Wetland Breaking News: July 2019

                  

IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

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Wetland Breaking News: August 2019

 

 

 




 

Editor's Note


Dear Wetlanders,

Wetland Breaking News: August 2019When I accepted the job as Executive Director of the Association of State Wetland
Managers (ASWM), some friends of mine gave me a card with wonderful “advice from a frog.” It says “Make a splash. Look before you leap. Don’t jump to conclusions. Enjoy a good swim. Stretch your legs often. Spend time at your pad. Hop to it!” I have it framed and sitting on a bookcase where I can see it sitting at my desk.

Recently we had a visitor to our office – a huge American bullfrog. His visit was strange considering our office is located in an office park surrounded by pavement for parking and in between three fairly busy roads. But thereWetland Breaking News: August 2019 it was, waiting at our front door, demanding to be let in. Ironically, we had a much smaller frog friend visit our office a few years ago when we were located in a different space on the other side of the building. ASWM has had its frog logo for as long as anyone here can remember – coincidence? Perhaps. Or maybe our amphibian friends are trying to tell us something…

In this edition of Wetland Breaking News, you’ll find many nationally significant stories about multiple proposed policy changes on the federal level. States are keeping busy as always, with a few stories about new wetland restoration and creation projects that are expected to provide multiple benefits. And our Wetland Science section will keep you up to date with new information on sea level rise, climate change and extreme storms.

Best regards,

Marla J. Stelk
Editor
Wetland Breaking News

 

Wetland Breaking News: May 2019

   
                


Editor's ChoiceWetland Breaking News: June 2019


Has the Endangered Species Act saved ‘very few’ plants and animals?

By Salvador Rizzo – Washington Post – August 16, 2019 – Video
The Trump administration has finalized new rules to weaken the Endangered Species Act of 1973, a bedrock wildlife conservation law that bars the development of lands where at-risk species live. In a Fox Business interview, Wheeler defended the regulatory changes, stating that the ESA has “recovered very few species.” Government statistics show that 47 species of plants and animals deemed at risk under the ESA have been “recovered,” out of nearly 2,000 that have appeared on the list. But Wheeler is using a very strict definition of what it means to save a species from extinction. These conservation efforts work over many years, and not all species joined the list in 1973. The ESA could be helping a “threatened” or “endangered” species regrow its population significantly before U.S. officials classify it as “recovered” and take it off the list. Read full story and view video here.

Chair DeFazio Presses EPA on Its Decision to Limit States Rights Within the Clean Water Act

House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure – July 30, 2019
Today, Chair of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure Peter DeFazio (D-OR) sent a letter to the Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Andrew Wheeler, requesting that information be provided to the Committee on impacts and changes made to Section 401 of the Clean Water Act (CWA), which manages states’ roles in implementing water quality standards. Read full story here.

Fourteen AGs Blast EPA Guidance Limiting State Clean Water Act Permitting Authority

Contact: Christopher Gray – NYU Law – July 26, 2019
California Attorney General Xavier Becerra led a coalition of 14 state attorneys general in submitting comments yesterday to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) objecting to the agency’s new guidance limiting state authority over water quality permits under Section 401 of the Clean Water Act. The EPA developed its “Clean Water Act Section 401 Guidance for Federal Agencies, States and Authorized Tribes” in response to President Trump’s Executive Order 13,868, which purports to promote the development of new fossil fuel energy infrastructure. Read full press release here.

EPA Proposes Rule to Narrow, Streamline CWA Section 401 Review

By Michael A. Swiger and Sharon White – The National Law Review – August 12, 2019
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has issued a proposed rule (Proposed Rule) that would make sweeping changes in how states (and certain tribes) implement section 401 of the Clean Water Act (CWA). EPA characterizes the Proposed Rule, issued pursuant to Executive Order 13868, as “the EPA’s first comprehensive effort to promulgate federal rules governing the implementation of CWA section 401.” The Proposed Rule “is intended to increase the predictability and timeliness of section 401 certification by clarifying timeframes for certification, the scope of certification review and conditions, and related certification requirements and procedures.” EPA had previewed some of these changes in its updated section 401 guidance document (Updated Guidance), issued on June 7, 2019. The Proposed Rule is the latest in a series of recent executive and judicial developments, particularly for gas pipelines, hydropower projects, and other energy infrastructure projects, that are changing the section 401 landscape. Read full story here.


Wetland Breaking News: August 2019

 

Wetland Breaking News: August 2019National News 


Environmentalists renew bid to overturn EPA policy barring scientists from advisory panels

By Rebecca Beitsch – The Hill – August 15, 2019
Environmental groups on Thursday appealed a court decision in their attempt to end the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) policy of excluding certain scientists from serving on its advisory boards. “The Trump administration is simply trying to payback its polluter cronies by gutting sound science that our health and environmental protections rely on,” Neil Gormley, an attorney with Earthjustice, wrote in a statement announcing the appeal filed in the D.C. Circuit Court. The appeal stems from a controversial policy enacted in 2017 under former EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, who argued that scientists who receive agency grants would have a conflict of interest and shouldn’t be allowed to serve on various scientific panels that advise the EPA. Read full story here.

Pair of GOP senators propose easing Obama water rule

By Rebecca Beitsch and Miranda Green – The Hill – August 1, 2019
Two Midwest Republican senators are pushing a bill to cement changes made by the Trump administration to an Obama-era rule designed to reduce water pollution, bringing a pet project of the Trump administration to Congress. The Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule has long been controversial within the agriculture community, with farmers arguing it gives the federal government far too much power to regulate runoff in small bodies of water that could get contaminated by farm waste. The bill from Sens. Joni Ernst (R-Iowa) and Mike Braun (R-Ind.) is the latest attempt to put the onus on Congress instead of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to define which waters should be regulated under the law. Read full story here.

EPA punts on latest Pebble mine decision

By Ariel Wittenberg – E&E News – July 29, 2019
EPA has eschewed a decades long agreement with the Army Corps of Engineers about what to do with permits the agency disagrees with, punting a decision on whether the Pebble mine will have "substantial and unacceptable impacts" to Alaska's premier salmon fishery. EPA General Counsel Matt Leopold directed the agency last month to consider using a process under Section 404(q) of the Clean Water Act to enter into negotiations with the Army Corps over the permit for the Pebble mine in Alaska's Bristol Bay (Greenwire, July 22). Read full story here.

New Bill May Fund Wetland Restoration

Storm Water Solutions – July 29, 2019
New legislation may help boost funding for the Great Lakes. According to Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition press release, Sens. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.), Rob Portman (R-Ohio), and Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.) and Reps. David Joyce (R-Ohio) and Marcy Kaptur (D-Ohio) are leading the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. The senators introduced Senate Bill 2295. If signed, it will increase the initiative’s authorization from $300 million per year to $475 million per year over five years. Read full story here.

Migratory Birds to Benefit from $20 Million in Funding Throughout the Americas

Contact: Vanessa Kauffman – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – July 26, 2019
Every summer, backyards across America fill with the color and sound of millions of migratory birds. Many of these birds depend on wintering grounds across the Americas to survive. These long-distance travelers will benefit from $20 million in federal and matching funds from the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act (NMBCA). “The Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act grants will fund projects to conserve migratory bird habitat, engage local communities in bird habitat protection and strengthen international relations, while raising awareness of the importance of bird conservation,” said U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt. Read full press release here.

Water Funding for Estuaries: The Glue That Guards Against Storm Devastation

By Andrea Fox – EfficientGov – July 22, 2019 – Video
Waterkeepers address estuaries as the first line of defense against devastating storms as they went before Congress to give testimony on re-authorization of the National Estuary Program under the Clean Water Act, along with several proposed funding bills. There are major changes to the Clean Water Act (CWA) that some believe will imperil numerous river systems, lakes and the coasts. Ahead of these changes, several key U.S. waterkeepers provided testimony to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure’s Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment on Protecting and Restoring America’s Iconic Waters. Read full story and view hearing here.

Wetland Breaking News: August 2019Highlights from the Trump Administration’s Rulemaking Agenda

By Ann D. Navaro and Christine G. Wyman – The National Law Review – July 16, 2019
The Office of Management and Budget’s Spring 2019 Unified Regulatory Agenda includes many items with significant implications for the energy and infrastructure sectors. This blog post offers highlights from the Agenda, with an emphasis on upcoming actions by the Department of the Interior, Environmental Protection Agency, Army Corps of Engineers, and the Council on Environmental Quality. Read full blog post here.

Interior to move most of Bureau of Land Management’s D.C. staff out west as part of larger reorganization push

By Juliet Eilperin and Lisa Rein – The Washington Post – July 15, 2019
The Trump administration plans to relocate most of the Bureau of Land Management’s D.C. workforce to west of the Rockies, part of its broader push to shift power away from Washington and shrink the size of the federal government. The proposal to move roughly 300 employees from a key Interior Department agency — among them the majority of top managers — comes as Trump officials are forcibly reassigning career officials and upending operations across the federal government. Read full story here.

Recovering America's Wildlife Act Introduced

Wildlife Management Institute – July 2019
During a Capitol Hill press conference on July 12, Representatives Debbie Dingell (D-MI) and Jeff Fortenberry (R-NE) announced the reintroduction of the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act (RAWA), legislation that would dedicate just under $1.4 billion in annual funding for conservation of declining fish and wildlife species. Similar legislation was introduced in the previous congressional session and garnered bipartisan support from 116 members of the House. The new Recovering America’s Wildlife Act makes several notable changes to the bill introduced in the previous Congress. Most importantly the new bill would use general treasury funds rather than funding from energy revenues, there is also an additional $97.5 million for tribal fish and wildlife conservation efforts. Other bill changes include clarification that funds can be used for plants when connected to wildlife recovery and that states will be required to submit a report to Congress every five years that outlines their use of the funding to ensure accountability. Read full article here.

 

Outreach and Engagement on CWA Section 401 Certification

Pursuant to the April 10, 2019 Executive Order on Promoting Energy Infrastructure and Economic Growth, the EPA will continue to engage with states, authorized tribes, and relevant federal agencies to identify provisions that require clarification within section 401 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) and related federal regulations and guidance. On August 8, 2019, the EPA signed a proposed rule to implement Clean Water Act section 401. The EPA will open a 60-day public comment period after the proposed rule is published in the Federal Register (Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OW-2019-0405).

Public Hearing
The EPA will hold a public hearing session on the proposed “Updated Regulations on Water Quality Certifications” rule on September 5, 2019 from 2:00 pm – 8:00 pm (Mountain Daylight Time) and September 6, 2019 from 9:00 am – 12:00 pm (Mountain Daylight Time) at the Salt Lake City Public Library, 210 E 400 S, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84111. A Federal Register notice for the public hearing will be published with the proposed rule (Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OW-2019-0405).

State and Tribal Listening Sessions
The EPA will hold state and tribal listening sessions on the proposed “Updated Regulations on Water Quality Certifications” rule.
The first series of listening sessions will take place at the Salt Lake City Public Library, 210 E 400 S, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84111. The tribal listening session will be held on the afternoon of September 4, 2019. The state listening session will be held on the morning of September 5, 2019.

The second series of listening sessions will take place at the United States Environmental Protection Agency Region 5 offices at 77 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, Illinois 60604. The state listening session will be held on the morning of September 16, 2019. The tribal listening session will be held on the afternoon of September 16, 2019.  

 

 

 

Wetland Breaking News: August 2019

 State News Wetland Breaking News: August 2019

AR: Creatures of Arkansas’ Tallgrass Prairies

By Bob Whitby – Research Frontiers – July 9, 2019
Arkansas was once a patchwork of forests, prairies and grasslands. While forests are still abundant, the open, natural landscape of the prairies and grassland is mostly gone, developed as farmland or urban areas. Less than 1 percent remains intact. The tallgrass prairies of Northwest Arkansas were home to a variety of reptile and amphibian species, many of which have declined with the loss of habitat and are now listed as “species of greatest conservation need” by the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission. Animals such as the ornate box turtle, slender legless lizard, Great Plains narrowmouth frog, crawfish frog, and several types of snakes are included on the list. These are species that most people have never even heard of, let alone seen, and they are often very hard to find, even where they occur. Read full story here.

CA: California's Future Weather Will Alternate Between Drought and Atmospheric Rivers

U.S. Geological Survey – July 15, 2019
Researchers have found that a pattern of wet and dry extremes could become the norm for California, due to atmospheric rivers. Atmospheric rivers are narrow bands of concentrated water vapor in the atmosphere that carry heavy pulses of precipitation to the West Coast. The authors suggest that atmospheric rivers are the cause of California's increasingly extreme, yet infrequent bouts of precipitation. Based on projections of future climate, the authors found that while overall precipitation will remain the same over the long-term for California, it will fall in less frequent but more extreme bursts. Further, as temperatures warm, more precipitation from these events will fall as rain than snow, causing reductions in snowpack, a critical source of water during summer. Understanding these changes in precipitation as climate conditions change will be critical for the state’s water resource managers. Read full story here. Read the paper here.

DC: D.C. Is Vulnerable to Three Types of Flooding. Climate Change is Making Them All Worse.

By Jacob Fenston – WAMU 88.5 – July 9, 2019 – Video
While you were standing on the roof of your sinking car, or taking an unwanted shower in a Metro train, or bailing out your basement, it probably didn’t matter to you what type of flooding you were experiencing. A flood is a flood is a flood, right? Not really. It turns out, we don’t know enough about the type of flooding that occurred this week. But D.C. officials are investing $5 million dollars this year to get a more detailed picture. Read full story and view video here.

ID: Tribe, Environmental Groups Sue Oregon Agency Over Dam Deal

Associated Press U.S. News – July 26, 2019
A tribe and environmental groups have sued the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, looking to block the relicensing of three dams along the Idaho-Oregon border. The Nez Perce Tribe and the groups Pacific Rivers and Idaho Rivers United filed separate lawsuits claiming Oregon's water quality certification of the dams violates environmental regulations, The Lewiston Tribune reported Friday. Read full story here.

IL: ICC’s constructed wetland expected to hold a slew of benefits

By Grace Barbic – Journal Star – July 23, 2019
Right now, on the Illinois Central College East Peoria campus, there are a half-dozen or so various construction machines moving in a large, organized and strategic circle. It’s like a game of musical chairs. The rumbling, digging and beeping of the machines is the tune and instead of snagging a seat, the machines are stopping to unload piles of dirt. The game will be over Friday, and left will be a horseshoe shaped, shallow pond, about waist deep and as long as a football field from post to post. In about two years or less, the area will have transformed from an open field to a natural-looking wetland that could potentially act as a wildlife or pollinator habitat. Read full story here.

IA: Worth County wetland project billed as first of its kind in state

By Jared McNett – Globe Gazette – July 14, 2019
In 1997, a task force came together to look at water quality issues along the Mississippi River and in the Gulf of Mexico Watershed. The issue? How large areas with low oxygen due to nutrient contamination could pose a threat to aquatic life. According to the Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy from Iowa State University, "Nutrients that lead to algae growth are the main culprit." Since 2013, the Iowa Water Quality Initiative, with its Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy, has been working to improve water quality through collaboration between independent researchers, farmers and cities. Read full story here.

KS: Wichita’s newest park — a 91-acre wetlands — is officially open to the public

By Matt Riedl – The Wichita Eagle – July 8, 2019 – Videos
Wichita’s newest public park is open and ready for visitors — sort of. Pracht Wetlands Park, on 29th Street just east of Maize Road, had its official ribbon-cutting in late May, though the park is still technically a work in progress. The 91-acre park, which has been branded a rare and unique “urban wetland park” with the ability to attract tourists, is being constructed in five phases — the first two of which have been completed. Now, people can walk over galvanized-steel boardwalks and watch birds behind two observation points similar to duck blinds. Eventually there will be a half-mile loop of boardwalk circling the northern half of the park with multiple such observation points and an observation tower. Read full story and view videos here.

MD: Anne Arundel wants to identify more bogs to inform 20-year development plan

By Rachael Pacella – Capital Gazette – August 1, 2019
It’s Monday morning and Keith Underwood is preaching biology and physics in the Green Cathedral, 700 acres of protected forest and wetlands on the Severn River. Two decades ago, Underwood’s engineering transformed a degraded stream valley off Howard’s Branch into a wetland complex with sand and gravel that water seeps through, slowing it and filtering it. Years have passed and the area is now filled with pools of water, spagnum moss and Atlantic white cedar. It’s a bog, Underwood, a landscape architect, said, an ecosystem that sequesters carbon. Read full story here.

MD: Bloede Dam Removal Project Complete

Maryland Department of Natural Resources – July 31, 2019
One of the most important dam removal projects in the Mid-Atlantic is officially complete. Project partners announced today that the Bloede Dam removal and river restoration is finished and a significant portion of the Patapsco River now flows freely through Patapsco Valley State Park. After 18 months, often spent battling the elements during one of the region’s wettest years on record, crews have completed all construction work, including dam demolition, replacing portions of both Baltimore and Howard county sanitary sewer lines, and rebuilding the Grist Mill Trail. Read full story here.

MT: Enviro groups tout 'big win' in Montanore mining lawsuit

By Eve Byron – Missoulian – July 29, 2019
Montana illegally re-issued a water pollution discharge permit in 2004 for the proposed Montanore copper and silver mine under the Cabinet Mountains, according to a legal ruling that environmental groups are calling “a big win” in the fight to prohibit development of the controversial mine in northwestern Montana. In her July 24 ruling, District Court Judge Kathy Seeley wrote that the Montana Department of Environmental Quality’s (DEQ) re-issuance of the discharge permit to Hecla Mining Company and its subsidiary Montanore Minerals Corp. was based in part “on arbitrary and capricious decisions,” and violates the federal Clean Water Act and the Montana Water Quality Act. She vacated the permit and remanded the matter to DEQ for further action consistent with her decision. Read full story here.

NH: Governor vetoes wetlands bill

By Bob Sanders – NH Business Review – July 31, 2019
On Monday, Governor Sununu vetoed House Bill 326, which would have allowed municipalities to expand wetland protections and remove some land from development. “This bill adds additional and unnecessary regulations to those laws and does not properly account for property owners who could be negatively affected by them,” wrote the Governor in his veto message. “Any change to the definition of prime wetland should allow for sufficient protection for individual property rights before moving forward.” But supporters of the bill said they were trying to close a loophole – when the law was last amended in 2011 – that lopped off wetlands’ fingers and toes. Read full story here.

NY: Volunteers Help Create Wetland Habitat for Onondaga Lake Wildlife Visitors

By Chris Bolt and Kevin Fitzpatrick – WAER – July 29, 2019
Volunteers gathered at the southeastern shore of Onondaga Lake on Saturday to plant a variety of native plants at the mouth of Harbor Brook. The area of lakeshore is being reinvigorated as wetland habitat for local wildlife by the Onondaga Lake Conservation Corps. Read full story here.

NC: Navy Issues Finding on Plan to Fill Wetlands

Coastal Review Online – July 18, 2019
The Navy says its plan to permanently fill 30 acres of wetlands at the Dare County Bombing Range will have no significant effect on the environment. Coastal environmental advocates said Wednesday they were unaware of the Navy’s plan. According to an environmental assessment the Navy released Tuesday, the filling “will not significantly affect the quality of the human environment or natural environment or generate significant controversy.” The Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge surrounds the range. Read full story here.

OR: Clean Water Rule Stalled in Oregon

By Karina Brown – Courthouse News Service – July 17, 2019
The Obama-era Clean Water Rule still won’t take effect in Oregon, after a federal judge ruled Wednesday that its long-delayed implementation could “irreparably harm” farmers and ranchers who might have to pay for permits to harm intermittent streams if they end up winning their lawsuit challenging the rule. Oregon Cattlemen’s Association in April sued the Environmental Protection Agency, claiming it too broadly defined the types of waters that cannot be polluted, by including not only rivers and streams that are “navigable-in-fact,” but also those upstream from waters literally navigable by boat, as well as intermittent streams and isolated wetlands. Read full story here.

OR: Judge orders state DEQ to do more to shield salmon streams

By Paul Koberstein – Portland Tribune – July 16, 2019
U.S. District Judge Marco A. Hernández is ordering the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality to do more to protect salmon streams harmed by logging operations. He ruled in June in a clean water lawsuit filed by environmentalists that has been winding through the courts since 2012. The plaintiffs claimed the DEQ is not doing enough to protect salmon threatened by common logging practices, such as the removal of shade trees that cool water temperatures in mountain streams where salmon reside. They said the DEQ sometimes even allows stream temperatures to rise to levels lethal to salmon, a violation of federal environmental laws. Read full story here.

TX: More than 100 Wetland Mitigation Banking Credits Available for Galveston Bay Area

Contacts: Danny Moran, Will Beaty, and Beth Payan – Texas Environmental News – July 22, 2019
Development projects in south Texas that have been on hold for lack of access to wetland mitigation credits got good news in July with the release of more than 100 credits approved for the Gulf Coastal Plains Wetland Mitigation Bank (GCPWMB). Officials of EcoSystem Renewal LLC, co-manager for the sponsor of the mitigation bank site comprising 1,957 acres in the Galveston region, said the release of the new credits by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will help jump-start projects in the watershed. Read full story here.

VA: Scientists: Hampton Roads to get steamier and "floodier"

By Tamara Dietrich – The Virginian-Pilot – July 16, 2019
Summer in the South is a sticky season, as any quick trip outside this week will prove — temperatures approaching 100 degrees and humidity making it feel well above that. Climate scientists have long warned that such heat waves will only get hotter and more frequent as global carbon emissions broil the planet. Now some of them have released a report that spells out by how much. Their cautionary forecasts arrive on the heels of a separate federal report released last week that depicts what the U.S. can expect from sunny-day flooding as a warming climate continue to drive sea level rise. Read full story here.

WI: Wisconsin Indian tribe files suit to remove Enbridge pipeline from reservation

Lee Bergquist – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel – July 23, 2019
The Bad River band of Lake Superior Chippewa filed a lawsuit against Enbridge Inc. on Tuesday aimed at forcing the company to shut down a key pipeline that crosses tribal lands in northern Wisconsin. The pipeline transports oil and natural gas liquids from Canada to Michigan, including a controversial section that runs along the bed of the Straits of Mackinac between Lake Michigan and Lake Huron. The company is seeking to build a tunnel beneath the straits for a new pipeline but is facing fire from Democratic officials in Michigan. Read full story here.

 

Wetland Breaking News: August 2019Wetland Science News


What you need to know about the link between sea-level rise and coastal flooding

By Jan Ellen Spiegel – Yale Climate Connections – August 6, 2019
High-tide flooding – sometimes referred to as sunny day or nuisance flooding – is the official term NOAA uses to describe shoreline flooding that is not the result of a storm or some other weather event. “Sea-level rise flooding is what it is,” says Billy Sweet, a NOAA oceanographer considered the guru of high-tide flooding. “It’s front and center.” Read full story here.

Mapping the strain on our water

By Bonnie Berkowitz and Adrian Blanco – The Washington Post – August 6, 2019
The United States has enough water to satisfy the demand, but newly released data from the World Resources Institute shows some areas are out of balance. The WRI’s Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas researchers used hydrological models and more than 50 years of data to estimate the typical water supply of 189 countries compared to their demand. The result was a scale of “water stress” — how close a country comes to draining its annual water stores in a typical year. Read full story and view map here.

Who Will Pay for the Huge Costs of Holding Back Rising Seas?

By Jim Morrison – Yale Environment 360 – August 5, 2019
For cities in the United States, the price of infrastructure projects to combat rising seas and intensifying storms is coming into focus — and so is the sticker shock. In Boston, where many neighborhoods have been built and recently expanded in low-lying areas, an estimated $2.4 billion will be needed over the next several decades to protect the city from flooding, one study says. That report came as the city abandoned plans to build a harbor barrier that would have cost between $6 billion and $12 billion, which researchers concluded was economically unfeasible. Read full story here.

US Infrastructure Unprepared for Increasing Frequency of Extreme Storms

AGU – August 1, 2019
Current design standards for United States hydrologic infrastructure are unprepared for the increasing frequency and severity of extreme rainstorms, meaning structures like retention ponds and dams will face more frequent and severe flooding, according to a new study. Extreme weather events are on the rise, but U.S. water management systems use outdated design guidelines. New research, published in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters, analyzed data from multiple regions throughout the U.S. and found the rising number of extreme storms combined with outdated building criteria could overwhelm hydrologic structures like stormwater systems. The new study is particularly timely in light of recent storms and flash floods along the East Coast. Read full story here.

UMD Case Study Examines How Green Infrastructure Can Help Suburban Environments Manage Increasingly Intense Stormwater and Adapt to Climate Change

By Samantha Waters – College of Agriculture & Natural Resources – June 29, 2019
UMD researchers are connecting climate change to urban and suburban stormwater management, with the ultimate goal of increasing resiliency to major storm events. With models not only predicting more rain, but an increased frequency of particularly intense and destructive storms, flooding is a major concern in communities that are becoming more settled with more asphalt. Flooding doesn’t just cause property damage, but it impacts the health of the Chesapeake Bay through increased nutrient runoff and pollution. In a new case study published in the Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management, researchers examine two distinct watersheds and demonstrate that even small decentralized stormwater management practices like rain gardens can make a big cumulative difference to the resiliency of a watershed, using predictive modeling to assess what climate change will demand of our future stormwater management systems. Read full story here.

Wetland Breaking News: August 2019“Climate stripes" graphics show U.S. trends by state and county

By Rebecca Lindsey – NOAA Climate.gov – June 28, 2019
At Climate.gov you can access a new, visually striking collection of “climate stripes” graphics depicting U.S. climate conditions each year from 1895–2018 compared to the 20th-century average. A location’s yearly temperature and precipitation conditions since 1895 are shown as a simple row of colored stripes without dates or numbers. For the yearly temperature stripes, red colors mean warmer than average, and blues mean cooler than average. For the yearly precipitation stripes, green colors mean wetter than average, and browns mean drier than average. Locations are available by state and county. You can find data for all U.S. states except Hawaii. View map here.

Climate changes faster than animals adapt

Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. – July 23, 2019
Climate change can threaten species and extinctions can impact ecosystem health. It is therefore of vital importance to assess to which degree animals can respond to changing environmental conditions – for example by shifting the timing of breeding – and whether these shifts enable the persistence of populations in the long run. To answer these questions an international team of 64 researchers led by Viktoriia Radchuk, Alexandre Courtiol and Stephanie Kramer-Schadt from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) evaluated more than 10,000 published scientific studies. The results of their analysis are worrisome: Although animals do commonly respond to climate change, such responses are in general insufficient to cope with the rapid pace of rising temperatures and sometimes go in wrong directions. The results are published in the scientific journal “Nature Communications”. Read full press release here.

NOAA, partners predict large summer harmful algal bloom for western Lake Erie

By Jill Jentes Banicki – Ohio Sea Grant – July 11, 2019
NOAA and its research partners are forecasting that western Lake Erie will experience a significant harmful algal bloom (HAB) this summer. This year’s bloom is expected to measure 7.5 on the severity index but could possibly range between 6 and 9. An index above 5 indicates blooms having greater impact. The severity index is based on bloom’s biomass – the amount of algae – over a sustained period. The largest blooms occurred in 2011, with a severity index of 10, and 2015, at 10.5. Last year’s bloom had a severity index of 3.6, while 2017 was 8.0. Read full story here.

With More Big Storms, We Need More Infrastructure Funding

By Becky Hammer – NRDC – July 9, 2019
Yesterday’s record-breaking rain in the DC area showed just how unprepared we are for the storms that climate change is making more intense and more frequent. The flood tested our region’s water infrastructure, and we failed the test. We have an opportunity to use this event as a wake-up call and take action by increasing investment in our infrastructure’s resiliency. The only problem: a group Wetland Breaking News: August 2019of wastewater utilities is holding up legislation that could deliver much-needed funding to our communities. Read full story here.

Fish Die-offs Linked to Hotter Summers

By Kat Kerlin – UC Davis – July 8, 2019
Fish die-offs in Wisconsin lakes are expected to double by mid-century and quadruple by 2100 due to warmer summer temperatures, according to a study published today in the journal Nature Climate Change. To better understand how fish die-offs are changing, researchers from Reed College and the University of California, Davis, analyzed a database of freshwater fish die-offs in Wisconsin combined with lake temperature data and simulations. They found that more than 100 of 500 fish die-offs recorded between 2004 and 2014 in the state were strongly linked with heat waves and warmer average surface water temperatures. Read full story here.

 

 

Wetland Breaking News: August 2019Resources and Publications


Blue Accounting releases most comprehensive database of coastal wetlands projects in the Great Lakes

Great Lakes Commission – July 16, 2019
Blue Accounting has released the most comprehensive database of coastal wetlands protection, restoration and enhancement projects in the Great Lakes Basin on their information hub here. For the first time, decision-makers and stakeholders can view state, federal, provincial and private investments side-by-side and track progress toward acreage goals identified for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI). Read full story here.

ELI Issues New Report on In-Lieu Fee Wetland Mitigation

Environmental Law Institute – July 2019
The report, In-Lieu Fee Mitigation: Review of Program Instruments and Implementation Across the Country, outlines the range of practice in ILF mitigation and describes innovative approaches across the United States. To date, ILF programs have Wetland Breaking News: August 2019implemented hundreds of compensatory mitigation projects across the country and many more projects are pending or in the planning stages. In addition, new programs continue to come online to provide additional compensation options for permittees. Our goal was to support the development of effective ILF mitigation programs and enhance the capacity of state/local/tribal governments and others that develop or oversee ILF programs in order to improve the protection and restoration of watersheds and aquatic ecosystems across the country. Download the report here. Additional resources from ELI’s Wetlands Program are available here.

Wetland Breaking News: August 2019

 


PotpourriWetland Breaking News: August 2019


In a flash, nature’s night lights add sparkle to summer nights

By Kathy Reshetiloff Bay – Journal – August 2, 2019
Every summer, as the Earth enters a region of space containing high concentrations of solar debris, nighttime skywatchers are rewarded with a wonderful light display: the Perseid meteor shower. But you don’t have to be an astronomer to see summer light shows produced by nature. Some animals produce light from within their bodies. This phenomenon, bioluminescence, gives these creatures a visual aura. Read full article here.

The Problem with Levees

By Nicholas Pinter – Scientific American – August 1, 2019
Along the great rivers of the U.S.—the Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, Illinois and many others—history is tied to the syncopated rhythm of flooding. The great flood years of 1927, 1937, 1993 and 2011 are still remembered and discussed in history classrooms and around the family dinner table in many communities. Similarly, if you drill into most U.S. levees, you find marks similar to the growth rings of a tree, showing that the levee was enlarged multiple times, each time following failure during a previous flood event. Read full blog post here.

Why Isn’t Publicly Funded Conservation on Private Land More Accountable?

By Richard Conniff – YaleEnvironment360 – July 23, 2019
A few years ago, an environmental lawyer named Jessica Owley set out to learn how well it works when the federal government allows development in the habitat of an endangered species. Under the terms of these deals, introduced in the 1980s to mollify opponents of the Endangered Species Act, the developers provide mitigation, typically with a conservation easement on some other parcel of private land. Owley focused on four California examples, out of the almost 700 so-called Habitat Conservation Plans (or HCPs) that now exist nationwide. She had a long list of questions, from “Where are the protected parcels?” to “How do endangered species fare in the face of these deals?” Read full story here.

Indigenous Guardians get $6.4 million to monitor traditional territories

By Jimmy Thomson – The Narwhal – July 19, 2019
The federal government has boosted its investment in Indigenous-led conservation projects across the country, announcing it will commit $6.4 million into 22 projects. The funding is for the Indigenous Guardians pilot program, which began in 2017 with a $25 million announcement and now encompasses 40 programs across the country. The guardian’s projects put local Indigenous people on the land to monitor and protect their traditional territories. Read full story here.

Why Biodiversity Matters: Mapping the Linkages between Biodiversity and the SDGs

By Elsa Tsioumani, Ph.D. – SDG Knowledge Hub – July 16, 2019
Biodiversity is a concept difficult to understand or appreciate, let alone regulate and communicate. Defined in the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) as “the variability among living organisms from all sources including … diversity within species, between species and of ecosystems,” the term attempts to reflect the variation of, and interaction among, all life on Earth. Biodiversity matters, whether or not we think that specific species, genes or ecosystems are of direct interest to human needs. Read full story here.

'The river disappears, but the pollution doesn't'

By Ariel Wittenberg – E&E News – July 16, 2019
The Big Lost River earns its name. Beginning in Idaho's tallest peaks, moving through irrigation dams and diversions, the river flows into the desert here and simply ends. An ancient tributary to the iconic Snake River, the Big Lost was cut off by volcanic eruptions millions of years ago. Lava cooled into porous basalt, now covered by volcanic ash. When the river reaches the aptly named Sinks, it disappears underground. Read full story here.

Wetland Breaking News: August 2019An Innovative Underpass Keeps Turtles Off the Highway. It's Saved Dozens from Becoming Roadkill

By Rob Mentzer – Wisconsin Public Radio – July 10, 2019
The problem with the turtle underpass, at first, was that the turtles didn’t know it was a tunnel. Rather than a safe passage under the busy highway, turtles just saw a dark hole. It wasn’t very inviting, and few of them wanted to walk into it. Biologist Pete Zani had the idea of adding shiny aluminum flashing at either end of the tunnel. The metal would reflect light that would show the turtles what they were looking at was, in fact, a way under the highway. Zani and others installed the flashing, as well as grates above the tunnel on either side of the road to let some additional sunlight through. It worked. Turtles started to make their way under the road and have been using it ever since. Read full story here.

Sturgeon, America’s forgotten dinosaurs, show signs of life

By Ben Finley, Patrick Whittle and John Flesher – AP News – July 10, 2019 – Video
Sturgeon were America’s vanishing dinosaurs, armor-plated beasts that crowded the nation’s rivers until mankind’s craving for caviar pushed them to the edge of extinction. More than a century later, some populations of the massive bottom feeding fish are showing signs of recovery in the dark corners of U.S. waterways. Increased numbers are appearing in the cold streams of Maine, the lakes of Michigan and Wisconsin and the coffee-colored waters of Florida’s Suwannee River. A 14-foot Atlantic sturgeon — as long as a Volkswagen Beetle — was recently spotted in New York’s Hudson River. Read full story and view video here.

In an Era of Extreme Weather, Concerns Grow Over Dam Safety

By Jacques Leslie – YaleEnvironment360 – July 9, 2019
It is a telling illustration of the precarious state of United States dams that the near collapse in February 2017 of Oroville Dam, the nation’s tallest, occurred in California, considered one of the nation’s leading states in dam safety management. The Oroville incident forced the evacuation of nearly 190,000 people and cost the state $1.1 billion in repairs. It took its place as a seminal event in the history of U.S. dam safety, ranking just below the failures in the 1970s of two dams — Teton Dam in Idaho and Kelly Barnes in Georgia — that killed 14 and 39 people, respectively, and ushered in the modern dam safety era. Read full story here.
Wetland Breaking News: August 2019

Landscape with Beavers

By Stacy Passmore – Places Journal – July 2019
In the American West, beavers are gaining a reputation as environmental engineers who can help restore water systems — and challenge their human neighbors to think differently about land use. Left alone, beavers modify the environment more extensively than pretty much any other animal — except humans — and they fit their designs to the site context. Sometimes they build a single dam and maintain it for years. Elsewhere they create dozens of structures, shaping a watery world of ponds, shallow wetlands, and meadows. Read full article here.

 
Wetland Breaking News: August 2019

 Calendar of Events


WEBINARS
     
MEETINGS     
TRAINING  

 

Wetland Breaking News: August 2019

Special Events

BIOBLITZ 2019
July 19-20, 2019
Pickerington, OH

Wetland Explorations: Searching for Aquatic Critters and Amazing Plants
July 27, 2019
Pickerington, OH

Watching Monarhs
September 7, 2019
East Bethany, NY

National Estuaries Week
September 14-21, 2019

Voice of the Wetlands Festival
October 11-13, 2019
Houoma, LA

WEBINARS  
       
AUGUST 2019  
       
August 21, 2019
3:00 p.m. ET  
 
  Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Mapping Wetland Inundation Dynamics and Wetland Change using Google Earth Engine  
       
August 28, 2019
1:00 p.m. ET  
  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Webinar: Accelerating Statewide Green Infrastructure Investment in Rhode Island  
       
SEPTEMBER 2019  
       

September 10, 2019
2:00 p.m. ET

  Land Trust Alliance Webinar: Considering Climate Change in Conservation Planning  
     
September 17, 2019
1:00 p.m. ET
  Webinar: New Opportunities for Reducing Coastal Risk with Natural Defenses  
     
September 17, 2019
3:00 p.m. ET
 
  Association of State Wetland Managers Hot Topics Webinar: Indigenous Perspectives on Wetlands Science and Management  
     
September 18, 2019
1:00 p.m. ET
  Center for Watershed Protection Webcast 4: Stormwater Practice Design, Installation and Maintenance  
       
September 25, 2019
3:00 p.m. ET
 
  Association of State Wetland Managers Members’ Webinar: The Value of Wetlands for Natural Disaster Mitigation   
       
OCTOBER 2019     
       
October 15, 2019
3:00 p.m. ET 
 
  Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance Webinar: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers: Engineering with Nature  
       
October 16, 2019
1:00 p.m. ET 
 
  Center for Watershed Protection Webcast 5: Monitoring for Stream Restoration and Green Infrastructure Practices  
       
October 30, 2019
3:00 p.m. ET 
 
  Association of State Wetland Managers Members’ Webinar: Understanding California’s New Wetland Rules and Implications for Wetlands Management  
       

 

MEETINGS
 
AUGUST 2019   
   
August 21-25, 2019
Albuquerque, NM
  Western Field Ornithologist 44th Annual Conference
     
SEPTEMBER 2019
     
September 6-8, 2019
Crested Butte, CO
  2019 Guild of Rock Mountain Ecologist and Evolutionary Biologist
     
September 11-12, 2019
Cleveland, OH
  Great Lakes Area of Concern Conference
   
September 22-25, 2019
Phoenix, AZ
  Geological Society of American Annual Meeting
   
September 22-26, 2019
Sacramento, CA
International Conference on Ecology Transportation

   
September 23-29, 2019
New York, NY
  Climate Week 2019
   
September 29-
October 3, 2019

Reno, NV
  American Fisheries Society and the Wildlife Society Annual Meeting
     
OCTOBER 2019  
     

October 8-10, 2019
Pittsburgh, PA

Natural Areas Association: Natural Areas Conference

     
October 9-13, 2019
Fort Collins, CO
  Society of Environmental Journalists Conference
   
October 11-13, 2019
Wilmington, NC
  Diamondback Terrapin Working Group: 8th Symposium on the Ecology, Status, and Conservation of the Diamondback Terrapin
   
October 11-14, 2019
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI
  Sustainability & Development Conference
   
October 15-17, 2019
Atlantic City, NJ
  New Jersey Association for Floodplain Management Conference: One Water: Connecting the Dots of Floodplain Management
   
October 17-19, 2019
Raleigh, NC
  Land Trust Alliance Rally 2019
   
October 21-22, 2019
Oakland, CA
  San Francisco Estuary Partnership: State of teh Estuary Conference

October 27-30, 2019
Spokane, WA

AASHE Conference: Co-Creating a Sustainable Economy

     
NOVEMBER 2019
     
November 1-3, 2019
aizhou, China
  Invasion Ecology Lab, Taizhou University Conference: Current and Emerging Topics in Global Change Ecology of Plants
   
November 3-7, 2019
Mobile, AL
  CERF 2019 25th Biennial Conference: Responsive-Relevant-Ready
   
November 3-7, 2019
Salt Lake City, UT
  American Water Resources Association: Annual Water Resources Conference
   
November 8-10, 2019
University of Arizona
Tucson, AZ
  Society for Ecological Restoration Annual Conference
Abstracts and proposals due by August 30, 2019
     
November 14, 2019
Portland, OR
  The Wetlands Conservancy: Wetlands & Wellies
   
November 15-17, 2019
Shepherdstown, WV
 

Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Forum: Better Together: Diverse and Innovative Collaborations for the Chesapeake Watershed

     
DECEMBER 2019
     
December 10-14, 2019
Washington, DC
  AGU Fall Meeting: Science Communication: A Sharing Science Room
     
JANUARY 2020
     
January 3-7, 2020
Pacific Grove, CA
  American Society of Naturalists Stand Alone Meeting
     
January 29-30, 2020
Wlminton, DE
  Delaware Wetlands Conference 2020
Call for Abstract begins July 31, 2019
     
FEBRUARY 2020
     
February 16-21, 2020
San Diego, CA
  Ocean Sciences Meeting 
Abstracts due by September 11, 2019

     
February 18-20, 2020
Elkhart Lake, WI
  Wisconsin Wetlands Association: 25th Annual Wetland Science Conference
Call for Symposium and Workshop Proposals due: September 27, 2019
     
MARCH 2020
     
March 4-5, 2020
Washington, DC
  Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: Great Lakes Day 2020

     
March 23-26, 2020
Austin, TX
  American Water Resources Association Conference: Geospatial Water Technology Conference Complex Systems
     
JUNE 2020
     
June 7-11, 2020
Quebec City, Canada
  Canadian Land Reclamation Association (CLRA), the Society for Ecological Restoration (SER) and the Society of Wetland Scientists (SWS) joint Conference: From Reclaiming to Restoring and Rewilding
     
July 2020
     
July 5-10, 2020
Bremen, Germany
  14th International Coral Reef Symposium
Abstracts due by September 1, 2019
     

Eagle Hill Institute 2019 Seminars

TRAINING/WORKSHOPS
 
AUGUST 2019
     
August 26-29, 2019
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Grasses, Sedges and Rushes
     
August 28, 2019
Freeport, ME
  Cumberland County Soil & Water Conservation District: Wetland Identification and Protection Workshop
     
September 2019
     
September 4, 2019
Georgetown, ME
  Maine Association of Wetland Scientist: 2019 Soils and Natural Resouroces Workshop
     
September 4, 2019
Hatley, WI
  Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Hands-on Aquatic Plan ID Workshop
   
September 5-6, 2019
Hilliard, OH
  Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Ohio Rapid Assessment Method (ORAM) for Wetlands
September 6-8, 2019
Steuben, ME
Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Asteraceae: Fall Botanizing and Botanical Surveys
     
September 9-13, 2019
Covington, LA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
   
September 9-November 29, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
September 10-12, 2019
Avondale, PA
CUAHSI Workshop: DIY Water Monitoring Data Portals, and Watershed Modeling
     
September 23-27, 2019
Portage, WI
Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Riparian Habitat Restoration for the Arid Southwest
     
September 16-17, 2019
St. Michaels, MD
Environmental Concern Course: Evaluating Hydric Soils in the Field
   
September 16-20, 2019
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Essentials of Spatial Ecology: GIS Analysis with R, QGIS and Google Earth Engine
   
September 16-October 11, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessment
   
September 17-18, 2019
Toms River, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Vegetation Identification for Wetland Delineation: South
September 17-19, 2019
Pocono Mountains, PA
The Swamp School Workshop: Wetland Plant ID 
   
September 23-25, 2019
New Brunswick NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
     
September 23-25, 2019
New Brunswick NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Soils and Site Evaluation for Septic Disposal Systems and Stormwater BMPs
   
September 23-26, 2019
Hilliard, OH
  Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Wetland Delinetation
   
September 23-27, 2019
Trout Lake Station
Boulder Junction, WI
  North Temperate Lakes LTER and the Universtiy of Wisconsin-Madion's Trout Lake State: Aquatic Sensors Workshop
     
September 25, 2019
Spokane, WA
  Washington Department of Ecology Course: Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
   
September 25-26, 2019
Niles, MI 
Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Advanced Wetland Delineation
   
September 27-29, 2019
Steuben, ME
Eagle Hill Natural History Science Fall Workshop: Fall Maine Mushrooms
   
September 30
-October 4, 2019

St. Michaels, MD
Environmental Concern Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
     
October 2019
     
October 1, 2019
Vernon, WA
  Washington Department of Ecology Course: Using Field Indicators for Hydric Soils 
     
October 2-4, 2019
Hillsborough, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Wetland Construction: Principles, Planning and Design
   
October 7-11, 2019
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Basic Wetland Delineation 
     
October 7-18, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Stream Restoration Part 1 – Stream Physics
October 7-November 1, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2019
Other dates offered
   
October 11-13, 2019
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Natural History Science Fall Workshop: Bryophytes: Mosses and Liverworts
   
October 14-18, 2019
Shepherdstown, WV
  Stream Mechanics Workshop: Stream Functions Pyramid
   
October 14-November 8, 2019
Onlinle
  The Swamp School Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment
Other dates offered
   
October 15, 2019
Boulder, CO 
CUAHSI Workshop: The Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System 
   
October 21-24, 2019
Pittsburgh, PA
  The Swamp School Workshop: Principles of Wetland Design
   
October 22-25, 2019
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Methodology for Delineating Wetlands
   
October 23, 2019
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Introduction to Wetland Identification
   
October 25-27, 2019
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Natural History Science Fall Workshop: Crustose and Foliose Lichens
     
NOVEMBER 2019   
     
November 6, 2019
Shoreline, WA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Demystifying Wetland and IN-Water Permitting in Washington State
     
November 7-8 2019
Somerset, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Lake Management
   
November 11-13, 2019
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Winter Woody Plant ID
   
November 11-January 31, 2019 
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design
Other dates offered
   
November 14-15, 2019
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
   
November 18-19, 2019
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands, and Hydrology (Piedmont)
   
November 25-
December 23, 2019

Online
  The Swamp School Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment
     
   DECEMBER 2019
     
December 2-5, 2019
Atlanta, GA 
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
     
December 2-13, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Stream Restoration Part 2 – Stream Site Assessment Techniques
   
December 2-29, 2019 Online 
  The Swamp School Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2019
     
December 11-12, 2019 Portage, WI   Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Problematic Delineation Seminar
   
December 16-27, 2019
Online 
  The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
 
     
February 2020
     
February 10-21, 2020
Onlinle
  The Swamp School Course: Stream Restoration Part 3 – Stream Ecology
     
     

 

 

 

INDEX

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • Has the Endangered Species Act saved ‘very few’ plants and animals?
  • Chair DeFazio Presses EPA on Its Decision to Limit States Rights Within the Clean Water Act
  • Fourteen AGs Blast EPA Guidance Limiting State Clean Water Act Permitting Authority
  • EPA Proposes Rule to Narrow, Streamline CWA Section 401 Review

 

NATIONAL NEWS

  • Environmentalists renew bid to overturn EPA policy barring scientists from advisory panels
  • Pair of GOP senators propose easing Obama water rule
  • EPA punts on latest Pebble mine decision
  • New Bill May Fund Wetland Restoration
  • Migratory Birds to Benefit from $20 Million in Funding Throughout the Americas
  • Water Funding for Estuaries: The Glue That Guards Against Storm Devastation
  • Highlights from the Trump Administration’s Rulemaking Agenda
  • Interior to move most of Bureau of Land Management’s D.C. staff out west as part of larger reorganization push
  • Recovering America's Wildlife Act Introduced

STATE NEWS

  • AR: Creatures of Arkansas’ Tallgrass Prairies
  • CA: California's Future Weather Will Alternate Between Drought and Atmospheric Rivers
  • DC: D.C. Is Vulnerable to Three Types of Flooding. Climate Change is Making Them All Worse.
  • ID: Tribe, Environmental Groups Sue Oregon Agency Over Dam Deal
  • IL: ICC’s constructed wetland expected to hold a slew of benefits
  • IA: Worth County wetland project billed as first of its kind in state
  • KS: Wichita’s newest park — a 91-acre wetlands — is officially open to the public
  • MD: Anne Arundel wants to identify more bogs to inform 20-year development plan
  • MD: Bloede Dam Removal Project Complete
  • MT: Enviro groups tout 'big win' in Montanore mining lawsuit
  • NH: Governor vetoes wetlands bill
  • NY: Volunteers Help Create Wetland Habitat for Onondaga Lake Wildlife Visitors
  • NC: Navy Issues Finding on Plan to Fill Wetlands
  • OR: Clean Water Rule Stalled in Oregon
  • OR: Judge orders state DEQ to do more to shield salmon streams
  • TX: More than 100 Wetland Mitigation Banking Credits Available for Galveston Bay Area
  • VA: Scientists: Hampton Roads to get steamier and "floodier"
  • WI: Wisconsin Indian tribe files suit to remove Enbridge pipeline from reservation
 

Wetland Breaking News: July 2019


INDEX


Editor's Choice

National News

State News

Wetland Science News

Resources & Publications

Potpouri

Calendar of Events

WETLAND SCIENCE NEWS

  • What you need to know about the link between sea-level rise and coastal flooding
  • Mapping the strain on our water
  • Who Will Pay for the Huge Costs of Holding Back Rising Seas?
  • US Infrastructure Unprepared for Increasing Frequency of Extreme Storms
  • UMD Case Study Examines How Green Infrastructure Can Help Suburban Environments Manage Increasingly Intense Stormwater and Adapt to Climate Change
  • Climate stripes" graphics show U.S. trends by state and county
  • Climate changes faster than animals adapt
  • NOAA, partners predict large summer harmful algal bloom for western Lake Erie
  • With More Big Storms, We Need More Infrastructure Funding
  • Fish Die-offs Linked to Hotter Summers

RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONS

  • Blue Accounting releases most comprehensive database of coastal wetlands projects in the Great Lakes
  • ELI Issues New Report on In-Lieu Fee Wetland Mitigation

POTOURRI Wetland Breaking News: August 2019

  • In a flash, nature’s night lights add sparkle to summer nights
  • The Problem with Levees
  • Why Isn’t Publicly Funded Conservation on Private Land More Accountable?
  • Indigenous Guardians get $6.4 million to monitor traditional territories
  • Why Biodiversity Matters: Mapping the Linkages between Biodiversity and the SDGs
  • The river disappears, but the pollution doesn't'
  • An Innovative Underpass Keeps Turtles Off the Highway. It's Saved Dozens from Becoming Roadkill
  • Sturgeon, America’s forgotten dinosaurs, show signs of life
  • In an Era of Extreme Weather, Concerns Grow Over Dam Safety
  • Landscape with Beavers

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Webinars

August 2019

  • Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Mapping Wetland Inundation Dynamics and Wetland Change using Google Earth Engine
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Webinar: Accelerating Statewide Green Infrastructure Investment in Rhode Island

September 2019

  • Land Trust Alliance Webinar: Considering Climate Change in Conservation Planning
  • Webinar: New Opportunities for Reducing Coastal Risk with Natural Defenses
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Hot Topics Webinar: Indigenous Perspectives on Wetlands Science and Management
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webcast 4: Stormwater Practice Design, Installation and Maintenance
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Members’ Webinar: The Value of Wetlands for Natural Disaster Mitigation

October 2019

  • Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance Webinar: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers: Engineering with Nature
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webcast 5: Monitoring for Stream Restoration and Green Infrastructure Practices
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Members’ Webinar: Understanding California’s New Wetland Rules and Implications for Wetlands Management

 

MEETINGSWetland Breaking News: August 2019

August 2019

  • Western Field Ornithologist 44th Annual Conference

September 2019

  • 2019 Guild of Rock Mountain Ecologist and Evolutionary Biologist
  • Great Lakes Area of Concern Conference
  • Geological Society of America Annual Meeting
  • International Conference on Ecology & Transportation
  • Climate Week 2019
  • American Fisheries Society and the Wildlife Society Annual Meeting

October 2019

  • Natural Areas Association: Natural Areas Conference
  • Society of Environmental Journalists Conference
  • Diamondback Terrapin Working Group: 8th Symposium on the Ecology, Status, and Conservation of the Diamondback Terrapin
  • Sustainability & Development Conference
  • New Jersey Association for Floodplain Management Conference: One Water: Connecting the Dots of Floodplain Management
  • Land Trust Alliance Rally 2019
  • San Francisco Estuary Partnership: State of the Estuary Conference
  • AASHE Conference: Co-Creating a Sustainable Economy

November 2019

  • Invasion Ecology Lab, Taizhou University Conference: Current and Emerging Topics in Global Change Ecology of Plants
  • CERF 2019 25th Biennial Conference: Responsive-Relevant-Ready
  • American Water Resources Association: Annual Water Resources Conference
  • Society for Ecological Restoration Annual Conference
  • The Wetlands Conservancy: Wetlands & Wellies
  • Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Forum: Better Together: Diverse and Innovative Collaborations for the Chesapeake Watershed

December 2019Wetland Breaking News: July 2019

  • AGU Fall Meeting: Science Communication: A Sharing Science Room

January 2020

  • American Society of Naturalists Stand Alone Meeting
  • Delaware Wetlands Conference 2020

February 2020

  • Ocean Sciences Meeting
  • Wisconsin Wetlands Association: 25th Annual Wetland Science Conference

March 2020

  • Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: Great Lakes Day 2020
  • American Water Resources Association Conference: Geospatial Water Technology Conference: Complex Systems

June 2020

  • Canadian Land Reclamation Association (CLRA), the Society for Ecological Restoration (SER) and the Society of Wetland Scientists (SWS) joint Conference: From Reclaiming to Restoring and Rewilding

July 2020

  • 14th International Coral Reef Symposium

Training/Workshops

August 2019

  • Environmental Concern Course: Grasses. Sedges and Rushes
  • Cumberland County Soil & Water Conservation District: Wetland Identification and Protection Workshop

September 2019

  • Maine Association of Wetland Scientist: 2019 Soils and Natural Resources Workshop
  • Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Hands-on Aquatic Plan ID Workshop
  • Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Ohio Rapid Assessment Method (ORAM) for Wetlands
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Fall Workshop: Asteraceae: Fall Botanizing and Botanical Surveys
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
  • CUAHSI Workshop: DIY Water Monitoring Data Portals, and Watershed Modeling
  • Environmental Concern Course: Evaluating Hydric Soils in the Field 
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Essentials of Spatial Ecology: GIS Analysis with R, QGIS and Google Earth Engine
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments 
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Vegetation Identification for Wetland Delineation: South
  • The Swamp School: Wetland Plant ID Workshop 
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Soils and Site Evaluation for Septic Disposal Systems and Stormwater BMPs
  • Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Wetland Delineation
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • North Temperate Lakes LTER and the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Trout Lake State: Aquatic Sensors Workshop
  • Washington Department of Ecology Course: Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
  • Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Advanced Wetland Delineation
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Fall Workshop: Fall Maine Mushrooms
  • Environmental Concern Course: Basic Wetland Delineation

October 2019

  • Washington Department of Ecology Course: Using Field Indicators for Hydric Soils
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Wetland Construction: Principles, Planning and Design
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Stream Restoration Part 1 – Stream Physics
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2019
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Fall Workshop: Bryophytes: Mosses and Liverworts
  • Stream Mechanics Workshop: Stream Functions Pyramid
  • The Swamp School Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment
  • CUAHSI Workshop: The Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System 
  • The Swamp School Workshop: Principles of Wetland Design
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Methodology for Delineating Wetlands
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Introduction to Wetland Identification
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Fall Workshop: Crustose and Foliose Lichens

November 2019

  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Demystifying Wetland and IN-Water Permitting in Washington State
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Lake Management
  • Environmental Concern Course: Winter Woody Plant ID
  • The Swamp School Online Workshop: Principles of Wetland Design
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands, and Hydrology (Piedmont)
  • The Swamp School Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment

December 2019

  • The Swamp School Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Stream Restoration Part 2 – Stream Site Assessment Techniques
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2019
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Problematic Delineation Seminar
  • The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals

  
Wetland Breaking News: August 2019

Wetland Breaking News: August 2019

 

Wetland Breaking News:May 2019