WBN July 2018

                

 


IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

To view past issues of Wetland Breaking News on our website, please click here.

Visit ASWM online to read weekly news updates between issues.

Please send comments and news stories to .

Thank you for your continued interest.

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WBN July Index

All photos by 
Jeanne Christie, ASWM

 

WBN July 2018 - Editor's Note

Dear Wetlanders,

Last week I attended a fantastic wetland delineation training at the Eagle Hill Institute in Steuben, Maine. It was a wonderful week weather-wise and it was great to get back out in to the field. And although it may be blasphemous for the editor of a news ezine to say, it was also wonderful to unplug from the news for a while and the firehose of proposed changes in federal policy (and staff) that seem to never end.

In discussions with other participants at the training, however, it became clear that most people are unaware of all the advanced notices, changes in regulations, rule proposals, etc. that keep coming out of D.C. I assured them that even the most seasoned policy professionals are having a difficult time keeping abreast of all the proposed changes to environmental policy and regulations. And at the end of the week, I felt very fortunate to not only be able to inform people of the public comment opportunities but also provide them guidance about where to find more information and how to get involved. Hopefully they will subscribe to Wetland Breaking News as a way to stay informed of future changes.

In the Editor’s Choice section this month, you’ll see I have selected a few articles on proposed policy changes including proposed changes to the use of scientific studies by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (the scientific “transparency” rule), and the proposed “recodification” of the pre-2015 regulations for the Clean Water Act (Waters of the U.S. “Step One” rule). The Association of State Wetland Managers is actively participating in comment letter opportunities for both of these proposals and many more – you can read all of our comment letters posted on our website here. Other policy changes and/or proposals to stay abreast of include: 1) Trump’s Executive Order to replace Obama’s Ocean Policy; 2) proposals to limit EPA’s authority to block water pollution permits; 3) proposed changes to sage grouse protections; 3) proposed changes to the National Environmental Policy Act; and many more.

Although I thoroughly enjoyed being “disconnected” and back out in the field for a week, I am also very proud of the work we do from our desks here at ASWM. As always, we will continue do our best keeping you informed of potential policy changes on the federal and state level through our newsletters, webpages, social media and webinars and representing the best interests of our state and tribal partners.

Best regards,

Marla J. Stelk
Editor
Wetland Breaking News

 
   
              


WBN July 2018 - Editor's Choice

EPA Proposal to Limit Science Studies Draws Opposition

By Ellen Knickmeyer – Associate Press – July 17, 2018
Democratic lawmakers joined scores of scientists, health providers, environmental officials and activists Tuesday in denouncing an industry-backed proposal that could limit dramatically the scientific studies the Environmental Protection Agency considers in shaping protections for human health. If adopted by the Trump administration, the rule would allow an EPA administrator to reject study results in making decisions about chemicals, pollutants and other health risks if underlying research data is not made public because of patient privacy concerns or other issues. Opponents said the move would throw out the kind of public-health studies that underlie enforcement of the Clean Air Act and other landmark environmental controls, since the studies drew on confidential health data from thousands of individuals. Read full story here.

Supplemental Notice: Definition of “Waters of the United States” - Recodification of Preexisting Rule

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – July 12, 2018
The Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Army (the agencies) have issued a supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking to the July 2017 proposed action to repeal the 2015 definition of "waters of the United States" (also known as Step One). The agencies are issuing a supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking to clarify that the agencies are proposing to permanently repeal the 2015 Rule in its entirety. The notice also reiterates that the agencies are proposing to recodify the pre-2015 regulations - a longstanding regulatory framework that is currently being administered by the agencies - to keep them in place and implemented consistent with Supreme Court precedent while the agencies finalize a new definition of "waters of the United States." The public comment period will close on August 13, 2018. Read full notice here and submit comments here.

Request for Nominations of Candidates to the EPA's Science Advisory Board (SAB) and SAB Standing Committees

Federal Register – July 9, 2018
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) invites nominations of scientific experts from a diverse range of disciplines to be considered for appointment to the EPA Science Advisory Board (SAB) and four SAB committees described in this document. Appointments will be announced by the Administrator and are anticipated to be filled by the start of Fiscal Year 2019 (October 2018). Nominations should be submitted in time to arrive no later than August 8, 2018. Read full notice here.

6 Ways Andrew Wheeler Could Reshape Climate Policy as EPA's New Leader

By Marianne Lavelle – InsideClimate News – July 9, 2018
With Scott Pruitt's resignation, responsibility for leading President Donald Trump's retreat from climate action passed from an ideological fighter to a Washington political pro. But it remains to be seen whether former coal industry lobbyist and Congressional staffer Andrew Wheeler, who took the helm of the Environmental Protection Agency on Monday, will ease up at all or double down on Pruitt's ambitious deregulatory agenda. Read full story here.

Trump admin floats changes to environmental review standards

By Timothy Cama – The Hill – June 19, 2018
The Trump administration is considering major changes to the regulations that govern how federal agencies analyze the potential environmental impacts of their decisions. The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ), the White House agency responsible for coordinating compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), put out a notice Tuesday soliciting input on the matter from the public. Read full story here.

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WBN July 2018 - National News

Buried Internet Infrastructure at Risk as Sea Levels Rise

Science Daily – July 16, 2018
Thousands of miles of buried fiber optic cable in densely populated coastal regions of the United States may soon be inundated by rising seas, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Oregon. The study, presented July 16, 2018 at a meeting of internet network researchers, portrays critical communications infrastructure that could be submerged by rising seas in as soon as 15 years, according to the study's senior author, Paul Barford, a UW-Madison professor of computer science. Read full story here.

Trump Just Remade Ocean Policy—Here's What That Means

By Maya Wei-Haas – National Geographic – July 13, 2018
The spill began with a bang. On August 20, 2010 a jet of natural gas surged to the Deepwater Horizon drilling platform. Fumes filled the air, signaling something was amiss—and then the rig exploded in a smoky blaze, killing eleven people on board. In the three months that followed, an estimated 134 million gallons of oil gushed into the gulf, devastating marine life—from tiny microorganisms to sea birds and dolphins. “We're still feeling the effects today,” says Andrew Rosenberg, director of the Center for Science and Democracy at the Union of Concerned Scientists.

Amidst the cleanup, then-President Barack Obama issued Executive Order 13547, emphasizing the vital need for ocean and Great Lake stewardship. It established the first National Ocean Policy, noting that the Deepwater spill “is a stark reminder of how vulnerable our marine environments are, and how much communities and the nation rely on healthy and resilient ocean and coastal ecosystems.”

But on June 19, President Donald Trump issued another Executive Order, replacing the Ocean Policy with one that conspicuously leaves out this disaster, and instead focuses on economy, security, and energy, as well as “streamlining” current policies. Read full story here.

Nathaniel P. Reed, Leader in Efforts to Protect Endangered Wildlife and Wetlands, dies at 84

By Matt Schudel – The Washington Post – July 13, 2018
Nathaniel P. Reed, an environmentalist and onetime Interior Department official who was a key architect of the Clean Water Act and Endangered Species Act and who spearheaded efforts to preserve wildlife and open spaces from Alaska to his longtime home state of Florida, died July 11 at a hospital in Quebec City. He was 84. Read full story here.

All Wildfires Are Not Alike, but the U.S. is Fighting Them That Way

By Stephen Pyne – The Conservation – July 12, 2018 – Video
So far, the 2018 fire season has produced a handful of big fires in California, Nevada, New Mexico and Colorado; conflagrations in Oklahoma and Kansas; and a fire bust in Alaska, along with garden-variety wildfires from Florida to Oregon. Some of those fires are in rural areas, some are in wildlands, and a few are in exurbs. Every major fire rekindles another round of commentaries about “America’s wildfire problem.” But the fact is that our nation does not have a fire problem. It has many fire problems, and they require different strategies. Some problem fires have technical solutions, some demand cultural calls. All are political. Read full story and view video here.

NOAA Research Model Brings Severe Weather into Focus

NOAA Research News – July 12, 2018
NOAA’s two primary short-range weather models received upgrades developed by NOAA researchers that will provide more accurate hazardous weather and aviation forecasts as they roll into operations (July 12) for the National Weather Service’s Storm Prediction Center, other national forecast centers and local forecast offices across the country. Read full story here.

How Brett Kavanaugh Could Reshape Environmental Law from the Supreme Court

By Brad Plumer – The New York Times – July 10, 2018
Long before President Trump nominated him for the Supreme Court on Monday, Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh had already made a name for himself as an influential conservative critic of sweeping environmental regulations. During his 12 years on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, often regarded as the nation’s second-most powerful court, Judge Kavanaugh voted in a number of high-profile cases to limit Environmental Protection Agency rules involving issues like climate change and air pollution. In two key instances, his arguments were later embraced by the Supreme Court. Read full story here.

Second Binational Poll Reaffirms that Citizens Feel Great Lakes Protection is Critical

Contact: Sally Cole-Misch or Rag Bejankiwar – International Joint Commission – July 10, 2018
Eighty eight percent of respondents believe protecting the Great Lakes is highly important and are willing to pay more to ensure their restoration, according to the second large survey conducted on public perception of the world’s largest freshwater system. The International Joint Commission (IJC) sponsored the survey, which was completed by its Great Lakes Water Quality Board in January 2018 and is summarized in the poll report released today. The first survey was completed in late 2015. The 4,250 respondents to the 2018 poll live in the eight Great Lakes states (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin) and in the Canadian Province of Ontario, and also include members from the region’s First Nations, Tribes and Metis. Read full story here.

Bureau of Reclamation provides 27 projects $2.6 million in WaterSMART Cooperative Watershed Management Program grants

Cision PRWeb – July 10, 2018
Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman announced that 27 entities were selected to receive a total of $2.6 million to establish or further develop watershed groups in order to address water quantity or quality through Cooperative Watershed Management Program Grants. Of the 27 entities selected, 19 are existing watershed groups, including one from the Virgin Islands, and 8 are establishing a new watershed group. Read full story here.

Post-Harvey report provides inundation maps and flood details on "Largest rainfall event recorded in US history"

Contact: Jennifer LaVista or Lynne Fahiquist – U.S. Geological Survey – July 9, 2018
Nineteen inundation maps and detailed flood information from Hurricane Harvey are now available from the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Hurricane Harvey was the most significant rainfall event in U.S. history, both in scope and peak rainfall amounts, since records began in the 1880s. In the immediate aftermath of Harvey, the USGS and FEMA initiated a study to evaluate the magnitude of flooding, determine the probability of future occurrence and map the extent of the flooding in Texas. Read full story here.

In Groundwater Debate, Stakeholders Take Sides

By William C. Schillaci – EHS Daily Advisor – July 6, 2018
In February 2018, the EPA requested public comment on whether the Agency should continue to abide by its “previous statements” regarding whether point source pollutant discharges to groundwater are subject to regulation under the Clean Water Act (CWA) if the groundwater has a hydrologic connection to Waters of the United States (WOTUS) or waters that Congress made specifically jurisdictional under the CWA (February 20, 2018, Federal Register (FR)).

The previous Agency statements, made in multiple CWA rules promulgated in the 1990s and early 2000s, are that point source discharges to groundwater that flows into jurisdictional waters are indeed a CWA-regulated activity. Probably the most consequential effect of this interpretation is that these indirect discharges must be permitted under CWA’s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES).

The public comment period for the notice ended May 21, 2018, and the Agency received nearly 1,000 responses, many from major stakeholders, including industry associations, environmental groups, state attorneys general, members of Congress, state environmental agencies, public water utilities, regional water authorities, and independent water associations. Read full story here.

Obama's Wetlands Protection Rule Put 'Too Much Emphasis' on Science, Trump Officials Argue

By Ariel Wittenberg – E&E News – Science Magazine – July 5, 2018
President Donald Trump’s administration is faulting its predecessor for overemphasizing science in writing a 2015 Clean Water Act rule aimed at defining what isolated wetlands and waterways deserve automatic federal regulatory protection. At issue: the Obama-era Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Army Corps of Engineers' 400-page review of research on how wetlands and small streams affect downstream rivers, lakes and estuaries. As it proposes to repeal the Clean Water Rule, or Waters of the U.S. (WOTUS), regulation, the Trump-led agencies say the previous administration gave too much weight to the "Connectivity Report." Read full article here.

Local, county, and state governments are suing oil companies over climate change

By Patrick Parenteau – The Conversation – July 5, 2018
Thanks to climate change, sea levels are rising and storm surges are becoming more costly and frequent. Since most American state and local governments are cash-strapped, cities and counties fear that they won’t be able to afford all the construction it will take to protect their people and property. So some communities in California and Washington state, as well as New York City, are suing oil companies in a bid to force them to foot the bill. Recently, Rhode Island became the first state to take this step, when it sued 21 oil and gas companies “for knowingly contributing to climate change and the catastrophic consequences to the State and its residents, economy, eco-system, and infrastructure.” Does it make sense to hold the industries responsible for global warming liable for the price – in dollars and cents – that everyone will have to pay to adapt to a changed climate? Read full story here.

Trump plan to save coal may put lives at risk from pollution

By Jennifer A Dlouhy – Bloomberg – July 5, 2018
The Trump administration’s plan to keep money-losing power plants open would save coal mining jobs but at the same time unleash more pollution that would cost lives, according to a new analysis. For every 4.5 coal mining jobs supported by the drafted policy, one American would die from the surge in air pollution tied to generating electricity from the fossil fuel, according to modeling by the independent, nonprofit research group Resources for the Future. Read full story here.

National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and NOAA announce new coastal resilience funding

Environmental News – Network – July 3, 2018
The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF), and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) today announced a partnership that will restore, increase and strengthen natural infrastructure — the landscapes that help absorb the impacts of storms and floods — to protect coastal communities, while also enhancing habitats for fish and wildlife. In its inaugural year, the National Coastal Resilience Fund will invest up to $30 million in the restoration or expansion of natural features such as coastal marshes and wetlands, dune and beach systems, oyster and coral reefs, mangroves, forests, coastal rivers, as well as barrier islands that help minimize the impacts of storms, rising sea levels and other extreme events on nearby communities and infrastructure. Read full story here.

Can plastic roads curb waste epidemic?

By Nabila Khouri and Katy Scott – CNN – July 2, 2018 – Video
Something was cooking in Toby McCartney's Scottish home. The engineer and his two pals were boiling pot after pot of plastic on the stove. Plastic bottles, diapers, carrier bags -- it was all going in the melting pot. But McCartney wasn't going mad; he was concocting the perfect recipe for plastic roads. "We went through about five-to-six hundred different designs of different polymers that we were mixing in before we found one that actually worked," he tells CNN. This final recipe of blended waste plastics is mixed in with ordinary asphalt to create a stronger, longer-lasting road, explains McCartney. Read full story and view videos here. 

Pruitt seeks to limit EPA's authority to block water pollution permits

By Timothy Cama – The Hill – June 27, 2018
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) head Scott Pruitt is planning to limit the agency’s authority to block permits for activities that could pollute or harm waterways. In an agency memo released Wednesday, Pruitt formally asked the EPA’s water office to propose a regulation under which officials wouldn’t be able to block a permit before it had been applied for or after the Army Corps of Engineers has issued the permit. Read full story here.

Forest carbon offsets

By Paula Chamas – Conservation Finance Network – June 26, 2018
Carbon stored in forests has become a great opportunity for conservation-minded landowners to obtain an additional stream of revenue. Additionally, a recent analysis indicated that these “natural climate solutions” could provide 37 percent of the carbon sequestration needed by 2030 to meet the commitments of the Paris Agreement. Carbon offset markets have become financial incentives for carbon sequestration. This has provided substantial funding resources to advance conservation. Read full story here.

Great Lakes coastal flood study aims to pinpoint high-risk areas

By Danielle Kaeding – Wisconsin Public Radio – June 26, 2018
The Federal Emergency Management Agency is conducting a Great Lakes Coastal Flood study that will be used to update flood maps for coastal communities and define areas most at risk of flooding. It's is part of a national initiative to update flood maps and show areas prone to flood damage. Read or listen to full story here.

Forest Service proposes changes to sage grouse protections

By Keith Ridler – Associated Press – Your Basin – June 20, 2018
The U.S. Forest Service proposed changes Wednesday to sage grouse protections in six Western states that call for eliminating special designations for crucial habitat as well as keeping areas open for mining. The agency also said restrictions on water development for livestock will be removed as will other requirements that could limit some livestock grazing. The plan, detailed in documents, covers 9,500 square miles (24,500 square kilometers) of greater sage grouse habitat in Idaho, Colorado, Nevada, Wyoming, Utah and Montana. Read full story here.

More Rain, More Development Spell Disaster for Some US Cities

By Rebecca Hersher – NPR – June 11, 2018
There's more rain falling on some parts of the U.S. than there used to be, and many towns just aren't ready for the flooding that follows. Ellicott City, Md., is one such community. Nestled in a valley west of Baltimore, the town was founded in 1772, and some Revolutionary War-era buildings still house businesses along the narrow main street in historic downtown. It also sits at the confluence of three streams. Read full story here.

EPA staff say the Trump Administration is changing their mission from protecting human health and the environment to protecting industry

The Conversation – June 6, 2018
The Environmental Protection Agency made news recently for excluding reporters from a “summit” meeting on chemical contamination in drinking water. Episodes like this are symptoms of a larger problem: an ongoing, broad-scale takeover of the agency by industries it regulates. We are social scientists with interests in environmental health, environmental justice and inequality and democracy. We recently published a study, conducted under the auspices of the Environmental Data and Governance Initiative and based on interviews with 45 current and retired EPA employees, which concludes that EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt and the Trump administration have steered the agency to the verge of what scholars call “regulatory capture.” Read full story here. 


  

WBN July 2018 - State News

 
AZ: Phoenix Tries to Reverse Its 'Silent Storm' of Heat Deaths

By Will Stone – NPR – July 9, 2018
There is a moment as heatstroke sets in when the body, no longer able to cool itself, stops sweating. Joey Azuela remembers it well. "My body felt hot, like, in a different way," he says. "It was like a 'I'm cooking' hot." Three summers ago, Azuela, then 14, and his father were hiking a trail in one of Phoenix's rugged desert preserves. It was not an unusually hot day for Phoenix, and they had gotten a later start than usual. By the time they reached the top, Azuela was weak and nauseous. They had run out of water. Read or listen to full story here.

CA: California is Preparing for Extreme Weather. It's Time to Plant Some Trees

By Henry Fountain – The New York Times – July 15, 2018
For years, there has been a movement in California to restore floodplains, by moving levees back from rivers and planting trees, shrubs and grasses in the low-lying land between. The goal has been to go back in time, to bring back some of the habitat for birds, animals and fish that existed before the state was developed. But in addition to recreating the past, floodplain restoration is increasingly seen as a way of coping with the future — one of human-induced climate change. The reclaimed lands will flood more readily, and that will help protect cities and towns from the more frequent and larger inundations that scientists say are likely as California continues to warm. Read full story here.

CA: California Will Face a Terrible Choice: Save Cliff-side homes or Public Beaches from Rising Seas

By Darryl Fears – The Washington Post – July 11, 2018
Like an ax slowly chopping at the trunk of a massive tree, waves driven by sea-level rise will hack away the base of cliffs on the Southern California coast at an accelerated pace, a recent study says, increasing land erosion that could topple some bluffs and thousands of homes sitting atop them. California officials from Santa Barbara to San Diego will face an awful choice as the sea rises, the U.S. Geological Survey study says: save public beaches enjoyed by millions, or close them off with boulders and concrete walls to armor the shore and stop the waves in a bid to save homes. Read full story here.

CA: An Inventory of Loss of the Los Angeles River

By Roberto Guerra – High Country News – June 25, 2018
In the early 20th century, the unruly Los Angeles River supported a diverse ecosystem. But as the city grew, the river became problematic, prone to destructive winter flooding. After particularly devastating floods in the 1930s, a plan was set in motion to channelize the river, and by 1960 its verdant habitat had been transformed into a massive concrete ditch. This was the final blow for many species that once swam, soared and roamed in abundance along the river. After the concrete set, few would be seen here again. Read full story here. 

CO: How wildfires contaminate drinking water sources

By Trent Knoss – University of Colorado Boulder – June 19, 2018
Wildfires can contaminate nearby streams and watersheds through mobilization of sediments, nutrients and dissolved organic matter, straining the capabilities of downstream municipal treatment facilities, a new report co-authored by CU Boulder researchers shows. The research, which was funded by The Water Research Foundation (WRF) and presented at CU Boulder earlier this month, outlines a multitude of challenges posed by wildfires, including short- and long-term effects on the availability and quality of drinking water sources used by major metropolitan areas such as Denver, Colorado. The report also outlines potential remediation solutions to help utilities plan for worst-case scenarios. Read full story here.

CT: $8 Million Grant to Increase Connecticut's Coastal Resilience

By Jessica McBride – UConn Today – July 17, 2018
In the fall of 2012, Hurricane Sandy inflicted almost $70 billion in damage and killed at least 233 people in eight countries. Connecticut was one of those states, with four reported deaths and more than $360 million in damage resulting from Sandy. The Connecticut Institute for Resilience & Climate Adaptation (CIRCA) was established to help the state better prepare for future incidents like Superstorm Sandy. The Institute is located at UConn’s Avery Point campus in Groton. CIRCA has recently been awarded a contract worth $8 million from the Connecticut Department of Housing for administration of a grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) National Disaster Resilience Competition. Read full story here.

DE: Small but mighty: Floating wetlands ready to battle pollution in South Bethany Canals

By Maddy Lauria – Delaware Online – June 19, 2018 – Video
Along the hardened edges of the canals in South Bethany, marsh grasses nestled into man-made platforms promise to do some damage to the nutrient pollution known to cause icky algae and fish kills. The floating wetlands installed by volunteers from South Bethany and the Delaware Center for the Inland Bays on Tuesday are small compared to the footprint of the canals, which wind among multimillion-dollar homes fronting on the poorly flushed system. Small as they may be, 130 mini man-made wetland mats have the potential to make a dent in the pollution plaguing the canals, while also providing new shelter and habitat for fish, crabs and shrimp that will soon congregate on their underwater root systems. Read full story and view video here.

FL: Algae Bloom in Florida Prompts Fears about Harm to Health and Economy

By Melissa Gomez – The New York Times – July 9, 2018
The bright, blue-green film piling up in the canal in Jason Pim’s backyard is the first thing he wakes up thinking about and the last thing before his head hits the pillow. The pungent odor of the algae, which has traveled dozens of miles from Lake Okeechobee, Florida’s largest freshwater lake, is hard to describe. But Mr. Pim, 37, said the smell is like opening a bag of moldy bread. An unusually large algae bloom has filled the lake with a pea soup-like mixture that has built up because of rain, hot weather and a heavy concentration of phosphorus and nitrogen from fertilizer, Richard P. Stumpf, an oceanographer with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, said. Read full story here.

FL: With Governor and Legislators in Denial, this Tiny Florida Town Tries to Adapt to Climate Change

By Amy Green – Florida Center for Investigative Reporting – July 8, 2018
While Florida state government bans the terms “climate change” and “global warming” in official business, this coastal fishing village of about 500 people and more water than dry land is being swallowed by the sea with almost no public attention or concern. But town officials here are fighting back with some success. Read full story here.

LA: LSU AgCenter Looking to Develop Wetlands Mitigation Bank in St. Gabriel

By Stephanie Riegel – Business Report – July 11, 2018
The LSU AgCenter is pursuing a plan to turn a 400-acre site it owns in St. Gabriel into a wetlands mitigation bank, which it could use as a teaching and research tool and also as a revenue generator. Officials from the AgCenter and LSU are currently drafting a solicitation for offers for a private partner—presumably, an engineering or environmental services firm with an expertise in wetlands—that could help it return the site, located on both sides of La. 30 near the intersection of Highway 74, to its natural wetlands state. The process would likely take several years to complete and is contingent on approval from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Read full story here.

LA: New Orleans: Ready or Not? Here Comes the Rain

By Ravis Lux – New Orleans Public Radio – July 10, 2018
Scientists say climate change will bring heavier rains and more intense storms. City officials have acknowledged that New Orleans needs to rethink how it deals with rain — by reducing reliance on mechanical pumps and managing the water where it falls. Thanks to a post-Katrina settlement with FEMA, the city has more than $2 billion to fix streets and drainage — a perfect opportunity to try some new ideas. But will it? Read or listen to full story here.

ME/MA: In Need of Electricity, Massachusetts Looks to the North—Again

By Jon Kamp – Natural Resources Council of Maine – July 6, 2018
Massachusetts is again testing its northern neighbors’ willingness to help meet its growing need for electricity. Central Maine Power Co. wants to build a $950 million, 145-mile transmission line deep in the Maine woods to import hydropower from Quebec. The project grabbed the spotlight earlier this year after a competing plan in New Hampshire ran into regulatory hurdles, and Massachusetts utilities looked east for another way to import Canadian power. Now it is Maine’s turn to decide whether a slice of its forestland should be strung with wires to support another state’s energy supply. Thus far, the project is generating support in small towns eager for added tax revenue, but objections from some environmentalists and locals who question whether the impact is worthwhile. Read full story here.

ME: Maine should lead fight against coastal drilling expansion

By Rev. Dr. Bill Gregory – Natural Resources Council of Maine – June 26, 2018.
Offshore drilling for oil and gas – as encouraged by two executive orders, one issued last year, the other last week – is shortsighted. We need forward-looking leadership to serve the common good, the health and well-being of all life on Earth. Every person has a need for regular and healthy meals, safe housing, good medical care, a caring community and a healthy environment. These are central aspects of what we call “the common good.” Read full story here.

MD: Communities Receive More "Green" to go Green

Public News Service – July 5, 2018
Communities are finding it easier to go green when there's some "green" to help them make the transition - in the form of nearly $700,000 in grants announced this week. Towns and cities across five states and the District of Columbia use the money for infrastructure projects to reduce stormwater runoff, add green space to urban areas and improve the health of waterways and Chesapeake Bay. Read full story here.

MI: Using Green Infrastructure to Reduce Flooding

By Lester Graham – Michigan Radio – July 12, 2018
How can cities reduce flooding caused by increasingly intense rain storms?
More often, it's flooding in areas not known for a lot of flooding in the past. That happened in Detroit in 2014. It caught everyone by surprise as interstates and neighborhoods were suddenly under water. Read or listen to full story here.

NJ: The Wetlands Institute Offers Nature at the Shore

By Kimberly Kerr – SNJ Today – July 10, 2018 – Video
There’s much more to do at the Jersey Shore than just spend the day at the beach and night on the boards. Driving into Stone Harbor you can’t miss the Wetlands Institute, a nonprofit that focuses on coastal ecosystems and educating others about it. Read full story and view video here.

NY: Department of Environmental Protection Joins Brooklyn and Queens Elected Officials, Community Leaders, and Environmental Advocates to Announce $400 Million Jamaica Bay Improvement Plan

NYC Environmental Protection – July 2, 2018
New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Commissioner Vincent Sapienza today joined with Brooklyn, Queens elected officials, community leaders, and environmental advocates to announce a $400 million plan to further improve the ecological health of Jamaica Bay. The plan includes an array of waterbody improvement projects including 50 acres of wetland restoration, seven acres of ribbed mussel installations, and environmental dredging, all of which will result in a healthier Jamaica Bay. The projects will also deliver economic, social and ancillary environmental benefits, including healthier air and lower summer temperatures due to the addition of a significant number of new trees and plants. The plan is being submitted to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation today and if approved, planning and design could begin as soon as 2019. Read full story here.

OH: Ohio Takes Steps to Confront Toxic Algae Crisis

By Jordan Lubetkin – National Wildlife Federation – July 12, 2018
Yesterday, the state of Ohio took two steps to confront the epidemic of toxic algae that, in recent years, has poisoned drinking water, closed beaches, hurt tourism, increased water utility rates, and threatened fish and wildlife. Both actions are intended to reduce farm runoff pollution into Lake Erie that is the No. 1 cause of toxic algal blooms. Read full press release here.

PA: Pennsylvania Sea Grant Invests in Science Based Research

Sea Grant
The Pennsylvania Sea Grant College Program, which is dedicated to the sustainable use of coastal and watershed resources through research, education and outreach, announces research funding awards totaling $972,000. This applied research will help inform decision makers as they address some of the region’s most pressing coastal and watershed issues. “Pennsylvania Sea Grant supports science-based research to expand our understanding of aquatic ecosystems, coastlines, and watersheds, all identified as priority concerns for the Commonwealth, ” said Sean Rafferty, Research Director for Pennsylvania Sea Grant. “This research has the potential to yield solution-based results, and contribute to enhanced water quality and natural resource management strategies in Pennsylvania.” Read full story here.

PR: NASA Surveys Hurricane Damage to Puerto Rico's Forests

Environmental News – Network – July 11, 2018
On Sept. 20, 2017, Hurricane Maria barreled across Puerto Rico with winds of up to 155 miles per hour and battering rain that flooded towns, knocked out communications networks and destroyed the power grid. In the rugged central mountains and the lush northeast, Maria unleashed its fury as fierce winds completely defoliated the tropical forests and broke and uprooted trees. Heavy rainfall triggered thousands of landslides that mowed over swaths of steep mountainsides. In April a team of NASA scientists traveled to Puerto Rico with airborne instrumentation to survey damages from Hurricane Maria to the island’s forests. Read full story here.

PR: Judge Extends Housing Assistance for Puerto Ricans displaced by Hurricane

By Emily Birnbaum – The Hill – July 3, 2018
A federal judge on Tuesday extended by 20 days the housing aid program that provides temporary shelter to Puerto Ricans displaced by Hurricane Maria. U.S. District Judge Timothy S. Hillman extended the program to July 23, pending a formal hearing for Puerto Rican evacuees, according to a statement from, LatinoJustice PRLDEF, an advocacy group. Approximately 1,700 Puerto Ricans are receiving assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) program, which provides Puerto Rican hurricane survivors with temporary housing assistance. Read full story here.

VA: Putting Roads on a Salt Diet also Healthy for Nearby Streams

By Whitney Pipkin – Bay Journal – July 9, 2018
A creek in Northern Virginia is going on a pollution diet, and residents might feel the belt-tightening this time. That’s because it could lead to limits on a compound that’s as beloved on U.S. roads as it is in our meals: salt. After spending decades studying Accotink Creek — which drains a 52-square-mile swath of midsize homes and commuter-crowded roads in Fairfax County, VA — scientists couldn’t ignore the impacts that road salts were having on a freshwater creek whose critters weren’t accustomed to the brinier waters. At the end of May, the state Department of Environmental Quality approved a pair of new pollution limits for the creek, called total maximum daily loads, or TMDLs. One aims to reduce the amount of pollution-carrying sediment that runs through the creek, which is a tributary to the Potomac River. The other addresses the waterway’s high chloride concentrations — in what appears to be the first salt-related TMDL in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Read full article here.

WI: New Study Says Wetlands Restoration May Reduce Flood Risks in Northern Wisconsin

By Danielle Kaeding – Wisconsin Public Radio – July 5, 2018
A recent study says erosion and runoff are hurting wetland systems in the Lake Superior Basin, and its authors believe that it's making northern Wisconsin more vulnerable to flood damage. The Wisconsin Wetlands Association studied the relationship between wetlands, land use and storms after flooding caused around $35 million in damage to northern Wisconsin two years ago. Historic logging and agriculture practices combined with the region’s clay soils are causing water to move more quickly off the land and carving deeper stream beds, according to Kyle Magyera, study co-author and local government outreach specialist for the association. Read or listen to full story here.


 

 WBN July 2018 - Wetland Science News

If a Tree Stores Carbon in a Forest, does it Also Protect Biodiversity?

B y Sarah DeWeerdt – Anthropocene Magazine – July 17, 2018
Keeping tropical forest intact is an increasingly popular tool for climate change mitigation. After all, tropical forests are among the most carbon-dense environments on Earth, storing about one-third of terrestrial carbon. These forests are also very biodiverse, home to two-thirds of the planet’s terrestrial species. So it’s tempting to assume that protecting carbon stores would also protect biodiversity. Could conservationists use tropical forest carbon as a new sort of “umbrella species” to safeguard a host of mostly un-flashy biodiversity? Read full article here.

Wetlands are Natural Flood Tools

By Kali Katerberg – The Daily Mining Gazette – July 16, 2018
As demonstrated with the recent floods, wetlands provide many benefits to both humans and wildlife, most notably water filtration and water regulation. The state of Michigan was once about 50 percent wetlands. Today that number has been cut in half, said MTU ecologist and wetlands researcher Rodney Chimner. Despite the dramatic decrease, Michigan wetlands are benefiting from a conservation, protection and restoration movement that began in the 1970s. In fact, the United States is one of the world leaders in wetland restoration and protection, Chimner said, but it wasn’t always that way. Decades before, wetlands were seen as valueless and were eliminated. Read full story here.

This Tiny Fern Could Help Fight Climate Change

By Noel Kirkpatrick – Mother Nature Network – July 16, 2018 – Video
A fern with leaves no larger than a gnat could be one of the most important plants on Earth.
Researchers have sequenced the genome of Azolla filiculoides, a bright green fern with a long history, and they've discovered the genes that give the fern some incredible abilities: It's able to "fix" nitrogen on its own, to ward off insects and to be a carbon sink. Read full story and view video here.

As Seas Rise, Americans Use Nature to Fight Worsening Erosion

By John Upton – Climate Central – July 14, 2018 – Video
The grassy yard behind Jennifer McPeak’s house was slipping into Marler Bayou, its edge giving way as waves beat against it. She planned to stem the losses with a $14,000 seawall until a Florida permitting official suggested an alternative — marsh seedlings and bags of oyster shells arranged to blossom into a “living shoreline.” A few years later, crabs and snails crawl among the oysters and grasses in McPeak’s living shoreline, which occupies nearly the width of her shoreline. Fish school in it when the tide is up. The effects of years of erosion have been reversed; sand is being trapped in the yard when storms and floods hit instead of being washed away. Read full story and view video here.

Living in a Wildfire Prone Landscape: Collaborating Across Boundaries for Watershed Benefits

North Forty News – July 14, 2018
The Poudre headwaters are amazing – there are vast swaths of forests and rivers that we all enjoy for recreation and living. It provides beautiful habitat for plant and animal species and delivers clean drinking water. However, the sheer size and complexity of these forests also poses a challenge for land managers. There are large areas of our forest with lots of fuel, creating a situation where treating those forests with heavy equipment can be expensive and time consuming and we have limited markets to help reduce costs of thinning to a more natural condition. The complex challenges of our forested landscapes are pushing communities interested in forests and wildfires to think more strategically and creatively about finding effective and lasting solutions. Read full story here.

New Research Calculates Capacity of North American Forests to Sequester Carbon

By Jennifer McNulty – UC Santa Cruz – July 13, 2018
Researchers have calculated the capacity of North American forests to sequester carbon in a detailed analysis that for the first time integrates the effects of two key factors: the natural process of forest growth and regeneration, and climate changes that are likely to alter the growth process over the next 60 years.
The result is a compelling picture that's of great value, because forests play a critical role in mitigating the effects of climate change. Trees absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as they grow, storing the carbon in their wood. Read full story here.

The best-case climate change scenario could wind up being twice as bad as we think

By Sarah DeWeerdt – Anthropocene Magazine – July 10, 2018
Long-term global temperature increases and sea level rise could be greater than what computer climate models predict, even if we sharply cut carbon emissions. And in the case of continued high emissions, these models likely underestimate even near-term consequences. In a study recently published in Nature Geoscience, an international team of researchers ground-truthed computer climate models with data from three warm periods in Earth’s past. “Sea-level rise and regional and global warming may in the long run be significantly more severe than state-of-the-art climate models project,” they conclude. Read full article here.

Emissions from wetlands and permafrost impacts climate targets

University of Leeds – July 10, 2018
Additional cuts to fossil fuel emissions are required to limit global warming due to greenhouse gases from wetlands and permafrost, according to new research. A study has found that to limit the rise in global temperature levels to a maximum of 1.5 °C, fossil fuel emissions should be cut by an additional 20 per cent above previous estimations due to greenhouse gas emissions from wetlands and permafrost. Read full story here.

Acre for acre, urban trees can store as much carbon as tropical forest

By Sarah DeWeerdt – Anthropocene Magazine – July 3, 2018
Trees lining city streets, in public and private gardens, in parks, and in patches of urban woodland do a lot for cities. They help mitigate air pollution, lessen the urban heat island effect, provide flood control, and contribute a host of other benefits. Some studies have valued these ecosystem services at almost USD $1 million per square kilometer per year. Read full article here.

Birds Eat 400 Million to 500 Million Tonnes of Insects Annually

Springer – July 9, 2018
Birds around the world eat 400 to 500 million metric tonnes of beetles, flies, ants, moths, aphids, grasshoppers, crickets and other anthropods per year. These numbers have been calculated in a study led by Martin Nyffeler of the University of Basel in Switzerland. The research, published in Springer’s journal The Science of Nature, highlights the important role birds play in keeping plant-eating insect populations under control. Read full story here.

Beavers are the ultimate ecosystem engineers

By Ben Goldfarb – Sierra Club – July 3, 2018
Close your eyes and picture a healthy stream. Perhaps you imagine a crystalline, racing creek, its course narrow enough to leap across. It's a lovely picture, fit for a fly-fishing magazine. But it's missing one of the most crucial ingredients in a healthy watershed: beavers. By felling trees and building dams, beavers—endowed with sharp teeth, webbed feet, and rudderlike tails—capture water to expand their aquatic domains. Read full story here.

These Tiny Little Bugs are a Harbinger for Wetland Health—and They're Disappearing

By Dan Funderson – MPR News – June 29, 2018
A crustacean that's a key food source in Minnesota's wetlands is in trouble — and scientists are intensely studying them in the western half of the state, in an effort to save them. Amphipods, half-inch long shrimplike crustaceans, have been in decline for more than 20 years, and scientists say only five percent of wetlands in Minnesota where they could live actually have a healthy population. Amphipods might be small, but they play a major part in the diets of salamanders, fish and migrating waterfowl. Jake Carleen, a technician with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, has been counting their populations in wetlands from Windom to Bemidji. Read or listen to full story here.

Climate change is making it harder to revive damaged land

Maya L. Kapoor – High Country News – June 29, 2018
Carianne Campbell remembers the exact moment she fell in love with the Sonoran Desert. As a botany major in college, she joined a class field trip to Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument on the southern border of Arizona, arriving and setting up camp in the dark. Emerging from her tent the next morning, Campbell, who grew up on the East Coast, caught her first glimpse of enormous saguaros, clustered organ pipes and bright desert wildflowers. She knew immediately that she wanted to work in this kind of landscape. Read full story here.

Filling gaps in scientific knowledge of the Gulf Coast's interconnected natural and human system

PHYS.org – June 28, 2018
Improved understanding of the coupled natural-human coastal system will help promote resilience of coastal communities and ecosystems under rapidly changing environmental conditions and support informed decision-making, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Read full story and view report here.

Climate change will shuffle nature's deck; and we might need to embrace it

By Brandon Keim – Anthropocene Magazine – June 27, 2018
During the last Ice Age, species adapted to warmer climes survived in refugia: places that, through some quirk of topography and geography, stayed temperate in a glacial world. By this century’s end, new refugia will emerge — locales where plants and animals will shelter from rising temperatures, protected until such time as they can proliferate again. For that to happen, though, nature-loving people will need to be open-minded to change. After all, these places will become very different from what they are now. Read full article here.

Join ASWMThe fall, rise, fall of the Atlantic Puffin

By Dan Zukowski – Hakai Magazine – June 27, 2018
Hunters killed the last Atlantic puffin on Seal Island, off the coast of Maine, in 1887—perhaps for food or for feathers to adorn a lady’s hat. The death marked the end of the colony on this narrow squiggle of granite and grass that once nested hundreds of these charismatic birds. In 1970, Stephen Kress, then a budding scientist in his mid-20s, drew up plans for an improbable scheme: to reintroduce the Atlantic puffin to its former range. Kress knew that puffins return from winters at sea to nest where they were born. He figured that by transplanting eggs from a large existing colony in Newfoundland to Maine, the fledglings would become attached to their new home. Puffins, however, are not prolific breeders. Since they don’t reach sexual maturity until they’re close to five years old, and females lay only one egg each year, the effort would take time. Success came slowly. Now in its 45th year, Project Puffin, a program of the National Audubon Society run by Kress, has brought the puffin back to the Gulf of Maine. More than 2,000 Atlantic puffins now nest on five islands, including at least 1,000 on Seal Island. Read full article here.

Climate Change to become 'Greatest pressure on biodiversity' by 2070

By Daisy Dunne – EcoWatch – June 20, 2018
The combined effects of global warming and land-use change could cause the world's ecosystems to lose more than a third of their animal species by 2070, a new study finds. Climate change is expected to become the largest driver of biodiversity loss by the second half of the century, the research finds, surpassing the effects of deforestation and agriculture. Read full story here.

Where have all our insects gone?

By Robin McKie – The Guardian – June 17, 2018
When Simon Leather was a student in the 1970s, he took a summer job as a postman and delivered mail to the villages of Kirk Hammerton and Green Hammerton in North Yorkshire. He recalls his early morning walks through its lanes, past the porches of houses on his round. At virtually every home, he saw the same picture: windows plastered with tiger moths that had been attracted by lights the previous night and were still clinging to the glass. “It was quite a sight,” says Leather, who is now a professor of entomology at Harper Adams University in Shropshire. But it is not a vision that he has experienced in recent years. Those tiger moths have almost disappeared. “You hardly see any, although there used to be thousands in summer and that was just a couple of villages.” Read full story here.

For a more sustainable food future, molluscs and small fish may be the answer

By Emma Bryce –Anthropocene Magazine – June 15, 2018
Want to substantially reduce your environmental footprint? Consider switching red meat for molluscs and tiny forage fish like anchovies, a new study suggests. The new Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment study ranked common animal-based foods like beef, pork, and chicken, pelagic fisheries, molluscs, and catfish aquaculture according to their planetary impact. Across factors like greenhouse gas emissions, energy-use and eutrophication, it showed that beef–unsurprisingly–had the highest environmental footprint. More unexpectedly, farmed catfish came in as a close second. Read full article here.

Sea level rise could overwhelm coral reefs

By Ilsa B. Kuffner – Nature – June 13, 2018
Coral reefs are famous for housing biodiversity and attracting tourists, and the economic benefits that reefs provide for tropical, coastal communities around the globe measure in the billions of dollars. One of the main services provided by reefs is that they act as natural breakwaters, protecting shorelines and human-built infrastructure from storms. In a paper in Nature, Perry et al. report a detailed analysis of the ability of coral reefs in two ocean basins to keep growing upwards in the face of the ecological degradation they have already experienced, and taking into account future sea-level rise. The findings show that, as living coral population’s wane, their capacity to build reefs might be diminished to the point at which the reef community fails to keep up with the rising ocean surface. Read full story here. 

 

WBN July 2018   Resources and Publications

Carbon Trading, Co-Pollutants, and Environmental Equity: Evidence from California's Cap-and-Trade Program (2011-2015)

PLOS – July 10, 2018
Policies to mitigate climate change by reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions can yield public health benefits by also reducing emissions of hazardous co-pollutants, such as air toxics and particulate matter. Socioeconomically disadvantaged communities are typically disproportionately exposed to air pollutants, and therefore climate policy could also potentially reduce these environmental inequities. We sought to explore potential social disparities in GHG and co-pollutant emissions under an existing carbon trading program—the dominant approach to GHG regulation in the US and globally. Read full article here.

River Discharge Effects on United States Atlantic and Gulf Coast Sea-Level Changes

PNAS – July 9, 2018
Identifying physical processes responsible for historical coastal sea-level changes is important for anticipating future impacts. Recent studies sought to understand the drivers of interannual to multidecadal sea-level changes on the United States Atlantic and Gulf coasts. Ocean dynamics, terrestrial water storage, vertical land motion, and melting of land ice were highlighted as important mechanisms of sea-level change along this densely populated coast on these time scales. While known to exert an important control on coastal ocean circulation, variable river discharge has been absent from recent discussions of drivers of sea-level change. We update calculations from the 1970s, comparing annual river-discharge and coastal sea-level data along the Gulf of Maine, Mid-Atlantic Bight, South Atlantic Bight, and Gulf of Mexico during 1910–2017. We show that river-discharge and sea-level changes are significantly correlated (p<0.01), such that sea level rises between 0.01 and 0.08 cm for a 1 km3 annual river-discharge increase, depending on region. We formulate a theory that describes the relation between river-discharge and halosteric sea-level changes (i.e., changes in sea level related to salinity) as a function of river discharge, Earth’s rotation, and density stratification. This theory correctly predicts the order of observed increment sea-level change per unit river-discharge anomaly, suggesting a causal relation. Our results have implications for remote sensing, climate modeling, interpreting Common Era proxy sea-level reconstructions, and projecting coastal flood risk. Read full article here.

Credit Downgrade Threat as a Non-Regulatory Driver for Flood Risk Mitigation and Sea Level Rise Adaptation

By John A. Miller – University of Pennsylvania – 2018
Federal policies and regulations with higher standards that respond to flood risk and sea level rise are being rolled back by the current administration. In that void, the threat of credit rating downgrades is expected to be a developing non-regulatory driver to future risk planning and adaptation. Several exposed communities have been downgraded due, in part, to their lost tax base from major disasters. As sea level rise manifests along the coasts, reducing property value, impacts on revenue will present new challenges in servicing debt. Credit rating agencies in the last few years have issued publications giving some notice on how climate change is to be considered in municipal credit ratings. Proactive communities, conducting planning and realizing adaptation practices in the present are likely to be spared the need to increase revenues to counter the higher borrowing costs that are coincident with a bond rating downgrade, due to likely loss of taxable properties, caused by sea level rise in the future. Municipalities that do not engage now in addressing the threats associated with climate change may have to increase taxes to offset the increased bond return demanded by investors. Read full article here.

Early Palaeozoic Ocean Anoxia and Global Warming Driven by the Evolution of Shallow Burrowing

Nature Communications – July 2, 2018
The evolution of burrowing animals forms a defining event in the history of the Earth. It has been hypothesised that the expansion of seafloor burrowing during the Palaeozoic altered the biogeochemistry of the oceans and atmosphere. However, whilst potential impacts of bioturbation on the individual phosphorus, oxygen and sulphur cycles have been considered, combined effects have not been investigated, leading to major uncertainty over the timing and magnitude of the Earth system response to the evolution of bioturbation. Here we integrate the evolution of bioturbation into the COPSE model of global biogeochemical cycling, and compare quantitative model predictions to multiple geochemical proxies. Our results suggest that the advent of shallow burrowing in the early Cambrian contributed to a global low-oxygen state, which prevailed for ~100 million years. This impact of bioturbation on global biogeochemistry likely affected animal evolution through expanded ocean anoxia, high atmospheric CO2 levels and global warming. Read full article here.




WBN July 2018 - Potpouri


If China won't solve the World's plastics problem anymore

By Ellen Airhart – Wired – June 20, 2018
For a long time, China has been a dumping ground for the world’s problematic plastics. In the 1990s, Chinese markets saw that discarded plastic could be profitably recreated into exportable bits and bobs—and it was less expensive for international cities to send their waste to China than to deal with it themselves. China got cheap plastic and the exporting countries go rid of their trash. But in November 2017, China said enough. The country closed its doors to contaminated plastic, leaving the exports to be absorbed by neighboring countries like Vietnam, South Korea, and Thailand. And without the infrastructure to absorb all the waste that China is rejecting, the plastics are piling up. Read full story here.

Harvesting Rain Could Help Caribbean Countries Keep the Water on After Hurricanes

The Conversation – July 17, 2018
After hurricanes Maria and Irma hit last September, it took Puerto Rico until this June to restore water to most residents. Those living in rural and hard-to-reach mountainous areas waited the longest. In Dominica, where 80 percent of the population was hit hard by Hurricane Maria, water service was not restored to the most remote areas until April 2018, several months after the storm. Now, another hurricane season is already underway in the Caribbean. Our research on rainwater harvesting – a low-cost, low-tech way to collect and store rainwater – suggests this technique could be deployed across the Caribbean to improve these communities’ access to water both after storms and in everyday life. Read full story here.

Is the global era of massive infrastructure projects coming to an end?

By William Laurance – Yale Environment 360 – July 10, 2018
We are living in the most explosive era of infrastructure expansion in human history. To meet the United Nations’ development goals, we would need to invest tens of trillions of dollars in new roads, railways, energy ventures, ports, and other projects by 2030 — dramatically amplifying an infrastructure tsunami that is already shattering the world’s biologically richest ecosystems. But this great wave of infrastructure development is suddenly looking shaky — and it might just be the best outcome for nature and humanity alike. Read full story here. 

In the Arctic Ocean, Hurricane Season Hits in the Summer

By Rebecca Boyle – Hakai Magazine – July 5, 2018
For the past several years, ships have been taking advantage of an increasingly ice-free Arctic, using polar routes to shave several days off a trip from Asia to Europe or North America. Five years ago, a container ship transited through Russia’s Northern Sea Route for the first time. Two years ago, the first passenger cruise ship—the 250-meter Crystal Serenity—passed through Canada’s Northwest Passage. But as the climate changes, powerful Arctic cyclones—storms that hammer the sea with pounding rain and gusting winds—are expected to grow stronger and more frequent. As these two trends converge, the potential for catastrophe is rising. Read full article here.

Former Oil Rigs Could Have Environmental Benefits, Says Poll

Climate Action – July 5, 2018
An international survey has suggested that leaving oil rigs in the ocean could support wildlife. The poll of 38 environmental experts found that 36 agreed that a “case-by-case” approach to decommissioning oil rigs could benefit marine life in the North Sea. The results form the basis of a new journal article from the University of Technology Sydney, which seeks to guide best practice on the issue. In the next few decades, an estimated 7,500 offshore platforms in the oil & gas industry are set to reach the end of their life. Many of them have been in the water for nearly 30 decades and have provided an artificial reef for local marine life. Completely removing rigs from the sea could provide detrimental to these species, which have grown to depend on them, the paper argues. Read full article here.

36 Years of Bike Race Footage Reveals how Belgium's Climate is Changing

By Katie Langin – Science Magazine – July 3, 2018
Green-thumbed grandmothers the world over have noticed a disturbing trend: Spring seems to be arriving earlier every year. But without hard data, it’s difficult to back up those claims. Now, scientists have found a new source of data—old television footage of outdoor sporting events, which reveals how early trees and other plants are “leafing out” each year. Read full article here.

2017 was the second-worst year on record for tropical tree cover loss

By Mikaela Weisse and Elizabeth Dow Goldman – World Resources institute – June 26, 2018
Last year was the second-worst on record for tropical tree cover loss, according to new data from the University of Maryland, released today on Global Forest Watch. In total, the tropics experienced 15.8 million hectares (39.0 million acres) of tree cover loss in 2017, an area the size of Bangladesh. That’s the equivalent of losing 40 football fields of trees every minute for an entire year. Read full blog post here.

We’ve failed to secure our coasts — we must build resilience before it’s too late

By Katharine Mach – The Hill – June 27, 2018
As record-setting rains pummel South Texas and Ellicott City struggles to recover from another deadly flood, we are experiencing more reminders that the United States is facing more severe and frequent extreme weather events. Last year’s hurricane season was the most expensive season to date — and arguably one of the most deadly on record. In the eight months since Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria struck our shores, are our coastal areas better prepared for the coming storms? Read full story here.

Fostering scientific inquiry and environmental awareness

Earth Island Journal – June 25, 2018
The Journal, has several projects that are engaging volunteers with exciting citizen science opportunities. When people hear the word “watershed” it’s natural that they first think simply of water. But watersheds are full ecosystems with many living beings impacting their health and vitality. Water conservation education nonprofit Wholly H2O’s project The Waterhood is reimagining watersheds as neighborhoods, with all living flora and fauna as our relatives and neighbors. The goal? To spread awareness that we all live in a watershed, and that our behavior influences the well-being of our waterhood neighbors. Read full article here.

Your efforts to save water are actually making a difference

By Kat Eschner – Popular Science – June 20, 2018
Water is essential for life, but we’re not always the best at keeping our water supply safe. However, a new study from the United States Geological Survey shows water use across the country dropped between 2010 and 2015, even though the population rose by four percent in that time. Significantly, average water use by individuals across the country also fell, following a pattern that’s been continuous since the early 2000s. That means that your low-flush toilet is actually helping conserve fresh water. Read full story here.

Coastal resilience is getting high-tech, but there are still information gaps to fill

By Shannon Cunniff– Environmental Defense Fund – June 20, 2018
Coastal communities are struggling to accurately understand their flooding risks and identify appropriate solutions for mitigating the effects of rising seas and increased storm surges. Fortunately, new technologies are emerging that facilitate more rapid acquisition of more accurate data and improve data visualization to support efforts to build coastal resilience. Read full blog post here.

Coal is Being Squeeze out of Power Industry by Cheap Renewables

By Reed Landberg and Anna Hirtenstein – Bloomberg – June 19, 2018
Coal will be increasingly squeezed out of the power generation market over the next three decades as the cost of renewables plunges and technology improves the flexibility of grids globally. That’s the conclusion of a report by Bloomberg New Energy Finance, which estimated some $11.5 trillion of investment will go into electricity generation between now and 2050. Of that, 85 percent, or $9.8 trillion, will go into wind, solar and other zero-emissions technologies such as hydro and nuclear, the London-based researcher said. Read full story here.

All We Need is Some Vitamin Green

By Gali Laska – Great Ecology – June 14, 2018
Your local city park is likely playing a vital role in your city’s health, and probably your own mental health too. Parks and other “green spaces” help keep cities cool, and as places of recreation, can help with health issues such as anxiety and depression. Just looking at greenery can make you feel better! But in increasingly crowded cities, it can be difficult to find room for parks and other green spaces. About 66% of the world’s population lives in a bustling loud city. But do they know that the lack of green may be the reason they feel less motivated, happy and fulfilled? Read full blog post here.

How Will People Move as Climate Changes?

Earth Institute – June 13, 2018
In coming decades, climate change is expected to displace millions of people through sea level rise, crop failures, more frequent extreme weather and other impacts. But scientists are still struggling to accurately predict how many climate migrants there will be, and where they are likely to go. A new study published this week in the journal Environmental Research Letters seeks to address these questions by incorporating climate impacts into a universal model of human mobility. The model also seeks to predict the effects migrants might have on the places to which they move. Read full blog post here.

   

 Wetland Breaking News July 2018 - Calendar of Events

WEBINARS

   

MEETINGS

 

TRAINING

 

SPECIAL EVENTS

 

 

WEBINARS  
   
JULY 2018  
       
July 25, 2018
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of State Wetland Mangers Members’ Wetland Webinar: Navigating the Clean Water Act: A Map to the Waters of the United States  
       
July 31, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  EBM Tools Network Webinar: The NOAA Digital Coast: Turning Coastal Data and Tools into Actionable Information    
       
AUGUST 2018  
       
August 15, 2018
3:00 p.m. ET
  ASWM-NRCS Wetland Training Webinar 2: Wetlands in a Watershed at the Landscape Scale  
       
August 22, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  American Water Resources Association Webinar: Hydrologic Modeling for Austin's Integrated Water Resources Plan 
 
       
August 27, 2018
2:00 p.m. ET
  Environmental Law Institute Webinar: Assessing Stream Functions and Conditions – Challenges and Solutions  
       
SEPTEMBER 2018   
       
September 12, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  American Water Works Association Webinar: Utility Tools and Strategies for Climate Change Planning  
       
September 19, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  American Water Resources Association Webinar: Groundwater Discharges and Clean Water Act Compliance  
       
OCTOBER 2018  
       
October 2, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET 
  EBM Tools Network Webinar: Managing Global Acidification on a Regional Scale: How the US Mid-Atlantic and Northeast Coastal Acidification Networks (MACAN and NECAN) Are Working to Understand Impacts through Partnerships  
       
October 10, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  American Water Resources Association Webinar: Forecast Informed Reservoir Operations Improve Water Management    
       
October 10, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  Center for Watershed Protection Webcast: Innovations in Stream Restoration Design and Construction   
       
NOVEMBER 2018  
       
November 14, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  American Water Resources Association Webinar: Setting Up a Water Bank: From the Ground(water) Up   
       
November 14, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  Center for Watershed Protection Webcast: It Ain’t Easy Getting Green: Incentivizing Watershed Programs  
       
MEETINGS  
 
JULY 2018  
       
July 29-August 1, 2018
Albuquerque, NM
  Soil and Water Conservation Society: 73rd International Annual Conference: Culture, Climate, and Conservation    
       
July 29-August 1, 2018
Shepherdstown, WV
  CUAHSI Biennial Colloquium: Hydrologic Connections:
Climate, Food, Energy, Environment, and Society
 
       
July 29 to August 2, 2018
Brunswick, ME
  Bowdoin College Clonal Plants in Context Symposium    
       
July 30-August 3, 2018
Baltimore, MD
  36th International Conference on Coastal Engineering  
       
July 30-August 3, 2018
Universidad Andrés Bello
Viña del Mar, Chile
  11th International Conference on the Applications of Stable Isotope Techniques to Ecological Studies (IsoEcol 2018)  
       
AUGUST 2018  
       
August 5-10, 2018
New Orleans, LA
  2018 ESA Annual Meeting

 
       
August 8-9, 2018
Indiana University of Pennsylvania
  Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative (ARRI): 2018 Mined Land Reforestation Conference: Developing Partnerships for Mine Land Reforestation  
       
August 13-16, 2018
Asheville, NC
  North Carolina State University: EcoStream Conference

 
       
August 19-20, 2018
Vancouver, BC, Canada 
  Waterbird Society/International Ornithological Congress: 42nd Annual Conference and General Meeting  
       
August 19-22, 2018
Montpellier, France
  Joint Congress on Evolutionary Biology – Montpellier 2018   
       
August 19-23, 2018
Atlantic City, NJ
  American Fisheries Society Meeting: Communicating the Science of Fisheries Conservation to Diverse Audiences  
       
August 19-23, 2018
Albuquerque, NM 
  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: 20th Annual EPA Region 6 Stormwater Conference   
       
August 26-30, 2018
New Orleans, LA
  National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration (NCER)

 
       
August 26-31, 2018
Stockholm, Sweden
  SIWI: World Water Week: Water, ecosystems and human development  
       
August 27-29, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  California Adaptation Forum  
       
SEPTEMBER 2018  
       
September 5-9, 2018
Tulcea, Romania
  Romanian Limnogeographical Association (RLA): 4th International Conference “Water resources and wetlands”    
       
September 9-12, 2018
Tampa, FL
  Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies 108th Annual Meeting

 
       
September 9-13, 2018
Reykjavik, Iceland
  Society of Ecological Restoration Conference: Restoration in the Era of Climate Change  
       
September 10-12, 2018
Sacramento, CA
  San Francisco Estuary Partnership: 2018 Bay-Delta Science Conference: Our Estuary at an Intersection    
       
September 12, 2018
Saugerties, NY 
  2018 NYC Watershed and technical Conference: Clean water Through Protection and Partnership   
       
September 12-13, 2018
Portsmouth University
Portsmouth, UK
  Constructed Wetland Association Annual Conference 2018: How to Make Better Constructed Wetlands  
       
September 15-16, 2018
University of Maryland
Baltimore, MD
  Maryland Native Plant Society Annual Fall Conference: The Times They are A ‘Changin’: Threats to Maryland’s Native Plant Communities

 
       
September 17-19, 2018
Columbia, SC
  2018 Carolinas Climate Resilience Conference  
       
September 17-21, 2018
Gothic CO
  MtnClim 2018: Anticipating climate change impacts in mountains: Embracing variability    
       
September 18-20, 2018
Cadiz, KY
  Kentucky Association of Mitigation Managers Conference   
       
September 18-20, 2018
Camp Hill, PA
  Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the International Erosion Control Association: 25th Annual Environmental Conference & Tradeshow   
       
September 19-21, 2018
Boulder, CO
  National Center for Atmospheric Research: 8th International Workshop on Climate Informatics  
       
September 20-23, 2018
University of Georgia
Athens, GA
  Center for Integrative Conservation Research: Integrative Conservation Conference

 
       
September 22, 2018
University of Pittsburgh
  Three Rivers Evolution Event  
       
September 24-28, 2018
Jena, Germany
  10th International Conference on Ecological Informatics    
       
September 24-30, 2018
New York, NY
  Climate Week NYC  
       
OCTOBER 2018   
       
October 2-3, 2018
Indianapolis, IN
  2018 Great Lakes Commission Annual Meeting  
       
October 4, 2018
University of Connecticut
Storrs, CT
  University of Connecticut: Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group 2018 Invasive Plant Symposium   
       
October 5-7, 2018
Miami, FL
  2018 Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference (SEEC)   
       
October 7-11, 2018
Cleveland, OH
  The Wildlife Society's 25 Annual Conference  
       
October 9-12, 2018
Houghton, MI
  2018 State of Lake Superior Conference    
       
October 10-12, 2018
Little Rock, AR
  2018 Society of Wetland Scientists South Central Chapter Fall Meeting
Abstract Deadline: August 20, 2018
 
       
October 11-13, 2018
Pittsburgh, PA
  Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2018 National Land Conservation Conference   
       
October 15-18, 2018
Spokane, WA
 
  Society for Ecological Restoration Northwest Chapter and the Society of Wetland Scientists Pacific Northwest Chapter Joint Regional Conference: Restoring Resilient Communities in Changing Landscapes  
       
October 15-18, 2018
Rome, Italy
  World Congress on Climate Change  
       
October 16-17, 2018
St. Paul, MN
  University of Minnesota Water Resources Center: Minnesota Water Resources Conference

 
       
October 17-18, 2018
Detroit, MI
  Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: Great Lakes Restoration Conference    
       
October 18-21, 2018
Antalya, Turkey
  International Marine & Freshwater Sciences Symposium (MarFresh2018)
 
       
October 20, 2018
Leominster, MA
  MACC Fall Conference   
       
October 21-29, 2018
Dubai
  13th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands  
       
October 22-26, 2018
Stowe, VT
  American Meteorological Society: 29th Conference on Severe Local Storms  
       
October 23-25, 2018
Bloominton, IN
  Natural Areas Conference: Building Resilience: The Future of Natural Areas   
       
October 24-25, 2018
Miami Beach, FL
  Southeast Florida Regional Compact: Southeast Florida Regional Climate Leadership Summit  
       
October 24-26, 2018
New York, NY
  American Museum of Natural History Center for Biodiversity and Conservation: Student Conference on Conservation Science-New York

 
October 28-31, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  American Water Works Association: Water Infrastructure Conference  
       
October 29-31, 2018
San Diego, CA
  6th International Conference on Sustainable Environment and Agriculture  
October 30-November 2, 2018
Cincinnati, OH 
  38th International Symposium of the North American Lake Management Society: Now Trending: Innovations in Lake Management    
       
October 30-November 2, 2018
Galveston, TX
  American Shore & Beach Preservation Association: 2018 National Coastal Conference: Resilient Shorelines for Rising Tides  
       
NOVEMBER 2018   
       
November 2-3, 2018
State College, PA
  4th Biennial Pennsylvania Botany Symposium
 
       
November 4-7, 2018
Baltimore, MD
 
  American Society of Agronomy, the Crop Science Society of America, and the Canadian Society of Agronomy: 2018 International Annual Meeting: Enhancing Productivity in a Changing Climate   
       
November 9-11, 2018
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI
  Sustainability and Development Conference  
       
November 13-15, 2018
Homer, AK
  Alaska Committee for Noxious and Invasive Pest Management: Invasive Species Workshop   
       
November 13-16, 2018
Chicago, IL
  Lincoln Park Zoo 2nd International Wildlife Reintroduction Conference  
 
DECEMBER 2018   
       
December 8-13, 2018
Long Beach, CA
  Restore America’s Estuaries Conference: 9th National Summit on Coastal and Estuarine Restoration and Management  
       
December 10-14, 2018
Washington, DC 
  AGU Fall Meeting
Abstracts due by July 25, 2018 
 
       
JANUARY 2019   
       
January 6-9, 2019
San Diego, CA
  International Soils Meeting: Soils Across Latitudes

 
       
FEBRUARY 2019   
       
February 5-7, 2019
Phoenix, AZ
  Tamarisk Coalition and the Desert Botanical Garden: Riparian Restoration Conference
Abstract deadline: October 1, 2018
 
       
February 5-7, 2019
Osage Beach, MO
  Missouri Natural Resources Conference

 
       
February 5-7, 2019
Stevenson, WA
  River Restoration Northwest: Stream Restoration Symposium
Abstract Deadline: August 13, 2018
 
       
February 11-15, 2019
Anchorage, AK
  Alaska Forum on the Environment

 
       
February 19-21, 2018
Madison, WI
  Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Wetland Science Conference
Proposals due by November 1, 2018
 
       
TRAINING  
   
JULY 2018  
       
July 28-29, 2018
Amherst Junction, WI
  University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point College of Natural Resources and Continuing Education Workshop: Prairie Plant Identification and Sampling  
       
July 29-August 4, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Mushroom Identification for New Mycophiles: Foraging for Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms  
       
July 29-August 4, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: Tracks and Sign of Insects and Other Invertebrates  
       
July 29-August 4, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Eagle Hill Institute: The Eastern Maine Ice Age Landscape as a Record Hemispheric Climate Change: The Last Deglaciation: The Pineo Ridge Moraine and Emerged Delta Complex  
       
July 30-August 3, 2018
Steuben, ME 
  Humboldt State University Course: Teaching Individual/Agent-based Modeling  
       
July 30-August 3, 2018
Logan, UT
  Utah State University Course: Sediment Transport in Stream Assessment and Design  
       
July 31-August 2, 2018
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Problematic Delineation Seminar – 2018  
       
AUGUST 2018  
       
August 5-11, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Sphagnum Mosses and Ecology  
       
August 5-11, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Aquatic Entomology  
       
August 6, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Botanist   
       
August 6-9, 2018
Savannah, GA 
  D&D West Course: Basic Wetland Delineation - 40 hours (½ lecture, ½ field)   
       
August 6-10, 2018
Truckee, CA
  River Lab, University of California – Berkeley Course: Geomorphic and Ecological Fundamentals for River and Stream Restoration  
       
August 6-11, 2018
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Rock Outcrop and Cliff Face Communities  
       
Augut 6-17, 2018
University of Montana
  Flathead Lake Bio Station: Stream Ecology  
       
Augut 6-17, 2018
University of Montana
  Flathead Lake Bio Station: Ecology of Forests and Grasslands
 
       
Augut 6-17, 2018
University of Montana
  Flathead Lake Bio Station: Drone Remote Sensing of Freshwater Ecosystems
 
       
August 6-October 29, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training  
       
August 8-19, 2018
Indianapolis, IN
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training  
       
Augut 12-18, 2018
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Introductory Ecology    
       
Augut 12-18, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Witness to Nature: A Creative Writing Workshop  
       
Augut 12-18, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Plant Anatomy and Microtechnique  
       
Augut 13-14, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  D & D West Course: Hydrophytic Vegetation - Eastern Mountains/Piedmont - 16 hours (field)
 
       
August 13-17, 2018
Online and Field
Raleigh, NC
  The Swamp School Blended Online and Field Wetland Delineation Workshop  
       
August 13-18, 2018
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Southeastern Grasslands: Ecology and Conservation    
       
August 14-15, 2018
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Wetland Plant ID  
       
August 14-17, 2018
Hays, KS
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Wetlands and Wetland Delineators  
       
August 15, 2018
Boylston, MA 
  Association of Massachusetts Wetland Scientists Workshop: Late Season Grasses     
       
August 15-16, 2018
Arlington, WA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
August 15-16, 2018
Arlington, WA 
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018   
       
August 17, 2018
Arlington, WA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Plant ID – Familiarization for New Wetland Delineators  
       
Augut 19-25, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Mushroom Microscopy: An Exploration of the Intricate Microscopic World of Mushrooms  
       
Augut 19-25, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Banding Songbirds and Raptors: Livetrapping, In-hand Aging and Sexing, and Data Collection for Research  
       
August 20-24, 2018
Arlington, WA 
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation   
       
August 20-25, 2018
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Grasses of the Southern Appalachians   
       
August 20-September 17, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment   
       
August 20-September 17, 2018
Online 
  The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets | 2018  
       
August 22-24, 2018
Hillsborough, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Wetland Construction: Principles, Planning and Design  
       
Augut 26-September 1, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Mosses: Orthotrichaceae of Maine  
       
Augut 26-September 1, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute: Independent Study: Pyrenolichens
 
 
       
August 28-31, 2018
Annapolis, MD
  National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) Workshop: Socio-Environmental Synthesis: Interdisciplinary Skill Building, Proposal Writing,  Collaborating    
       
August 29-30, 2018
Denver, CO 
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training   
       
August 29-30, 2018
Lansing, MI
  Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Michigan Rapid Assessment Method for Wetlands (MiRAM)    
       
August 31-September 1, 2018
Denver, CO
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training  
       
 SEPTEMBER 2018  
       
September 6-7, 2018
Whitefish, MT
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum   
       
September 6-7, 2018
Whitefish, MT
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018  
       
September 7-9, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Asters and Goldenrods  
       
September 10, 2018
Boston, MA
  Institute for Wetland & Environmental Education & Research, Inc.: Wetlands and Their Borders Course  
       
September 10-14, 2018
Covington, LA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
September 10-14, 2018
St. Michaels, MD 
  Environmental Concern Course: Basic Wetland Delineation    
       
September 10-December 3, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist    
       
September 10, 2018-
December 3, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018  
       
September 11-12, 2018
Charleston, SC
  D & D West Course: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes - 16 hours (field)  
       
September 11-14, 2018
Boston, MA 
  Institute for Wetland & Environmental Education & Research, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineator Training  
       
September 12-13, 2018
Kansas City, MO 
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training  
       
September 12-13, 2018
Spokane, WA 
  Washington Department of Ecology Workshop: Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington    
       
September 13-14, 2018
San Diego, CA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Riparian Habitat Restoration for the Arid Southwest
 
       
September 14, 2018
Boylston, MA
  Association of Massachusetts Wetland Scientists Workshop: Late Season Sedges  
       
September 14-16, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Current Issues in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation    
       
September 17-18, 2018
Covington, LA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
September 17-18, 2018
Covington, LA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018  
       
September 17-28, 2018
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: The Ecology and Conservation of Migratory Birds  
       
September 17-October 14, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments    
       
September 19-20, 2018
Washtenaw County, MI
  Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Asters and Goldenrods in Michigan Wetlands  
       
September 20-22, 2018
Laramie, WY
  CUAHSI: Near Surface Geophysics for Hydrology Workshop   
       
September 21, 2018
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Plant ID – Familiarization for New Wetland Delineators   
       
September 21-23, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review Process   
       
September 24-25, 201
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Evaluating Hydric Soils in the Field   
       
September 24-28, 2018
Covington, LA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
September 24-28, 2018
Aliquippa, PA
  The Swamp School: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training  
       
September 24-28, 2018
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
September 26-27, 2018
Baton Rouge, LA 
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
 
       
September 28-29, 2018
Baton Rouge, LA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training  
       
September 28-30, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Fall Maine Mushroom  
       
OCTOBER 2018  
       
October 1-December 24, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018  
       
October 5-7, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Columbus Day Weekend Retreat  
       
October 8- November 5, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets    
       
October 8-December 31, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator  
       
October 9-12, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  D&D West Course: Basic Wetland Delineation - 40 hours (½ lecture, ½ field)  
       
October 9-12, 2018
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Methodology for Delineating Wetlands  
       
October 10-11, 2018
Marquette, MI
  Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Hydric Soils Identification    
October 10-11, 2018
Richmond, VA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
October 10-11, 2018
Richmond, VA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018  
       
October 12-14, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Bryophytes: Mosses and Liverworts   
       
October 17-18, 2018
San Diego, CA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
 
       
October 19-21, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Northeastern Freshwater Fish Assemblages   
       
October 22-November 5, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Habitat Conservation Plans  
       
October 23-24, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  D & D West Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species - 16 hours (lecture)  
       
October 23-28, 2018
Boulder, CO
  CUAHSI – NCAR Training Workshop: The Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System

 
       
October 26-28, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Crustose and Foliose Lichens    
       
October 31-November 1, 2018
Tampa, FL
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training  
       
NOVEMBER 2018  
       
November 5-8, 2018
John Bunker Sands Wetland Center
Seagoville, TX
  The Swamp School CourseWetland Delineation Training  
       
November 5, 2018-
January 28, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018  
       
November 5, 2018-January 28, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist    
       
November 7-8, 2018
Columbus, OH
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training   
       
November 7-8, 2018
Charleston, SC
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
November 7-8, 2018
Charleston, SC
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018  
       
November 8, 2018
Lacey, WA
  Washington Department of Ecology Workshop: Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
 
       
November 8-11, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Tree and Shrub Identification Using Twigs and Other Winter Characteristics    
       
November 12-13, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  D & D West Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology – Piedmont - 16 hours (field)  
       
November 12, 2018-
February 4, 2019

Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design    
       
November 13-15, 2018
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Winter Woody Plant ID   
       
November 26-December 24, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment   
       
DECEMBER 2018  
       
December 3-31, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets  
       
December 3, 2018-
February 25, 2019

Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018    
       
December 5-6, 2018
Tampa, FL
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training   
       
December 7-8, 2018
Tampa, FL
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training  
       
December 10-11, 2018
Charleston, SC
  D & D West Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement – Eastern Mountains/Piedmont) - 16 hours (½ lecture, ½ field)  
       
December 10, 2018-April 2019
Pittsburgh, PA
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator  
       
December 12-13, 2018
Houston, TX 
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training  
       
December 17-31, 2018 
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals  
       
JANUARY 2019  
       
January 13-18, 2019
Oracle, AZ
  CUAHSI Master Class: Advanced Techniques in Watershed Science   
       
SPECIAL EVENTS  
       
September 15, 2018   International Coastal Cleanup Day: Fight for Trash Free Seas

 
September 22, 2018
Viera, FL
  The Avenue Viera: Wild About Nature

 
       
September 22, 2018
Cape May, NJ
  Wetlands Institute: Fall Migration Festival 
 
 
       
October 12-14, 2018
Houma, LA
  2018 Voice of the Wetlands Festival    
       
October 14 and 28, 2018
Bath, ME
  Maine Maritime Museum: Birding on the Bay  
 
       
 


 

  


EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • EPA Proposal to Limit Science Studies Draws Opposition
  • Supplemental Notice: Definition of “Waters of the United States” - Recodification of Preexisting Rule
  • Request for Nominations of Candidates to the EPA's Science Advisory Board (SAB) and SAB Standing Committees
  • 6 Ways Andrew Wheeler Could Reshape Climate Policy as EPA's New Leader
  • Trump admin floats changes to environmental review standards

NATIONAL NEWS

  • Buried Internet Infrastructure at Risk as Sea Levels Rise
  • Trump Just Remade Ocean Policy—Here's What That Means
  • Nathaniel P. Reed, Leader in Efforts to Protect Endangered Wildlife and Wetlands, dies at 84
  • All Wildfires Are Not Alike, but the U.S. is Fighting Them That Way
  • NOAA Research Model Brings Severe Weather into Focus
  • How Brett Kavanaugh Could Reshape Environmental Law from the Supreme Court
  • Second Binational Poll Reaffirms that Citizens Feel Great Lakes Protection is Critical
  • Bureau of Reclamation provides 27 projects $2.6 million in WaterSMART Cooperative Watershed Management Program grants
  • Post-Harvey report provides inundation maps and flood details on "Largest rainfall event recorded in US history"
  • In Groundwater Debate, Stakeholders Take Sides
  • Obama's Wetlands Protection Rule Put 'Too Much Emphasis' on Science, Trump Officials Argue
  • Local, county, and state governments are suing oil companies over climate change
  • Trump plan to save coal may put lives at risk from pollution
  • National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and NOAA announce new coastal resilience funding
  • Can plastic roads curb waste epidemic?
  • Pruitt seeks to limit EPA's authority to block water pollution permits
  • Forest carbon offsets
  • Great Lakes coastal flood study aims to pinpoint high-risk areas
  • Forest Service proposes changes to sage grouse protections
  • More Rain, More Development Spell Disaster for Some US Cities
  • EPA staff say the Trump Administration is changing their mission from protecting human health and the environment to protecting industry

STATE NEWS

  • AZ: Phoenix Tries to Reverse Its 'Silent Storm' of Heat Deaths
  • CA: California is Preparing for Extreme Weather. It's Time to Plant Some Trees
  • CA: California Will Face a Terrible Choice: Save Cliff-side homes or Public Beaches from Rising Seas
  • CA: An Inventory of Loss of the Los Angeles River
  • CO: How wildfires contaminate drinking water sources
  • CT: $8 Million Grant to Increase Connecticut's Coastal Resilience
  • DE: Small but mighty: Floating wetlands ready to battle pollution in South Bethany Canals
  • FL: Algae Bloom in Florida Prompts Fears about Harm to Health and Economy
  • FL: With Governor and Legislators in Denial, this Tiny Florida Town Tries to Adapt to Climate Change
  • LA: LSU AgCenter Looking to Develop Wetlands Mitigation Bank in St. Gabriel
  • LA: New Orleans: Ready or Not? Here Comes the Rain
  • ME/MA: In Need of Electricity, Massachusetts Looks to the North—Again
  • ME: Maine should lead fight against coastal drilling expansion
  • MD: Communities Receive More "Green" to go Green
  • MI: Using Green Infrastructure to Reduce Flooding
  • NJ: The Wetlands Institute Offers Nature at the Shore
  • NY: Department of Environmental Protection Joins Brooklyn and Queens Elected Officials, Community Leaders, and Environmental Advocates to Announce $400 Million Jamaica Bay Improvement Plan
  • OH: Ohio Takes Steps to Confront Toxic Algae Crisis
  • PA: Pennsylvania Sea Grant Invests in Science Based Research
  • PR: NASA Surveys Hurricane Damage to Puerto Rico's Forests
  • PR: Judge Extends Housing Assistance for Puerto Ricans displaced by Hurricane
  • VA: Putting Roads on a Salt Diet also Healthy for Nearby Streams
  • WI: New Study Says Wetlands Restoration May Reduce Flood Risks in Northern Wisconsin

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • If a Tree Stores Carbon in a Forest, does it Also Protect Biodiversity? 
  • Wetlands are Natural Flood Tools
  • This Tiny Fern Could Help Fight Climate Change
  • As Seas Rise, Americans Use Nature to Fight Worsening Erosion
  • Living in a Wildfire Prone Landscape: Collaborating Across Boundaries for Watershed Benefits
  • New Research Calculates Capacity of North American Forests to Sequester Carbon
  • Emissions from wetlands and permafrost impacts climate targets
  • Acre for acre, urban trees can store as much carbon as tropical forest
  • Birds Eat 400 Million to 500 Million Tonnes of Insects Annually
  • Beavers are the ultimate ecosystem engineers
  • These Tiny Little Bugs are a Harbinger for Wetland Health—and They're Disappearing
  • Climate change is making it harder to revive damaged land
  • Filling gaps in scientific knowledge of the Gulf Coast's interconnected natural and human system
  • Climate change will shuffle nature's deck; and we might need to embrace it
  • The fall, rise, fall of the Atlantic Puffin
  • Climate Change to become 'Greatest pressure on biodiversity' by 2070
  • Where have all our insects gone?
  • For a more sustainable food future, molluscs and small fish may be the answer
  • Sea level rise could overwhelm coral reefs

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • Carbon Trading, Co-Pollutants, and Environmental Equity: Evidence from California's Cap-and-Trade Program (2011-2015)
  • River Discharge Effects on United States Atlantic and Gulf Coast Sea-Level Changes
  • Credit Downgrade Threat as a Non-Regulatory Driver for Flood Risk Mitigation and Sea Level Rise Adaptation
  • Early Palaeozoic Ocean Anoxia and Global Warming Driven by the Evolution of Shallow Burrowing

POTPOURRI

  • If China won't solve the World's plastics problem anymore
  • Harvesting Rain Could Help Caribbean Countries Keep the Water on After Hurricanes
  • Is the global era of massive infrastructure projects coming to an end?
  • In the Arctic Ocean, Hurricane Season Hits in the Summer
  • Former Oil Rigs Could Have Environmental Benefits, Says Poll
  • 36 Years of Bike Race Footage Reveals how Belgium's Climate is Changing
  • 2017 was the second-worst year on record for tropical tree cover loss
  • We’ve failed to secure our coasts — we must build resilience before it’s too late

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Webinars

July

  • Association of State Wetland Mangers Members’ Wetland Webinar: Navigating the Clean Water Act: A Map to the Waters of the United States
  • EBM Toolsl Network Webinar: The NOAA Digital Coast: Turning Coastal Data and Tools into Actionable Information

August

  • ASWM-NRCS Wetland Training Webinar 2: Wetlands in a Watershed at the Landscape Scale
  • American Water Resources Association Webinar: Hydrologic Modeling for Austin's Integrated Water Resources Plan
  • Environmental Law Institute Webinar: Assessing Stream Functions and Conditions – Challenges and Solutions

September

  • American Water Works Association Webinar: Utility Tools and Strategies for Climate Change Planning
  • American Water Resources Association Webinar: Groundwater Discharges and Clean Water Act Compliance

October

  • EBM Tools Network Webinar: Managing Global Acidification on a Regional Scale: How the US Mid-Atlantic and Northeast Coastal Acidification Networks (MACAN and NECAN) Are Working to Understand Impacts through Partnerships
  • American Water Resources Association Webinar: Forecast Informed Reservoir Operations Improve Water Management
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webcast: Innovations in Stream Restoration Design and Construction

November

  • American Water Resources Association Webinar: Setting Up a Water Bank: From the Ground(water) Up
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webcast: It Ain’t Easy Getting Green: Incentivizing Watershed Programs

Meetings

July

  • Soil and Water Conservation Society: 73rd International Annual Conference: Culture, Climate, and Conservation
  • CUAHSI Biennial Colloquium: Hydrologic Connections: Climate, Food, Energy, Environment, and Society
  • Bowdoin College Clonal Plants in Context Symposium
  • 36th International Conference on Coastal Engineering
  • 11th International Conference on the Applications of Stable Isotope Techniques to Ecological Studies (IsoEcol 2018)

August

  • 2018 ESA Annual Meeting
  • Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative (ARRI): 2018 Mined Land Reforestation Conference: Developing Partnerships for Mine Land Reforestation
  • North Carolina State University: EcoStream Conference
  • Waterbird Society/International Ornithological Congress: 42nd Annual Conference and General Meeting
  • Joint Congress on Evolutionary Biology – Montpellier 2018
  • American Fisheries Society Meeting: Communicating the Science of Fisheries Conservation to Diverse Audiences
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: 20th Annual EPA Region 6 Stormwater Conference
  • National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration (NCER)
  • SIWI: World Water Week: Water, ecosystems and human development
  • California Adaptation Forum

September

  • Romanian Limnogeographical Association (RLA): 4th International Conference “Water resources and wetlands”
  • Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies 108th Annual Meeting
  • Society of Ecological Restoration Conference: Restoration in the Era of Climate Change
  • San Francisco Estuary Partnership: 2018 Bay-Delta Science Conference: Our Estuary at an Intersection
  • 2018 NYC Watershed and technical Conference: Clean water Through Protection and Partnership
  • Constructed Wetland Association Annual Conference 2018: How to Make Better Constructed Wetlands
  • Maryland Native Plant Society Annual Fall Conference: The Times They are A ‘Changin’: Threats to Maryland’s Native Plant Communities
  • 2018 Carolinas Climate Resilience Conference
  • MtnClim 2018: Anticipating climate change impacts in mountains: Embracing variability
  • Kentucky Association of Mitigation Managers Conference
  • Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the International Erosion Control Association: 25th Annual Environmental Conference & Tradeshow
  • National Center for Atmospheric Research: 8th International Workshop on Climate Informatics
  • Center for Integrative Conservation Research: Integrative Conservation Conference
  • Three Rivers Evolution Event
  • 10th International Conference on Ecological Informatics
  • Climate Week NYC

October

  • 2018 Great Lakes Commission Annual Meeting
  • University of Connecticut: Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group 2018 Invasive Plant Symposium
  • 2018 Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference (SEEC)
  • The Wildlife Society’s 25 Annual Conference
  • 2018 State of Lake Superior Conference
  • 2018 Society of Wetland Scientists South Central Chapter Fall Meeting
  • Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2018 National Land Conservation Conference
  • Society for Ecological Restoration Northwest Chapter and the Society of Wetland Scientists Pacific Northwest Chapter Joint Regional Conference: Restoring Resilient Communities in Changing Landscapes
  • World Congress on Climate Change
  • University of Minnesota Water Resources Center: Minnesota Water Resources Conference
  • Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: Great Lakes Restoration Conference
  • International Marine & Freshwater Sciences Symposium (MarFresh2018)
  • MACC Fall Conference
  • 13th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands
  • American Meteorological Society: 29th Conference on Severe Local Storms
  • Natural Areas Conference: Building Resilience: The Future of Natural Areas
  • Southeast Florida Regional Compact: Southeast Florida Regional Climate Leadership Summit
  • American Museum of Natural History Center for Biodiversity and Conservation: Student Conference on Conservation Science-New York
  • American Water Works Association: Water Infrastructure Conference
  • 6th International Conference on Sustainable Environment and Agriculture
  • 38th International Symposium of the North American Lake Management Society: Now Trending: Innovations in Lake Management
  • American Shore & Beach Preservation Association: 2018 National Coastal Conference: Resilient Shorelines for Rising Tides

November

  • 4th Biennial Pennsylvania Botany Symposium
  • American Society of Agronomy, the Crop Science Society of America, and the Canadian Society of Agronomy: 2018 International Annual Meeting: Enhancing Productivity in a Changing Climate
  • Sustainability and Development Conference
  • Alaska Committee for Noxious and Invasive Pest Management: Invasive Species Workshop
  • Lincoln Park Zoo 2nd International Wildlife Reintroduction Conference

December

  • Restore America’s Estuaries Conference: 9th National Summit on Coastal and Estuarine Restoration and Management
  • AGU Fall Meeting

January 2019

  • International Soils Meeting: Soils Across Latitudes

February 2019

  • Tamarisk Coalition and the Desert Botanical Garden: Riparian Restoration Conference
  • Missouri Natural Resources Conference
  • River Restoration Northwest: Stream Restoration Symposium
  • Alaska Forum on the Environment
  • Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Wetland Science Conference

Training

July

  • University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point College of Natural Resources and Continuing Education Workshop: Prairie Plant Identification and Sampling
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Mushroom Identification for New Mycophiles: Foraging for Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Tracks and Sign of Insects and Other Invertebrates
  • Eagle Hill Institute: The Eastern Maine Ice Age Landscape as a Record Hemispheric Climate Change: The Last Deglaciation: The Pineo Ridge Moraine and Emerged Delta Complex
  • Humboldt State University Course: Teaching Individual/Agent-based Modeling
  • Utah State University Course: Sediment Transport in Stream Assessment and Design
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Problematic Delineation Seminar – 2018

August

  • Eagle Hill Institute: Sphagnum Mosses and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Aquatic Entomology
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Botanist
  • D&D West Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • River Lab, University of California – Berkeley Course: Geomorphic and Ecological Fundamentals for River and Stream Restoration
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Rock Outcrop and Cliff Face Communities
  • Flathead Lake Bio Station: Stream Ecology
  • Flathead Lake Bio Station: Ecology of Forests and Grasslands
  • Flathead Lake Bio Station: Drone Remote Sensing of Freshwater Ecosystems
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Introductory Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Witness to Nature: A Creative Writing Workshop
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Plant Anatomy and Microtechnique
  • D & D West Course: Hydrophytic Vegetation - Eastern Mountains/Piedmont
  • The Swamp School: Blended Online and Field Wetland Delineation Workshop
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Southeastern Grasslands: Ecology and Conservation
  • Environmental Concern Course: Wetland Plant ID
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Wetlands and Wetland Delineators
  • Association of Massachusetts Wetland Scientists Workshop: Late Season Grasses
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Plant ID – Familiarization for New Wetland Delineators
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Mushroom Microscopy: An Exploration of the Intricate Microscopic World of Mushrooms
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Banding Songbirds and Raptors: Livetrapping, In-hand Aging and Sexing, and Data Collection for Research
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Grasses of the Southern Appalachians
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets | 2018
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Wetland Construction: Principles, Planning and Design
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Mosses: Orthotrichaceae of Maine
  • Eagle Hill Institute: Independent Study: Pyrenolichens
  • National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) Workshop: Socio-Environmental Synthesis: Interdisciplinary Skill Building, Proposal Writing, Collaborating
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Michigan Rapid Assessment Method for Wetlands (MiRAM)
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training

September

  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Asters and Goldenrods
  • Institute for Wetland & Environmental Education & Research, Inc.: Wetlands and Their Borders Course
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
    Environmental Concern Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018
  • D & D West Course: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
  • Institute for Wetland & Environmental Education & Research, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineator Training
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Washington Department of Ecology Workshop: Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Eastern Washington
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Riparian Habitat Restoration for the Arid Southwest
  • Association of Massachusetts Wetland Scientists Workshop: Late Season Sedges
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Current Issues in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation: The Ecology and Conservation of Migratory Birds
    The Swamp School Online Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments
  • Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Asters and Goldenrods in Michigan Wetlands
  • CUAHSI: Near Surface Geophysics for Hydrology Workshop
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Plant ID – Familiarization for New Wetland Delineators
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review Process
  • Environmental Concern Course: Evaluating Hydric Soils in the Field
    Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • The Swamp School: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Fall Maine Mushroom

October

  • The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Columbus Day Weekend Retreat
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator
  • D&D West Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Methodology for Delineating Wetlands
  • Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Hydric Soils Identification
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Bryophytes: Mosses and Liverworts
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Habitat Conservation Plans
  • D & D West Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
  • CUAHSI – NCAR Training Workshop: The Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Crustose and Foliose Lichens
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training

November

  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
  • Washington Department of Ecology Workshop: Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Tree and Shrub Identification Using Twigs and Other Winter Characteristics
  • D & D West Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology – Piedmont
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • Environmental Concern Course: Winter Woody Plant ID
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment

December

  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training
  • D & D West Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement – Eastern Mountains/Piedmont)
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals

January 2019

  • CUAHSI Master Class: Advanced Techniques in Watershed Science

SPECIAL EVENT

  • International Coastal Cleanup Day: Fight for Trash Free Seas
  • The Avenue Viera: Wild About Nature
  • Wetlands Institute: Fall Migration Festival
  • 2018 Voice of the Wetlands Festival
  • Maine Maritime Museum: Birding on the Bay

 

 

Wetland Breaking News - March 2016

The Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News (WBN) is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those working in water resources and related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published for over fifteen years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to .

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled by Sean Seary, ASWM Intern; Edited by Marla Stelk, Editor; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors; Executive Director: Jeanne Christie, Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399; Fax: 207-894-7992.

All photos by Jeanne Christie, ASWM 

     
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