IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

To view past issues of Wetland Breaking News on our website, please click here.

Visit ASWM online to read weekly news updates between issues.

Please send comments and news stories to .

Thank you for your continued interest.

PRINT THIS ISSUE

All photos by
Jeanne Christie, ASWM

   


Dear Wetlandsers,

The role of agriculture in the loss and degradation of wetlands across the United States is well documented. However, it’s a complicated relationship with many farmers who are trying to do the right thing. Development and stormwater pollution are further complicating efforts to make progress. Fortunately, there have been many advances in policy and practice over the last 10-20 years that have tried to address the financial needs of farmers while simultaneously improving wetland and watershed health.

I have included several articles in this edition of Wetland Breaking News that explore issues associated with agriculture and wetlands. In some, we are clearly losing ground, e.g., The Gulf of Mexico's 'Dead Zone' Is Bigger Than it Has Ever Been Before while it appears that in some cases we are making progress, e.g., Bay 'dead zone' smaller than predicted this summer.

Clean and safe drinking water is at risk nationwide due to fertilizer and stormwater run-off into our surface waters and streams. And sometimes, our efforts to disinfect our drinking water are adding more contaminants (see What Our Tap Water Says About the Way We Farm).

And drought is making water very scarce, particularly in the corn-belt and arid west. But in some states like Nevada, farmers are proposing novel solutions. In South Dakota, they are expected to reach a milestone this month for acres of land enrolled in the USDA Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP). And in Illinois, the Wetlands Initiative is building new partnerships with farmers to construct nutrient-removal wetlands to improve downstream water quality in the Gulf of Mexico.

I hope you enjoy this issue of Wetland Breaking News as we focus on agriculture and watershed health.

Best regards,
Marla J. Stelk
Editor, Wetland Breaking News

   
             
             

Comment Period for Proposed Rule to Rescind Clean Water Rule Extended 30 days to September 27

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – August 16, 2017
EPA and the Army are extending the comment period by 30 days for the proposed first step of the review of the definition of ‘Waters of the U.S.’ to provide additional time for stakeholders to weigh in. The comment period, as now extended, will close on September 27, 2017. The proposed rule was signed by Administrator Scott Pruitt and posted to EPA’s website on June 27th and published in the Federal Register on July 27th. With this extension, the public will have more than 90 days to review the proposal. When finalized, the proposed rule would replace the 2015 Clean Water Rule with the regulations that were in effect immediately preceding the 2015 rule. For more information on the proposed rule, click here. For the comment extension notice, click here.

Trump infrastructure push rolls back environmental rules

By Valerie Volcovici and Jeff Mason – Reuters – August 15, 2017
U.S. President Donald Trump on Tuesday rolled back rules regarding environmental reviews and restrictions on government-funded building projects in flood-prone areas as part of his proposal to spend $1 trillion to fix aging U.S. infrastructure. Trump's latest executive order would speed approvals of permits for highways, bridges, pipelines and other major building efforts. It revokes an Obama-era executive order aimed at reducing exposure to flooding, sea level rise and other consequences of climate change. For full story, click here.

The Gulf of Mexico's 'Dead Zone' Is Bigger Than it Has Ever Been Before

By Janet McConnaughey – Time.com – August 2, 2017 – Video
There's an unwanted record in the Gulf of Mexico: This year's "dead zone," a largely human-caused phenomenon where there's too little oxygen to support marine life, is the biggest ever measured. The low-oxygen, or hypoxic, zone covers 8,776 square miles (22,720 square kilometers) — about the size of New Jersey, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Wednesday. The area is more than 3% larger than the 2002 dead zone, the previous record. "We predicted it would be large, and it is large," said scientist Nancy Rabalais, who has been measuring the dead zone since 1985. For full story, click here.

Bay 'dead zone' smaller than predicted this summer

By Josh Bollinger – July 31, 2017
Following what could have been bad news that broke in June for the Chesapeake Bay’s low-oxygen zone, scientists have found that the “dead zone” is “much better than average for early June,” according to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Dead zones are hypoxic areas of the Bay with little to no oxygen, which stresses fish and other Bay life, like oyster and crabs, which need oxygen to support life. They are fueled by excess nutrient pollution, which feeds algae blooms, and when the algae dies it settles to the bottom and absorbs the oxygen in the water. The dead zone was originally expected to be larger than average this summer, with scientists in June pointing to higher than average spring rainfall amounts in New York and Pennsylvania, and that stormwater would makes its way to the Susquehanna River, which flows south until it reaches the headwaters of the Chesapeake Bay, and this spring brought with it above average nitrogen loads, a nutrient that helps fuel algae growth. For full story, click here.

EPA Water Rule Repeal Based on Sloppy Cost Analysis: Economists

By Amena H. Saiyid – Bloomberg BNA – July 27, 2017
The Trump administration was sloppy in how it estimated the economic impact of a proposal to repeal an Obama-era water pollution regulation, relying on data and assumptions that industry previously criticized, according to economists and regulatory analysts interviewed by Bloomberg BNA. Chief among their complaints was that the Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers used recession-era economic data and failed to account for some of the benefits of leaving the 2015 Clean Water Rule in place. For full story, click here. 

 

  

 

EPA plans to rewrite Obama-era limits for coal power plant wastewater

By Michael Biesecker, Associated Press – PBS Newshour – August 14, 2017
The Environmental Protection Agency says it plans to scrap an Obama-era measure limiting water pollution from coal-fired power plants. A letter from EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt released Monday as part of a legal appeal said he will seek to revise the 2015 guidelines mandating increased treatment for wastewater from steam electric power-generating plants. For full story, click here.

Native American tribes fight for clean water and more money

By Lauren Kaljur and Macee Beheler – News21- Troubled Water – August 14, 2017
When John Doyle first noticed signs of trouble in the Little Bighorn River, he was still a young member of the Apsaalooke Nation in southeastern Montana. Stagnant water would pool in some areas, filling with algae. It wouldn’t even freeze in the cold of winter. Later, catfish would turn up with quarter-size white sores. Doyle knew something had gone seriously wrong with the river – from which tribal members would drink, swim and practice religious ceremonies. He took his observations to officials from the Bureau of Indian Affairs. After several months, he went to them again. And again. For full story, click here.

Scott Pruitt Is Carrying Out His E.P.A. Agenda in Secret, Critics Say

By Coral Davenport and Eric Lipton – The New York Times – August 11, 2017
When career employees of the Environmental Protection Agency are summoned to a meeting with the agency’s administrator, Scott Pruitt, at agency headquarters, they no longer can count on easy access to the floor where his office is, according to interviews with employees of the federal agency. Doors to the floor are now frequently locked, and employees have to have an escort to gain entrance. Some employees say they are also told to leave behind their cellphones when they meet with Mr. Pruitt, and are sometimes told not to take notes. Mr. Pruitt, according to the employees, who requested anonymity out of fear of losing their jobs, often makes important phone calls from other offices rather than use the phone in his office, and he is accompanied, even at E.P.A. headquarters, by armed guards, the first head of the agency to ever request round-the-clock security. For full story, click here.

Study: Fines for illegal pollution plummet under Trump

By Michael Biesecker, Associated Press – ABC News – August 10, 2017
Fines for illegal pollution have plummeted under President Donald Trump, according to analysis by an environmental advocacy group. The Environmental Integrity Project looked at civil penalties paid by polluters during the first six months under Trump. The group published an analysis Thursday that found penalties were less than half their levels under each of the past three presidents. The analysis found that Trump's Justice Department settled 26 civil cases against companies over environmental violations, totaling $12 million in penalties. That's a 60 percent drop on average from comparable time periods under presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush or Bill Clinton, even before adjustments for inflation. Besides reaching fewer settlements, the group said, environmental offenders also were required to perform less cleanup under Trump and make smaller reductions to future pollution. For full story, click here.

Obama-era greater sage grouse protections face changes under Trump

CBS News – August 8, 2017
President Trump's administration has opened the door to industry-friendly changes to a sweeping plan imposed by his predecessor to protect a ground-dwelling bird across vast areas of the West. Wildlife advocates warn that the proposed changes would undercut a hard-won struggle to protect the greater sage grouse. Representatives of the ranching and energy industries cheered the policy shift as needed to give states flexibility. A document outlining the recommended changes was released Monday by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke. For full story, click here.

Scrapping Climate Protections Would Erase $300 Billion in Benefits, Study Finds

By Nicholas Kusnetz – InsideClimate News – August 7, 2017
The Trump administration has been systematically dismantling the nation's climate change regulations, often claiming a high cost of compliance as justification. But a new study says keeping those rules would actually save nearly $300 billion a year by 2030. "That just gives you a sense of the scale of the impact of the climate deregulation that's underway right now," said Jessica Wentz, a staff attorney at Columbia University's Sabin Center for Climate Change Law and one of the study's authors. To get the figure, Wentz and a colleague took the cost-benefit analyses published by the federal government with each major greenhouse gas emissions rule issued under Barack Obama—regulations that touched on the power sector, the oil and gas industry and automobiles—and essentially added them up. For full story, click here. 

Mapping Coastal Flood Risk Lags Behind Sea Level Rise

By Christopher Joyce – WWNO.org – July 27, 2017
Sea levels are rising and climate scientists blame global warming. They predict that higher seas will cause more coastal flooding through this century and beyond, even in places that have normally been high and dry. But mapping where future floods will strike has barely begun. The Federal Emergency Management Agency maps where people are at moderate or high risk of flooding. Most people with property in hazardous areas — where the annual risk of a flood is one in a hundred or more — are required by law to buy federal flood insurance from FEMA's National Flood Insurance Program. But FEMA's insurance maps are based on past patterns of flooding. Future sea level rise — which is expected to create new, bigger flood zones — is not factored in. For full story, click here.

Trump Administration Moving Closer to Picking Science Director

By Randy Showstock – EOS – July 27, 2017
President Donald Trump could be nearing a decision to appoint a director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), a post whose occupant typically also is the assistant to the president for science and technology. “There is still momentum” for choosing a director, said an administration official knowledgeable about current circumstances within OSTP. To speak openly with Eos, he requested that his name not be published. “I really think that this could be locked in within the next 4 to 6 weeks,” he added. “It’s overdue.” Several former OSTP directors and other scientists knowledgeable about the office strongly agree with that last statement. Some of them told Eos that they are increasingly alarmed that the Trump administration has not yet selected a director and that the office is understaffed more than 6 months after Trump’s inauguration in January. For full story, click here.

What Our Tap Water Says About the Way We Farm

By Twilight Greenaway – Civil Eats – July 26, 2017
When the news broke earlier this summer that cancer-causing chemicals had spiked in my local tap water, I was alarmed. But, like many of the 1.4 million people living in Oakland, Berkeley, Richmond, and a number of other cities on the eastern slopes of the San Francisco Bay Area impacted by the news, I wasn’t sure how concerned I should be. “The water is safe to drink,” a water district spokesperson told the East Bay Times. But there are “risks of consuming it over a lifetime,” she added. The contaminants in question are called trihalomethanes (THMs), a byproduct of the disinfectants used to kill organic matter in water. And, according to Craig Cox, senior vice president for agriculture and natural resources at the Environmental Working Group (EWG), byproducts like these are increasingly common. For full story, click here.

8 Senators Call for Probe of ‘Arbitrary’ Reassignment of Federal Scientists

By Sabrina Shankman – InsideClimate News – July 24, 2017
Eight U.S. senators called for an investigation today after a federal climate scientist filed a whistleblower complaint alleging that he had been arbitrarily reassigned by the Trump administration in what he believed was retaliation for speaking out publicly about the dangers climate change poses to Alaska Native communities. The scientist, Joel Clement, had been working on climate adaptation in Alaska for the Department of Interior when he was moved to an obscure accounting position that deals with fossil fuel royalty payments. The senators, all members of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, asked the deputy inspector general in the Department of Interior to look into allegations that as many as 50 Senior Executive Service employees at the department have been arbitrarily reassigned. For full story, click here.

Panel approves Interior-EPA spending bill

By Kellie Lunney and Sean Reilly – E&E News – July 19, 2017
The House Appropriations Committee late yesterday approved a $31.4 billion spending bill for U.S. EPA, the Interior Department and related agencies, giving them over $800 million less than fiscal 2017 but rejecting many of the administration's steeper cuts for programs popular with lawmakers and constituents. The White House wanted to slash EPA's budget by 31 percent and sought an approximate 13 percent cut for Interior in fiscal 2018. But Republican and Democratic appropriators in both chambers have said they were uncomfortable with cuts targeting a wide range of programs, from regional water cleanup efforts to land acquisition and conservation. For full story, click here.

The country’s flood insurance program is sinking. Rescuing it won’t be easy.

By Brady Dennis – The Washington Post – July 16, 2017
Time after time, as the river has risen and the water has crept up Roosevelt Street, Leni-anne Shuchter has fled the white clapboard home she bought more than four decades ago. There was the night in 1984 when rescuers plucked her from a neighbor’s roof as floodwaters engulfed her house. And the months in 2011 when she and her husband, John Van Seters, lived in a hotel after torrential rains from Hurricane Irene forced them to gut walls and floors and replace nearly everything they owned. In between, other storms have forced her to file claim after claim with the troubled National Flood Insurance Program so she could rebuild. Yet the small home remains as vulnerable as ever, a reality reflected by its falling value in recent years. For full story, click here.

Trump Plan Would 'Reduce or Eliminate' Important Data Access, Federal Science Official Warns

By Bob Berwyn – InsideClimate News – July 15, 2017
A U.S. Geological Survey program coordinator has sent an alert to colleagues around the world, warning that the Trump administration's proposed 2018 budget cuts, if approved, will undermine important data-gathering programs and cooperative studies in areas including forests, volcanoes, flooding, wildfires, extreme precipitation and climate change. The email went to 500 researchers on June 19 to give them time to comment on the proposed changes and prepare. In it, Debra Willard, coordinator for the USGS Climate Research and Development Program, wrote that the cuts "would reduce or eliminate the availability of current data and collaborations between the USGS, other agencies and universities." The reductions threaten as many as 40 programs involved in monitoring the speed and severity of climate change impacts and the effects of other land use changes, Willard said. So far, the agency has received responses from dozens of scientists in Europe, Asia, and North America. For full story, click here.

Forecasters: Lake Erie algae bloom shaping up as big and possibly harmful

By Keith Matheny – Detroit Free Press – July 13, 2017 – Video
The forecast for western Lake Erie for later this summer into fall?: Green and mucky. The algae blooms that have plagued the lake in recent years are expected to be worse than normal this year, well above the size at which they can potentially become harmful to aquatic life and even humans, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration forecasters announced Thursday. This year's algae bloom, which usually begins in late July and can continue into October, is expected to measure 7.5 on a severity index developed by NOAA and other researchers, but could range between 6.5 and 9.5. The largest blooms since the problem returned to Lake Erie in the late 1990s, in 2011 and 2015, were 10 and 10.5, respectively, on the severity index. For full story, click here.

"Big Muddy" Missouri River needs a plan

Morning Ag Clips – July 11, 2017
As the Missouri River flows across the Great Plains to where it meets the Mississippi River at St. Louis, it accumulates such a large sediment load that it has earned the nickname “Big Muddy.” A recent University of Illinois study looks at the history of the river, damages and changes from the 2011 flood, and its current post-flood condition. The study concludes that the river needs a comprehensive plan with multi-state cooperation. For full story, click here.

Proposed EPA permit violates Clean Water Act, group alleges

By David Hammer – WWLTV – July 11, 2017
An environmental group is accusing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency of violating federal pollution laws by allowing oil and gas companies to dump an unlimited quantity of fracking chemicals into the Gulf of Mexico. The Center for Biological Diversity sent a formal comment to the EPA regarding a proposed permit that will cover oil and gas operations in the western part of the Gulf of Mexico for the next five years. That permit proposes requiring companies for the first time to keep a list of chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, but would not limit their discharge with processed water that is regularly dumped overboard. For full story, click here.

Trump analysis slashes WOTUS's economic benefits

By Ariel Wittenberg – E&E News – July 7, 2017
U.S. EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers are disputing their own economic analysis of the 2015 Clean Water Rule, now saying most benefits they previously ascribed to the Obama-era regulation can no longer be quantified. The agencies criticize their previous calculations in a new analysis of the economic impacts of repealing the Clean Water Rule, which seeks to clarify which wetlands and small waterways are protected by the Clean Water Act. The Trump administration has made repealing the Clean Water Rule, also known as the Waters of the U.S. (WOTUS) rule, a priority. The administration's new economic analysis, released this week along with a proposed WOTUS repeal, maintains the previously calculated costs of implementing the rule but reduces the regulation's benefits by 85 to 90 percent. For full story, click here.

 
 

AK: As Hilcorp Plans to Drill in Arctic Waters, a Troubling Trail of Violations Surfaces

By Sabrina Shankman – InsideClimate News – August 10, 2017
In the energy industry, Hilcorp has built a reputation for fast growth, big profits and making people rich. This 28-year-old Houston-based company has kept a low public profile while becoming one of the top five privately held oil and gas producers in the United States. Founder Jeffery Hildebrand has become a billionaire, rising up the ranks of the hundred richest Americans. Employees, who got six-figure bonuses for meeting output goals, rave online about their employer, which Fortune magazine has lauded as one of the 100 best companies to work for five years in a row. In regulatory circles, however, and among environmentalists, Hilcorp has become known for different reasons. As the company has bought up older oil and gas fields from bigger companies, a business strategy known as "acquire and exploit," it has amassed a troubling safety and environmental track record in Alaska and several other states. For full story, click here.

AK: Controversial Alaskan gold mine could be revived under Trump’s EPA

By Brady Dennis – The Washington Post – July 11, 2017
The Trump administration has taken a key step toward paving the way for a controversial gold, copper and molybdenum mine in Alaska’s Bristol Bay watershed, marking a sharp reversal from President Barack Obama’s opposition to the project. The Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday proposed withdrawing its 2014 determination barring any large-scale mine in the area because it would imperil the region’s valuable sockeye salmon fishery. The agency said it would accept public comments on the proposal for the next 90 days. For full story, click here.

CA: California Sues for Answers About Pruitt's EPA Stewardship

By Andrew M. Harris – Bloomberg.com – August 11, 2017
California Attorney General Xavier Becerra sued the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to compel it to say what steps were taken to ensure its rule making and procedures remain impartial even as it’s led by a man who opposed the EPA in at least a half dozen lawsuits while serving as Oklahoma’s attorney general. For full story, click here.

CA: U.S. eases environment laws for Mexico border wall near San Diego

By Susan Heavey – Reuters – August 1, 2017
The United States will waive environmental rules so extra barriers can be built to bar illegal immigrants from crossing the border with Mexico near San Diego, the Department of Homeland Security said on Tuesday. The projects, on about 15 miles (24 km) of the frontier extending east from the Pacific Ocean, are part of President Donald Trump's planned wall between the United States and Mexico. For full story, click here.

CA: California Proposes New Permitting Procedures for Impacts to Wetlands and Waters of the State

The National Law Review – July 24, 2017
On July 21, 2017, the California State Water Resources Control Board (State Board) published its latest proposal for new permitting procedures that would apply to waters of the State, including wetlands. The proposal – which would define wetlands, create delineation procedures, and impose requirements for an alternatives analysis and mitigation – will be vetted through workshops and a public hearing, with the public comment period ending September 7, 2017. The State Board could adopt the proposal as early as the fall of 2017. The proposed State Wetland Definition and Procedures for Discharges of Dredged or Fill Materials to Waters of the State represent the latest development in a program the State Board has been working on since 2007, in response to U.S. Supreme Court decisions narrowing the scope of aquatic resources subject to the federal Clean Water Act (CWA). For full story, click here.

CA: Did rogue paddlers, Scalia cement protection for LA River?

By Ariel Wittenberg and Jeremy P. Jacobs – E&E News – July 24, 2017
A possible survivor of the Trump administration's efforts to limit Clean Water Act protections is a concrete canal that looks more like a highway than a waterway: the Los Angeles River. The 51-mile river — famous as a soundstage for "Terminator 2," "Grease," "Transformers" and many other movies featuring car chases — also played a starring role in a 2006 Supreme Court opinion by Justice Anthony Kennedy. He used the river to show why Justice Antonin Scalia was incorrect in asserting that only relatively permanent waterways should be shielded by the Clean Water Act. For full story, click here.

CA: GOP push to shift state water policy away from conservation

By Carolyn Lochhead – San Francisco Chronicle – July 19, 2017
With a friend in the White House and their party in control of both chambers of Congress, House Republicans have embarked on their most ambitious effort yet to change the way water flows in California. Legislation that the House sent to the Senate last week outlines a bold effort to build big new dams and shift water from fish, birds and other wildlife to farms in the San Joaquin Valley. For full story, click here.

CO: Sen. Bennet cosponsors Improving Access to Farm Conservation Act

The Fence Post – August 8, 2017
Colorado U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet joined his colleagues, Sens. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., John Boozman, R-Ark., Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, and Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., in cosponsoring the bipartisan Improving Access to Farm Conservation Act to improve access to voluntary farm conservation programs administered through the Natural Resources Conservation Service. "Farmers and ranchers in Colorado are eager to enroll in conservation programs, but are often hindered by the onerous reporting requirements," Bennet said. "This bill would remove the time-consuming and unnecessary reporting requirements for small farmers, making it easier for them to take advantage of tools to protect soil and water resources and improve wildlife habitat." For full story, click here.

FL: Two Sad Ironies In Florida Passing Its 'Anti-Science' Law

By Marshall Shepherd – Forbes – July 1, 2017
It is officially called Florida House Bill 989, and it was signed into law by Florida Governor Rick Scott on June 26th, 2017 after passing both chambers of the house. According to the National Center for Science Education’s website: With the law now in place, any county resident — not just any parent with a child in the country’s public schools, as was the case previously — can now file a complaint about instructional materials in the county’s public schools, and the school will now have to appoint a hearing officer to hear the complaint. For full story, click here.

LA: Help Louisiana scientists track spread of wetland-killing bug

By Tristan Baurick – NOLA.com – The Times-Picayume – August 1, 2017
Scientists want the public's help tracking the spread of a foreign insect that's been decimating a plant important to the health of Louisiana's coastal wetlands. The Louisiana State University AgCenter has launched an online survey for collecting data on the insect, a type of scale or mealybug from Asia. Identified only a few months ago, the bug has already killed more than 200,000 acres of roseau cane, a tall grass scientists call phragmites. Roseau's sturdy roots hold much of the lower Mississippi River Delta's landscape in place, and its densely-packed stalks catch passing river sediment, helping to build and retain marshland. Without the cane, the coast's already rapid rate of erosion will increase, scientists say. For full story, click here.

LA: Wetland restoration altered to benefit oil and gas, audit finds

By Tristan Baurick – NOLA.com – The Times-Picayume – July 27, 2017
More than a decade ago, Louisiana put forth a plan to reconnect silt-clogged Bayou Postillion with the rich swamplands of the Atchafalaya River Basin. It was billed as an ecological project, but along the way the Department of Natural Resources bowed to pressure from Iberia Parish landowners and changed what had been a restoration effort into one that also benefited the private property owners and facilitated oil and gas drilling. In the process, the department even hired one of the landowners, an attorney who was representing other property owners seeking improvements on their land. For full story, click here.

LA: USGS finds rate of long term wetland loss in Louisiana is slowing

WWL.com – July 13, 2017
The U.S. Geological Survey has found the long term rate of Louisiana wetland loss is slowing. Research Geographer Brady Couvillion says analysis finds rates of land area loss have continued to decrease since the 1970s. He says one possible reason for this is the lack of major hurricane activity over the past 8 years. “We had experienced quite a bit of loss from the hurricanes of 2005 and 2008, Katrina, Rita, Gustav and Ike. Since that time, we’ve had a period of hiatus from tropical activity.” About half of the county’s wetlands have been lost over the last 200 years, with the greatest losses in Louisiana where an area the size of Delaware has been lost since the 1930s. Couvillion says one possible reason for the long term decrease in loss is the relocation of the oil and gas industry inland or offshore. For full story, click here.

LA: Seeking Supreme Court Review of Suit Against Energy Industry

By Keven McGill, Associated Press – U.S. News – July 11, 2017
A Louisiana flood protection board has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to revive its lawsuit seeking to make oil, gas and pipeline companies pay for decades of damage to coastal wetlands, hoping to reverse losses in the lower federal courts. The suit drew fierce opposition from the energy industry and many in state government when it was filed in 2013 by the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority-East. It said the energy industry's dredging of canals in coastal drilling areas contributed to loss of wetlands that form a hurricane buffer for New Orleans. Some 80 companies are named as defendants, among them Chevron, Exxon Mobil Corp., and subsidiaries of BP. For full story, click here.

ME: Mysterious algae blooms in Portland, South Portland, Harpswell worry Casco Bay advocates

By Melanie Sochan – The Forecaster – July 18, 2017
Advocates say a growing spread of green algae that has returned for the second consecutive year could threaten the health of Casco Bay. The blooms were first noticed on June 21, several weeks earlier than last year. Environmentalists said they don’t know what’s causing the fibrous mats of algae, which have been spotted in several places. Friends of Casco Bay is monitoring the blooms in South Portland’s Mill Cove and Pleasantdale Cove, Portland’s Back Cove, and Basin Cove in Harpswell. The algae can suffocate species that are important to the health of the bay, including clams, worms, and other small organisms. It also makes it difficult for birds to eat, because the algae is difficult to penetrate, said Mike Doan, a research associate with the group, a nonprofit founded in 1989 to improve and protect the environmental health of the bay. He said the organization has received reports of other blooms in the bay and will be inspecting them, too. For full story, click here.

ME: Penobscot River cleanup study enters new phase

By Stephen Rappaport – The Ellsworth American – July 16, 2017
The continuing effort to clean up mercury contamination in the Penobscot River has emerged from the shadows again. Within the past few weeks, the engineering company charged with devising a plan to alleviate the impact of the mercury has established a website that provides a comprehensive look at the situation. It looks at how the problem was created, past efforts to deal with the contamination and the current status of a “Phase III Engineering Study” in which engineers and scientists are evaluating a variety of options to reduce the levels of mercury in the Penobscot River system and the resulting threats to human health and the environment. For full story, click here.

ME: DEP issues violation notice to Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens

By Bill Pearson – Boothbay Register – July 12, 2017
The Maine Department of Environmental Protection issued a notice of violation June 27 against Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens for allegedly violating four state statutes. The notice was sent to CMBG and to construction manager Wright-Ryan Construction of Portland and site contractor Crooker Construction, LLC of Topsham. The DEP alleges violations regarding the state’s Natural Resource Protection Act, Erosion and Sedimentation Control Law, Site Location of Development Law, and Protection and Improvement Waters Act. The letter cites numerous violations reported by a third party inspector who issued four reports between April 7 and May 26 detailing concerns about the expansion project. For full story, click here.

MD: At a high-tech marsh in Edgewater, the future is unclear

By Alex Mann – Capital Gazette – July 29, 2017 – Video
The Global Change Research Wetland is like no marsh you've seen before. Clear plastic chambers are strewn about 53 acres of lush green, connected by a complex infrastructure of grated walkways that weave through tall marsh plants like a high-tech corn maze. Each chamber is treated with differently — with either carbon dioxide or a nitrogen liquid. There are also untreated chambers that serve as control in what scientists involved say is the longest-running climate change experiment in the world. The gas treatments mimic future environmental conditions. "It's the most elaborate facility of its kind," lead investigator Pat Megonigal said. "We've been manipulating carbon dioxide concentrations in the air, around marsh plants, for over 30 years." Now the innovative marsh at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center campus in Edgewater is in jeopardy thanks to sweeping cuts to environmental programs proposed by President Donald Trump. For full story and to view video, click here.

MD: National study puts timeline on impact of sea-level rise in Maryland and Virginia

By Joel Heim – The Washington Post – July 14, 2017
On Maryland’s Eastern Shore, rising seawater levels and chronic flooding threaten to disrupt daily life, damage homes and businesses, and swallow land in the relatively near future, according to a new study. For some parts of the Eastern Shore, there soon may be no more there. That’s the takeaway from a report released Wednesday by the Union of Concerned Scientists. The study, “When Rising Seas Hit Home: Hard Choices Ahead for Hundreds of U.S. Coastal Communities,” looks at the impact rising sea levels caused by global warming will have on coastal regions across the country. For full story, click here.

MD: Scientists say Conowingo dam no longer stopping pollution; Hogan seeks solutions

By Erin Cox – The Baltimore Sun – July 16, 2017 – Video
A year ago, Gov. Larry Hogan put out a call for private industry to suggest how Maryland should address the pollution that was quickly piling up behind the Conowingo Dam — a staggeringly expensive problem that many policymakers thought could wait. For nearly a century, the dam had stopped silt and polluting muck in the Susquehanna River from spilling into the Chesapeake Bay. There was wide agreement the reservoir behind the dam would eventually reach its capacity, and stop holding back the pollution. But scientists now agree the dam is not stopping anything at all. For full story, click here. 

MN: Tribal liaison in Minnesota pipeline review is sidelined after oil company complains to governor

By Alleen Brown – The Intercept – August 12, 2017
A controversial proposal for a tar sands oil pipeline has led indigenous leaders in Minnesota to threaten an uprising similar to the one near Standing Rock last fall. That conflict began with what tribes described as the federal government’s failure to properly consult with nearby tribal communities prior to permitting the Dakota Access Pipeline project. In July, Danielle Oxendine Molliver, the tribal liaison brought on by Minnesota’s Department of Commerce to consult with indigenous leaders about Enbridge Energy’s Line 3 pipeline, resigned in protest of what she called a flawed environmental review process that lacked transparency, professionalism, and fairness. For full story, click here.

MN: BWSR offers new funding, website for buffers

By Paula Mohr – The Farmer – July 18, 2017
Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources officials recently announced two additional resources for landowners working to come into compliance with the state’s buffer law. Landowners now have the option of applying for funds available through a new buffer cost-share program, and they can obtain up-to-date information on a new BWSR buffer website. The buffer law requires the implementation of a buffer strip on public waters by Nov. 1, 2017, and a buffer on public drainage ditches by Nov. 1, 2018. John Jaschke, BWSR executive director, says these additional resources will help landowners comply with the law. For full story, click here.

MT: Group nears goal of protecting Montana wetland for birds

By Associated Press – The Washington Times – July 22, 2017
A land conservation group says it has raised nearly all the money needed to protect habitat for sandhill cranes and dozens of other bird species in northern Montana. Flathead Land Trust says two recent gifts put the group just $4,000 away from raising the $1.4 million necessary to complete the project. The Montana Fish and Wildlife Conservation Trust has given $40,000 and Montana’s Outdoor Legacy Foundation has donated $5,000. The money will go toward protecting 400 acres of farmland from future development. The Flathead Beacon reports the property includes a 45-acre wetland used by tens of thousands of migratory birds every year. For full story, click here. 

NE: Pipeline fight returns to where it started: Water

By Jenny Mandel – E&E News – August 7, 2017
James Carlson of Polk County, Neb., is not a fan of the Keystone XL pipeline project. He and his wife own land along the route and have testified against the pipeline, fought pipeline developer TransCanada in court, and attended rallies and public meetings to speak against it and the effects it could have on Nebraska's water resources. As the state's Public Service Commission launches into a formal hearing this week to determine the project's fate in Nebraska and, effectively, its ability to proceed at all, the question of how the pipeline could affect the famed Ogallala Aquifer looms large. For full story, click here.

NV: Farmers Propose Novel Solution to Fight Over Groundwater in Nevada

By Daniel Rothberg – News Deeply – August 14, 2017
When Jake Tibbitts heard rumors about the two cattle shot at Sadler Ranch, it didn’t occur to him that water could be the potential motive, although the rancher would later make that claim. Water is a contentious topic in Eureka County, a tight-knit community of about 2,000 in rural central Nevada where Tibbitts, who oversees the county’s Natural Resources Department, has been working to prevent a vital water source from running dry. Like many communities in the West, Eureka County faces a water crisis that stems from over-appropriation. For decades, state regulators have let irrigators in Diamond Valley – a high-desert basin with 25,000 acres of irrigated agriculture, mostly hay fields – pump more groundwater than the basin could replenish. For full story, click here.

NH: Climate Change is the Leading Cause of Moose and Loon Population Decline in New Hampshire

By The Exchange – nhpr – August 1, 2017
Climate change, which causes rising temperatures, increasingly severe weather events, and shrinking habitats, negatively impacts the moose and loon populations of New Hampshire more than any other factors -- including human interference from road construction or hunting and fishing practices. That's according to longtime wildlife observers, who joined The Exchange to deliver an update on these two beloved new Hampshire species. In January, The Exchange explored the correlation between climate change and the decline of the moose population based on an ongoing four-year study with New Hampshire Fish and Game. In a follow-up, The Exchange checked in with Kristine Rines, the study's project leader, Harry Vogel, of the Loon Preservation Committee, and David Patrick, of the Nature Conservancy. For full story, click here.

NJ: In a Rare U.S. Preserve, Water Pressures Mount As Development Closes In

By Bruce Stutz – YaleEnviornment 360 – August 10, 2017
The persistence of New Jersey’s Pinelands is no small feat in a state so top-heavy with industrial development and metropolitan sprawl. Yet only a 90-minute drive south of New York City, and just east of Interstate 95, a two-lane rural blacktop leads into a million-acre preserve where slow streams meander among dense pine and oak forests, shadowy cedar swamps, and rare wetland habitats. Nestled within the sweeping arc of New Jersey’s coastal plain, the internationally recognized Pinelands Biosphere Reserve is the largest area of open space between Richmond, Virginia and Boston, occupying some 22 percent of New Jersey’s land area. For full story, click here.

NM: EPA: No review of mine spill claims after New Mexico, Navajo Nation sued

By Dan Elliott – Deseret News – August 7, 2017
Days after the Environmental Protection Agency pledged to reconsider damage claims it previously rejected after a mine spill, the agency said Monday it could not review multimillion-dollar requests from New Mexico and the Navajo Nation because both have sued the agency. In a written statement, the EPA said the law prevents it from reconsidering claims from anyone who has filed suit. That could rule out a review of the two largest claims from the 2015 spill in southwestern Colorado, which the EPA inadvertently triggered. For full story, click here. 

NY: While other states go along, NY says no to gas pipelines

By Donna Morelli – Bay Journal – July 20, 2017
In the upper reaches of the Chesapeake Bay watershed, Tim and Chris Camman walk daily through a thick wood, shaded by a canopy of tall hemlocks, white pines and hardwoods. Dappled sunlight filters through, with only the sounds of birds and Carrs Creek as it bubbles and swirls around the flat rocks and wood snags of its bed. It has been several years since surveyors came through and measured where a 100-foot wide swath of forest could be felled on their 77-acre farm in New York northeast of Binghamton to make way for a natural gas pipeline. If the project goes forward, it would ultimately take about 10 percent of the land the Cammans have owned since 1988. Faded orange and pink survey flags poke out from thick brush, tied on stakes or tree branches. “Every time I go for a walk, I can picture all of this gone,” Chris Camman said. For full story, click here.

NC: Coal Plants Might Be Even More Toxic Than We Thought

By Eric Roston Bloomberg – August 8, 2017 – Video
Scientists studying the aftermath of a massive coal-ash spill in North Carolina have discovered a byproduct of the fossil fuel that may pose human health risks. Duke Energy Corp. announced in early February 2014 that drainage from a broken pipe was leaking coal-ash into the Dan River, which runs through Virginia and North Carolina. Within a few days, researchers at Virginia Tech realized the spill created an unusual opportunity to better understand how particles just billionths of a meter wide, notably arsenic, embedded themselves in an ecosystem. They published that work in 2015. Then came the surprise. “It was just scientific curiosity,” Hochella said. “What the hell is this stuff?” Whatever it was and wherever it was from, it appeared downstream of the spill, not upstream. Eventually, they found it in coal ash and were able to reproduce it in a lab. For full story, click here.

ND: The State Battling the Corporate Giants…In Farming

By Nick Fouriezos – OZY – August 3, 2017
The North Dakota plains stretch farther than the imagination allows, and amid acres upon acres of farms and ranches, the clogged streets and skyscrapers of faraway Wall Street seem almost fictional. And yet the sentiments of your protest-minded, Big Apple millennial firebrand and your average Roughrider State family farmer may not be such worlds apart — at least not when it comes to one issue: taking on big business. That’s because: North Dakota is one of nine states that prohibit or limit corporate farming — and the only one with no exemption for livestock. For full story, click here. 

OH: Burning river reborn: How Cleveland saved the Cuyahoga – and itself

By Doug Struck – The Christian Science Monitor – August 8, 2017
Tim Gottshall paused in mid-paddle, his kayak drifting for a moment on the Cuyahoga River, to consider the question: Is the water safe? “Well,” he replied, “I’m not drinking it.” But splashing a bit as he paddled: no problem. Nearby on Wendy Park, where the river meets Lake Erie, Jermaine Eggleton was pulling catfish and bass out of the Cuyahoga. A jet-skier offshore tumbled in the water, laughing. And Tom Rousher and Paul Grande, almost finished a 20-mile Sunday bike ride, said they would have no problem eating fish from the river, “though no more than two a week,” allowed Mr. Rousher. The mere fact that there are fish, fishermen, bikers, and boaters in and about the Cuyahoga River is a dramatic example of progress, one that Wayne Bratton welcomes with a mix of emotions as he watches the river’s busy scene from his boat. For full story, click here.

OR: County farmers first in nation to have say in wetland siting

Tillamook Headlight Herald – August 4, 2017
The following is a press release from Oregon Farm Bureau:
Farmers in Tillamook County are the first in the nation to have a say in wetland siting after a unanimous vote by the Tillamook County Board of Commissioners on Aug. 2. "Thanks to legislation Oregon Farm Bureau and the Oregon Dairy Farmers Association worked on in 2016, Tillamook County has adopted an ordinance that allows local farmers to have a voice in designing conservation projects that may have spillover impacts on their land," said Mary Anne Nash, OFB public policy counsel. The ordinance requires that new wetland projects must not have negative impacts on neighboring agricultural operations. It's part of an innovative 10-year pilot project championed by Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) and the Oregon Dairy Farmers Association (ODFA), and authorized by the Oregon Legislature in 2016 with the passage of SB 1517. For full story, click here. 

PA: Fracking is causing invasion of harmful non-native plants in Pennsylvania forests, PSU researchers say

By Ad Crable – Lancaster Online – August 6, 2017
Invasive, non-native plant species are “rapidly invading” northern forests in Pennsylvania because of fracking in the Marcellus shale basin, a group of Penn State researchers say. The spread of invasive plants could have longterm detrimental consequences for forest ecosystems, animals and birds, timbering and ecotourism, the researchers say. Invasive plant seeds in gravel and mud are being spread by the tires and undercarriages of fracking equipment and trucks, the researchers found. The seeds find an ideal home in new openings in the forest created by wells, service roads and pipelines. A team of researchers in Penn State’s College of Agricultural Sciences did invasive plant surveys on Marcellus shale gas well pads and adjacent access roads throughout the Allegheny National Forest. For full story, click here.

PA: Despite challenges, PA environmental programs face cuts

By Donna Morelli – Bay Journal – July 11, 2017
Pennsylvania has no new funding for the Chesapeake Bay, drinking water or the Susquehanna River in a 2017–18 budget that includes cuts to environmental and resource agencies. And some worry the situation may get worse as legislators still have no plan in place to fill a $1.1 billion shortfall in the nearly $32 billion spending plan. Despite repeated warnings from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to better fund Pennsylvania’s lagging Chesapeake Bay cleanup efforts and the state’s clean drinking water program, environmental programs overall had their funds cut, some by as much as 50 percent. For full article, click here.

PA: Pennsylvania judge halts pipeline construction after multiple problems

By Donna Morelli Bay – Journal – July 27, 2017
A Pennsylvania judge has put a two-week hold on all drilling for a controversial pipeline construction project that’s had multiple spills and sparked complaints of well contamination. The Pennsylvania Environmental Hearing Board ordered Sunoco Pipeline L.P. late Tuesday to stop all horizontal directional drilling underneath waterways on its 350-mile Mariner East 2 pipeline after a series of leaks or spills of drilling fluid and the contamination of private water supplies. The board, an appeals body for state regulatory decisions, heard arguments last week from several environmental groups seeking a permanent injunction on construction. They described 61 spills of drilling mud, including one of 160,000 gallons into an exceptional value wetland, and drilling damage to wells that forced 15 families to evacuate their homes. For full article, click here.

SD: Conservation milestone coming for South Dakota in August

Farm Forum – July 28, 2017
South Dakota farmers and ranchers are expected to reach a conservation milestone in August. When Lyman County producer Reed Petersek signs a contract with USDA on August 9 to enroll his farm in the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP), it will mark the 7 millionth acre of land in South Dakota to be entered into the program. South Dakota farmers and ranchers lead the nation in acres enrolled in CSP, a U.S. Department of Agriculture program aimed at recognizing producers performing at a high level of conservation that also encourages them to reach an elite status in resource protection. For full story, click here.

TX: Trump’s border wall would slice through wildlife refuges and cut off U.S. territory in Texas

By Darryl Fears – The Washington Post – August 7, 2017
On dusty land in Mission, Tex., near the Mexican border, Marianna Trevino Wright recently took a walk with a contractor. She was showing off her effort to turn the earth surrounding the National Butterfly Center into “an oasis for butterflies,” she said — with 10,000 native milkweed plants that a dwindling number of monarch butterflies use as habitat in their arduous and yearly migration from Mexico and across the United States to Canada. But the yellow that caught her eye that day wasn’t the fluttering wings of butterflies. It was heavy machinery that mows vegetation, said Wright, executive director of the butterfly reserve. And men were taking soil samples on the center’s property. “I said, ‘Hey guys what you’re doing?’ They said, ‘Working.’ I said, ‘On what?’ They said, ‘Clearing the land.’ I said, ‘You mean my land.’ They said, ‘We’re going to have to call our supervisor.’” For full story, click here.

TX: As the oil patch demands more water, West Texas fights over a scarce resource

By David Hunn – Houston Chronicle – August 1, 2017
A West Texas land baron and oilman is on the verge of pumping 5.4 million gallons of water a day from far under the desert mountains here and piping it 60 miles to the nation's most bountiful oil field, the Permian Basin, where hydraulic fracturing has fueled a renaissance of U.S. oil and gas production. With water in short supply and high demand, Dan Allen Hughes Jr., one of the largest landowners in the United States and president of his father's eponymous oil company, plans to tap an aquifer under his 140,000-acre Apache Ranch. For full story, click here.

UT: Utah seeking $1.9 billion from EPA over mine-waste spill

By Dan Elliott, Associated Press – ABC News – August 8, 2017
Utah is asking the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for $1.9 billion in damages after the EPA inadvertently triggered a multi-state spill from an old gold mine in Colorado, the Utah Attorney General's Office confirmed Tuesday. The state filed the claim in February but never publicly announced it, said Dan Burton, a spokesman for the attorney general. Word of the claim first surfaced Friday when the EPA made a passing reference to it in a news release. It is by far the largest known claim stemming from the August 2015 spill from the inactive Gold King Mine in southwestern Colorado, and it brings the total to at least $2.3 billion. The Navajo Nation filed a claim for $162 million and the state of New Mexico sought $130 million. Burton initially declined to say what Utah's claim included or how state officials arrived at the $1.9 billion figure but said details would be released later. For full story, click here.

VA: VA city’s artificial wetland the real deal in slowing stormwater pollution

By William H. Funk – Bay Journal – July 13, 2017
Historically, cities and towns relegated stormwater treatment to the unseen places: The backs of buildings, the edges of town. A pond that held runoff containing the detritus of urban life — water mixed with heavy metals and fertilizer, motor oil and animal waste — was not the prettiest town amenity. But Waynesboro, VA is bringing stormwater treatment to the forefront. Recently, the city of 21,000 installed a 10-acre “constructed wetland” in its center. Mimicking nature as best as it can, it filters runoff from its natural drainage basin — 330 acres of mostly residential neighborhood. The beneficiary is a mile or so to the east: the South River, which flows through the city and eventually to the Shenandoah’s South Fork 15 miles away. This constructed wetland works by forcing runoff to cascade gradually downhill through an array of three ponds — four, if you count the highest elevation, the “sediment forebay,” which captures mud from the runoff before it enters the vegetated ponds. According to Waynesboro’s stormwater manager, Trafford McRae, the city will likely have to dredge the forebay every two to three years. For full article, click here.

WI: Dairy Group Sues Wisconsin Over Pollution Discharge Rules

By Todd Richmond, Associate Press – U.S. News – August 8, 2017
Wisconsin environmental officials are over-regulating large livestock operations, imposing pollution requirements that are tougher than federal law and arbitrarily changing runoff standards without going through the rule-making process, a trade association says in a lawsuit. The Dairy Business Association filed the lawsuit in Brown County on July 31. It alleges the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has changed requirements for concentrated animal feeding operations to treat runoff. The department last year stopped allowing farmers to move runoff through patches of vegetation to filter pollution without going through the administrative rule-making process, the lawsuit said. For full story, click here.

WI: Wisconsin coastal communities to receive $2.4 million in grants

By Marisa DeCandido – NBC26 – July 11, 2017 – Video
Wisconsin coastal communities will receive millions of dollars in grants to protect and improve Great Lakes resources, Governor Walker announced Monday. 34 grants, totaling $2.4 million, will go to local and state governments, regional planning commissions, universities and non-profits to assist with various projects. The Wisconsin Department of Administration's Wisconsin Coastal Management Program distributes the grants. For full story and to view video, click here.

 

 

Healthy Watersheds Begin on Private Lands

By Tivoli Gough – USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service – August 11, 2017
America’s Great Lakes — Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie and Ontario — hold 21 percent of the world’s surface fresh water. This water provides habitat for a variety of fish and wildlife and drinking water for more than 40 million people. But the lakes suffer from pollution. This pollution damages the aquatic ecosystems and poses risks to human health. In recent times, algal blooms in Lake Erie underscored the importance of continued conservation efforts in the region. For full story, click here.

Hot, Dry and Worrisome: 2016 Was a Record-Breaking Year for Climate

By Georgina Gustin – InsideClimate News – August 11, 2017
Global scientists relied on the typical superlatives to describe the state of the climate in 2016, but they might have come up with a few neologisms as well. It was not only the hottest year on record, but one of the doughtiest, high-tidiest and altogether worryingest. Driven by the inexorable warming brought on by record concentrations of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, and vaulted even higher into the record books by the effects of a powerful El Niño, the signals of climate change were unmistakable and remarkably diverse, the authoritative annual review, State of the Climate in 2016, shows. For full story, click here.

‘Spongy’ Soil Can Help Farmers Combat Climate Change

By Georgina Gustin – InsideClimate News – August 9, 2017
Droughts are expected to worsen and intense storms to become more frequent across much of the country in coming decades as the planet warms, but their impact on agriculture could be blunted if American farmers focus on their roots. A new study, released Wednesday, examines the benefits of cover cropping—planting soil-enriching plants between crop cycles—and other soil-boosting practices used around the world, with a close look at Iowa, one of the Midwest's top-producing agriculture states. The study determined that farmers could help their land better withstand some of the effects of a warming climate by making their soil more "spongy." For full story, click here.

Army Corps unveils $275M plan to battle Asian carp

By Melissa Nann Burke – The Detroit News – August 7, 2017
Environmental groups and Gov. Rick Snyder demanded immediate action on Monday after the Trump administration released a long-awaited report on a $275 million plan to control the invasive Asian carp before it reaches the Great Lakes. The report by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers lays out tentative measures that include installing a new electric barrier to repel or stun the destructive fish and underwater speakers generating “complex noise” to deter them from traveling beyond the lock and dam at Brandon Road near Joliet, Illinois. It came after five months of prodding from bipartisan members of the Michigan delegation and others. For full story, click here.

The good, the bad and the algae

Sandia National Laboratories – Science Daily – August 7, 2017
Sandia National Laboratories is testing whether one of California's largest and most polluted lakes can transform into one of its most productive and profitable. Southern California's 350-square-mile Salton Sea has well-documented problems related to elevated levels of nitrogen and phosphorus from agricultural runoff. Algae thrives on these elements -- a fact that causes environmental problems but could also be a solution to those problems. For full story, click here.

A legal snarl in Idaho portends future conflicts over water

By Emily Benson – High Country News – August 4, 2017
On a sunny day in late April, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers released hundreds of millions of gallons of water from Idaho’s Lucky Peak Dam, a dozen miles upstream of Boise. The dam operators call it a “rooster tail” display; thousands of observers took in the spectacle. The water, roaring out of a dam gate, arced high above the Boise River, rainbows shimmering in its spray. Rooster tails are one way the Corps releases excess water to reduce the risk of flooding — a partially empty reservoir can capture spring runoff before it can race downstream and inundate Boise. Releases are necessary about seven years out of every 10, including this year, when basin flows were among the highest recorded. For full story, click here.

New farm partnerships cropping up to spread nutrient-removal wetlands

The Wetlands Initiative – August 3, 2017
With this summer’s Gulf of Mexico “dead zone” officially declared its largest ever, solutions to nutrient runoff are urgently needed in the Midwest. The Wetlands Initiative has been advancing the use of one such solution in the form of small constructed wetlands on farms designed to naturally remove the excess nutrients leaving through tile drainage. The first two farm-based wetlands have been built on properties in Bureau County, Illinois, and TWI is building new partnerships to get the word out on these wetlands’ ability to improve water quality. A new initiative taking root at Illinois Central College in East Peoria is one example. The Illinois Sustainable Ag Partnership (ISAP)—a collaborative that includes the Illinois Corn Growers Association, American Farmland Trust, the Soil Health Partnership, and others—is expanding a demonstration farm on the ICC campus to spotlight a range of on-farm conservation practices, including constructed wetlands. TWI is designing a wetland for the site and is in the process of joining the broader partnership. For full story, click here.

Hypothesis Confirmed: Sea Lion Mass Deaths Caused by Malnutrition

By Alastair Bland – Hakai Magazine – August 2, 2017
Meteorologists had never seen anything quite like it—a mass of abnormally warm surface water that overwhelmed much of the northeastern Pacific Ocean for three years starting in late 2013. They called it the Blob. Within months, thousands of starving sea lion pups began washing ashore along the west coast of the United States. At the time, scientists figured the two occurrences were related. But in a new study, a team of researchers describes in detail how warm water and related impacts on ocean productivity hurt the young sea lions. For full article, click here.

Historical wildlife trends reliable for predicting species at risk

University of York – August 2, 2017
Scientists at the University of York have shown that using historical wildlife data provides a more accurate measure of how vulnerable certain species might be to extinction from climate change. Some of the methods used to predict at risk species are trend-based – an indicator of what happens gradually over time – while others are trait based, which uses signs of climate change in the current environment. Mix these methods together, however, and you get an unreliable set of results, scientist have found. For full story, click here.

Fish out of water: Loss of 350 miles of Great Plains streams causing changes in aquatic food web

Kansas State University – August 2, 2017
The food web in Great Plains streams could be unraveling, according to a Kansas State University ecologist. Keith Gido, professor of biology, and Josh Perkin, a Kansas State University alumnus, recently published "Groundwater declines are linked to changes in Great Plains stream fish assemblages" in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The research maps the loss of stream habitat for many small fish in the Great Plains region and attributes it to declining groundwater sources. "This is one of the first examples that links groundwater depletion to changes in the biotic communities of the river," Gido said. "We've lost more than 350 miles of stream in the last 65 years because of a reduction in the groundwater, and we expect we will lose another 180 miles of stream by 2060." For full story, click here.

"Ghost forests": What they are and why they’re becoming more common

CBS News – August 1, 2017 – Video
They're called "ghost forests" - dead trees along vast swaths of coastline invaded by rising seas, something scientists call one of the most visible markers of climate change. The process has occurred naturally for thousands of years, but has accelerated in recent decades as polar ice melts and raises sea levels, scientists say, pushing salt water farther inland and killing trees in what used to be thriving freshwater plains. Efforts are underway worldwide to determine exactly how quickly the creation of ghost forests is increasing. For full story and to view video, click here.

Meat industry blamed for largest-ever 'dead zone' in Gulf of Mexico

By Oliver Milman – The Guardian – August 1, 2017
The global meat industry, already implicated in driving global warming and deforestation, has now been blamed for fueling what is expected to be the worst “dead zone” on record in the Gulf of Mexico. Toxins from manure and fertilizer pouring into waterways are exacerbating huge, harmful algal blooms that create oxygen-deprived stretches of the gulf, the Great Lakes and Chesapeake Bay, according to a new report by Mighty, an environmental group chaired by former congressman Henry Waxman. It is expected that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will this week announce the largest ever recorded dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico. It is expected to be larger than the nearly 8,200 square-mile area that was forecast for July – an expanse of water roughly the size of New Jersey. For full story, click here.

Nutrient pollution: Voluntary steps are failing to shrink algae blooms and dead zones

By Donald Scavia – The Conservation – July 31, 2017 – Video
Summer is the season for harmful algae blooms in many U.S. lakes and bays. They occur when water bodies become overloaded with nitrogen and phosphorus from farms, water treatment plants and other sources. Warm water and lots of nutrients promote rapid growth of algae that can be toxic and potentially fatal to aquatic life and people. Eventually algae settle to the bottom and decay, depleting dissolved oxygen in the water, creating hypoxia – “dead zones” where oxygen levels are low enough to kill fish. For full story and to view video, click here.

U.S. Farmers Favor Little Change in Farm Programs

By Terri Queck-Matzie – Agriculture – July 31, 2017
Don’t screw up what we already have. That’s the word from the agricultural field to elected representatives in Washington concerning farm bill talks and budget proposals. On no subject does that advice apply more than on the issue of crop insurance. President Trump’s proposed budget calls for $29 billion in cuts to the federal crop insurance program over the next 10 years, crippling the safety net many crop producers credit with keeping them in business through tough seasons. For full story, click here.

Fertilizers, a Boon to Agriculture, Pose Growing Threat to U.S. Waterways

By Tatiana Schlossberg – The New York Times – July 27, 2017
Nitrogen-based fertilizers, which came into wide use after World War II, helped prompt the agricultural revolution that has allowed the Earth to feed its seven billion people. But that revolution came at a cost: Artificial fertilizers, often applied in amounts beyond what crops need to grow, are carried in runoff from farmland into streams, lakes and the ocean. New research suggests that climate change will substantially increase this form of pollution, leading to more damaging algae blooms and dead zones in American coastal waters. For full story, click here.

Great Lakes waters threaten Beluga whales

By Lucy Schroeder – Great Lakes Echo – July 26, 2017
Great Lakes pollutants threaten a special population of beluga whales.
Their chemical structures figure prominently in a picture artist Eric Gajewski recently drew to illustrate the plight of the mammals living in the St. Lawrence River. “Water is such a sacred thing—that it can also be so toxic and poisonous seems to go against a life law,” said Gajewski, an environmental studies doctoral student at York University in Toronto, Ontario. The water draining from the Great Lakes through the St. Lawrence and into the ocean contain a toxic stew that may contribute to a recent rise in the number of whales that die shortly after giving birth, scientists say. For full story, click here.

GOP Science chairman extolls 'benefits' of climate change

By Timothy Cama – The Hill – July 24, 2017
The chairman of the House Science Committee argued Monday that climate change is real and has numerous benefits in areas like agriculture and shipping. Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas), an outspoken skeptic of mainstream climate science, wrote in the Heritage Foundation's Daily Signal that the “benefits of a changing climate are often ignored and under-researched.” “Our climate is too complex and the consequences of misguided policies too harsh to discount the positive effects of carbon enrichment,” he said. For full story, click here.

Destruction of small wetlands leads to more algal blooms, Ontario study finds

By Nicole Thompson – The Hamiton Spectator – July 23, 2017
A new study suggests that small wetlands play a bigger role in filtering out pollutants and preventing algal blooms in the Great Lakes than their larger counterparts. Wetlands — which include marshes, seasonally flooded forests and bogs — play important roles as habitats for waterfowl, absorb the impact of large waves or floods and act as a filter preventing excess nutrients that come from fertilizers from reaching lakes and reservoirs. For full story, click here.

'Invasive' species have been around much longer than believed

University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg – July 20, 2017
Pollen record of plant, that is currently being eradicated, extends much further back than the 100 years it is believed to be growing in the Lesotho Highlands. The DST-NRF Centre of Excellence for Palaeoscience funded researchers based in the School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies and in the Evolutionary Studies Institute of the University of the Witwatersrand have used fossil pollen records to solve an on-going debate regarding invasive plant species in eastern Lesotho. Their study, Chrysocoma ciliata L. (Asteraceae) in the Lesotho Highlands: an anthropogenically introduced invasive or a niche coloniser?, published in Biological Invasions, confirms that a shrub believed to be an invasive in the eastern Lesotho Highlands has been growing in the region for over 4,000 years. For full story, click here.

Whistleblower Case Shows How Trump Tries to Silence Science

By Sabrina Shankman – InsideClimate News – July 20, 2017
For the first time since the Trump administration came to office and began dismantling the key science underpinnings of federal climate policy, a senior agency official has invoked the protections of the whistleblower law to publicly object to what he calls an illegal attempt to intimidate him. The official, Joel Clement, had been the director of the Office of Policy Analysis at the Interior Department before he says he was arbitrarily reassigned to an obscure accounting post to punish him for speaking up about protections for native Americans in Alaska. He says that was ordered by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to force him to be quiet or quit—and to send a message. Clement, who publicized his formal complaint in a commentary published Wednesday in the Washington Post, said his case is not an isolated example but part of a pattern. For full story, click here.

Aquatic plants survive in 'ghost ponds' under agricultural fields

PHYS.org – July 19, 2017
Aquatic plants in 'ghost ponds' are able to survive more than 100 years buried beneath cropped agricultural fields, according to new UCL research. Ghost ponds are abundant across many agricultural regions, often visible as damp depressions, areas of poor crop cover, or changes in soil colour. Many UK ponds were filled-in during agricultural land intensification that took place after the 1950s. At the start of 20th century, there were an estimated 800,000 ponds in England and Wales, but it is thought that less than a quarter of these now remain. However, the UCL study, published in Biological Conservation, highlights that it is possible to 'resurrect' these buried habitats from the seeds and eggs stored within their historic sediments. For full story, click here.

Soil filters out some emerging contaminants before reaching groundwater

By Jeff Mulhollem – Penn State News – July 18, 2017
There is considerable uncertainty surrounding emerging contaminants in aquatic ecosystems and groundwater, and a recent Penn State study of compounds from pharmaceuticals and personal care products didn't add much clarity. But it did provide insight into the transport of the chemicals, according to researchers in the College of Agricultural Sciences. The research, which was conducted at the Penn State Wastewater Treatment plant and the University's Living Filter, analyzed the fate of seven emerging contaminants: acetaminophen, ampicillin, caffeine, naproxen, ofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. The study's goal was to track these compounds through the wastewater treatment plant and ultimately to the wells at the Living Filter to assess the removal efficiency of the plant and the ability of the Living Filter’s soil profile to provide further treatment of the compounds that persisted in the effluent. For full story, click here. 

House votes to delay Obama-era smog reductions

By Michael Biesecker – Associated Press – PBS Newshour – July 18, 2017
The House voted Tuesday to pass a Republican-backed bill delaying implementation of Obama-era reductions in smog-causing air pollutants. Congress voted 229 to 199 to approve the Ozone Standards Implementation Act of 2017. The measure delays by eight more years the implementation of 2015 air pollution standards issued by the Environmental Protection Agency under the prior administration. The bill also makes key technical changes that environmentalists say will weaken the Clean Air Act, including switching the EPA’s mandated review of air quality standards from every five years to every 10. Ground-level ozone can cause breathing problems among sensitive groups, causing thousands of premature deaths each year. For full story, click here.

NOAA to give VIMS $835K for 'nature-based' flood resilience work

By Tamara Dietrich – Daily Press – July 18, 2017 – Video
The Virginia Institute of Marine Science will get nearly $835,000 in federal funds to support "nature-based infrastructure" to help coastal Virginia counter and recover from flood events. The money is part of the competitive Coastal Resilience Grants program at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to help vulnerable communities protect against storms and extreme weather. The program requires a 50 percent match from a nonfederal source, which brings the project total to more than $1.25 million. The matching funds will come from VIMS, the College of William and Mary Coastal Policy Center and The Wetlands Watch. For full story and to view video, click here.

Invasive plant species can enhance coastal ecosystems

PHYS.org – July 17, 2017
Invasive plant species can be a source of valuable ecosystem functions where native coastal habitats such as salt marshes and oyster reefs have severely declined, a new study by scientists at Duke University and the University of North Carolina-Wilmington finds. "With the progressive decline of coastal habitats worldwide, our findings suggest it's better to have a non-native habitat than no habitat at all," said Aaron Ramus, a PhD student at UNC Wilmington and former Bookhout Research Scholar at the Duke University Marine Laboratory, who led the research. "There's a good chance that many invaders don't have the negative effects that we often think they do," Ramus said. For full story, click here.

Treated Fracking Wastewater Contaminated Watershed, Study Finds

Yale Environment 360 – July 17, 2017
A study in the Marcellus Shale region of western Pennsylvania has shown that even after being treated, wastewater from hydraulic fracturing operations left significant contamination in a waterway downstream of treatment plants. Researchers from Penn State University, Colorado State University, and Dartmouth College studied sediments from Conemaugh River Lake — a dammed reservoir east of Pittsburgh — and found that they were contaminated with endocrine-disrupting chemicals called nonylphenol ethoxylates; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are carcinogens; and elevated levels of radium. The study, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, said that the highest concentrations of these pollutants were found in lake sediment layers deposited five to ten years ago during a peak period of fracking wastewater disposal. The high radium levels were found as far as 12 miles downstream of treatment plants. For full story, click here.

Climate change to deplete some U.S. water basins, reduce irrigated crop yields

By Jennifer Chu – PHYS.org – July 12, 2017
A new study by MIT climate scientists, economists, and agriculture experts finds that certain hotspots in the country will experience severe reductions in crop yields by 2050, due to climate change's impact on irrigation. The most adversely affected region, according to the researchers, will be the Southwest. Already a water-stressed part of the country, this region is projected to experience reduced precipitation by midcentury. Less rainfall to the area will mean reduced runoff into water basins that feed irrigated fields. Production of cotton, the primary irrigated crop in the Southwest and in southern Arizona in particular, will drop to less than 10 percent of the crop yield under optimal irrigation conditions, the study projects. Similarly, maize grown in Utah, now only yielding 40 percent of the optimal expected yield, will decrease to 10 percent with further climate-driven water deficits. For full story, click here.

Farmers consider floodplain easements, wetland reserves for flooded ground

By Rachael Krause – WPSD Local 6 – July 11, 2017 – Video
It’s been months since floodwaters started rising this year on the Mississippi River, but in some parts of Alexander County, Illinois, the sand and some of the water never left. It’s leaving people who live and work in the area with few options. With the Natural Resources Conservation Service and state conservation leaders talking about options for farmers and landowners to convert their lands to wetlands or floodplain easements, farmers and others are considering turning over their land to the government. For full story and to view video, click here.

The Uninhabitable Earth

By David Wallace-Wells – New York Magazine – July 9, 2017
It is, I promise, worse than you think. If your anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of sea-level rise, you are barely scratching the surface of what terrors are possible, even within the lifetime of a teenager today. And yet the swelling seas — and the cities they will drown — have so dominated the picture of global warming, and so overwhelmed our capacity for climate panic, that they have occluded our perception of other threats, many much closer at hand. Rising oceans are bad, in fact very bad; but fleeing the coastline will not be enough. For full article, click here.

Reaching Higher Ground in the Face of Climate Change

By David Flores – CPR Blog – May 3, 2017
We've seen a flurry of news coverage in the last several weeks on climate migration, displacement, and relocation. In a new report published today, the Center for Progressive Reform explores these issues and examines tools and resources that communities can use when faced with the challenges of relocating out of harm's way. For full blog post, click here. 

 

 

An Easy To Use Toolkit for State Legislators to Create Environmental Legislative Action

USC Schwarzenegger Institute – Video
A Curated List of Environmental Laws That Both Protect The Environment and Support Economic and Job Growth
Laws that protect the environment and the health of citizens, while simultaneously supporting economic and job growth, are being passed in state legislatures across the United States. These laws are more important than ever before and, increasingly, the work being done at the subnational level is having an impact on national and global decision making. The USC Schwarzenegger Institute and the National Caucus of Environmental Legislators have partnered with one another to create this online resource that will help state legislators throughout America learn from their colleagues in other states. We hope to assist legislators who are interested in advancing smart environmental policies by sharing best practices and actual legislation that is working successfully in a number of states already. For more information and to view video, click here.

Completing and Using Ecosystem Service Assessment for Decision-Making: An Interdisciplinary Toolkit for Managers and Analysts

The Ecosystem Services Toolkit is a technical guide to ecosystem services assessment and analysis that offers practical, step-by-step guidance for governments at all levels, as well as for consultants and researchers. The approach is fully interdisciplinary, integrating biophysical sciences, social sciences, economics, and traditional and practitioner knowledge. It provides guidance on how to consider and incorporate ecosystem services analysis in a variety of different policy contexts such as spatial planning, environmental assessment, and wildlife management, among others. It contains numerous innovative tools and resources designed to enhance users’ understanding of ecosystem services and to support analysis and decision-making. Canadian examples are featured throughout the guide. To download the technical guide, click here

Climate Deregulation Tracker

Columbia Law School
The Climate Deregulation Tracker identifies steps taken by the Trump administration and Congress to scale back or wholly eliminate federal climate mitigation and adaptation measures. The tracker is linked to their database of climate change regulations. For more information, click here. To learn more about the tracker, click here.

Stream Quality Checklist – Expand Awareness & Support for Clean Water

Community & Environmental Defense Services
This checklist provides easy to use indicators of stream health. It is oriented to streams draining the suburban-urban areas where most of us (81%) live. Many of these waters are within a five -minute walk of a home yet are frequently degraded to a point that they may not be Child -Safe & Friendly. The cause of the degradation is usually stormwater pollution, sewer releases, illicit discharges, and other sources of contamination. To see what a healthy stream looks like apply these indicators to a rural waterway, preferably one draining lots of forest in an area with little development. To learn how to restore waters degraded by past growth and how to prevent future damage see the CEDS Protecting & Restoring Wetlands, Streams, Lakes, Tidal Waters & Wells from Land Development Impacts webpage. Read more here. To download this new resource click on: Stream Quality Checklist. Users can add their findings to the: Stream Quality Database.

Summary Findings of Pilot Studies Conducted by the Interagency Coastal Wetlands Workgroup

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – July 2017
This report summarizes the findings of a series of pilot studies conducted by the Interagency Coastal Wetlands Workgroup in four coastal watersheds (San Francisco, CA; Galveston, TX; Cape Fear, NC; and Tampa, FL). The purpose of these studies was to gain a deeper understanding of the drivers behind coastal wetland loss. To download this report, click here. Direct download.

New EPA Tool Helps Communities Access More Than $10 Billion in Water Infrastructure Financing

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – July 26, 2017
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is launching the Water Finance Clearinghouse, a web‐based portal to help communities make informed financing decisions for their drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater infrastructure needs. The Clearinghouse provides communities with a searchable database with more than $10 billion in water funding sources and over 550 resources to support local water infrastructure projects. It consolidates and expands upon existing EPA-supported databases to create a one-stop-shop for all community water finance needs. The Water Finance Clearinghouse was developed by EPA’s Water Infrastructure and Resiliency Finance Center, an information and assistance center that provides financing information to help local decision makers make informed decisions for drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater infrastructure to reach their public health and environmental goals. For full news release and a list of Webinars on how to use the Clearinghouse, click here.

When Rising Seas Hit Home: Hard Choices Ahead for Hundreds of US Coastal Communities

Union of Concerned Scientists – July 2017 – Video
If saltwater regularly soaked your basement or first floor, kept you from getting to work, or damaged your car, how often would it have to happen before you began looking for a new place to call home?
This national analysis identifies when US coastal communities will face a level of disruptive flooding that affects people's homes, daily routines, and livelihoods. It identifies hundreds of communities that will face chronic inundation and possible retreat over the coming decades as sea levels rise. The findings highlight what’s at stake in our fight to address sea level rise and global warming. They also provide affected communities a measure of how much time they have to prepare. For more information and to view video, click here. To download the report, click here.

NOAA Database for Green Infrastructure Effectiveness

NOAA Digital Coast
Search this online database of literature sources containing information on the effectiveness of green infrastructure to reduce the impacts of coastal hazards, such as inundation and erosion from tropical storms and cyclones, more frequent precipitation events, and sea level rise. The database contains records from a wide range of sources, such as peer-reviewed journals, online tools, and gray literature, and includes information on 32 different coastal green infrastructure types. The green infrastructure techniques referenced cover a full range of approaches to coastal management, including natural, nature-based (e.g., low-impact development), structural, and policies. Click here to read more and to download database.

 

Accounting for individual animals in the Anthropocene

By Brandon Keim – Anthropocene – August 9, 2017
When land is converted to human use, the environmental impacts are typically measured in terms of pollution and populations and species. Unless they’re endangered, the fate of individual animals doesn’t enter the discussion. They’re practically invisible. Given the vast scale of human development and the care given to domestic animal welfare, it’s a big inconsistency. For full article, click here.

U.S. lawmakers seek missing information in review of Monsanto weed killer

By Kate Kelland – Reuters – August 8, 2017
The chairman of a congressional committee has asked the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) to explain why its National Cancer Institute (NCI) failed to publish data that showed no links between glyphosate and cancer. In a Tuesday letter seen by Reuters, U.S. Representative Trey Gowdy, who chairs the House Committee on Government and Oversight Reform (OGR), said he "is concerned about the new revelations" and is "seeking more information" about why the exculpatory results were not published by the NCI. Glyphosate is a key ingredient in Monsanto's top-selling weed killer Roundup. For full story, click here.

Science: Pay attention to two other messages in the breakthrough BPA water treatment paper

By Pete Myers – Environmental Health News – August 8, 2017
I want to call your attention to some important details in the latest research from Terry Collins' green chemistry laboratory at Carnegie Mellon University. We covered the main story last week: There now exists economically viable, efficient technology to remove bisphenol A (BPA) and a host of similar chemicals from water. But the paper has two additional sections that make it even more important. Collins's team wrote two mini-reviews to help chemists—the primary readers of the journal Green Chemistry, where the paper was published—understand what’s the big deal. The water-treatment breakthrough is the meat, so to speak, between two pieces of bread. But that bread—the two reviews—has profound implications. Given how siloed science is, it was not safe to expect that chemists not specializing in endocrine disruption would immediately grasp this. Collins and his team lay it out in stark terms. For full story, click here.

Boosting resilience to modern-day threats - what is it worth?

By Megan Rowling – Reuters – August 2, 2017
From protecting coastal towns against storms and rising seas, to helping poor farmers grow new crops, projects that equip people to overcome disasters and other threats can have wide-ranging benefits - but an inability to quantify those in dollar terms has held back much-needed investment, resilience experts say. Economists at the RAND Corporation, a global think tank, have spent the past year working out how to demonstrate the social, environmental and economic impact of building resilience. For full story, click here.

Monsanto Pushed EPA to Fast-Track Pesticide Report in 2015

By Tiffany Stecker – Bloomberg BNA – August 2, 2017
Monsanto Co. pressed the EPA in 2015 to publicize a report that would show its Roundup herbicide doesn’t cause cancer, but the agency appeared reluctant to do so on the company’s timeline, newly released documents show. The correspondence, part of a cache of documents posted Aug. 1 by attorneys representing cancer patients in multidistrict litigation against Monsanto, is an attempt to showcase what the attorneys claim is an inappropriately close relationship between the Environmental Protection Agency and Monsanto. But it also shows an agency whose leaders under President Barack Obama were in no hurry to put out a key report that would have helped the company’s reputation. For full story, click here.

The Consolidated Livelihoods Exercise for Analyzing Resilience (CLEAR) approach

WeADAPT – July 24, 2017
Climate change and climate-related disasters are a major driver of global food insecurity. Zero Hunger cannot be achieved without concrete action to help vulnerable communities prepare for, respond to, and recover from climate shocks. To guide such action, however, it is essential that we better understand how climate risks — both current and future ones — impact food security and livelihoods. For full story, click here.

Conservation Meets Corrections

By Katie Jewett bioGraphic – July 26, 2017
Nalini Nadkarni probably looked out of place as she walked up to the chain-link and razor-wire fence enclosing the Cedar Creek Corrections Center. She certainly would have felt more at home in the forest that surrounded the minimum-security prison. As a rainforest ecologist at The Evergreen State College, just 25 miles northeast in Olympia, Washington, Nadkarni usually spent her days studying the role that tree canopies play in forest ecosystems. Using modified rock climbing techniques, she clambered to dizzying heights in the treetops of Costa Rica’s tropical rainforests and the temperate forests of the rain-soaked Pacific Northwest. But by this time, in 2005, she had become a regular visitor to Cedar Creek. “I like going where people haven’t gone before,” Nadkarni says. “I like testing borders and seeing how far I can push them.” That penchant for exploration, along with her unbounded appreciation for the natural world, had led Nadkarni from uncharted canopies straight into one of the most nature-deprived spaces humans have ever created. For full story, click here.

Green Crabs Are Officially Delicious

By Jackson Landers – Hakai Magazine – July 26, 2017
Kick over a rock or a chunk of turf along the coast of Maine and chances are a horde of invasive green crabs will scurry out. Since their accidental introduction to the North American coast by European ships in the early 1800s, green crabs have become among the most common creatures in the region. Commercial crabbers and lobster fishermen motor past millions of them every day because the credit card-sized crabs—though perfectly edible—are too small to be worth manually shucking. A new processing technique explored in a scientific paper by researchers from the University of Maine could change that. By experimenting with a mechanical means of extracting meat from green crabs, they hope to create a market for the ecologically disruptive animals. For full article, click here. 

Taking Children on Their First Fishing Trip

By Ben Team – Outdoor Empire
Few memories last as long as those surrounding your first fishing trip ( family’s first RV trip maybe? ). You probably still remember the sights, sounds and smiles of the occasion vividly, and you probably look back on the outing fondly. Now, so many years later, it is time to introduce your children to angling. You certainly don’t have to do anything fancy to introduce children to the sport, but it helps to have a good game plan in place. After all, you may be introducing your children to a lifelong hobby, and you want to get started on the right foot. For full blog post, click here.

Five types of underwater grasses found in the Chesapeake Bay

Chesapeake Bay News – July 18, 2017
The plants that grow in the shallow waters of the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers, streams and creeks are a critical part of the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. Known as underwater grasses or submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), they improve water quality by reducing erosion, trapping loose sediment and absorbing nutrient pollution. During photosynthesis, they add the dissolved oxygen to the water underwater critters need to survive. They also serve as habitat for vulnerable young fish and crabs and provide food for migrating waterfowl. For full blog post, click here.

Ghost nets: the remote town turning death-trap debris into world-class art

By Clarissa Sebag-Montefiore – The Guardian – July 11, 2017 – Video
On the outskirts of the Aboriginal town of Pormpuraaw – beyond the scented frangipani trees, the rows of bungalows, and the lush tropical greenery – is a mountainous rubbish tip. Locals have their own name for it: Bunnings. As if browsing the Australian hardware store it’s named for, they pick through the tip for rubber, rope, bicycle rims. Detritus is then turned into art, woven with feathers and bones into the cean sculptures that this remote Indigenous community has become famous for. For full story and to view video, click here.

Time Travel, with Trees

By Joe Dawson – Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) - Shorelines – July 10, 2017
Looking at the Kirkpatrick Marsh on the Rhode River, a time machine is not the first thing that comes to mind. Tall grasses dominate the landscape, with vertical PVC pipes popping up here and there and octagon-shaped chambers rising out of the wetland every ten paces or so. Take a step off the walkway, and you might lose a shoe. But 5 experiments on the marsh are designed to take sections of the marsh into the 22nd Century, and the marsh has been dubbed the Global Change Research Wetland, or GCReW. The expertise that GCReW scientists have in simulating the future brought National Museum of Natural History scientists here to mirror the past. For full blog post, click here.

 

 

WEBINARS

   

MEETINGS

 

TRAINING

 

SPECIAL EVENTS

 

MORE DECEMBER MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR​

WEBINARS
       
AUGUST 2017  
       
August 22, 2017
2:00 p.m. EDT
  NEIWPCC: Stream & Wetland Buffers Webinar Series: Part 2: Education   
       
August 29, 2017
1:00 p.m. EDT
  Co-sponsored by the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org) and MEAM Webinar: Identification of Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Indicators using an Ecological Resilience Framework    
       
MORE AUGUST WEBINARS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
       
SEPTEMBER 2017  
       
September 12, 2017
2:00 p.m. EST 
  Land Trust Alliance Webinar: Talkin' Bout My Conservation: The Latest Market Research on Conservation, the Environment and the Work of Land Trusts   
       
September 13, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  AWRA Webinar: Groundwater Droughts - A Tale from a Few Aquifers   
       
September 13, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Stream Restoration: Where are we now?   
       
September 14, 2017
2:00 p.m. EST 
  Land Trust Alliance Webinar: Rethinking Land Protection Priorities to Engage Your Whole Community   
       
September 15, 2017
10:00 a.m. EST
  NEIWPCC: Stream & Wetland Buffers Webinar Series: Part 3: Legal Challenges   
       
September 19, 2017
12:00 p.m. EST
  Penn State Community Forestry Management Webinar:
A Novel Water Management Tool for Your Landscape Plantings
 
       
September 20, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  EUCI Webinar: Natural Infrastructure for Resilient Communities  
       
September 27, 2017
2:00 p.m. EST 
  Land Trust Alliance Webinar: Voting for Conservation Dollars: What Does It Take to Pass a Ballot Measure?   
       
MORE SEPTEMBER WEBINARS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
       
OCTOBER 2017  
       
October 18, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Bringing Better Site Design into The 21st Century   
       
MORE OCTOBER WEBINARS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
       
NOVEMBER 2017  
       
November 15, 2017
1:00 p.m. EST
  Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Modeling for Water Quality   
       
MORE NOVEMBER WEBINARS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
       
MEETINGS
 
AUGUST 2017
       
August 21-25, 2017
Beijing, China
  12th International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL 2017 Beijing): Ecology and Civilization in a Changing World
 
       
August 22-26, 2017
Big Sky, MT
  7th International Symposium: Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control (WETPOL)  
       
August 24-26, 2017
Corum, Montpellier, France
  Biodiversity and Ecosystem Scenarios Network (ScenNet): Scenarios and Models of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Support of Decision Making  
       
August 26-30, 2017
New Orleans, LA
  National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration (NCER)
Proposals due by October 1, 2017
 
       
August 27-September 1, 2017
Stockholm, Sweden
  SIWI World Water Week: Water and Waste: Reduce and Reuse’   
       
MORE AUGUST MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
SEPTEMBER 2017
       
September 5-7, 2017
University of Leeds, UK
  7th International Conference on Flood Management (ICFM7)  
       
September 5-8, 2017
Long Beach, CA
  Floodplain Management Association Annual Conference: Creating Partnerships through Integration: Water, Environment, People  
       
September 9, 2017
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA
  Three Rivers Evolution Event  
       
September 10-11, 2017
Tel Aviv, Israel 
  American Water Resources Association: 2017 International Conference: Cutting-Edge Solutions to Wicked Water Problems  
       
September 10-13, 2017
Phoenix, AZ
  WateReuse: 32nd Annual WateReuse Symposium  
       
September 10-13, 2017
Loveland, CO 
  American Water Works Association Rocky Mountain Section: Annual Conference   
       
September 10-13, 2017
Duluth, MN
  ASCE Congress on Technical Advancement   
       
September 13, 2017
Chevy Chase, MD 
  Audubon Naturalist Society Naturally Latinos Conference   
       
September 14, 2017
Washington, DC
  State of the Art: Innovations in CO2 Capture and Use
Center for Climate and Energy Solutions
 
       
September 16-17, 2017
Toonton, Candad
  Sixth International Conference: Climate Change Adaptation 2017 (CCA 2017). Abstracts due by April 30, 2017.  
       
September 16-23, 2017

  Restore America's Estuaries: National Estuaries Week 2017
To find an event, click here.
 
       
September 18-24, 2017 
New York, NY
  Climate Week NYC   
       
September 19-20, 2017
Duluth, MN
 

Great Lakes Commission 2017 Annual Meeting

 
       
September 20-22, 2017
Baltimore, MD
  Rhode Island Resource Institute: 8th Mid-Atlantic Stream Restoration Conference  
       
September 22-24, 2017
Florida Gulf Coast University
Estero, FL  
  Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference   
       
September 23-27, 2017
Albuquerque, NM
  Wildlife Society 24th Annual Conference  
       
September 28-29, 2017
Budapest, Hungary
  1st International Conference on Community Ecology (ComEc)  
       
MORE SEPTEMBER MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
OCTOBER 2017
       
October 8-13, 2017
St. Petersburgh, FL
  International Conference: Global Challenges and Date-Driven Sciences   
       
October 10-12, 2017
Collins, CO
  Natural Areas Association: Natural Areas Conference

 
       
October 11-13, 2017
American Museum of Natural History
New York, NY
  Center for Biodiversity and Conservation and its partners: 2017 Student Conference on Conservation Science  
       
October 12, 2017
Linthicum, MD
  13th Annual Maryland Association of Floodplain and Stormwater Managers (MAFSM) Conference  
       
October 12-13, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  2017 Mid-Atlantic Water Resources Conference: Water Research: Building Knowledge and Innovative Solutions  
       
October 14, 2017
Westerville, OH
  Ohio Wetlands Association Wetlands Science Summit: Working Wetlands for Water Quality  
       
October 14-15, 2017
San Marcos, TX
  Texas State University, Department of Geography's Resilience and Bio-Geomorphic Systems: 48th Annual Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium. A field trip on October 13, 2017.  
       
October 17-19, 2017
University of California, Davis
  California Department of Water Resources, Urban Streams Restoration Program, Riparian Habitat Joint Venture: 2017 Riparian Summit - Confluence to Influence  
       
October 17-19, 2017
Buffalo, NY
  Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: 13th Annual Great Lakes Restoration Conference   
       
October 19-21, 2017
University of Oklahoma
  4th Life Discovery – Doing Science Biology Education Conference  
       
October 19-21, 2017
Rome, Italy
  4th World Conference on Climate Change: Today's Progress and Tomorrow's Climate Challenges  
       
October 22-25, 2017
Tampa, FL
  American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America will host: 2017 International Annual Meeting, "Managing Global Resources for a Secure Future"    
       
October 24-26, 2017
Atlantic City, NJ
  2017 NJAFM Annual Conference  
       
October 24-27, 2017 
Ft. Lauderdale, FL
  2017 ASBPA National Coastal Conference: Beaches, Bays and Beyond
Abstracts due by September 8, 2017
 
       
October 25-27, 2017
Boyne Falls, MI
  Michigan Aquatic Restoration Conference  
       
October 26-28, 2017
Denver, CO
  Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2017 National Land Conservation Conference  
       
MORE OCTOBER MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
NOVEMBER 2017
       
November 1-3, 2017
Shaw Centre
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 
  9th Canadian Science Policy Conference  
       
November 5-9, 2017
Portland, OR
  2017 AWRA Annual Conference  
       
November 5-9, 2017
Providence, RI
  Coastal Estuarine Research Federation (CERF) Conference: Coastal Science at the Inflection Point: Celebrating Successes & Learning from Challenges   
       
November 6-9, 2017
Green Bay, WI
  International Association for Great Lakes Research: State of Lake Michigan Conference  
       
November 8-9, 2017
Manhattan, KS
  Kansas Water Office Governor's Conference: Future of Water in Kansas  
       
November 23-24, 2017
St. John's Newfoundland & Labrador
  Geomatics Atlantic 2017  
       
MORE NOVEMBER MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
DECEMBER 2017
       
December 8, 2017
Linthicum, MD
  Maryland Water Monitoring Council Annual Conference  
       
December 11-15, 2017
New Orleans, LA
  AGU Fall Meeting

 
 
MORE DECEMBER MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
 
JANUARY 2018
       
January 4-6, 2018
Acme, MI
  Northern Michigan Waterways Hazardous Material Spill Planning Committee: 27th Annual No Spills Conference: New and Innovative Technology for Spill Prevention & Response  
       
January 5-9, 2018
Pacific Grove, CA
  American Society of Naturalists Conference  
       
January 11-13, 2018
College Park, MD
  Future Harvest CASA (Chesapeake Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture) Annual Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed Conference  
       
January 31-February 1, 2018
Wilmington, DE
  2018 Delaware Wetlands Conference
Abstracts accepted through November 1, 2017
 
       
MORE JANUARY MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR    
       
FEBRUARY 2018
       
February 1-4, 2018
Princess Royal
Ocean City, MD 
  Maryland Association for Environmental & Outdoor Education
Expand Your Influence! Empowering Citizens Action for the Environment
 
       
February 5-7, 2018
Denver, CO
  International LiDAR Mapping Forum  
       
February 11-16, 2018 
Portland, OR
  2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting
Abstracts due by September 6, 2017 
 
       
February 1-4, 2018
Denver, CO
  Climate Leadership Conference  
 
MORE FEBRUARY MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
 
MARCH 2018
       
March 8-9, 2018
University of Denver Sturm College
  Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute: 2018 Western Places/Western Spaces. Proposal deadline is August, 25, 2018  
       
March 14-16, 2018
Chattanooga, TN
  Southeast Regional Conference for Community and Land Conservation   
       
March 25-28, 2018
Seattle, WA
  American Water Works Association: Sustainable Water Management Conference

 
       
MORE MARCH MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
APRIL 2018
       
April 23-26, 2018
Coral Springs, FL
  University of Florida: 12th International Symposium on Biogeochemistry of Wetlands  
       
April 24-26, 2018
Forat Collings, CO
  Instream Flow Council: Flow 2 Managing Rivers, Reservoirs and Lakes in the Face of Drought: Practical Tools and Strategies for Sustaining and Protecting Ecological Values of Water  
 
MORE APRIL MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
 
MAY 2018
       
May 4-5, 2018
San Diego, CA
  P3 Water Summit: Solving Water Challenges Through Partnerships   
       
May 20-24, 2018
Detroit, MI
  Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting: Navigating Boundaries in Freshwater Science  
       
May 29-June 1, 2018
Denver, CO
  Society of Wetland Scientists 2018 Annual Meeting: Wetland Science: Integrating Research, Practice and Policy - An Exchange of Expertise   
       
MORE MAY MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR    
       
JUNE 2018
       
June 10-15, 2018
Victoria, B.C. Canada 
  ASLO (Association for the Science of Limnology and Oceanography 2018 Summer Meeting  
       
June 12-15, 2018
Jyväskylä, Finland
  Scientific Committee of the Society for Conservation Biology Europe Section's 5th European Congress for Conservation Biology (ECCB 2018)  
 
MORE JUNE MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
TRAINING
 
AUGUST 2017
       
August 20-26, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Identification, Biology, and Natural History of Ferns and Lycophytes  
       
August 20-26, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Banding/research Techniques for Studying Songbirds and Raptors  
       
August 21-22, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Evaluating Hydric Soils in the Field  
       
August 21-25, 2017
Alexandria Bay, NY
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Wetland Assessment, Restoration and Management  
       
August 23-25, 2017
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI
  CUAHSI and the University of Michigan Training Workshop: Sensor Network Bootcamp in an Urban Environment  
       
August 24-25, 2017
Denver, CO
  Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Floodplain Delineation using 2D HEC RAS Model  
       
August 25, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Vested Rights, Vesting Maps and Development Agreements  
       
August 27-September 2, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Better Birding: Passerines and Seabirds for Advancing Birders  
       
August 28-29, 2017
Arlington, WA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
August 28-29, 2017
Days, MT
  Ohio Sea Grant Workshop: Aquatic Invasive Species - Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point
 
       
August 30-December 3, 2017 
Online
  University of Maryland Extension Online Course: The Woods in Your Backyard   
       
MORE AUGUST TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
SEPTEMBER 2017
       
September 4-18, 2017   The Swamp School On-Demand Workshop: What is a “Waters of the US?”   
       
September 6-7, 2017
Duck Creek Conservation Area
Puxico, MO
  Wetland Management and Educational Services, Inc. Workshop: Moist-soil Management for Biologists and Managers  
       
September 6-December 13, 2017
Grasonville, MD
  Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center Course: Maryland Master Naturalist Program
Held on Wednesdays, from 9:30am-3:30pm and a Field Trip on September 13. 2017. 
 
       
September 7-8, 2017
Whitefish, MT
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
September 9, 2017
St. Michaels, MD 
  Environmental Concern Course: Monarch Rearing   
       
September 9, 2017
St. Michaels, MD 
  Environmental Concern Course: Late Season Nectar Sources for Monarchs  
       
September 11-15, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
September 12-13, 2017
Charleston, SC
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes  
       
September 12-26, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals  
       
September 12-26, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Habitat Conservation Plans  
       
September 12, 2017-December 4, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training    
       
September 12, 2017-December 4, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator | 2017  
       
September 13, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Land Use and Natural Resources Information Session  
       
September 13, 2017
Pickering Creek Audubon Center
Easton, MD
  Environmental Concern, Inc. Course: Tag Monarchs at Pickering Creek!
September 20, 2017 (rain date September 21, 2017
 
       
September 13-14, 2017
McNary National Wildlife Refuge
Burbank, WA
  Wetland Management and Educational Services, Inc. Workshop: Moist-Soil Management for Maintenance Staff  
       
September 14-15, 2017
San Diego, CA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Riparian Habitat Restoration for the Arid Southwest  
       
September 14-15, 2017
Milville, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Vegetation Identification for Wetland Delineation: South   
       
September 15, 2017
Jefferson, MD 
  Creek Freaks Training for Educators   
       
September 16, 2017
Prince Frederick, MD
  Invasive Plant ID  
       
September 18-19, 2017
Covington, LA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
September 18-21, 2017
Pittsburgh, PA
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training  
       
September 18-29, 2017
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute The Ecology and Conservation of Migratory Birds  
       
September 14-15, 2017
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species  
       
September 19-20, 2017
Arlington, VA
  Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Wetlands: Science and Regulatory Management  
       
September 19-22, 2017
Arlington, VA 
  North Carolina Stream Assessment Method (NC SAM) Certification Training: Lecture and Field Course   
       
September 20-21, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Habitat Site Restoration  
       
September 21-22, 2017
Poolesville, MD
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum - 2017  
       
September 25-26, 2017
Tuckerton, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants   
       
September 25-27, 2017
Bordentown, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Wetland Construction: Principles, Planning and Design   
       
September 27-29, 2017
Clovis, NM
  Wetlands Assessment using the New Mexico Rapid Assessment Method (NMRAM) for Playa Wetlands Version 1.0   
       
September 28, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Exploring Wetland Wildlife  
       
MORE SEPTEMBER TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
   
OCTOBER 2017
       
October 2-5, 2017
Hilliard, OH
  MBI (Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Wetland Delineation  
       
October 2-6, 2017
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
October 2-30, 2017
Online 
  The Swamp School Workshop: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment  
       
October 2-30, 2017
Online 
  The Swamp School Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments  
       
October 2-30, 2017
Online 
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Hydrology    
       
October 2-December 25, 2017
Online 
  The Swamp School Course: Basic Wetland Delineation Training  
       
October 9-13, 2017
Barcelona, Spain
  Transmitting Science, the Institut Catalá de Paleontologia Miquel, Crusafont and the Centre de Restauració i Interpretació Paleontològica Course: Comparative Approaches in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Science    
       
October 11, 2017
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Introduction to Wetland Identification   
       
October 12-14, 2017
Klamath Falls, OR
  Society for Ecological Restoration Northwest Workshop: Aquatic and Riparian Ecosystems: Interactions, Management, and Restoration East of the Cascades  
       
October 13, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Politics and Policymaking   
       
October 14-17, 2017
Iselin, NJ
  National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop  
       
October 16-27, 2017
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute Spatial Ecology, Geospatial Analysis and Remote Sensing for Conservation  
       
October 17-19, 2017
Boulder, CO
  CUAHSI and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Training Workshop: The Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System  
       
October 18, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Planning Tools to Create Healthy Communities  
       
October 18-19, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Workshop: Tree Identification  
       
October 20, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Land Use Planning for Non-Planners: An Introduction to Planning in California   
       
October 20, 2017
Sacramento, CA 
  UC Davis Extension Course: CEQA: A Step-by-Step Approach
 
 
       
October 23, 2017
New Brunswick, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Understanding Advanced Stormwater Management Techniques  
       
October 23-27, 2017
Asheville, NC
  Resource Institute Course: Level I - Applied Fluvial Morphology  
       
October 24-27, 2017
National Conservation Training Center
Shepherdstown, WV 
  Stream Mechanics: Stream Functions Pyramid Workshop   
       
October 26, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Building Stream Buffers  
       
October 26-27, 2017
Denver, CO
  Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Stormwater Green Drainage Design Using EPA SWMM-LID  
       
October 27, 2017 
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: EIR/EIS Preparation and Review
 
 
       
MORE OCTOBER TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
   
NOVEMBER 2017
       
November 2-3, 2017
Charleston, SC
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
November 6-9, 2017
Columbus, OH
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: ACOE Wetland Delineation, Waters of the US and Regional Supplement Training  
       
November 6-December 4, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment   
       
November 6, 2017-January 29, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training   
       
November 6, 2017-January 29, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Botanist  
       
November 7-9, 2017
Gainseville, FL
  CUAHSI and the University of Florida 3-day Training Workshop: Using In-Situ Water Quality Sensors - Lagrangian and Eulerian Applications  
       
November 8, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Mitigation Measure Development and Monitoring  
       
November 8, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetland Pollinators  
       
November 11, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern, Inc. Course: Life in a Chesapeake Bay Marsh Tour  
       
November 13-14, 2017
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands, and Hydrology (Coastal Plain or Piedmont)  
       
November 13-16, 2017
Richmond, VA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: Wetland Delineation Training  
       
November 13-17, 2017
Portland, OR
  U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Training: Climate-Smart Conservation with Scenario Planning
 
       
November 15, 2017 
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Streambank Assessment and Restoration    
       
November 15-16, 2017
Richmond, VA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: Regional Supplment Wetland Delineation Training. For other dates, go here.  
       
November 16-17, 2017;
December 14-14, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Environmental Planning and Site Analysis   
       
November 29, 2017 
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: The General Plan in California  
 
MORE NOVEMBER TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
   
DECEMBER 2017  
   
December 1, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Water Quality Regulation and Permitting    
       
December 4-18, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals   
       
December 4-18, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Habitat Conservation Plans  
       
December 4, 2017-February 26, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator  
       
December 4, 2017-February 26, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design  
       
December 4, 2017-February 26, 2018
Online 
   The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training   
       
December 7, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetlands of the World   
       
December 8, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Habitat Conservation Planning  
       
December 13, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: POW! The Planning of Wetlands   
       
December 13-15, 2017
Davis, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: GIS for Forestry Application  
       
December 14, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Implementing Citizen Science In Your Outdoor Classroom  
       
MORE DECEMBER TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
       
JANUARY 2018  
       
January 17-19, 2018
Knoxville, TX
  NIMBioS Investigative Workshop: Modeling Ecotoxicological Dynamics Subject to Stoichiometric Constraints  
       
MORE JANUARY TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
MARCH 2018      
       
March 12-16, 2018
Asheville, NC
  Resource Institute: Level 1 - Applied Fluvial Morphology
 
       
March 12-23, 2018
Asheville, NC
  Resource Institute: Level II - River Morphology and Application  
   
MORE MARCH TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR  
   
SPECIAL EVENTS
       
September 12-16, 2017
Bloomfield Hills, NI
  Rouge River Water Festival  
       
September 23, 2017
Cape May, NJ
  Fall Migration Festival  
       
September 25, 2017
Valencia, PA
  5th Annual Wildbird Recovery: Fall Migration Festival  
October 5, 2017 
Los Angeles, CA
  A Climate Series for the Ages
October 5 – Climate Change Cliff Notes
October 19 – Earth and Human Climate
November 2 – A Tale of Two Cities in a Hotter World: Los Angeles and Beijing
November 16 – Imagined Futures for a Hotter Planet
 
October 13-15, 2017
Houma, LA
  2017 Voice of Wetlands Festival  
       
For more wetland events, meetings, conferences, and courses nationwide, visit the ASWM calendar.
       

    
       
INDEX      


EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • Comment Period for Proposed Rule to Rescind Clean Water Rule Exteded 30 days to September 27
  • Trump infrastructure push rolls back environmental rules
  • The Gulf of Mexico's 'Dead Zone' Is Bigger Than it Has Ever Been Before
  • Bay 'dead zone' smaller than predicted this summer
  • EPA Water Rule Repeal Based on Sloppy Cost Analysis: Economists

NATIONAL NEWS

  • EPA plans to rewrite Obama-era limits for coal power plant wastewater
  • Native American tribes fight for clean water and more money
  • Scott Pruitt Is Carrying Out His E.P.A. Agenda in Secret, Critics Say
  • Study: Fines for illegal pollution plummet under Trump
  • Obama-era greater sage grouse protections face changes under Trump
  • Scrapping Climate Protections Would Erase $300 Billion in Benefits, Study Finds
  • Mapping Coastal Flood Risk Lags Behind Sea Level Rise
  • Trump Administration Moving Closer to Picking Science Director
  • What Our Tap Water Says About the Way We Farm
  • 8 Senators Call for Probe of ‘Arbitrary’ Reassignment of Federal Scientists
  • Panel approves Interior-EPA spending bill
  • The country’s flood insurance program is sinking. Rescuing it won’t be easy.
  • Trump Plan Would 'Reduce or Eliminate' Important Data Access, Federal Science Official Warns
  • Forecasters: Lake Erie algae bloom shaping up as big and possibly harmful
  • "Big Muddy" Missouri River needs a plan
  • Proposed EPA permit violates Clean Water Act, group alleges
  • Trump analysis slashes WOTUS's economic benefits

STATE NEWS

  • AK: As Hilcorp Plans to Drill in Arctic Waters, a Troubling Trail of Violations Surfaces
  • AK: Controversial Alaskan gold mine could be revived under Trump’s EPA
  • CA: California Sues for Answers About Pruitt's EPA Stewardship
  • CA: U.S. eases environment laws for Mexico border wall near San Diego
  • CA: California Proposes New Permitting Procedures for Impacts to Wetlands and Waters of the State
  • CA: Did rogue paddlers, Scalia cement protection for LA River?
  • CA: GOP push to shift state water policy away from conservation
  • CO: Sen. Bennet cosponsors Improving Access to Farm Conservation Act
  • FL: Two Sad Ironies In Florida Passing Its 'Anti-Science' Law
  • LA: Help Louisiana scientists track spread of wetland-killing bug
  • LA: Wetland restoration altered to benefit oil and gas, audit finds
  • LA: USGS finds rate of long term wetland loss in Louisiana is slowing
  • LA: Seeking Supreme Court Review of Suit Against Energy Industry
  • ME: Penobscot River cleanup study enters new phase
  • ME: DEP issues violation notice to Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens
  • MD: At a high-tech marsh in Edgewater, the future is unclear
  • MD: National study puts timeline on impact of sea-level rise in Maryland and Virginia
  • MD: Scientists say Conowingo dam no longer stopping pollution; Hogan seeks solutions
  • ME: Mysterious algae blooms in Portland, South Portland, Harpswell worry Casco Bay advocates
  • MN: Tribal liaison in Minnesota pipeline review is sidelined after oil company complains to governor
  • MN: BWSR offers new funding, website for buffers
  • MT: Group nears goal of protecting Montana wetland for birds
  • NE: Pipeline fight returns to where it started: Water
  • NV: Farmers Propose Novel Solution to Fight Over Groundwater in Nevada
  • NH: Climate Change is the Leading Cause of Moose and Loon Population Decline in New Hampshire
  • NJ: In a Rare U.S. Preserve, Water Pressures Mount As Development Closes In
  • NM: EPA: No review of mine spill claims after New Mexico, Navajo Nation sued
  • NY: While other states go along, NY says no to gas pipelines 
  • NC: Coal Plants Might Be Even More Toxic Than We Thought
  • ND: The State Battling the Corporate Giants…In Farming
  • OH: Burning river reborn: How Cleveland saved the Cuyahoga – and itself
  • OR: County farmers first in nation to have say in wetland siting
  • PA: Fracking is causing invasion of harmful non-native plants in Pennsylvania forests, PSU researchers say
  • PA: Despite challenges, PA environmental programs face cuts
  • PA: Pennsylvania judge halts pipeline construction after multiple problems
  • SD: Conservation milestone coming for South Dakota in August
  • TX: Trump’s border wall would slice through wildlife refuges and cut off U.S. territory in Texas
  • TX: As the oil patch demands more water, West Texas fights over a scarce resource
  • UT: Utah seeking $1.9 billion from EPA over mine-waste spill
  • VA: VA city’s artificial wetland the real deal in slowing stormwater pollution
  • WI: Dairy Group Sues Wisconsin Over Pollution Discharge Rules
  • WI: Wisconsin coastal communities to receive $2.4 million in grants

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • Healthy Watersheds Begin on Private Lands
  • Hot, Dry and Worrisome: 2016 Was a Record-Breaking Year for Climate
  • ‘Spongy’ Soil Can Help Farmers Combat Climate Change
  • Army Corps unveils $275M plan to battle Asian carp
  • The good, the bad and the algae
  • A legal snarl in Idaho portends future conflicts over water
  • New farm partnerships cropping up to spread nutrient-removal wetlands
  • Hypothesis Confirmed: Sea Lion Mass Deaths Caused by Malnutrition
  • Historical wildlife trends reliable for predicting species at risk
  • Fish out of water: Loss of 350 miles of Great Plains streams causing changes in aquatic food web
  • "Ghost forests": What they are and why they’re becoming more common
  • Meat industry blamed for largest-ever 'dead zone' in Gulf of Mexico
  • Nutrient pollution: Voluntary steps are failing to shrink algae blooms and dead zones
  • U.S. Farmers Favor Little Change in Farm Programs
  • Fertilizers, a Boon to Agriculture, Pose Growing Threat to U.S. Waterways
  • Great Lakes waters threaten Beluga whales
  • GOP Science chairman extolls 'benefits' of climate change
  • Destruction of small wetlands leads to more algal blooms, Ontario study finds
  • 'Invasive' species have been around much longer than believed
  • Whistleblower Case Shows How Trump Tries to Silence Science
  • Aquatic plants survive in 'ghost ponds' under agricultural fields
  • Soil filters out some emerging contaminants before reaching groundwater
  • House votes to delay Obama-era smog reductions
  • NOAA to give VIMS $835K for 'nature-based' flood resilience work
  • Invasive plant species can enhance coastal ecosystems
  • Treated Fracking Wastewater Contaminated Watershed, Study Finds
  • Climate change to deplete some U.S. water basins, reduce irrigated crop yields
  • Farmers consider floodplain easements, wetland reserves for flooded ground
  • The Uninhabitable Earth
  • Reaching Higher Ground in the Face of Climate Change

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • An Easy To Use Toolkit for State Legislators to Create Environmental Legislative Action
  • Completing and Using Ecosystem Service Assessment for Decision-Making: An Interdisciplinary Toolkit for Managers and Analysts
  • Climate Deregulation Tracker
  • Stream Quality Checklist – Expand Awareness & Support for Clean Water
  • Summary Findings of Pilot Studies Conducted by the Interagency Coastal Wetlands Workgroup
  • New EPA Tool Helps Communities Access More Than $10 Billion in Water Infrastructure Financing
  • When Rising Seas Hit Home: Hard Choices Ahead for Hundreds of US Coastal Communities
  • NOAA Database for Green Infrastructure Effectiveness

POTPOURRI

  • Accounting for individual animals in the Anthropocene
  • U.S. lawmakers seek missing information in review of Monsanto weed killer
  • Science: Pay attention to two other messages in the breakthrough BPA water treatment paper
  • Boosting resilience to modern-day threats - what is it worth?
  • Monsanto Pushed EPA to Fast-Track Pesticide Report in 2015
  • The Consolidated Livelihoods Exercise for Analyzing Resilience (CLEAR) approach
    Conservation Meets Corrections
  • Green Crabs Are Officially Delicious
  • Taking Children on Their First Fishing Trip
  • Five types of underwater grasses found in the Chesapeake Bay
  • Ghost nets: the remote town turning death-trap debris into world-class art
  • Time Travel, with Trees

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

WEBINARS, MEETINGS, TRAINING

Webinars

  • NEIWPCC: Stream & Wetland Buffers Webinar Series: Part 2: Education
  • Webinar: Identification of Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Indicators using an Ecological Resilience Framework
  • Land Trust Alliance Webinar: Talkin' Bout My Conservation: The Latest Market Research on Conservation, the Environment and the Work of Land Trusts
  • AWRA Webinar: Groundwater Droughts - A Tale from a Few Aquifers
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Stream Restoration: Where are we now?
  • Land Trust Alliance Webinar: Rethinking Land Protection Priorities to Engage Your Whole Community
  • NEIWPCC: Stream & Wetland Buffers Webinar Series: Part 3: Legal Challenges
  • Penn State Community Forestry Management Webinar: A Novel Water Management Tool for Your Landscape Plantings
  • EUCI Webinar: Natural Infrastructure for Resilient Communities
  • Land Trust Alliance Webinar: Voting for Conservation Dollars: What Does It Take to Pass a Ballot Measure?
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Bringing Better Site Design into The 21st Century
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Modeling for Water Quality

Meetings

  • 12th International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL 2017 Beijing): Ecology and Civilization in a Changing World
  • 7th International Symposium for Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control (WETPOL)
  • Biodiversity and Ecosystem Scenarios Network (ScenNet): Scenarios and Models of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Support of Decision Making
  • National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration
  • SIWI World Water Week: Water and Waste: Reduce and Reuse’
  • 7th International Conference on Flood Management (ICFM7)
  • Floodplain Management Association Annual Conference: Creating Partnerships through Integration: Water, Environment, People
  • Three Rivers Evolution Event
  • American Water Resources Association: 2017 International Conference: Cutting-Edge Solutions to Wicked Water Problems
  • WateReuse: 32nd Annual WateReuse Symposium
  • American Water Works Association Rocky Mountain Section: Annual Conference
  • ASCE Congress on Technical Advancement
  • Audubon Naturalist Society Naturally Latinos Conference
  • Center for Climate and Energy Solutions: State of the Art: Innovations in CO2 Capture and Use
  • Sixth International Conference: Climate Change Adaptation 2017 (CCA 2017)
  • Restore America's Estuaries: National Estuaries Week 2017
  • Climate Week NYC
  • Great Lakes Commission 2017 Annual Meeting
  • Rhode Island Resource Institute: 8th Mid-Atlantic Stream Restoration Conference
  • Wildlife Society 24th Annual Conference
  • 1st International Conference on Community Ecology (ComEc)
  • International Conference: Global Challenges and Date-Driven Sciences
  • Natural Areas Association: Natural Areas Conference
  • Center for Biodiversity and Conservation and its partners: 2017 Student Conference on Conservation Science
  • 13th Annual Maryland Association of Floodplain and Stormwater Managers (MAFSM) Conference
  • 2017 Mid-Atlantic Water Resources Conference: Water Research: Building Knowledge and Innovative Solutions
  • Ohio Wetlands Association Wetlands Science Summit: Working Wetlands for Water Quality
  • 48th Annual Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium
  • California Department of Water Resources, Urban Streams Restoration Program, Riparian Habitat Joint Venture: 2017 Riparian Summit - Confluence to Influence
  • Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: 13th Annual Great Lakes Restoration Conference
  • 4th Life Discovery – Doing Science Biology Education Conference
  • 4th World Conference on Climate Change: Today's Progress and Tomorrow's Climate Challenges
  • 2017 International Annual Meeting, "Managing Global Resources for a Secure Future"
  • 2017 NJAFM Annual Conference
  • 2017 ASBPA National Coastal Conference: Beaches, Bays and Beyond
  • Michigan Aquatic Restoration Conference
  • Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2017 National Land Conservation Conference
  • 9th Canadian Science Policy Conference
  • 2017 AWRA Annual Conference
  • Coastal Estuarine Research Federation (CERF) Conference: Coastal Science at the Inflection Point: Celebrating Successes & Learning from Challenges
  • International Association for Great Lakes Research: State of Lake Michigan Conference
  • Kansas Water Office Governor's Conference: Future of Water in Kansas
  • Geomatics Atlantic 2017
  • Maryland Water Monitoring Council Annual Conference
  • AGU Fall Meeting
  • 27th Annual No Spills Conference: New and Innovative Technology for Spill Prevention & Response
  • American Society of Naturalists Conference
  • Future Harvest CASA (Chesapeake Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture) Annual Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed Conference
  • 2018 Delaware Wetlands Conference
  • Maryland Association for Environmental & Outdoor Education
  • Expand Your Influence! Empowering Citizens Action for the Environment
  • International LiDAR Mapping Forum
  • 2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting
  • Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute: 2018 Western Places/Western Spaces
  • Southeast Regional Conference for Community and Land Conservation
  • University of Florida: 12th International Symposium on Biogeochemistry of Wetlands
  • Instream Flow Council: Flow 2018
  • P3 Water Summit: Solving Water Challenges Through Partnerships
  • Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting: Navigating Boundaries in Freshwater Science
  • SWS 2018 Annual Meeting: Wetland Science: Integrating Research, Practice and Policy - An Exchange of Expertise
  • ASLO (Association for the Science of Limnology and Oceanography 2018 Summer Meeting
  • Scientific Committee of the Society for Conservation Biology Europe Section's 5th European Congress for Conservation Biology

Training

  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Identification, Biology, and Natural History of Ferns and Lycophytes
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Banding/research Techniques for Studying Songbirds and Raptors
  • Environmental Concern Course: Evaluating Hydric Soils in the Field
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Wetland Assessment, Restoration and Management
  • CUAHSI and the University of Michigan Training Workshop: Sensor Network Bootcamp in an Urban Environment
  • Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Floodplain Delineation using 2D HEC RAS Model
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Vested Rights, Vesting Maps and Development Agreements
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Better Birding: Passerines and Seabirds for Advancing Birders
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Ohio Sea Grant Workshop: Aquatic Invasive Species - Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point
  • University of Maryland Extension Online Course: The Woods in Your Backyard
  • The Swamp School On-Demand Workshop: What is a “Waters of the US?”
  • Wetland Management and Educational Services, Inc. Workshop: Moist-soil Management for Biologists and Managers
  • Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center Course: Maryland Master Naturalist Program
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Environmental Concern Course: Monarch Rearing
  • Environmental Concern Course: Late Season Nectar Sources for Monarchs
  • Environmental Concern Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
  • The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
  • The Swamp School Course: Habitat Conservation Plans
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Land Use and Natural Resources Information Session
  • Environmental Concern, Inc. Course: Tag Monarchs at Pickering Creek!
  • Wetland Management and Educational Services, Inc. Workshop: Moist-Soil Management for Maintenance Staff
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Riparian Habitat Restoration for the Arid Southwest
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Vegetation Identification for Wetland Delineation: South
  • Creek Freaks Training for Educators
  • Invasive Plant ID
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute The Ecology and Conservation of Migratory Birds
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Wetlands: Science and Regulatory Management
  • North Carolina Stream Assessment Method (NC SAM) Certification Training: Lecture and Field Course
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Habitat Site Restoration
  •  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum – 2017 – MD
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Wetland Construction: Principles, Planning and Design
  • Wetlands Assessment using the New Mexico Rapid Assessment Method (NMRAM) for Playa Wetlands Version 1.0
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Exploring Wetland Wildlife
  • MBI (Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Wetland Delineation
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • The Swamp School Workshop: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment
  • The Swamp School Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Hydrology
  • The Swamp School Course: Basic Wetland Delineation Training
  • Course: Comparative Approaches in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Science
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Introduction to Wetland Identification
  • Society for Ecological Restoration Northwest Workshop: Aquatic and Riparian Ecosystems: Interactions, Management, and Restoration East of the Cascades
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Politics and Policymaking
  • National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Spatial Ecology, Geospatial Analysis and Remote Sensing for Conservation
  • CUAHSI and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)
  • Training Workshop: The Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Planning Tools to Create Healthy Communities
  • Highlands Biological Station Workshop: Tree Identification
  • UC Davis Extension Course Land Use Planning for Non-Planners: An Introduction to Planning in California
  • UC Davis Extension Course: CEQA: A Step-by-Step Approach
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Understanding Advanced Stormwater Management Techniques
  • Resource Institute Course: Level I – Applied Fluvial Morphology
  • Stream Mechanics: Stream Functions Pyramid Workshop
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Building Stream Buffers
  • Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Stormwater Green Drainage Design Using EPA SWMM-LID
  • UC Davis Extension Course: EIR/EIS Preparation and Review
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Basic: Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum – SC
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: ACOE Wetland Delineation, Waters of the US and Regional Supplement Training
  • The Swamp School Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Botanist
  • CUAHSI and the University of Florida 3-day Training Workshop: Using In-Situ Water Quality Sensors - Lagrangian and Eulerian Applications
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Mitigation Measure Development and Monitoring
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetland Pollinators
  • Environmental Concern, Inc. Course: Life in a Chesapeake Bay Marsh Tour
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands, and Hydrology (Coastal Plain or Piedmont)
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: Wetland Delineation Training
  • U.S Fish & Wildlife Service Training: Climate Smart Conservation with Scenario Planning
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Streambank Assessment and Restoration
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • UC Davis Extension Course Environmental Planning and Site Analysis
  • UC Davis Extension Course: The General Plan in California
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Water Quality Regulation and Permitting
  • The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
  • The Swamp School Course: Habitat Conservation Plans
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
  • The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetlands of the World
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Habitat Conservation Planning
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: POW! The Planning of Wetlands
  • UC Davis Extension Course: GIS for Forestry Application
  • Environmental Concern Course: Implementing Citizen Science In Your Outdoor Classroom
  • NIMBioS Investigative Workshop: Modeling Ecotoxicological Dynamics Subject to Stoichiometric Constraints
  • Resource Institute: Level 1 - Applied Fluvial Morphology
  • Resource Institute: Level II - River Morphology and Application

SPECIAL EVENT

  • Rouge River Water Festival
  • Fall Migration Festival
  • 5th Annual Wildbird Recovery: Fall Migration Festival
  • A Climate Series for the Ages
  • 2017 Voice of Wetlands Festival
       
Wetland Breaking News - July 2017
 
 

Wetland Breaking News - March 2016

The Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News (WBN) is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those working in water resources and related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published Wetland Breaking News - January 2017for over fifteen years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to .

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled and Edited by Marla Stelk, Editor; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors. Executive Director: Jeanne Christie. Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399 Fax: 207-892-3089
All photos by Jeanne Christie, ASWM
Association of State Wetland Managers   Find us on Facebook Join our Group on Linkedin