story and view video here.

Wetlands Disappearing Three Times Faster than Forests: Study

By Nina Larson – Phys.org – September 27, 2018
Wetlands, among the world's most valuable and biodiverse ecosystems, are disappearing at alarming speed amid urbanization and agriculture shifts, conservationists said Thursday, calling for urgent action to halt the erosion. "We are in a crisis," Martha Rojas Urrego, head of the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands, told reporters in Geneva, warning of the potential devastating impact of wetland loss, including on climate change. The convention, adopted in the Iranian city of Ramsar nearly a half-century ago, on Thursday issued its first-ever global report on the state of the world's wetlands. Read full story here.

National Parks Hit Harder by Climate Change than Rest of U.S.

YaleEnvironment 360 – September 24, 2018
America’s national parks are warming up and drying out much faster than the rest of the United States, according to a new study on the impacts of climate change on U.S. parks published in the journal Environmental Research Letters. The changing conditions are threatening protected ecosystems from the Everglades in Florida to Denali National Park in Alaska. Read full story here.

Climate Change Will Cost U.S. More in Economic Damage Than Any Other Country but OneWBN: October 2018

By Stacy Morford – InsideClimate News – September 24, 2018
The United States stands to lose a lot more from climate change than it realizes. In a study published Monday, scientists estimate for the first time how much each country around the world will suffer in future economic damage from each new ton of carbon dioxide pumped into the atmosphere. What they found may come as a surprise: the future economic costs within the U.S. borders are the second-highest in the world, behind only India. The results suggest that the U.S. has been underestimating how much it benefits from reducing its greenhouse gas emissions and that the country has far more to gain from international climate agreements than the Trump administration is willing to admit. Read full story here.

Coastal Wetlands Will Survive Rising Seas, but Only if We Let Them

Contact: David Malmquist – EurekAlert – September 20, 2018
When Florence slogged ashore in North Carolina last week, coastal wetlands offered one of the best lines of defense against the hurricane's waves and surge. A new study predicts such wetlands will survive rising seas to buffer the world's coastlines against future storms and provide their many other ecological and economic benefits, but only if humans preserve the room needed for the wetlands to migrate inland--what scientists call "accommodation space." Read full story here.

Some Species Shield Others from Climate Change

By Brandon Keim – Anthropocene Magazine – September 19, 2018
Refuges from climate change are typically understood in geographic terms: as places that, through some fortuitous circumstance of topography and local weather patterns, will provide a temperate haven for sensitive species even as global temperatures rise. Another, less-appreciated kind of climate refuge exists. The activities of certain plants and animals create sheltered habitats within which other life can flourish — and their protective powers might be harnessed. Read full article here.

The Future of Wetlands: We’ve Been Warned

By Monica Evans – Forests News – September 17, 2018
At the Rio conference 25 years ago, the Union of Concerned Scientists – which included 1,700 leading researchers, a number of them Nobel prizewinners – issued a warning to humanity about the dire consequences of failing to curtail environmental destruction. Last year, world scientists issued a second warning, bemoaning the lack of progress since the first warning was issued and drawing attention to particular issues, such as the declining availability of fresh water and the likely impacts of climate change on biodiversity. Read full story here.


 

Resources and Publications


Effective Adaption to Rising Flood Risk

By Brenden Jongman – Nature.com – May 29, 2018
Floods are causing increasing havoc in our rapidly urbanizing world, with disproportionally high impacts on the poorest and most vulnerable. Effective adaptation strategies are needed, which combine flood protection infrastructure, nature-based solutions, and risk financing schemes to manage floods and buffer their economic impacts. Read full article here.

Ecosystem-Based Adaptation from Mountains to Oceans: How People Adapt to Climate Change by Using Nature

GIZ – 2018
This publication intends to inspire policy and decision makers by showcasing a selection of solutions, that have been applied in very different settings. It shows that ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) has ‘many faces’: It is being implemented successfully in a broad range of countries and ecosystems and it is being driven forward by all kinds of people and organizations. EbA solutions are applied examples of successful processes or approaches to solve a specific challenge related to climate change. They address current and future climate change impacts (e.g. floods, droughts, storms, sea level rise, melting of glaciers) on human wellbeing through a sustainable management of ecosystems and the services they provide — with a proven impact. A solution usually consists of a combination of building blocks. Read full publication here.

Conserving California’s Coastal Habitats: A Legacy and a Future with Sea Level Rise

By Walter N. Heady, Brian S. Cohen, Mary G. Gleason, et al. – The Nature Conservancy, San Francisco, CA; California State Coastal Conservancy, Oakland, CA – 2018
The California coast that we know today will not be the same coast in the future due to sea level rise and climate change. Investments made to date in coastal conservation to protect important habitats and species, are at risk as ocean waters rise and coastal margins erode. California’s current policies and decision-making frameworks are not yet prepared for this threat. Land use, development, and conservation decisions made for California’s coastal areas must consider the vulnerability of the coast to sea level rise, and the coastal changes that will unfold over the coming decades. To guide current and future adaptation decisions and conservation actions, we conducted the first statewide, comprehensive assessment of the vulnerability of California’s coastal habitats, imperiled species, and conservation lands to sea level rise. How California accommodates and adapts to changes from sea level rise will determine what our future coast will look like, how well conserved and protected coastal ecosystems will be, and what benefits the coast will provide to future generations. Read full report here.

Midwest US: What’s in Your Stream? Get Online to Find Out!

Release Date: October 9, 2018
An online interactive tool for learning about pesticides, nutrients, and the overall health of Midwest streams is now available from the U.S. Geological Survey. This information can be used by the public and resource managers to better understand the relative effects of these stressors on aquatic organisms in streams. The Results Viewer shows results for selected stressor and ecology metrics on a map. Sites are color coded based on metric values. By clicking on a site in the map, the user can view a scorecard with all metrics for a site or the user can view a time-series graph for results available for up to hundreds of different constituents. Access the tool and read full article here.

 

PotpourriWBN: October 2018: Potpourri


3 Actions the Government Can Take Today to Lessen the Damage of Future Floods

By Shannon Cunniff – Environmental Defense Fund – October 8, 2018
Another devastating hurricane, another bill for American taxpayers: The tally from Hurricane Florence may go as high as $22 billion, according to Moody’s, placing it in the top 10 category for damages. We can either continue down this path or make a collective reevaluation of how we manage risk. It means we must revisit the myriad of local, state and federal laws and policies that guide how we cope with storms in our changing climate. And it means we must challenge long-held assumptions. Read full blog post here.

The Answer to Coastal Flooding is Not More Cement

By David Yarnold, opinion contributor – The Hill – October 2, 2018
For decades, governments have built higher levees and concrete barriers as the answer to protecting life and property from damaging coastal storms and flooding. Surrounding ourselves with concrete isn’t a solution — water always finds a way. Part of the solution is far more fundamental. It’s called natural infrastructure. That simply means incorporating natural landscapes such as marshes, barrier islands and oyster reefs to minimize flood and storm damage. And while nothing will stop a nine-foot storm surge, it’s worth noting that coastal wetlands prevented $625 million in direct property damages during Hurricane Sandy. Read full opinion here.

Coastal Communities Must Plan for the Future Instead of Planning from the Past

By Devyani Kar – Environmental Defense Fund – September 28, 2018
Ecosystem restoration planning has traditionally been based on a desire to restore a system to some historic condition – even as conditions are constantly evolving because of climate change. Rather than planning for the future, we often look back at what the system once was and try to replicate it. But in a rapidly changing world, this model is not sustainable. Ecosystem restoration planning has traditionally been based on a desire to restore a system to some historic condition – even as conditions are constantly evolving because of climate change. Rather than planning for the future, we often look back at what the system once was and try to replicate it. But in a rapidly changing world, this model is not sustainable. Read full story here.

Research Shows Wind Farms Could Divert Hurricane Rains

By Richard Kemeny – Hakai Magazine – September 21, 2018
Nature’s strength was laid bare again last week as two tropical storms marauded through Southeast Asia and the southeastern United States. Super Typhoon Mangkhut, thought to be one of the most powerful cyclones to hit the Philippines in decades, uprooted homes and turned roads into violent rivers. It killed at least 81 people before twisting its way over the South China Sea and careening into the Chinese mainland where the death toll rose further. On the US east coast, Hurricane Florence caused widespread flooding, killed at least 37 people, and left millions without power. And as with Hurricane Harvey in 2017, Florence stalled over the continent, dropping ever more rain long after making landfall. In the face of such a raw display of nature’s fury, it may seem like little can be done to lessen the blow of a hurricane. But according to new research, help in tempering the power of hurricanes could one day come from an unexpected source: offshore wind farms. Read full article here. 

Not All Watersheds Are Created Equal: Natural Boundaries Also Predict Patterns of Inequality

By Dustin Hill, Mary Collins and Elizabeth Vidon – Science Trends – September 18, 2018
Patterns of inequality in exposure to environmental pollutants exist around the world today, even right here in our backyards. Such patterns of injustice, observed over the past few decades, are often researched and discussed in the body of scholarship known as Environmental Justice. Researchers who work in this field typically study patterns of exposure by race and class, documenting the fact that the underprivileged in society are exposed to harmful pollutants and environmental hazards to a greater degree than other groups. Read full story here.

In the U.S., Black, Brown, and Poor People Suffer the Most from Environmental Contamination

By Colin Provost and Brian J. Gerber – The Washington Post – September 18, 2018
At the end of August, the Trump administration’s Environmental Protection Agency released its Affordable Clean Energy Plan to reduce carbon dioxide (or greenhouse gas) emissions from existing coal-fired power plants. This plan is less stringent about reducing emissions than was the Obama administration’s Clean Power Plan, and potentially enables coal-burning plants to last longer. Few noticed that, on the same day, a judge ordered Michigan’s health director, Nick Lyon, to stand trial on involuntary manslaughter charges related to two men who died of Legionnaire’s disease after Lyon didn’t alert the public that Flint’s contaminated water was spreading the disease. Read full story here.

Yes, You Can Blame Bad Storms on Climate Change

By David Fickling – Bloomberg Opinion – September 16, 2018 – Video
There’s a familiar refrain that goes up when extreme weather events bear down on population centers, as Hurricane Florence and Typhoon Mangkhut are now doing in the western Atlantic and Pacific Oceans: While carbon emissions from human activity may be causing a general warming, it’s impossible to draw a direct link between any one event and climate change. That’s a comforting thought. Droughts, hurricanes, floods and heatwaves have been a feature of the global climate since long before humans walked the earth. Who’s to say whether this latest round of disasters is a result of our industrial and agricultural practices, or simply the normal weather variations of a chaotic atmosphere? Read full opinion and view video here.

How Do Wetlands Protect Land and Water?

Soils Matter – September 15, 2018
Originally, wetlands were thought of as wasted land that could be drained for agriculture, building housing developments and other structures. Even the word “swamp” implies that they are areas with little meaning. The truth is, wetlands are a crucial part of the earth’s ecosystem, one that we cannot do without! Read full blog post here.

Amphibious Architecture: Float When it Floods

By Emily Anthes – Anthropocene Magazine – September 10, 2018 – Video
Last June, not long after a catastrophic thunderstorm swept through southern Ontario, bringing a month’s worth of rain in just a few hours, a group of 75 architects, engineers, and policymakers from 16 countries gathered in the city of Waterloo to discuss how humanity will cope with its waterlogged future. The timing of the conference was a fitting meteorological coincidence; in a world increasingly transformed by climate change, heavy rains and major floods are becoming more common, at least in some areas. In the summer of 2017 alone, Hurricane Harvey dumped more than 50 inches of rain over Texas; a monster monsoon season damaged more than 800,000 homes in India; and flash floods and mudslides claimed at least 500 lives in Sierra Leone. In the past two decades, the world’s ten worst floods have done more than a 165 billion dollars’ worth of damage and driven more than a billion people from their homes. Read full article and view video here.

What We Risk by Ignoring Nature

By Mia Signs and Matthew McCartney – PreventionWeb – August 30, 2018
2018 is slated to become the fourth hottest year in recorded history. A global heat wave has brought about a massive European drought, with crop failures and fires plaguing the continent. It’s also brought about the Mendocino-Complex Fire, which is the largest wildfire in California’s state history, a growing phenomenon made worse by groundwater depletion due to years of decreased precipitation. Read full story here.



 Calendar of Events


WEBINARS
     
MEETINGS     
TRAINING  

 

WBN: October 2018

 Special Events

Maine Maritime Museum: 
Birding on the Bay

October 14 and 28, 2018
Bath, ME

Elkhorn Slough
Fall Migration Birding Walk
October 27, 2018

World Wetlands Day
February 2, 2019

Shiver in the River
February 23, 2019
Richmond, VA

Wings Over the Rockies Festival
May 6-12, 2019

WEBINARS  
             
October 2018  
   

October 17, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET 





October 23, 2018

1:00 p.m. ET



October 23, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET




October 24, 2018
3:00 p.m. ET 

       

Center for Watershed Protection Webcast: Crediting Water Quality Benefits from Stream Restoration: Implementation Case Studies and Potential for Crediting Guidance Applications

EBM Tools Network Webinar: Leverage a Global Volunteer Network and Access the Data Needed to Solve Environmental Challenges

Soak Up the Rain New England Webinar Series: Stormwater-Driven Design: Water Supply Protection Through Green Infrastructure and Open Space Improvements at Fresh Pond Reservation in Cambridge, MA

Association of State Wetland Managers Members’ Wetland Webinar: Utilizing EPA’s Water Quality “eXchange” (WQX) Data Tools and  Services to Support Wetland Water Quality Work 

 
     
       

 

     
NOVEMBER 2018
     
November 14, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  American Water Resources Association Webinar: Setting Up a Water Bank: From the Ground(water) Up 
     
November 14, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  Center for Watershed Protection Webcast: It Ain’t Easy Getting Green: Incentivizing Watershed Programs
     
November 15, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  EBM Tools Network Webinar: New Study Highlights Need to Tackle Fisheries and Climate Together
     
November 28, 2018
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of State Wetland Managers: Members Wetland Webinar: Planning Wetland Restoration at the Watershed Level
     
DECEMBER 2018
     
December 19, 2018
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of State Wetland Managers: Members Wetland Webinar: Using a Living Shorelines Prioritization Tool for Wetland Improvements
     
  WBN: October 2018

 

MEETINGS
 
OCTOBER 2018 
     
October 20, 2018
Leominster, MA
  MACC Fall Conference 
     
October 21-29, 2018
Dubai
  13th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands
     
October 22-26, 2018
Stowe, VT
  American Meteorological Society: 29th Conference on Severe Local Storms
     
October 23, 2018
Washington, DC
  Corporate Governance in an Age of Increased Environmental Accountability, Liability and Risk (2018 Corporate Forum)
     
October 23-25, 2018
Bloominton, IN
  Natural Areas Conference: Building Resilience: The Future of Natural Areas 
     
October 23-25, 2018
Atlantic City, NJ 
  New Jersey Association for Floodplain Management: 14th Annual Conference   
     
October 24-25, 2018
Miami Beach, FL
  Southeast Florida Regional Compact: Southeast Florida Regional Climate Leadership Summit
     
October 24-26, 2018
New York, NY
  American Museum of Natural History Center for Biodiversity and Conservation: Student Conference on Conservation Science-New York

     
October 27-28, 2018
Knoxville, TN
  National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS): 10th Annual Undergraduate Research Conference
     
October 28-31, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  American Water Works Association: Water Infrastructure Conference
     
October 29-31, 2018
San Diego, CA
  6th International Conference on Sustainable Environment and Agriculture
October 30-November 2, 2018
Cincinnati, OH 
  38th International Symposium of the North American Lake Management Society: Now Trending: Innovations in Lake Management  
     
October 30-November 2, 2018
Galveston, TX
  American Shore & Beach Preservation Association: 2018 National Coastal Conference: Resilient Shorelines for Rising Tides
     
NOVEMBER 2018 
     
November 2-3, 2018
State College, PA
  4th Biennial Pennsylvania Botany Symposium
     
November 4-7, 2018
Baltimore, MD
 
  American Society of Agronomy, the Crop Science Society of America, and the Canadian Society of Agronomy: 2018 International Annual Meeting: Enhancing Productivity in a Changing Climate 
     
November 4-7, 2018
Indianapolis, IN
  Geological Society of America 2018 Annual Meeting
     
November 4-8, 2018
Baltimore, MD
  American Water Resources Association (AWRA) 53rd Annual Water Resources 
     
November 7-9, 2018
Pewaukee, WI
  Wisconsin Association for Floodplain, Stormwater, & Coastal Management 16th Annual Conference 
     
November 8, 2018
Gulfport, FL
  Stetson University Sixth Annual ELI-Stetson Wetlands Workshop: The Role of NGOs and the Public Sector in Implementing Wetland Restoration Projects: Trends, lessons Learned, and Best Practices
     
November 9, 2018
Boylston, MA
  Association of Massachusetts Wetland Scientists Annual Meeting 2018: What Could Go Wrong?
     
November 9-11, 2018
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI
  Sustainability and Development Conference
November 9-11, 2018
San Antonio, TX 
  Texas Society for Ecological Restoration Conference: Making Restoration Work in Texas  
     
November 13-15, 2018
Homer, AK
  Alaska Committee for Noxious and Invasive Pest Management: Invasive Species Workshop 
     
November 13-16, 2018
Chicago, IL
  Lincoln Park Zoo 2nd International Wildlife Reintroduction Conference
November 14-16, 2018
Mankato, MN
  2018 Minnesota Association of Floodplain Managers Conference
 
November 17, 2018
Cromwell, CT
  CACIWC Annual Meeting and Environmental Conference
     
November 19-20, 2018
Paris, France
  6th Global Summit on Climate Change: Paleoclimatology: The Earth’s Climate in Long View
     
November 25-29, 2018
Champions Gate, FL
  American Water Works Association, Florida Section: 2018 Fall Conference: Planning the Future of Water
     
November 26-27, 2018
Tokyo, Japan
  World Summit on Climate Change & Global Warming
 
DECEMBER 2018 
     
December 3-6, 2018 
Washington, DC
  2018 ACES Conference: A Community on Ecosystem Services 
     
December 8-13, 2018
Long Beach, CA
  Restore America’s Estuaries Conference: 9th National Summit on Coastal and Estuarine Restoration and Management
     
December 10-11, 2018
Carmel, IN 
  Midwestern States Environmental Consultants Association Conference: Environmental Liabilities, Risk Assessment, and Remediation  
     
December 10-14, 2018
Washington, DC 
  AGU Fall Meeting

     
December 11-13, 2018
Indianapolis, IN
  North Central Region Water Network: North Central Region One Water Action Forum
     
JANUARY 2019 
     
January 6-9, 2019
San Diego, CA
  International Soils Meeting: Soils Across Latitudes

     
January 10-12, 2019 
Miami, FL
  Sixth Evolutionary Demography Society Annual Meeting
     
January 11, 2019 
Thatcher, AZ
  Upper Gila Watershed Forum 
     
January 27-30, 2019 
Cape May, NJ
  2019 Delaware Estuary Science & Environmental Summit: Estuary 2029: Saving our System Through Collaboration
     
FEBRUARY 2019 
     
February 5-7, 2019
Phoenix, AZ
  Tamarisk Coalition and the Desert Botanical Garden: Riparian Restoration Conference
     
February 5-7, 2019
Osage Beach, MO
  Missouri Natural Resources Conference

     
February 5-7, 2019
Stevenson, WA
  River Restoration Northwest: Stream Restoration Symposium

     
February 11-15, 2019
Anchorage, AK
  Alaska Forum on the Environment

     
February 19-21, 2018
Madison, WI
  Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Wetland Science Conference
Proposals due by November 1, 2018
     
February 21-24, 2019
Oracle, AZ
  University of Arizona Conference: Crafting the Long Tomorrow: New Conversations & Productive Catalysts Across Science and Humanities Boundaries as the Global Emergency Worsens
     
February 23-
March 2, 2019 
San Juan, Puerto Rico
  Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography: Planet Water: Challenges and Successes 
     
February 27-28, 2018
Toronto, Canada
  International Conference on Water Management Modeling
     
MARCH 2019
     
March 2, 2019
Worcester, MA 
  Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commissions Annual Environmental Conference
     
March 11-22, 2019
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology
     
March 13-15, 2019
Ann Arbor, MI
  Michigan Stormwater Floodplain Association Conference
     
March 13-17, 2019
Raleigh, NC 
  CitSci 2019: Growing Our Family Tree 
     
March 20-22, 2019
Baltimore, MD 
  Climate Leadership Conference
     
March 25-29, 2019
Denver, CO
  5th Life Discovery – Doing Science Biology Education Conference: : Microbiomes to Ecosystems: Evolution and Biodiversity across Scale, Space, and Time
     
March 25-29, 2019
Denver, CO
  National Water Quality Monitoring Council: 11th Annual National Monitoring Conference
   APRIL 2019
     
April 4-6, 2019
Ashland, OH
  Ohio Wetlands Association Vernal Poolooza
     
April 22-25, 2019
Coral Springs, FL
  Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration: Science Advancing Everglades Resilience and Sustainability
     
April 23-25, 2019
Madison, WI
  National Adaptation Forum
     
April 29-May 2, 2019
Charleston, SC
  Center for Watershed Protection: 2019 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference. Submit an abstract by November 19, 2018
     
MAY 2019   
     
May 2, 2019
Washington, DC
  Environmental Law Institute Conference: Clean Water Act: Law and Regulation 2019 
     
May 6-10, 2019
Minneapolis, MN
  National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Connecting Policy, Practice, Business, Science & People
     
May 7, 2019
Washington, DC
  Environmental Law Institute 30th Annual National Wetlands Awards 2019 
     
May 19-23, 2019
Baltimore, MD
  2018 NAEP Conference: The Environmental Landscape in an Age of Infrastructure Modernization
     
May 19-24, 2019
Cleveland, OH
  Association of State Floodplain Managers 42nd Annual Meeting: Managing Floods Where the Mountains Meet the Desert 
     
May 28-31, 2019
Baltimore, MD
  Society of Wetland Scientists 2019 Annual Meeting: The Role of Wetlands in Meeting Global Environmental Challenges: Linking Wetland Science, Policy , and Society
     
May 29-June 2, 2019
Waikoloa, HI
  Ducks Unlimited National Convention
   JUNE 2019
June 4-6, 20, 2019
Bologna, Italy
  2nd International Conference on Community Ecology 
     
June 16-19, 2018
Sparks, NV
  2019 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: Improving Water Infrastructure Through Resilient Adaptation
     
June 17-20, 2019
Louisville, KY
  National Hydrologic Warming Council Conference
     
AUGUST 2019   
     
August 11-16, 2019
Louisville, KY
  Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting
Abstracts due by September 24, 2018
     

WBN: October 2018   

TRAINING
 
OCTOBER 2018
     
October 22-25, 2018
Pittsburgh, PA
  The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design
     
October 22-November 5, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Habitat Conservation Plans
     
October 23-24, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  D & D West Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species - 16 hours (lecture)
     
October 23-28, 2018
Boulder, CO
  CUAHSI – NCAR Training Workshop: The Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System

     
October 25-26, 2018
Gainesville, FL
  Southeastern Botany, LLC Workshop: Grass & Sedge Workshop 
     
October 26-28, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Crustose and Foliose Lichens  
     
October 29-November 1, 2018
Richmond, VA
  Richard Ginn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: ACOE/Waters of the US/Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
     
October 30, 2018
New Brunswick NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Education Course: Flood Hazard Area Control Act Rules: Technical Standards Part II 
     
October 31-November 1, 2018
Tampa, FL
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
     
NOVEMBER 2018
     
November 5-9, 2018
John Bunker Sands Wetland Center
Seagoville, TX
  The Swamp School CourseWetland Delineation Training
     
November 5, 2018-
January 28, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018
     
November 5, 2018-January 28, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist  
     
November 7-8, 2018
Columbus, OH
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training 
     
November 7-8, 2018
Charleston, SC
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
     
November 7-8, 2018
Charleston, SC
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
     
November 8, 2018
Lacey, WA
  Washington Department of Ecology Workshop: Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
     
November 8-9, 2018
Hillsborough, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Education Course: Lake Management
     
November 8-11, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Tree and Shrub Identification Using Twigs and Other Winter Characteristics  
     
November 12-13, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  D & D West Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology – Piedmont - 16 hours (field)
     
November 12, 2018-
February 4, 2019

Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design  
     
November 13-15, 2018
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Winter Woody Plant ID 
     
November 26-December 24, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment 
     
November 29, 2018
Belton, TX
  Urban Riparian and Stream Restoration Training
     
DECEMBER 2018
     
December 3-31, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets
     
December 3, 2018-
February 25, 2019

Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018  
     
December 4-6, 2018
Portland, OR
  Portland State University Course: River Restoration Project Management
     
December 5-6, 2018
Tampa, FL
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training 
     
December 7-8, 2018
Tampa, FL
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training
     
December 10-11, 2018
Charleston, SC
  D & D West Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement – Eastern Mountains/Piedmont) - 16 hours (½ lecture, ½ field)
     
December 10, 2018-April 2019
Pittsburgh, PA
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
     
December 12-13, 2018
Houston, TX 
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
     
December 13-14, 2018
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Education Course: Identification of Wetland Plants in Winter
     
December 17-31, 2018 
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
     
December 28, 2018-January 16, 2019 
Costa Rica
  Organization for Tropical Studies and the University of Costa Course:  Field Ecology: Skills for Science and Beyond
     
JANUARY 2019
     
January 4-5, 2019
Saukville, WI
  University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Workshop: Ecology and Physiology of Plants in Winter
     
January 9-April 26, 2019
Online
  Montana State University Online Course: Wetland & Riparian Ecology & Management
January 10-21, 2019
Kananaskis Valley
Alberta, Canada 
  University of Saskatchewan Centre for Hydrology / CWRA / Canadian Society for Hydrological Sciences Kananaskis Short Course: Principles of Hydrology  
     

January 13-18, 2019
Oracle, AZ 

January 14-17, 2019
Sacramento, CA
 

 

CUAHSI Master Class: Advanced Techniques in Watershed Science  

Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training 

 
 
   
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 WBN: October 2018

 INDEX 

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • Protecting Wetlands Helps Communities Reduce Damage from Hurricanes and Storms
  • Senate Overwhelmingly Passes Water Infrastructure Bill
  • Interior Department ‘Open Science’ Directive Echoes EPA Effort
  • Why North America’s Gangliest Bird is Hitching a Ride with the Coast Guard

NATIONAL NEWS

  • EPA Removes 22 Cleaned-Up Sites from Superfund List
  • The Hurricanes, and Climate Change Questions, Keep Coming. Yes, They’re Linked.
  • IPCC Says Limiting Global Warming to 1.5 °C Will Require Drastic Action
  • Clean Water Act Dramatically Cut Pollution in U.S. Waterways
  • What Brett Kavanaugh on Supreme Court Could Mean for Climate Regulations
  • Congress Allows Farm Bill to Lapse Before Reauthorization Deadline
  • E.P.A. to Eliminate Office That Advises Agency Chief on Science
  • American Farm Bureau Asks Federal Court to Halt WOTUS Rule Nationwide
  • Congress Spars Over Environmental Permitting

STATE NEWS

  • CA: As States Near Deal on Colorado River shortage, California Looks at Water Cuts of as Much as 8%
  • CA: Should California Expand the Definition for the ‘Beneficial Use’ of its Water?
  • CO: In a Drying Climate, Colorado’s ‘Water Cop’ Patrols for Water 
    Thieves
 

INDEX

Editor's Choice

National News

State News

Wetland Science News

Resources & Publications

Potpouri

Calendar

  • CT: Climate Corps Seek to Make Impact in Connecticut’s Communities
  • CT: Climate Corps Seek to Make Impact in Connecticut’s Communities
  • KY: 'You Just Don’t Touch That Tap Water Unless Absolutely Necessary’
  • NJ: State’s Tidal Wetlands Could be Swamped by Rising Seas—Report
  • NY: Columbia Researchers Help with Plan to Restore and Protect the Hudson River
  • NY: New York City Area Wetlands May Be Unwitting Generator of Greenhouse Gases
  • NY: Urbanization is Cutting Off Life Support to NYC’s Wetlands
  • NC: Floods. Wildfire. Yet Few Candidates Are Running on Climate Change
  • NC: Coal Ash Spill Highlights Key Role of Environmental Regulations in Disasters
  • NC: Florence Pushes Away from Carolinas but Rivers Keep Rising
  • SC: Science Teacher Transforms Detention Pond Into ‘Wetlands Laboratory’ for Environmental Education
  • TN: ‘Alarming’ Level of Microplastics Found in a Major U.S. River
  • UT: Just in Time for Duck Season, Cows Improve Great Salt Lake Wetlands
  • VA: Breaking: Mountain Valley Pipeline Loses Authority to Cross Streams and Wetlands in Virginia
  • WA: Tacoma City Council Facing Critical Crossroads for Tideflats Land-Use
  • WV: Model to Predict Greenhouse Gases, Carbon Storage in Coastal Wetlands Under Changing Conditions Developed at WVU

WETLAND SCIENCE NEWS

  • How Drought and Other Extremes Impact Water Pollution
  • Sea Level Rise Inevitable, But Just How High Will It Get?
  • Climate Change Takes a Chronic Psychological Toll
  • Fertilizers Can Accumulate Over Time, Causing Water Quality Problems Decades Later
  • How Wildfires Are Polluting Rivers and Threatening Water Supplies
  • High CO2 Levels Cause Plants to Thicken Their Leaves, Which Could Worsen Climate Change Effects, Researchers Say
  • Invasive Plants Could Boost Blue Carbon Storage
  • New Programme of Research Translation, Policy Advice, and Advocacy for Nature-Based Solutions to Climate Change
  • Wetlands Disappearing Three Times Faster than Forests: Study
  • National Parks Hit Harder by Climate Change than Rest of U.S.
  • Climate Change Will Cost U.S. More in Economic Damage Than Any Other Country but One
  • Coastal Wetlands Will Survive Rising Seas, but Only if We Let Them
  • Some Species Shield Others from Climate Change
  • The Future of Wetlands: We’ve Been Warned

RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONS

  • Effective Adaption to Rising Flood Risk
  • Ecosystem-Based Adaptation from Mountains to Oceans: How People Adapt to Climate Change by Using Nature
  • Conserving California’s Coastal Habitats: A Legacy and a Future with Sea Level Rise
  • Midwest US: What’s in Your Stream? Get Online to Find Out!

POTOURRI

  • 3 Actions the Government Can Take Today to Lessen the Damage of Future Floods
  • The Answer to Coastal Flooding is Not More Cement
  • Coastal Communities Must Plan for the Future Instead of Planning from the Past
  • Research Shows Wind Farms Could Divert Hurricane Rains
  • Not All Watersheds Are Created Equal: Natural Boundaries Also Predict Patterns of Inequality
  • In the U.S., Black, Brown, and Poor People Suffer the Most from Environmental Contamination
  • Yes, You Can Blame Bad Storms on Climate Change
  • How Do Wetlands Protect Land and Water?
  • Amphibious Architecture: Float When it Floods
  • What We Risk by Ignoring Nature

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Webinars

October

  • Center for Watershed Protection Webcast: Crediting Water Quality Benefits from Stream Restoration: Implementation Case Studies and Potential for Crediting Guidance Application
  • EBM Tools Network Webinar: Leverage a Global Volunteer Network and Access the Data Needed to Solve Environmental Challenges
  • Soak Up the Rain New England Webinar Series: Stormwater-Driven Design: Water Supply Protection Through Green Infrastructure and Open Space Improvements at Fresh Pond Reservation in Cambridge, MA
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Members’ Wetland Webinar: Utilizing EPA’s Water Quality “eXchange” (WQX) Data Tools and Services to Support Wetland Water Quality Work

November

  • American Water Resources Association Webinar: Setting Up a Water Bank: From the Ground(water) Up
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webcast: It Ain’t Easy Getting Green: Incentivizing Watershed Programs
  • EBM Tools Network Webinar: New Study Highlights Need to Tackle Fisheries and Climate Together
  • Association of State Wetland Managers: Members Wetland Webinar: Planning Wetland Restoration at the Watershed Level

December

  • Association of State Wetland Managers: Members Wetland Webinar: Using a Living Shorelines Prioritization Tool for Wetland Improvements

MEETINGS

October

  • MACC Fall Conference
  • 13TH Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands
  • American Meteorological Society: 29th Conference on Severe Local Storms
  • Corporate Governance in an Age of Increased Environmental Accountability, Liability and Risk (2018 Corporate Forum)
  • Natural Areas Conference: Building Resilience: The Future of Natural Areas
  • New Jersey Association for Floodplain Management: 14th Annual Conference
  • Southeast Florida Regional Compact: Southeast Florida Regional Climate Leadership Summit
  • American Museum of Natural History Center for Biodiversity and Conservation: Student Conference on Conservation Science-New York
  • National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS): 10th Annual Undergraduate Research Conference
  • American Water Works Association: Water Infrastructure Conference
  • 6th International Conference on Sustainable Environment and Agriculture
  • 38th International Symposium of the North American Lake Management Society: Now Trending: Innovations in Lake Management
  • American Shore & Beach Preservation Association: 2018 National Coastal Conference: Resilient Shorelines for Rising Tides

November

  • 4th Biennial Pennsylvania Botany Symposium
  • American Society of Agronomy, the Crop Science Society of America, and the Canadian Society of Agronomy: 2018 International Annual Meeting: Enhancing Productivity in a Changing Climate
  • Geological Society of America 2018 Annual Meeting
  • American Water Resources Association (AWRA) 53rd Annual Water Resources Conference
  • Wisconsin Association for Floodplain, Stormwater, & Coastal Management 16th Annual Conference
  • Stetson University Sixth Annual ELI-Stetson Wetlands Workshop: The Role of NGOs and the Public Sector in Implementing Wetland Restoration Projects: Trends, lessons Learned, and Best Practices
  • Association of Massachusetts Wetland Scientists Annual Meeting 2018: What Could Go Wrong?
  • Sustainability and Development Conference
  • Texas Society for Ecological Restoration Conference: Making Restoration Work in Texas
  • Alaska Committee for Noxious and Invasive Pest Management: Invasive Species Workshop
  • Lincoln Park Zoo 2nd International Wildlife Reintroduction Conference
  • 2018 Minnesota Association of Floodplain Managers Conference
  • CACIWC Annual Meeting and Environmental Conference
  • 6th Global Summit on Climate Change: Paleoclimatology: The Earth’s Climate in Long View
  • American Water Works Association, Florida Section: 2018 Fall Conference: Planning the Future of Water
  • World Summit on Climate Change & Global Warming

December

  • 2018 ACES Conference: A Community on Ecosystem Services
  • Restore America’s Estuaries Conference: 9th National Summit on Coastal and Estuarine Restoration and Management
  • Midwestern States Environmental Consultants Association Conference: Environmental Liabilities, Risk Assessment, and Remediation
  • AGU Fall Meeting
  • North Central Region Water Network: North Central Region One Water Action Forum

January 2019

  • International Soils Meeting: Soils Across Latitudes
  • Sixth Evolutionary Demography Society Annual Meeting
  • Upper Gila Watershed Forum
  • 2019 Delaware Estuary Science & Environmental Summit: Estuary 2029: Saving our System Through Collaboration

February 2019

  • Tamarisk Coalition and the Desert Botanical Garden: Riparian Restoration Conference
  • Missouri Natural Resources Conference
  • River Restoration Northwest: Stream Restoration Symposium
  • Alaska Forum on the Environment
  • Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Wetland Science Conference
  • University of Arizona Conference: Crafting the Long Tomorrow: New Conversations & Productive Catalysts Across Science and Humanities Boundaries as the Global Emergency Worsens
  • International Conference on Water Management Modeling

 March 2019

  • Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commission Annual Environmental Conference
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology
  • Michigan Stormwater Floodplain Association Conference
  • CitSci 2019: Growing Our Family Tree
  • Climate Leadership Conference
  • 5th Life Discovery – Doing Science Biology Education Conference: Microbiomes to Ecosystems: Evolution and Biodiversity across Scale, Space, and Time
  • National Water Quality Monitoring Council: 11th Annual National Monitoring Conference

April 2019

  • Ohio Wetlands Association Vernal Poolooza
  • Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration: Science Advancing Everglades Resilience and Sustainability
  • National Adaptation Forum
  • Center for Watershed Protection: 2019 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference

May 2019

  • Environmental Law Institute Conference: Clean Water Act: Law and Regulation 2019
  • National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Connecting Policy, Practice, Business, Science & People
  • Environmental Law Institute 30th Annual National Wetlands Awards 2019
  • 2018 NAEP Conference: The Environmental Landscape in an Age of Infrastructure Modernization
  • Association of State Floodplain Managers 42nd Annual Meeting: Managing Floods Where the Mountains Meet the Desert
  • Society of Wetland Scientists 2019 Annual Meeting: The Role of Wetlands in Meeting Global Environmental Challenges: Linking Wetland Science, Policy, and Society
  • Ducks Unlimited National Convention

June 2019

  • 2nd International Conference on Community Ecology
  • 2019 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: Improving Water Infrastructure Through Resilient Adaptation
  • National Hydrologic Warning Council Conference

August 2019

  • Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting 

Training/Workshops

October

  • The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Habitat Conservation Plans
  • D & D West Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
  • CUAHSI – NCAR Training Workshop: The Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System
  • Southeastern Botany, LLC Workshop: Grass & Sedge Workshop
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Crustose and Foliose Lichens
  • Richard Ginn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: ACOE/Waters of the US/Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Education Course: Flood Hazard Area Control Act Rules: Technical Standards Part II
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training

November

  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
  • Washington Department of Ecology Workshop: Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Education Course: Lake Management
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Tree and Shrub Identification Using Twigs and Other Winter Characteristics
  • D & D West Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology – Piedmont
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • Environmental Concern Course: Winter Woody Plant ID
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment
  • Urban Riparian and Stream Restoration Training

December

  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018
  • Portland State University Course: River Restoration Project Management
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training
  • D & D West Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement – Eastern Mountains/Piedmont)
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Education Course: Identification of Wetland Plants in Winter
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
  • Organization for Tropical Studies and the University of Costa Course: Field Ecology: Skills for Science and Beyond

January 2019

  • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Workshop: Ecology and Physiology of Plants in Winter
  • Montana State University Online Course: Wetland & Riparian Ecology & Management
  • University of Saskatchewan Centre for Hydrology / CWRA / Canadian Society for Hydrological Sciences Kananaskis Short Course: Principles of Hydrology
  • CUAHSI Master Class: Advanced Techniques in Watershed Science
  • University of Saskatchewan Centre for Hydrology / CWRA / Canadian Society for Hydrological Sciences Kananaskis Short Course: Principles of Hydrology
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training