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WETLAND SCIENCE

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All photos by
Jeanne Christie, ASWM

   


Dear Wetlanders,

I recently visited Seattle, Washington and the surrounding area while on vacation. The Pacific Northwest is truly one of the most beautiful places on earth. I was awestruck, however, by the smoke and fires that were visible from our plane. The fires in the western United States have been out-shadowed in the news by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma but they are equally concerning and incredibly devastating to those who live there – both human and wildlife. Between hurricanes and wildfires, it has certainly been a tragic month for many communities across the nation.

Anyone who works in the field of wetland science and/or policy already has a deep understanding and appreciation for the myriad ways in which wetlands help us mitigate the impacts of extreme weather events like wildfires, droughts, floods and hurricanes. And when we mitigate the negative physical impacts, we save money that would otherwise have to be spent on rescues, emergency crews, clean-up, repairs, rebuilding, etc. That can add up to millions, even billions of dollars. Wetlands, in a way, are a form of insurance that can lessen the adverse physical and economic impacts of natural disasters and other stressors. 

Recently several new articles and blogs have been published which discuss the economic benefits of preserving and restoring our natural resources like wetlands, rivers and floodplains. In National News, there is a story about a recent U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service report which found that 101.6 million Americans collectively spent $156 billion in 2016 on hunting, fishing and wildlife activities. Imagine what the impact would be to our economy if the habitats supporting those activities were destroyed by wildfires or hurricanes. And in Editor’s Choice, you’ll find a story about a team of researchers at UC Santa Cruz that recently released a study showing that coastal wetlands in the northeast U.S. prevented $625 million in direct flood damages during Hurricane Sandy. Clearly, wetlands have enormous economic value (not to mention tremendous ecological, social, and cultural value as well).

We live in a world where the vast majority of our decisions for the future are made based on a benefit-cost analysis, often without any consideration of the very real benefits provided by wetlands. The field of ecosystem service valuation is still somewhat young, but it is continuing to grow and refine itself. As we face an era of increasing intensity in storms and other natural disasters, the ability to quantify the economic benefits of protecting and restoring wetlands, rivers and floodplains will become increasingly important.

Best regards,

Marla J. Stelk
Editor
Wetland Breaking News

   
                 
                 


Cost of fighting U.S. wildfires topped $2 billion in 2017

By Laura Zuckerman – Reuters – September 14, 2017
The costs of fighting U.S. wildfires topped $2 billion in 2017, breaking records and underscoring the need to address a U.S. Forest Service budget that mostly goes to fires, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said on Thursday. “Forest Service spending on fire suppression in recent years has gone from 15 percent of the budget to 55 percent – or maybe even more – which means we have to keep borrowing from funds that are intended for forest management,” Perdue said in a written statement. For full story, click here.

Coastal wetlands dramatically reduce property losses during hurricanes

By Tim Stephens – University of California Santa Cruz – August 31, 2017
With the Atlantic hurricane season well under way and Tropical Storm Harvey causing devastation in Texas, a new scientific study reports that coastal wetlands significantly reduce annual flood losses and catastrophic damages from storms. Led by a team of scientists from the engineering, insurance, and conservation sectors, including researchers at UC Santa Cruz, the study found that coastal wetlands in the northeast United States prevented $625 million in direct flood damages during Hurricane Sandy, reducing damages by more than 22 percent in half of the affected areas and by as much as 30 percent in some states. For full story, click here
 

Pruitt stars in industry video promoting WOTUS repeal

By Ariel Wittenberg – E&E News – August 21, 2017 – Video
U.S. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt appears in an agribusiness video urging farmers and ranchers to comment on the proposed repeal of the Obama-era Clean Water Rule, promoting the rollback of a regulation that he sued to stop as Oklahoma attorney general. In the National Cattlemen's Beef Association video, Pruitt uses industry talking points to inaccurately describe the rule, also known as the Waters of the U.S. (WOTUS). The 2015 regulation was aimed at clarifying which wetlands and small waterways are protected by the Clean Water Act. For full story and to view video, click here.  

Farm bill pays high dividends for people and the environment 

By Amanda D. Rodewald – The Hill – August 10, 2017
The Agriculture Adjustment Act, also known as the farm bill, provides crop payments, insurance subsidies and loans to many American farmers. However, fewer recognize that the bill has a much wider scope that includes forestry, energy and conservation programs. A new report called, The State of the Birds 2017: A Farm Bill Special Report, highlighted how this strategic federal investment not only supports the livelihoods of farmers, ranchers, and forest owners, but also protects critical ecosystem services and biodiversity. For full blog post, click here

Beyond compensation: the insurance industry's role in climate resilience

By Allie Goldstein – Business Insurance – August 7, 2017
Nearly 2,000 disclosures to a climate questionnaire issued last year by CDP, a London-based organization that works with shareholders and corporations to disclose greenhouse gas emissions, revealed that one in five companies rely on insurance as a part of their climate change risk management strategy, not just to compensate losses but also to guide investments in prevention and protection. Private-sector strategies to continue operations and reduce financial losses in the face of intensifying storms, sweltering temperatures and pressured supply chains include a variety of process-driven and engineered measures, from strengthening relationships with partners to building flood barriers. For full story, click here

A New Insurance Market to Protect People, Places, and Economies

By Kathy Baughman McLeod – 100 Resilient Cities – August 7, 2017
When you hear the word ‘nature,’ what do you think about? A pristine beach? Maybe your favorite wild animal? Nature means different things to different people. But do you think of nature as a powerful source of protection from storms, rising sea levels and other negative impacts of climate change? If you don’t, then you should. Climate change is no longer a distant threat. We are living with the reality of it, right here and right now. The impacts of climate disruption from Florida to Fiji, and everywhere in between are clear, costly, and widespread as storms, floods and droughts become more severe and less predictable. Storms are costing us $300 billion a year, and 68,000 people are being displaced every single day. For full story, click here

 

 

EPA will reconsider Obama-era safeguards on coal waste

By Brady Dennis and Juliet Eilperin – The Washington Post – September 14, 2017
The Environmental Protection Agency plans to reconsider parts of an Obama-era effort to regulate potentially toxic waste known as coal ash, again siding with energy-industry efforts to slow or reverse standards put in place in recent years. Federal regulators have struggled for several decades with how to address coal ash, the substance that remains when coal is burned in power plants to generate electricity. A toxic mix of mercury, cadmium, arsenic and other heavy metals, coal ash can pollute waterways, poison wildlife and cause respiratory illness among those living near the massive storage pits plant operators use to contain it. For full story, click here.  

It's a small world after all, say scientists warning of sand scarcity

By Eoin O'Carroll – The Christian Science Monitor – September 14, 2017
If you’re looking for a way to express something that’s staggeringly hard to count, you won’t find a more reliable metaphor than grains of sand. There is indeed quite a bit of it – about 7.5 quintillion grains on Earth’s beaches and deserts, according to one estimate. But if you think that this would be sufficient to supply an ever-expanding global economy with all the concrete, asphalt, glass, and semiconductors it could possibly desire, think again. For full story, click here

Climate Skeptics Could Snag EPA Science Adviser Slots

By Scott Waldman – Scientific America – September 14, 2017
Climate skeptics may soon join a key science advisory panel at U.S. EPA. A number of people who reject the findings of mainstream climate science are being considered by the Trump administration for spots on EPA's Science Advisory Board, a voluntary but influential panel that reviews science used in environmental regulations. At least one nominee hopes to use a position on the board to challenge the science undergirding many environmental regulations. One has said in a statement that the world must "abandon this suicidal Global Warming crusade." Another compared people concerned about climate change to "Aztecs who believed they could make rain by cutting out beating hearts." For full story, click here.

Visitors Threaten River in One of Southwest’s Most Popular Parks

By Matt Weiser – News Deeply Water Deeply – September 12, 2017
The past four years have seen an explosion in visitors to national parks in the West, prompting concern about environmental impacts – from air pollution and erosion in the parks to traffic congestion in nearby towns. But the effects on Zion National Park in southwest Utah are unique, thanks to its star attraction. The most popular trail in the park takes visitors right into the streambed of the Virgin River, through a scenic section called the Narrows, where hikers wade in the water between steep redrock cliff walls. For full story, click here

Alert: Nature, on the Verge of Bankruptcy

By Baher Kamal – IPS News – September 12, 2017
Pressures on global land resources are now greater than ever, as a rapidly increasing population coupled with rising levels of consumption is placing ever-larger demands on the world’s land-based natural capital, warns a new United Nations report. Consumption of the earth’s natural reserves has doubled in the last 30 years, with a third of the planet’s land now severely degraded, adds the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) new report, launched on 12 September in Ordos, China during the Convention’s 13th summit (6-16 September 2017). “Each year, we lose 15 billion trees and 24 billion tonnes of fertile soil,” the UNCCD’s report The Global Land Outlook (GLO) says, adding that a significant proportion of managed and natural ecosystems are degrading and at further risk from climate change and biodiversity loss. For full story, click here

New 5-Year Report Shows 101.6 Million Americans Participated in Hunting, Fishing & Wildlife Activities

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – September 7, 201
The U.S. Department of the Interior announced a new report by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that shows that 101.6 million Americans—40 percent of the U.S. population 16 years old and older—participated in wildlife-related activities in 2016, such as hunting, fishing and wildlife-watching. The survey illustrates gains in wildlife watching—particularly around the home—and fishing, with moderate declines in the number of hunters nationally. The findings reflect a continued interest in engaging in the outdoors. These activities are drivers behind an economic powerhouse, where participants spent $156 billion—the most in the last 25 years, adjusted for inflation. For full press release, click here.

EPA under Trump shrinks to near Reagan-era staffing levels

By Brady Dennis – The Washington Post – September 6, 2017 – Video
The workforce of the Environmental Protection Agency could soon shrink to the lowest level since Ronald Reagan occupied the White House — part of a push to curtail the size and scope of an agency that President Trump once promised to eliminate “in almost every form.” The EPA employs about 14,880 people, but administration officials made clear this spring that they intended to reduce those numbers in several ways. The agency also has been under a hiring freeze. And in June, the EPA said it planned to offer buyouts and early retirement packages to more than 1,200 people by early September. For full story and to view video, click here.

Trump official’s flounder ruling clouds Atlantic coast fish conservation

By Karl Blankenship – Bay Journal – September 6, 2017
No one considers summer flounder an iconic Bay species. But fishery managers and conservationists say the ripple effect of a controversial Trump administration decision to let more “fluke” be caught in New Jersey may impact how important species such as striped bass and menhaden are managed in the Chesapeake. In the wake of an unprecedented decision by the U.S. Department of Commerce, some in Maryland are already calling on fishery managers to challenge how coastwide fishing restrictions are implemented in the Bay. For full article, click here.

Deadly Fish Virus Spreading in Pacific Northwest

By Sean Duffy – Courthouse News Service – September 6, 2017
A highly contagious virus that can be lethal to juvenile fish represents a major threat to local conservation efforts and the fishing industry in the Pacific Northwest, according to new research that analyzes the pathogen’s spread. Known as infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus, or IHNV, the pathogen affects Pacific salmon, trout and other species and can spread among juvenile hatchery-raised fish. For full story, click here.

While Trump Keeps Monument Plan Secret, Proponents Tout Their Economic Benefits

By Bryce Oates – Daily Yonder – September 5, 2017
The argument that National Monuments impede economic growth doesn’t hold water, say an economist and conservationists. With 98% of public comments in favor of leaving monuments just the way they are, many think the Trump administration is going to make changes to allow more energy and timber development. Abundant turkey habitat might not be the most common image associated with the deserts of Southern Utah, but Jay Banta of nearby Torrey, Utah, has had good luck with the birds at the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. For full story, click here.

Plastic fibres found in tap water around the world, study reveals

Damian Carrington – The Guardian – September 5, 2017
Microplastic contamination has been found in tap water in countries around the world, leading to calls from scientists for urgent research on the implications for health. Scores of tap water samples from more than a dozen nations were analyzed by scientists for an investigation by Orb Media, who shared the findings with the Guardian. Overall, 83% of the samples were contaminated with plastic fibres. The US had the highest contamination rate, at 94%, with plastic fibres found in tap water sampled at sites including Congress buildings, the US Environmental Protection Agency’s headquarters, and Trump Tower in New York. Lebanon and India had the next highest rates. For full story, click here.

Investors Offer New Source of Conservation Funding

Philip Gruber – Lancaster Farming – September 1, 2017
When some people think about farm runoff, they see pollution, a problem that needs to be fixed by government-funded conservation projects. Ashley Allen sees an investment opportunity. Allen, the founder and CEO of i2 Capital, is working with The Nature Conservancy to get conservation practices on farms in the Brandywine-Christina watershed in Pennsylvania and Delaware. The two groups are taking advantage of a relatively new investment strategy called pay for success. In this model, private investors pay for the project up front, and another entity, usually the government, pays the investors if the project hits certain performance metrics. The strategy is being used to combat a number of social and environmental challenges, but in this case, the challenge is agricultural runoff. For full story,
 
click here

Trump reversed regulations to protect infrastructure against flooding just days before Hurricane Harvey

By Eliza Relman – Business Insider – August 28, 2017
Ten days before Hurricane Harvey descended upon Texas on Friday, wreaking havoc and causing widespread flooding, President Donald Trump signed an executive order revoking a set of regulations that would have made federally funded infrastructure less vulnerable to flooding. The Obama-era rules, which had not yet gone into effect, would have required the federal government to take into account the risk of flooding and sea-level rise as a result of climate change when constructing new infrastructure and rebuilding after disasters. Experts are predicting that Harvey — the most powerful storm to hit the US since 2004 — will cost Texas between $30 billion and $100 billion in damage. For full story, click here.

Army Corps of Engineers working to restore Chesapeake, one river at a time

By Joe Lacdan – U.S. Army – August 23, 2017
On a bright, sweltering summer morning, a crane stacked clusters of granite into the brackish waters of the Piankatank River on Virginia's middle peninsula . The crane's hum broke the tranquil silence, steadily plunging the rock into a white swath of waves. Here, hidden beneath rows of cypress and pine trees near the shores of Virginia's sparsely populated coastal plains, the Army Corps of Engineers built a $2 million project -- a 25-acre artificial reef in the lower section of the river near the Chesapeake Bay. On the river's eastern edge where the Piankatank empties into the bay, the reef marks a small step in the hopes of creating a sustainable oyster population as part of the Chesapeake Bay Program. For full storyclick here.

State lawyers use Pruitt's playbook against him — by suing

By Robin Bravender – E&E News – August 22, 2017
When Scott Pruitt was Oklahoma's top attorney, he made a name for himself by suing the Obama administration. Pruitt teamed up with other Republican state attorneys general to launch more than a dozen court challenges to U.S. EPA rules — including multiple attacks on the high-profile Clean Power Plan, a lawsuit against EPA's signature water regulation, and cases to combat standards on mercury and other air pollutants. Now, as President Trump's EPA administrator, Pruitt is on the flip side, facing a legal onslaught from Democratic attorneys general he's long sparred against in court. And as Pruitt attempts to use his new position to unravel Obama-era climate rules he's long fought, his foes are hoping attorneys general who oppose Trump will take a page from Pruitt's past playbook. For full story, click here.

Trump’s Interior Department moves to stop mountaintop removal study

By Ken Ward, Jr. – Charleston Gazette-Mail – August 21, 2017
Trump administration officials have told the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine to halt a review of the increased public health risks faced by Appalachian residents who live near mountaintop removal coal-mining sites, the academies revealed in a statement issued Monday. Word of the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement order was disclosed by the academies just hours before the scientific panel conducting the study was scheduled to hear from coalfield residents at a public meeting Monday evening in Hazard, Kentucky, and then hold two days of business meetings in Lexington. For full story,  click here.

Federal court upholds state's right to stop natural gas pipeline under the Clean Water Act

By Mary C. Serreze – MassLive – August 21, 2017
Fossil fuel foes are claiming victory after a federal appeals court on Friday upheld New York's move to block a federally permitted interstate natural gas pipeline that failed to meet state water quality standards. The New York Department of Environmental Conservation acted properly in 2016 when it denied Constitution Pipeline a Section 401 certificate under the U.S. Clean Water Act, effectively vetoing the project, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals ruled. For full story, click here. 

Trump administration urged to avoid salmon protection rules

By Keith Ridler, Associated Press – Seattle PI – August 13, 2017
A group that represents farmers is calling the costs of saving imperiled salmon in the largest river system in the Pacific Northwest unsustainable and is turning to the Trump administration to sidestep endangered species laws. The Columbia-Snake River Irrigators Association wants the government to convene a Cabinet-level committee with the power to allow exemptions to the Endangered Species Act. Known as the "God squad" because its decisions can lead to extinctions of threatened wildlife, it has only gathered three times — the last 25 years ago during a controversy over spotted owl habitat in the Northwest. For full story, click here.

Against the Stream: The Future of the Federal Clean Water Rule

By Charles Schmidt – UnDark – August 10, 2017
High up in Washington’s Cascade Range, snow feeds the creeks that descend toward the coast, flowing intermittently in summer and gaining strength again the following spring as they coalesce into the Cedar, Snohomish, and Stillaguamish rivers that dump into Puget Sound. These mountainous creeks have a major influence on downstream water quality, and polluting them could jeopardize clean drinking water for much of Seattle’s population, as well as the spawning habitat for the state’s iconic salmon and trout fisheries. They are among the two million miles of streams and 20 million acres of wetlands across the United States that, as a result of pressure from the administration of President Donald J. Trump and allied Republicans in Congress, are currently at risk of losing federal protection under the 1972 Clean Water Act. For full story, click here.

10 states back California agencies in fight with tribe over groundwater

By Ian James – The Desert Sun – August 8, 2017 – Video
Ten states from Nevada to Texas have weighed in to support two water agencies in their fight with an Indian tribe over control of groundwater in the California desert. The states filed a brief Monday before the U.S. Supreme Court, which will soon decide whether to take up an appeal by the Desert Water Agency and the Coachella Valley Water District. The water agencies are challenging a decision by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, which ruled the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians has a federally established right to groundwater dating to the creation of its reservation in the 1870s. For full story and to view video, click here.

EPA’s Pruitt gathers input for WOTUS redo

By Ben Nuelle – Agri Pulse – August 8, 2017
Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt met with farmers, elected officials, and ag industry leaders today to hear feedback on re-writing the Waters of the U.S. Rule (WOTUS) under the Clean Water Act (CWA). The controversial rule has been put on hold by the U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals amid strong opposition from farm organizations, home builders and others who consider it to be an overreach of federal regulations. Shortly after taking office, President Donald Trump issued an executive order to rescind or revise it. The CWA prohibits the discharge of pollutants without a federal permit into “navigable waters,” defined as “waters of the United States.” But jurisdiction was gradually expanded by the respective agencies in charge of administrating the rule. For full story, click here.
 
 

AK: As Arctic Sea Ice Disappears, 2,000 Walruses Mob Remote Alaska Beach

By Phil McKenna – InsideClimate News – August 17, 2017
A remote barrier island off Alaska's northwest coast has been mobbed by thousands of Pacific walruses in recent weeks in the earliest known "haul out" for the species. Their arrival is tied to shrinking Arctic sea ice and follows one of the hottest months on record. It also comes as Arctic sea ice extent is near a record low for this time of year. For full story, click here.

AZ: EPA Announces $2.86 Million to Improve Tribal Lands in Arizona

Contact: Margot Perez-Sullivan – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – August 21, 2017
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced $2.86 million in funding to nine Arizona tribes for environmental programs including drinking water infrastructure development, hazardous waste cleanups, air pollution control, water quality improvement and wetland protection. “This funding will help support tribal employment, develop infrastructure and conserve resources,” said EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt. “These vital grants have a huge impact in Indian County.” For full news release, click here. 

AR: Court Lets Exxon Off Hook for Pipeline Spill in Arkansas Neighborhood

By Georgina Gustin – InsideClimate News – August 16, 2017
A federal appeals court has let ExxonMobil largely off the hook for a 2013 pipeline spill that deluged a neighborhood in Mayflower, Arkansas, with more than 200,000 gallons of heavy tar sands crude oil, sickening residents and forcing them from their homes. The Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals on Monday overturned federal findings of violations and the better part of a $2.6 million fine imposed on Exxon's pipeline unit in 2015 by the U.S. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA). The regulator had accused the company of failing to maintain the decades-old Pegasus Pipeline and to prioritize testing of a segment of older, high-risk pipe where a 22-foot gash eventually opened along a metal seam. For full story, click here.  

CA: Study: Heavy Storms May Be Enough to Recharge California Groundwater

By Matt Weiser – News Deeply Water Deeply – August 21, 2017
California’s Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, passed in 2014, requires some 250 groundwater basins throughout the state to halt the overdraft in their aquifers. The big question for everyone is: Where will the water come from to do that? It could come from “high-magnitude flows” – flooding events, essentially, that occur from just a handful of storms every winter. Tiffany Kocis, a PhD student in hydrologic sciences at University of California, Davis, is the lead author of a new study that attempts to quantify these high flows. It’s one of the first efforts to measure how much water might be available for groundwater recharge from these storm events, and the results are surprising. For full story, click here

FL: Florida’s Poop Nightmare Has Come True

By Emily Atkin – New Republic – September 14, 2017
In the days and hours before Hurricane Irma slammed into Florida, its residents were treated to copious media speculation about nightmare scenarios. This monster storm, journalists said, could bring a 15-foot storm surge, blow roofs off of buildings, and cause tens of billions of dollars in damage. But perhaps no scenario seemed more dire than the one Quartz warned about the day before Irma made landfall: “Hurricane Irma will likely cover South Florida with a film of poop.” Quartz’ apparent hyperbole turned out to be an understatement. Pollution reports submitted to Florida’s Department of Environmental Protection show that, due to power outages and flooding caused by Irma, human waste has been spilling into streets, residences, and waterways across the entire state. For full story, click here.

FL: Construction to begin next year on Ocala wetland park

By Fred Hiers – Ocala.com – August 7, 2017
The 55-acre, multimillion-dollar project will be near Pine Oaks golf course. 
Construction should begin in early 2018 on the city of Ocala’s 55-acre, multimillion-dollar wetland groundwater recharge park. The plan for the $10 million project by Pine Oaks Golf Course is meant to allow the city’s water and sewer department to pump treated water from its wastewater treatment plants to the recharge area, treating it one more time before it joins the groundwater. For full story, click here

IA: Gov. Reynolds cuts ribbon on Abner Bell wetland

By Dana Larsen – The Daily Reporter – August 13, 2017
Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds is not the kind of governor who leaves the house with just one pair of shoes. 
Her morning in Storm Lake Wednesday is typical of her barnstorming around the state since taking office. First a ribbon cutting for a woodsy wetland area, quick switch from sensible flats to black heels, and minutes later it's a formal occasion handing out awards at a volunteerism ceremony hosted by Buena Vista University. Asked if she always totes indoor and outdoor shoes, Iowa’s new chief executive only winks. “Wish I had indoor and outdoor hair,” she said, swiping at wayward locks. A small crowd, ruffled from a stiff breeze and a few sprinkles that morning, ventured along a curving dirt peninsula to the middle of the newly-created Abner Bell Wetland, a name shared by a local pioneer and the nearby Storm Lake roadway. Reynolds and Lt. Gov. Adam Gregg have been highlighting water quality efforts as they travel the state after taking their new offices, and for locals, that meant an opportunity for celebrity impact for a ribbon cutting on the wetland. The project was built on the site of former unsightly lime treatment lagoons, on the edge of the Little Storm Lake preserve and its earlier-developed Discovery Center. For full story, click here.

ME: ‘Not one drop’ of Poland Spring bottled water is from a spring, lawsuit claims

By Abha Bhattarai – The Washington Post – August 22, 2017
Poland Spring, the country’s best-selling bottled water, is “a colossal fraud,” according to a class-action lawsuit. The lawsuit, filed last week in Connecticut, alleges that instead of spring water, parent company Nestle Water North America has been selling billions of gallons of groundwater to its customers. “Not one drop of Poland Spring Water emanates from a water source that complies with the Food and Drug Administration definition of ‘spring water,'” the lawsuit states. For full story, click here

MD: Bloede Dam Removal Project Begins in Patapsco Valley State Park

Maryland Department of Natural Resources – September 5, 2017
The Maryland Department of Natural Resources announced today that the Bloede Dam, located along the Patapsco River, is scheduled to be removed from Patapsco Valley State Park over the next two years, with completion scheduled for late spring 2019. Construction staging and trail closures will begin Sept. 5, 2017, following the Labor Day holiday weekend. During the project, sections of the Grist Mill and Buzzards Rock trails will be closed along with portions of the Patapsco River from Ilchester Road Bridge down to the dam. Park patrons, including anglers, bikers and hikers are encouraged to seek alternatives, either within the park or elsewhere. For full story, click here

MD: EPA cuts funding for Chesapeake Bay Journal, threatening publication's future

By Scott Dance – The Baltimore Sun – August 23, 2017
The Trump administration has cut a grant funding the Chesapeake Bay Journal, threatening the future of the publication that covers environmental issues across the estuary’s watershed. Editor Karl Blankenship said the organization is “disappointed that political appointees in the EPA have made an unprecedented decision to cut short a multi-year grant to the Bay Journal with no clear explanation.” For full story, click here

MD: Sea level is rising. Delmarva refuge's solution? Build taller marshes

By Jeremy Cox – Delmarvanow – August 21, 2017 – VideoThere's an old country song whose chorus goes, "Give me 40 acres, and I'll turn this rig around." It's unclear whether that Red Simpson ditty is popular inside the headquarters at the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge. But trade the word "rig" for "marsh," and that's exactly what federal officials and conservation groups are doing to combat the twin threats of rising seas and sinking land there. They hope that the $2.1 million marsh restoration project, which at 40 acres is the largest of its kind ever attempted in the Chesapeake Bay region, provides a road map for similar efforts elsewhere around the estuary. For full story, click here. 

MD: Pilot project planned to dredge Conowingo sediments

By Timothy B. Wheeler – Bay Journal – August 8, 2017
Declaring the sediment buildup behind Conowingo Dam a growing threat to the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan announced Tuesday a pilot project to dredge up a tiny portion of the accumulated silt and sand. Speaking at a press conference at the dam, Hogan said the state later this month would issue a request for proposals to dredge 25,000 cubic yards of sediment by next spring from the reservoir upstream of the hydroelectric facility on the Susquehanna River. The intent, he said, is to pin down what it would cost to dredge massive quantities of sediment from the Conowingo “pond,” as the reservoir is called, and to find out if there are viable markets for reusing the material. For full article, click here

MI: Flint water crisis legal bills top $15M with far to go in criminal cases

By Ron Fonger – MLive – September 7, 2017
The state has paid more than $15 million in legal fees related to the Flint water crisis even though 13 current and former city and state employees are just getting started in fighting criminal charges against them. Information from four state government offices that are primarily involved in the legal aftermath of the water emergency shows spending has continued to rise with no end in sight as civil and criminal cases slowly make their way through the court system. For full story, click here
 

MI: Menominee Tribe seeks stricter federal oversight in Michigan mine fight.

By Brian Bienkowski – Environmental Health News – August 25, 2017
In its continued fight against a mine near sacred waters, the Menominee Indians of Wisconsin want stronger federal regulations to apply as officials weigh the final permit for mine approval. At issue is the Back Forty mine, a proposed 83-acre open pit gold, zinc and copper mine in the southwestern corner of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. The mine would sit within 150 feet of the Menominee River, which forms the Michigan-Wisconsin border—and is namesake for the Menominee Tribe across the border in Wisconsin. The mine was on track for approval but has been stagnant, as it still needs one permit—a wetlands permit—before beginning operation. The state of Michigan has controlled permitting to this point. For full story, click here

MI: Warming rivers threaten iconic Michigan fish

By Brian Bienkowski – The Daily Climate – August 21, 2017
If the word “tricos” means anything to you, the Au Sable River is the place to be in late summer. Tricos are tiny mayflies, hatching abundantly in August. The imitations tediously tied by fly anglers are, of course, just as tiny. On a clear Sunday earlier this month, I was lobbing these pinky fingernail sized flies on a particularly productive stretch of the river known locally as the “Holy Waters.” For full story, click here

     

State

Wetland

Associations 


While ASWM focuses on national issues, knowledge sharing, and building state and tribal capacity, there are several statewide wetland associations that also provide local and state specific opportunities for involvement. Below are links to some that you can check out:

           
                          

MN: To protect wild rice, officials suggest new sulfate rule

By Dan Kraker – MPR News – August 21, 2017
The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency is proposing a change to a long-standing but rarely enforced rule that aims to protect wild rice from sulfate, a pollutant released by iron ore mines, wastewater treatment plants and other industry. A proposed change would institute a more flexible approach, determining what standard is necessary on a lake-by-lake or river-by-river basis. It would replace a 1973 flat limit on sulfate discharges. For full story, click here

MT: Governor Bullock Declares Drought Disaster in 31 Counties, 6 Indian Reservations

Montana.gov – August 18, 2017
Governor Steve Bullock today issued an Executive Order declaring the following 31 counties and six Indian Reservations are in drought disaster: “High temperatures, extreme drought, and worsening fire conditions are affecting Montanans in many corners of our state,” said Governor Bullock. “We’re doing everything we can to minimize the economic impact of these hot and dry conditions and help folks get back on their feet using all resources available.” For full story, click here. 

NV: Nevada wants out of Superfund listing at mine

By Scott Sonner, Associated Press – Las Vegas Sun – September 7, 2017
Nevada wants to back out of an agreement to designate a toxic mine a priority U.S. Superfund site — a move critics warn could leave state taxpayers on the hook for hundreds of millions of dollars in cleanup costs, according to documents obtained by The Associated Press. State regulators say a new strategy with private backing would save money over the next 10 years and ensure faster cleanup, especially given the Trump administration's sometimes hostile view of the EPA. However, the watchdog group Great Basin Resource Watch says the state's unprecedented effort would further delay restoration of groundwater polluted by nearly 100 tons of uranium and other contaminants abandoned at the former Anaconda copper mine about 80 miles southeast of Reno. For full story, click here. 

NH: Squam Lake’s loons are suffering, and unexpected pollution part of the problem

By David Brooks – Concord Monitor – September 4, 2017
Somewhere in the woods of Holderness or Sandwich, at the northern end of the lovely lake that inspired On Golden Pond, it’s likely that an abandoned barrel of unintended consequences is slowly killing loons. And on the western side of the lake, along a dirt road named after a quaint local farm, a different set of unintended consequences is adding to the toll. Between them, these oozing products of decades-old decisions help explain why Squam Lake is proving fatal to New Hampshire’s most iconic waterfowl. For full storyclick here

NM: New Mexico Project Would Pipe Rural Groundwater 150 Miles to Big City

By Matt Weiser – News Deeply Water Deeply – September 5, 2017
A wealthy Italian family hopes to serve future water demand in urban New Mexico by pumping ancient groundwater from an arid plain some 150 miles (240km) away. The plan is uncannily similar to California’s Cadiz project, where a wealthy landowner plans to pump ancient Mojave Desert groundwater to serve the Los Angeles metropolitan region. That project recently won an important policy rollback from the Trump administration, which could make construction much more likely. In New Mexico, Augustin Plains Ranch proposes to pump groundwater from rural Catron County north to sprawling Albuquerque, the state’s population hub. Its application with the state engineer calls for pumping 54,000 acre-feet annually from depths of some 1,500ft (46 meters) in the aquifer. That’s enough to meet the annual needs of 110,000 average households. The $600 million project includes 37 new wells and a 54in (137cm) pipeline running 140 miles to the Albuquerque region.  For full story, click here

NC: NC sues company accused of polluting Cape Fear River

By Will Doran – The News & Observer – September 5, 2017Gov. Roy Cooper’s administration is suing a manufacturer accused of dumping pollutants into the river that serves as the main source of drinking water for hundreds of thousands of North Carolinians. The state initiated the lawsuit Tuesday, just a few days after the N.C. General Assembly voted to spend $435,000 to start looking into the alleged pollution. It came to light in June but has allegedly been going on for decades. For full story, click here

OH: Algal blooms cost Ohio homeowners $152 million over six years

By Pam Frost Gorder – The Ohio State University – August 17, 2017
In a new study, researchers at The Ohio State University estimate algal blooms at two Ohio lakes cost Ohio homeowners $152 million in lost property value over six years. Meanwhile, a related study suggests that algae is driving anglers away from Lake Erie, causing fishing license sales to drop at least 10 percent every time a bloom reaches a moderate level of health risk. Based on those numbers; a computer model projects that a severe, summer-long bloom would cause up to $5.6 million in lost fishing revenue and associated expenditures by anglers. For full story, click here

OR: USFS begins Glaze Meadow wetland restoration project

By KTVZ.com – August 28, 2017
Starting this week, the Sisters Ranger District of the Deschutes National Forest will begin work to restore Glaze Meadow, located 5 miles northwest of Sisters, near Black Butte Ranch. The restoration work will begin on Thursday and continue until late October and is being done in partnership with Trout Unlimited. The goal of the project is to improve water storage in the meadow, increase habitat for wetland plant and animal species and reduce the encroachment of Ponderosa pine into the meadow, officials said. For full story, click here.

OR: Hillsboro embarks on major restoration at Jackson Bottom Wetlands

By John William Howard – Hillsboro Tribune – August 25, 2017
This time of year, the Jackson Bottom Wetland Preserve along Hillsboro's southern border is all but bone-dry. Biologists Laura Trunk and Chris Rombough walk along a dusty gravel path with thick brush on each side. At an intersection they turn north, their shadows stretching out in the late morning sun. With each step, a handful of grasshoppers spring out of the road and into the scraggly brown grass. In the distance, a pair of white egrets — a large bird in the heron family — look on at the group of humans invading their territory. The path bends to the northwest, revealing two ponds. Both are empty, but the one on the left is full of green plants. Large green wapato leaves, dotted with small frogs, cover the edge of the path on both sides. The pond to the right is barren. The dry marsh is what Trunk and Rombough came to see. It's the centerpiece of a massive 270-acre restoration project set to begin this month at the preserve. For full story, click here.

OR: Tillamook County enacts new wetland process

By Mateusz Perkowski – Capital Capital Press – August 9, 2017
Wetland restoration projects on farmland will have to clear a new hurdle in Oregon’s Tillamook County to ensure they don’t disrupt agricultural practices. However, the county’s newly enacted ordinance isn’t expected to block wetland projects as much as steer them to the least-contentious areas, experts say. For full story, click here.

PA: About half of Lancaster County farmers inspected didn't have required conservation plans

By Ad Crable – Lancaster Online – August 20, 2017
A yearlong inspection of farms in Lancaster and 42 other counties found that 60 percent of them had state-required erosion and manure plans. Lancaster County farmers had a slightly lower compliance rate, at 48 percent. Of 308 farms visited here, 140 had the required plans, according to the Lancaster County Conservation District. Of the 168 local farmers who initially did not have the plans when inspected, 154 then acquired them within the 90- to 180-day grace period, raising the compliance rate to 95 percent. Currently, there are 14 farmers who have not acquired the plans. The state Department of Environmental Protection, which initiated the inspections, said it was “pursuing enforcement actions on farmers not meeting their planning requirements.” For full story, click here.

PA: Pennsylvania Contemplates Bottom-Up Bay Plan

By Charlene M. Shupp Espenshade – Lancaster Farming – August 18, 2017

Pennsylvania has some heavy  lifting over the next couple of years to meet the final phase of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plan. It’s not an impossible task, but several people testifying Wednesday at the joint hearing by the Pennsylvania House and Senate Agriculture Committees said it’s going to take a cooperative effort to achieve the goals. Phase III of the Watershed Implementation Plan will focus on actions Chesapeake Bay jurisdictions, including Pennsylvania, intend to take between 2018 and 2025 to meet federally mandated goals. For full story, click here.

TX: The Exploding Chemical Plant Outside Houston Faces Its First Lawsuit

By Vann R. Newkirk II – The Atlantic – September 7, 2017
“Toxicity is a relative thing.” So Arkema executive Richard Rennard described the noxious fumes emanating from a plant that had been flooded by Hurricane Harvey last week. Locals had claimed that the plant, which is dangerously close to residential areas, had caught fire—with some containers possibly exploding—and sent potentially poisonous chemicals across the area. Rennard and other Arkema officials vehemently denied those claims, claiming that the “pops” residents heard were not explosions, and that the chemical fumes leaking from the plant were “noxious,” but not necessarily poisonous. For full story, click here.

TX: Receding Floodwaters in Houston Expose Long-Term Health Risk

By Jennifer A Dlouhy – Bloomberg – September 7, 2017 – Video
Benzene churns through Houston’s economy. The clear, sweet-smelling chemical is found in the crude oil processed in the region’s refineries and is used to make plastic, pesticides and other products. It’s also a carcinogen with cancer-causing properties, illustrating the risks that will linger for southeast Texas long after the floodwaters of Harvey have receded. Thousands of homes were submerged in murky water that may have been tainted with benzene and other runoff from an area that boasts the nation’s largest concentration of refineries and petrochemical plants. "This is going to be an ongoing concern, because some chemicals, when they get in water, become active and volatile," said Christine Todd Whitman, a Republican who led the Environmental Protection Agency from 2001 to 2003. "There are some major areas of problem." For full storyclick here.

VT: Fish & Wildlife manages popular wetland area to promote bird habitat, improve water quality

Contact: Amy Alfieri – VT Digger – August 23, 2017
Each August, biologists with the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department begin to intentionally lower water levels along several impoundments at Dead Creek Wildlife Management Area in Addison. The goal of these annual water drawdowns is to promote healthy wetlands on the nearly 3,000-acre property. According to Amy Alfieri, a Vermont Fish & Wildlife biologist who manages Dead Creek Wildlife Management Area, systematically flooding the wetlands and exposing the soil allows plants that migrating waterfowl eat to grow. Many of these plants are annuals, such as smartweed, beggarticks, and millet. By mimicking the water level fluctuations of a natural wetland, cattails, bulrushes, and sedges flourish, providing food and nesting habitat for waterfowl. The drawdowns also create mudflats which attract migrating shorebirds in August and September that feed on invertebrates burrowed in the mud. Shallow flooding in September and October increases availability of seeds and invertebrates for wading shorebirds. “The wetlands promoted by the annual drawdowns provide places for a variety of birds to thrive from spring through fall,” said Alfieri. For full press release, click here.

VA: Virginia gets $2.7M from NOAA to protect, restore coastal communities

By Tamara Dietrich – Daily Press – August 24, 2017
Virginia is getting nearly $2.7 million in federal funds to continue its Coastal Zone Management efforts in Hampton Roads and other coastal communities. The money comes from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and will be matched by state and local funds to help manage beaches and wetlands, fisheries and coastal wildlife habitats, waterfront redevelopment and fisheries, water and air pollution, shoreline sanitation and public access to waterways. For full story, click here.

VA: The James River at 45: From toilet to treasure, it's a modern-day survival tale

By Michael Paul Williams – Richmond Times-Dispatch – August 13, 2017
The saga of one of the leading lights in reviving the James River drips with enough irony to reach flood stage. During the 1960s, Newton H. Ancarrow built speedboats at the river landing in Richmond that now bears his name. With a client list that included Persian Gulf emirs and shipping tycoon Aristotle Onassis, Ancarrow was a businessman, not a conservationist. But the desecration of "America's Founding River," fouled by a stew of industrial and human waste, became more than he could tolerate. Ancarrow railed at City Hall to clean the James, which he compared unfavorably to India's Ganges. He once appeared before City Council with a jarful of the James that included a condom and a dead rat. For full story, click here.

WA: Yakima Basin water-rights case coming to a close

By David Mann – YakTriNews – August 17, 2017
The historic Ecology v. James Acquavella, et al adjudication determining and confirming all surface water rights in the Yakima River Basin will soon be final, announces the Washington Department of Ecology. After 40 years of court proceedings and deliberation, Yakima Superior Court Judge F. James Gavin entered a proposed final decree for the case on Aug. 10, 2017, including a draft schedule of rights set to be confirmed over the next eight months. Information is now being mailed to water right holders, beginning a review process after which the court will enter a final judgment concluding the case. For full story, click here.

WI: Scott Walker’s Foxconn deal waives all environmental regulations and permits

By Scott Bauer – Wisconsin Gazette – July 30, 2017
A wide array of Wisconsin environmental regulations would be waived in an effort to speed up construction of a $10 billion Foxconn electronics factory under a proposal Gov. Scott Walker unveiled July 29. Walker's deal also would put taxpayers on the hook for paying up to $200 million a year to the Taiwan-based Foxconn Technology Group as an incentive for locating a plant in the state. That give-away comes on top of Wisconsin's practice of not charging taxes on manufacturing credits in the state. The total deal would cost the state $3 billion. For full story, click here.

 


 

Asia's glaciers to shrink by a third by 2100, threatening water supply of millions

By Agence France-Presse – The Guardian – September 13, 2017

Asia’s mountain glaciers will lose at least a third of their mass through global warming by the century’s end, with dire consequences for millions of people who rely on them for fresh water, researchers have said. This is a best-case scenario, based on the assumption that the world manages to limit average global warming to 1.5C (2.7F) over pre-industrial levels, a team wrote in the journal Nature. For full story, click here.

6 Questions on Hurricane Irma, Harvey and Climate Change

By Sabrina Shankman – InsideClimate News – September 9, 2017
A third of the way into the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season, NOAA looked at the ocean and air temperatures and issued an ominous new forecast: the region would likely experience "an above normal hurricane season" that "could be extremely active," with more named storms than previously expected—14 to 19 this season—and two to five major hurricanes. Now, halfway through the season, Hurricane Harvey's destruction stretches along the Texas coast, and Hurricane Irma is expected to make landfall in Florida late Saturday after causing mass destruction in the Caribbean. On Irma's heels, Hurricane Jose appears to be following the same deadly path, while Hurricane Katia struck Mexico's eastern coast late Friday night as it weakened to a Category 1 storm. As global temperatures continue to rise, climate scientists have said this is what we should expect—more huge storms, with drastic impacts. For full story, click here

Wild Horses: Adored by the Public, but Destroying Water Resources

By Matt Weiser – News Deeply Water Deeply – September 7, 2017
Wild horses are deeply ingrained in the mythology of the American West. They represent a spirit of freedom that has long defined the nation.
 But wild horses also pose a thorny management problem. A federal law passed in 1971 restricts what the government can do with the horses, even once they begin to affect the environment. The United States Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service periodically conduct roundups (“gathers”) to thin the wild horse herds. Sometimes the animals are given birth-control drugs and returned to the range; sometimes they are corralled until they can be adopted by private citizens. Both strategies are expensive. For full story, click here

As trees come down, some hidden homes are disappearing

By Roberta Kwok – Science News for Students – September 7, 2017
One evening in May 2007, two scientists in a forest in India heard a curious noise. It sounded like “tik-tik-tik,” “croink-croink,” recalls one of the researchers, Sathyabhama Das Biju.
 Biju is an amphibian biologist at the University of Delhi in India. He knew that frogs were likely making the sounds. But the calls came from high in the trees, and he couldn’t climb up to investigate. The next day, Biju returned with a boy named Tengbat from a nearby village. The teen easily scrambled about 10 meters (33 feet) up into the trees without any ropes or ladder. “He’s a magical boy,” Biju says. Tengbat discovered that the noises came from brownish-green frogs with oval-shaped heads and long legs. The frogs were living inside hollows in the trees’ trunks. Like apartments in high-rise buildings, these holes provided the animals with homes. For full story, click here

Increasing effective decision-making for coastal marine ecosystems

Contacts: Dr Megan Saunders and Professor Hugh Possignham – The University of Queensland – September 7, 2017
Marine restoration, rather than protection, might be the most cost-effective solution for coastal marine ecosystems suffering from human activities, a new study has found. The University of Queensland and the Australian Research Council Centre for Excellence in Environmental Decisions study examined how to best benefit coastal marine ecosystems on limited conservation budgets, to help managers better understand the trade-offs. For full story, click here

UCI, JPL investigators find direct evidence of sea level ‘fingerprints’

UCI News – September 7, 2017
Researchers from the University of California, Irvine and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory have reported the first observation of sea level “fingerprints,” tell-tale differences in sea level rise around the world in response to changes in continental water and ice sheet mass. The team’s findings were published today in the American Geophysical Union journal Geophysical Research Letters. “Scientists have a solid understanding of the physics of sea level fingerprints, but we’ve never had a direct detection of the phenomenon until now,” said co-author Isabella Velicogna, UCI professor of Earth system science and JPL research scientist. For full story, click here

Monarchs in western U.S. risk extinction, scientists say

By Laura Zuckerman – Reuters – September 7, 2017
Monarch butterflies west of the Rocky Mountains are teetering on the edge of extinction, with the number wintering in California down more than 90 percent from the 1980s, researchers said in a study published on Thursday. While much is known about the black-and-orange winged insects’ decadeslong population decline in the eastern United States, scientists have been unable to track the western variety accurately until the recent development of new statistical models. The new study, published in the scientific journal Biological Conservation, was funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which is considering giving monarch butterflies Endangered Species Act protections. For full story
, click here

240-year-old nautical maps show coral loss is much worse than we knew

By Ben Guarino – The Washington Post – September 6, 2017
Between 1773 and 1775, George Gauld, a surveyor with the British Admiralty, immortalized the coast of the Florida Keys in ink. Though his most pressing goal was to record the depth of the sea — to prevent future shipwrecks — Gauld embraced his naturalist side, too. He sprinkled his maps with miscellany that later charts would omit: where sea turtles made their nests, or the colors and consistency of sand. Gauld also took note of the corals he saw. And in doing so he created the oldest known records of Florida reefs. For full story, click here

Unnatural Surveillance: How Online Data Is Putting Species at Risk

By Adam Welz – YaleEnvironment360 – September 6, 2017
In the arid far-western region of South Africa is a vast flatland covered with white quartzite gravel known as the Knersvlakte – Afrikaans for “Gnashing Plain” – because it sounds like grinding teeth when you walk across it. It’s a good place to watch unpeopled horizons vanish into ripples of heat haze, but to appreciate its real value you must get down on your knees. The Knersvlakte holds about 1,500 species of plants, including 190 species found nowhere else on earth and 155 that are Red-Listed by conservation biologists as threatened with extinction. To protect them, 211,000 acres have been set aside as the Knersvlakte Nature Reserve. For full story, click here

Unraveling a major cause of sea ice retreat in the Arctic Ocean

Contacts: Professor Kay I. Ohshima and Naoki Namba – Hokkaido University – September 6, 2017
Ice-covered sea areas in the Arctic Ocean during summer have nearly halved since the 1970s and 1980s, raising alarm that the ocean is shifting from a multiyear to a seasonal ice zone. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has forecasted summer ice cover in the polar ocean might disappear almost completely as early as 2050. Various factors have been cited as causes, including rising temperatures and changes in atmospheric circulation patterns. For full blog post, click here

URI researcher says invasive plants change ecosystems from the bottom up

Contact: Todd McLeish – University of Rhode Island – September 5, 2017
In a common garden at the University of Rhode Island, Laura Meyerson has been growing specimens of Phragmites – also known as the common reed – that she has collected from around the world. And while they are all the same species, each plant lineage exhibits unique traits. Now Meyerson, a professor of natural resources sciences, and Northeastern University Professor Jennifer Bowen have revealed that even when two different lineages grow side-by-side in the same ecosystem, the bacterial communities in the soil differ dramatically. It’s a discovery that will aid in understanding how plant invasions succeed and the conditions necessary for their success. For full story, click here

New research: Acid zone in Chesapeake Bay could harm oysters

By Katie Peikes – Delaware Public Media – September 3, 2017
Water in the Chesapeake Bay that’s about 30 to 50 ft. deep is becoming more acidified, according to new research. That means carbon dioxide is dissolving in the water, which could potentially hurt oysters and clams. There aren’t as many oysters in the Chesapeake Bay as there used to be. And University of Delaware Wei-Jun Cai says he may know why. For full story, click here

VIMS uses drones to find, study algal blooms

By Tamara Dietrich – Daily Press – September 2, 2017 – Video
One day in late July, Donglai Gong was piloting his little quadcopter above his house when he noticed his drone camera picking up something odd in the York River below. “There were features, like, streaks of darkness,” Gong recalled Wednesday at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science in Gloucester Point. Gong is an assistant professor studying the physics of coastal and polar oceanography. “And, being a physicist, I had no idea what biological processes could be causing that. So I took some pictures. They looked pretty.” He emailed those pictures to VIMS colleagues, many of whom were biologists who knew exactly what was going on: a harmful algal bloom, or HAB. Gong and a handful of colleagues who study HABs were soon teaming up to see just how effective drones like this can be in finding the troublesome blooms that pop up in the bay and its tributaries every summer. For full story and to view video, click here

Pop-up Wetlands Helping Migrating Shorebirds

By Tracy Staedter – How Stuff Works – August 31, 2017 – Video
The sharing economy, which has changed everything from how people get around to how they rent rooms for vacation, is even seeping into ecology. In California's Sacramento Valley, farmers are temporarily leasing flooded rice paddies to The Nature Conservancy so migratory shorebirds have a place to stop and feed while traveling the Pacific Flyway, the major north-south route that extends from Alaska to Patagonia. For full story and to view video, click here

Earth Matters: ‘Instant wetlands’ may help solve water quality challenges

By Ross Clark – Santa Cruz Sentinel – August 31, 2017
Wetlands are the kidneys of our coastal streams and ocean. Wetlands remove pollutants through absorption by plants and within sediments, degradation by the sun and metabolism by bacteria. In the pre-Columbian world, the balance between limited pollution and vast coastal wetlands ensured healthy coastal waters. Today that balance has been disrupted with pollution from our cities and farms increasing significantly while much of our coastal wetlands have been lost to these other land uses. Now, both cities and farmers are being asked to play a role in improving water quality; helping reduce shellfish contamination and toxic red tides. For full story, click here

Unprecedented levels of nitrogen could pose risks to Earth's environment

Contact Tim Lucas – Nicholas School of the Environment – August 29, 2017
Human production of fixed nitrogen, used mostly to fertilize crops, now accounts for about half of the total fixed nitrogen added to the Earth both on land and in the oceans, according to a new study by researchers at North Carolina State University and Duke University. Human production of this nitrogen is now five times higher than it was 60 years ago. This increase could pose as much of a danger to Earth’s environment as the rapid increase in climate-warming atmospheric carbon dioxide, the scientists say. 
For full story, click here.

Officials tour Blackwater marsh restoration project

By Dustin Holt – Dorchester Star – August 22, 2017
Federal and state officials visited Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge in Dorchester County Sunday, Aug. 20, to tour the Chesapeake Marshlands project. The $2.1 million project, through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, The Conservation Fund and the National Audubon Society, began in 2016 by spreading more than 26,000 cubic feet of sediment taken from the Blackwater River over 40 acres to elevate the marsh surface near Maple Dam Road. The project is the largest wetland restoration effort ever undertaken in the refuge, and the first thin-layer project in the Chesapeake watershed. For full story, click here

Stitching Together Forests Can Help Save Species, Study Finds

By Brad Plumer – The New York Times – August 21, 2017
In the 1980s, an ecologist named Thomas Lovejoy conducted an unusual experiment in Brazil’s Amazon rain forest. As loggers moved in with chain saws to clear trees for cattle pasture north of Manaus, he asked them to leave untouched several small “islands” of forest to see how the animals within them fared. The results were unsettling. Even in the largest protected forest fragments, 250 acres in size, the number of bird species living beneath the canopy declined by half within 15 years. The smaller isolated populations were far more likely to succumb to disease or climate fluctuations or demographic bad luck than a larger population would have. For full story, click here

Mangrove-planting drones on a mission to restore Myanmar delta

By Thin Lei Win – Thomson Reuters Foundation News – August 21, 2017
Fast-dwindling mangroves in Myanmar's low-lying Ayeyarwady Delta, ravaged by decades of deforestation and conversion of land for agriculture and aquaculture, could find an unlikely saviour - drones.
 Mangroves protect coastlines in the face of storms and rising sea levels, absorb carbon from the atmosphere, and boost fish stocks, experts say. Yet Myanmar has lost more than 1 million hectares (about 2.5 million acres) of mangroves since 1980, said Arne Fjortoft, founder and secretary-general of Worldview International Foundation (WIF), which has worked with two local universities to restore mangroves in the Southeast Asian nation since 2012. In the delta region, known as the country's rice bowl, only 16 percent of original mangrove cover remains, Fjortoft, former chairman of Norway's Liberal Party, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation by e-mail. There is an "urgent need" to restore mangroves to stem saltwater invasion of farmland and shoreline erosion due to sea level rise, as well as to protect lives and property from storms and floods in coastal areas, he added. For full story, click here

The Trump administration just disbanded a federal advisory committee on climate change

By Juliet Eilperin – The Washington Post – August 20, 2017 – Video
The Trump administration has decided to disband the federal advisory panel for the National Climate Assessment, a group aimed at helping policymakers and private-sector officials incorporate the government’s climate analysis into long-term planning.The charter for the 15-person Advisory Committee for the Sustained National Climate Assessment — which includes academics as well as local officials and corporate representatives — expires Sunday. On Friday, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s acting administrator, Ben Friedman, informed the committee’s chair that the agency would not renew the panel. For full story and to view video, click here.

New study validates East Antarctic ice sheet should remain stable even if western ice sheet melts

News at IUPUI – August 17, 2017
A new study from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis validates that the central core of the East Antarctic ice sheet should remain stable even if the West Antarctic ice sheet melts. The study's findings are significant, given that some predict the West Antarctic ice sheet could melt quickly due to global warming. For full story, click here

Frogs adapted to pesticides get more parasites

By Brooks Hays – UPI – August 15, 2017
Resistance to one sort of affliction may make frogs more susceptible to another, new research shows. Amphibians, with their extra-porous skin and fragile ecosystems, are especially vulnerable to a variety of contaminants. But some species, like wood frogs, have adapted to the presence of pesticides. However, new research out of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute suggests frogs with a tolerance for pesticides are more likely to become infected by parasitic worms. For full story, click here

A Bottom-up Boost for Coastal Habitat

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service – Northwest – August 14, 2017
The smell of the salt marsh can be overwhelming. Deep layers of mud dampened by the tides are rich in nutrients but low in oxygen. Bacteria within these layers feed on sulfate from seawater and produce the characteristic rotten-egg smell of the salt marsh. It is here, in the sometimes-smelly subsurface of the salt marsh, that Dr. Bart Wilson focuses his attention. Salt marshes are considered “green” infrastructure. These natural habitats can help protect neighboring coastal communities by buffering against wind and waves and absorbing, then slowly releasing, floodwaters. Salt marshes also provide habitat for fish, birds, and invertebrates and purify water by taking up nutrients that can be harmful in excess. According to Wilson, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Northeast region coastal resiliency coordinator, marshes and the many benefits they provide are threatened by accelerated sea-level rise. For full blog post, click here

Out of the Frying Pan, into the Wetlands

By Sandy Ong – Hakai Magazine – August 14, 2017
A crowd gathers at the edge of the brackish water in Malaysia’s Setiu Wetlands. It’s an odd mix of people—fishermen, politicians, scientists—and all of them are staring at their feet, where nearly 100 10-legged, dinner-plate-sized, alien-like creatures are crawling about. It’s early on a Sunday morning in July, and they’re here to witness the swarm of horseshoe crabs being released into the wetland on Malaysia’s eastern coast. For these ancient yet imperiled living fossils—they predate dinosaurs by 200 million years, and have changed little since—this was the last stop on a four-day, 250-kilometer journey meant to save them from becoming someone’s dinner. Now, they’re free to swim in Southeast Asia’s first horseshoe crab conservation area. For full article, click here

Sea level modelling predicts dire consequences within 80 years for wetlands worldwide

By Kerrin Thomas – ABC.net – August 10, 2017
Coastal wetlands around the world could have just 80 years left to live according to a warning issued by an international team of researchers who have worked on new impact modelling of sea level rise. The lead researcher, Dr. Jose Rodriguez, is based at the University of Newcastle and the research has been published in the journal Nature Communications. The team has scrapped the previous 'bathtub model' that suggested tidal effects flow through the wetlands without interruption and developed a new model that shows the dire impact that man-made structures like roads, culverts and bridges will have as sea levels rise. Dr. Rodriguez said under the new model, there is increased inundation and attenuation — bad news for wetlands and salt marshes which rely on water coming in and then flowing back out in a regulated fashion. For full story, click here

Lakes Are Being A-Salted

By Asher Elbein – Hakai Magazine – August 9, 2017
During winter storms, snowplows rumble along the roads ringing New Hampshire’s Mirror Lake. A spray of salt whirls out from behind each truck—sodium chloride settles on the frozen asphalt and helps break up the ice. Road salt is great for combatting winter’s hazards, but it’s a tool with potentially devastating consequences. All that salt has to go somewhere, and the melting ice often carries it into the clear, placid waters of Mirror Lake. In a new study, researchers show that across the United States and Canada, thousands of lakes—including the 0.5-square-kilometer Mirror Lake—are at risk of becoming dangerously saline. For full article, click here

USDA office told to use ‘weather extremes’ instead of 'climate change'

By Devin Henry – The Hill – August 7, 2017
Officials at a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) office told staffers to avoid the term “climate change” in their communications and use language like “weather extremes” instead, The Guardian reported Monday. According to emails obtained by The Guardian, officials told staffers in the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) to change the way they discuss climate change in their work. According to the office, climate change would become “weather extremes.” Climate change adaptation should instead be “resilience to weather,” and efforts to “reduce greenhouse gases” should instead be deemed as ways to “build soil organic matter, increase nutrient use efficiency.” For full story, click here

EPA Science Integrity Panel Says Pruitt’s Climate Denial Is Permissible

By John H. Cushman, Jr. – InsideClimate News – August 2, 2017
An internal review by the Environmental Protection Agency has found that its administrator did not violate its scientific integrity policy when he contradicted a fundamental tenet of climate science by denying that carbon dioxide pollution is the principal agent of global warming. The policy "explicitly protects differing opinions" held by any agency employee, including Administrator Scott Pruitt, on any matter of science informing agency policy decisions, said a review panel convened by the EPA's Scientific Integrity Committee. The panel addressed its finding to the Sierra Club, which had filed a complaint after Pruitt, whose views of climate science often skirt around the mainstream consensus on the causes and the urgency of the climate crisis, said in a television interview that he "would not agree" that carbon dioxide "is a primary contributor to the warming that we're seeing." For full story, click here
 

 


New Online Water Quality Standard Variance Building Tool

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – August 22, 2017
The Water Quality Standards (WQS) Variance Building Tool is an implementation support tool designed to help states, territories, and authorized tribes determine whether a WQS variance is an appropriate tool for a particular situation and, if so, help the entity navigate the requirements at 40 CFR Part 131.14 to determine what a legally binding WQS variance would look like and what additional information must be documented and submitted to EPA to support the WQS variance. The draft regulatory language that results from the use of this tool is intended as a regulatory framework for the state, territory, or authorized tribe to use as a starting point when drafting a legally binding WQS variance. States, territories, and authorized tribes may tailor the draft regulatory language to include additional information that more accurately captures the case-specific facts of the individual WQS variance or fits a desired format as long as all federal requirements are met. The final regulatory language and all necessary supporting documentation can then be adopted and submitted to EPA for Clean Water Act (CWA) Section 303(c) review. For more information, click here

Range position and climate sensitivity: The structure of among-population demographic responses to climatic variation

Amburgey SM, Miller DAW, Campbell Grant EH, et al. – Wiley Online Library – August 19, 2017
Species’ distributions will respond to climate change based on the relationship between local demographic processes and climate and how this relationship varies based on range position. A rarely tested demographic prediction is that populations at the extremes of a species’ climate envelope (e.g., populations in areas with the highest mean annual temperature) will be most sensitive to local shifts in climate (i.e., warming). We tested this prediction using a dynamic species distribution model linking demographic rates to variation in temperature and precipitation for wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) in North America. Using long-term monitoring data from 746 populations in 27 study areas, we determined how climatic variation affected population growth rates and how these relationships varied with respect to long-term climate. To read full abstract and to download article, click here

Nature‐based Solutions to Climate Change Adaptation in Urban Areas: Linkages between Science, Policy and Practice

Springer – 2017
This open access book brings together research findings and experiences from science, policy and practice to highlight and debate the importance of nature-based solutions to climate change adaptation in urban areas. Emphasis is given to the potential of nature-based approaches to create multiple-benefits for society. The expert contributions present recommendations for creating synergies between ongoing policy processes, scientific programmes and practical implementation of climate change and nature conservation measures in global urban areas. To read more, click here
To download the book, click here.  

A framework for assessing and implementing the co-benefits of nature-based solutions in urban areas

ScienceDirect – 2017
To address challenges associated with climate resilience, health and well-being in urban areas, current policy platforms are shifting their focus from ecosystem-based to nature-based solutions (NBS), broadly defined as solutions to societal challenges that are inspired and supported by nature. NBS result in the provision of co-benefits, such as the improvement of place attractiveness, of health and quality of life, and creation of green jobs. Few frameworks exist for acknowledging and assessing the value of such co-benefits of NBS and to guide cross-sectoral project and policy design and implementation. In this paper, we firstly developed a holistic framework for assessing co-benefits (and costs) of NBS across elements of socio-cultural and socio-economic systems, biodiversity, ecosystems and climate. The framework was guided by a review of over 1700 documents from science and practice within and across 10 societal challenges relevant to cities globally. We found that NBS can have environmental, social and economic co-benefits and/or costs both within and across these 10 societal challenges. On that base, we develop and propose a seven-stage process for situating co-benefit assessment within policy and project implementation. The seven stages include: 1) identify problem or opportunity; 2) select and assess NBS and related actions; 3) design NBS implementation processes; 4) implement NBS; 5) frequently engage stakeholders and communicate co-benefits; 6) transfer and upscale NBS; and 7) monitor and evaluate co-benefits across all stages. We conclude that the developed framework together with the seven-stage co-benefit assessment process represent a valuable tool for guiding thinking and identifying the multiple values of NBS implementation. To read full article, click here. 

Environmental Aspects of Integrated Flood Management: Case Studies

World Meteorological Organization – 2017
Integrated Flood Management (IFM) addresses issues of human security and sustainable development from the perspective of flood management, within the framework of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM). Some of the underlying causes that make it difficult to integrate the growing concerns regardingenvironmental degradation into sound flood-management practices arise from a communication gap between the various disciplines involved in understanding the varying perspectives of sustainable development (WMO, 2006). The publication, Environmental Aspects of Integrated Flood Management, was developed in 2006 as part of the Flood Management Policy Series. To read more and view report, click here

 



River and Water Conservation Organizations’ Role in Disaster Management

By Alice Srinivasan – River Network – September 12, 2017
Natural disasters are becoming more frequent and severe. Between 1995 and 2015, the United Nations estimated that a staggering 4.1 billion people worldwide were injured, left homeless, or required emergency assistance as a result of weather-related disasters 1. The majority of victims were impacted by flooding, which claims approximately 200 lives each year in the United States 2. The need for community-based disaster preparedness and emergency response has never been greater. For full story, click here.

Momentum against glyphosate spraying picks up

By Shane Fowler – CBC News – September 8, 2017
Opponents of glyphosate spraying say they feel they have momentum on their side. In the last two weeks, the municipalities of Upper Miramichi, Moncton, and Petitcodiac have all started to question the practice of spraying glyphosate in their jurisdictions. The mayor of Moncton has even gone so far to request a ban on spraying near parts of the city's watershed. Glyphosate opponents are comparing their efforts to early protests against fracking — protests that eventually pressured the New Brunswick Liberals into making a campaign promise to place a moratorium on fracking. That later became a full ban. Many opposed to spraying are hoping that glyphosate spraying, like fracking before it, will become an election issue. For full story, click here

Federal auditors say US nuclear dump running out of room

By Susan Montoya Bryan – The Seattle Times – September 7, 2017
The only underground nuclear waste repository in the United States doesn’t have enough space for radioactive tools, clothing and other debris left over from decades of bomb-making and research, much less tons of weapons-grade plutonium that the nation has agreed to eliminate as part of a pact with Russia, federal auditors said. In addition, the U.S. Government Accountability Office found that the U.S. Energy Department has no plans for securing regulatory approvals and expanding the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico before it reaches capacity in less than a decade. For full story, click here

EPA chief says ready to further relax fuel standards due to hurricanes

By Valerie Volcovici – Reuters – September 7, 2017
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is preparing for Hurricane Irma’s landfall on the U.S. East Coast by securing vulnerable toxic waste sites and easing gasoline standards to ensure steady fuel supplies, its chief told Reuters on Thursday. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt declined to say whether he believed claims by scientists that the second powerful storm to affect the United States in two weeks may have a link to warmer air and water temperatures resulting from climate change. For full story, click here. 

Climate, Power, Money And Sorrow: Lessons of Hurricane Harvey

By Adam Frank – NPR – September 6, 2017
I get a lot of "climate" hate mail. Whenever I write a piece on global warming, someone will email to call me a "lie-bra-tard," or something similar, and tell me I should be in jail. Sometimes I try to engage these folks and see if they might be interested in how the science of climate change works and what it has to tell us. Mostly, they aren't. Mostly, what they really want is to score some points. What they really want is an argument. That's what climate change and climate science has become after all these years. For full story, click here.  

Bloom and Bust

By Mara Johnson-Groh – Hakai Magazine – September 6, 2017
In the real estate business, it’s all about location, location, location. Except when it’s about water quality. And as a new study shows, large algal outbreaks are a great way to dampen the value of waterfront property. In the study, which looked at houses along Narragansett Bay, an estuary opening to the Atlantic Ocean on the Rhode Island coast, researchers tracked how housing prices rose and fell over 21 years in conjunction with changes in the bay’s water quality. For full article, click here

Houston's Flood Is a Design Problem

By Ian Bogost – The Atlantic – August 28, 2017
Floods cause greater property damage and more deaths than tornadoes or hurricanes. And Houston’s flood is truly a disaster of biblical proportions: The sky unloaded 9 trillion gallons of water on the city within two days, and much more might fall before Harvey dissipates, producing as much as 60 inches of rain. Pictures of Harvey’s runoff are harrowing, with interstates turned to sturdy and mature rivers. From Katrina to Sandy, Rita to Tōhoku, it’s easier to imagine the flooding caused by storm surges wrought by hurricanes and tsunamis. In these cases, the flooding problem appears to be caused by water breaching shores, seawalls, or levees. For full story, click here

As a city grows, its impact on rivers doesn’t have to

By Sarah DeWeerdt – Anthropocene Magazine – August 22, 2017
Throughout history, cities and towns have often been established along the banks of rivers, because these waterways provided a source of drinking water, power, and transport links to other communities. The effects of our settlements on those riverbanks – on terrestrial ecosystems – are easy to see. But because we’re mostly land animals, the urban transformation of environments below the water’s surface has gone relatively unnoticed. Now, researchers have undertaken the first comprehensive study of how the infrastructure of U.S. cities alters rivers and their biodiversity. For full article, click here

States Are Using Social Cost of Carbon in Energy Decisions, Despite Trump's Opposition

By Peter Fairley – InsideClimate News – August 14, 2017
The social cost of carbon was an arcane but important tool in the federal climate toolbox until President Donald Trump targeted it in his sweeping March 2017 executive order to weaken climate actions. Now, states are taking up the metric. Policymakers and regulators in several states, including New York, Minnesota, Illinois and Colorado, are using the social cost of carbon to measure and reduce CO2 impacts from their power grids. Some are using it to compensate rooftop solar panel owners who feed low-carbon power in the grid. Others use it to incentivize nuclear power and renewable energy. Their efforts, aimed at reducing planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions, come as Congress and the Trump administration try to restrict its use. For full story, click here

Forget ‘the environment’: we need new words to convey life’s wonders

By George Monbiot – The Guardian – August 9, 2017
If Moses had promised the Israelites a land flowing with mammary secretions and insect vomit, would they have followed him into Canaan? Though this means milk and honey, I doubt it would have inspired them. So why do we use such language to describe the natural wonders of the world? There are examples everywhere, but I will illustrate the problem with a few from the UK. On land, places in which nature is protected are called “sites of special scientific interest”. At sea, they are labelled “no-take zones” or “reference areas”. Had you set out to estrange people from the living world, you could scarcely have done better. For full opinion, click here. 

 

 

WEBINARS

   

MEETINGS

 

TRAINING

 

SPECIAL EVENTS

 

MORE DECEMBER MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR​

WEBINARS
       
SEPTEMBER 2017 
       
September 21, 2017
1:00 p.m. ET 
  Society of Wetland Scientists Webinar: Subtropical wetlands: comparing primary producer diversity and dominance and addressing restoration challenges   
       
September 27, 2017
2:00 p.m. ET 
  Land Trust Alliance Webinar: Voting for Conservation Dollars: What Does It Take to Pass a Ballot Measure?   
       
September 27, 2017
12:00 p.m. ET 
  Environmental Law Institute Webinar: Emerging Environmental Issues in Native Communities (Part 2)  
       
September 27, 2017
1:00 p.m. ET 
  Center for Climate and Energy Solutions Webinar: Using Climate Data in the Real World  
       
September 27, 2017
3:00 p.m. ET 
  Association of State Wetland Managers Webinar: Inspiring Lifelong Wetland and Coastal Habitat Stewards through Citizen Science   
       
September 28, 2017
1:00 p.m. ET 
  Webinar: Farm Bill Conservation Programs: Collaboration between USFWS and USDA  
       
OCTOBER 2017 
       
October 4, 2017
1:00 p.m. ET 
  Webinar: Coastal Conservancy Webinar: A Coast for All of Us, Part 2  
       
October 4, 2017
1:00 p.m. ET 
  AWRA Webinar: Miami Beach's Aggressive Action Toward Climate Change Adaptation, Part 1  
       
October 12, 2017
11:00 a.m. ET 
  Association of State Floodplain Managers Webinar: No Rise, No Problem! Managing Infrastructure in the Floodway   
       
October 18, 2017
1:00 p.m. ET
  AWRA Webinar: Adaptation Strategies for Miami Beach, Part 2: Green Infrastructure, Resilience, and Groundwater  
       
October 18, 2017
1:00 p.m. ET
  Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Bringing Better Site Design into The 21st Century   
       
October 24, 2017
3:00 p.m. ET
  Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance Webinar: The Iowa Watershed Approach: A New Paradigm for Flood Resilience  
       
October 31, 2017
2:00 p.m. ET  
  USDA NRCS Science and Technology Webinar: Restoring Native Plant Communities: Soil and Hydrology Suited Planning Tools  
       
NOVEMBER 2017 
       
November 9, 2017
2:00 p.m. ET
  Association of State Floodplain Managers Webinar: Webinar: After the Disaster: Mitigating Infrastructure Against Flooding Using 406 Mitigation Assistance  
       
November 15, 2017
1:00 p.m. ET
  Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Modeling for Water Quality   
       
MEETINGS
 
SEPTEMBER 2017
       
September 23-24, 2017 
Dayton, OH
  Ohio Environmental Council: Student Sustainability Leaders Conference   
       
September 23-27, 2017
Albuquerque, NM
  Wildlife Society 24th Annual Conference  
       
September 27-29, 2017
Gylord, MI
  Michigan Wetlands Association: 2017 Wetlands Conference
Innovations in Wetland Protection and Management
 
       
September 28-29, 2017
Budapest, Hungary
  1st International Conference on Community Ecology (ComEc)  
 
OCTOBER 2017
       
October 8-13, 2017
St. Petersburgh, FL
  International Conference: Global Challenges and Date-Driven Sciences   
       
October 9-11, 2017 
Traverse City, MI
  2nd National Conference: Protection Pollinators in Urban Landscapes   
       
October 10-12, 2017
Collins, CO
  Natural Areas Association: Natural Areas Conference

 
       
October 10-12, 2017
Blacksburg, VA
  SilviLaser 2017   
       
October 11-13, 2017
American Museum of Natural History
New York, NY
  Center for Biodiversity and Conservation and its partners: 2017 Student Conference on Conservation Science  
       
October 12, 2017
University of Southern Maine
Portland, ME 
  2017 RARGOM Annual Science Meeting: Ocean and Coastal Acidification: Causes and Potential Consequences for Ecological and Sociological Systems in the Gulf of Maine  
       
October 12, 2017
Linthicum, MD
  13th Annual Maryland Association of Floodplain and Stormwater Managers (MAFSM) Conference  
       
October 12-13, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  2017 Mid-Atlantic Water Resources Conference: Water Research: Building Knowledge and Innovative Solutions  
       
October 11-13, 2017
Potsdam, Germany 
  Counting the true costs of climate change   
       
October 12-14, 2017
Fargo, ND
  Society of Wetland Scientists: 2017 North Central Chapter Annual Meeting
 
       
October 14, 2017
Westerville, OH
  Ohio Wetlands Association Wetlands Science Summit: Working Wetlands for Water Quality  
       
October 14-15, 2017
San Marcos, TX
  Texas State University, Department of Geography's Resilience and Bio-Geomorphic Systems: 48th Annual Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium. A field trip on October 13, 2017.  
       
October 17-19, 2017
University of California, Davis
  California Department of Water Resources, Urban Streams Restoration Program, Riparian Habitat Joint Venture: 2017 Riparian Summit - Confluence to Influence  
       
October 17-19, 2017
Buffalo, NY
  Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: 13th Annual Great Lakes Restoration Conference   
       
October 19-21, 2017
University of Oklahoma
  4th Life Discovery – Doing Science Biology Education Conference  
       
October 19-21, 2017
Rome, Italy
  4th World Conference on Climate Change: Today's Progress and Tomorrow's Climate Challenges  
       
October 22-25, 2017
Tampa, FL
  American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America will host: 2017 International Annual Meeting, "Managing Global Resources for a Secure Future"    
       
October 22-25, 2017
Baiona, Spain  
  6th International Symposium: Marine and Freshwater Toxins Analysis
 
       
October 24, 2017 
Washington, DC
  Environmental Law Institute Workshop: Blueprint for Change: New Approaches and Needed Changes to Managing Natural Resource Risks, Liabilities and Opportunities  
       
October 24-26, 2017
Atlantic City, NJ
  2017 NJAFM Annual Conference  
       
October 24-27, 2017 
Ft. Lauderdale, FL
  2017 ASBPA National Coastal Conference: Beaches, Bays and Beyond
 
       
October 25-27, 2017
Boyne Falls, MI
  Michigan Aquatic Restoration Conference  
       
October 26-28, 2017
Denver, CO
  Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2017 National Land Conservation Conference  
       
October 27-28, 2017 
Lake Ariel, PA
  6th Annual Lacawac Ecology Conference   
       
NOVEMBER 2017
       
November 1-3, 2017
Shaw Centre
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 
  9th Canadian Science Policy Conference  
       
November 5-9, 2017
Portland, OR
  2017 AWRA Annual Conference  
       
November 5-9, 2017
Providence, RI
  Coastal Estuarine Research Federation (CERF) Conference: Coastal Science at the Inflection Point: Celebrating Successes & Learning from Challenges   
       
November 6, 2017
Stanford, CA
  Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment:
Young Environmental Scholars (YES) Annual Conference 
 
       
November 6-9, 2017
Green Bay, WI
  International Association for Great Lakes Research: State of Lake Michigan Conference  
       
November 8-9, 2017
Manhattan, KS
  Kansas Water Office Governor's Conference: Future of Water in Kansas  
       
November 8-10, 2017
Boston, MA
  Greenbuild WaterBuild Summit: Rising Above: Using Innovative Solutions to Build Resilience  
       
November 9, 2017
Gulfport, FL
  5th Annual ELI-Stetson Wetlands Workshop: Conserving the Coasts: The State of Marine Ecosystems and Coastal Compensatory Mitigation  
       
November 11-17, 2017
Baltimore, MD  
  9th US Symposium on Harmful Algae: Training the next generation  
       
November 23-24, 2017
St. John's Newfoundland & Labrador
  Geomatics Atlantic 2017  
       
November 28-30, 2017
Sanya, China  
  International Symposium on Environmental and Sustainability Agriculture Development  
       
DECEMBER 2017
       
December 8, 2017
Linthicum, MD
  Maryland Water Monitoring Council Annual Conference  
       
December 11-15, 2017
New Orleans, LA
  AGU Fall Meeting

 
       
December 18-19, 2017
San Diego, CA
  ICHA 2017: 19th International Conference on Harmful Algae
 
 
JANUARY 2018
       
January 4-6, 2018
Acme, MI
  Northern Michigan Waterways Hazardous Material Spill Planning Committee: 27th Annual No Spills Conference: New and Innovative Technology for Spill Prevention & Response  
       
January 5-9, 2018
Pacific Grove, CA
  American Society of Naturalists Conference  
       
January 11-13, 2018
College Park, MD
  Future Harvest CASA (Chesapeake Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture) Annual Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed Conference  
       
January 29, 2018-February 2, 2018
Bariloche, Argentia  
  Species Range Shifts & Local Adaptation: Challenging ecologcial and evolutionary ideas and assumptions

 
       
January 31-February 1, 2018
Wilmington, DE
  2018 Delaware Wetlands Conference
Abstracts accepted through November 1, 2017
 
       
FEBRUARY 2018
       
February 1-4, 2018
Princess Royal
Ocean City, MD 
  Maryland Association for Environmental & Outdoor Education: Expand Your Influence! Empowering Citizens Action for the Environment  
       
February 5-7, 2018
Denver, CO
  International LiDAR Mapping Forum  
       
February 11-16, 2018 
Portland, OR
  2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting

 
       
February 20-22, 2018
Oconomowoc, WI  
  Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Wetland Science Conference  
       
February 28-March 2, 2018
Denver, CO
  Climate Leadership Conference  
 
MARCH 2018
       
March 8-9, 2018
University of Denver Sturm College
  Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute: 2018 Western Places/Western Spaces. Proposal deadline is August, 25, 2018  
       
March 14-16, 2018
Chattanooga, TN
  Southeast Regional Conference for Community and Land Conservation   
       
March 18-21, 2018
Scottsdale, AZ
  21st Annual NFDA Conference  
       
March 25-28, 2018
Seattle, WA
  American Water Works Association: Sustainable Water Management Conference

 
       
APRIL 2018
       
April 23-26, 2018
Chicago, IL 
  US-IALE 2018 Annual Meeting  
       
April 22-25, 2018
Orlando, FL
  2018 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference; GIS & Water Resources X: Spatial Analysis of Watersheds: Ecological, Hydrological, and Societal Responses
Deadline for abstracts is January 9, 2018.
 
       
April 23-26, 2018
Coral Springs, FL
  University of Florida: 12th International Symposium on Biogeochemistry of Wetlands  
       
April 24-26, 2018
Forat Collings, CO
  Instream Flow Council: Flow 2 Managing Rivers, Reservoirs and Lakes in the Face of Drought: Practical Tools and Strategies for Sustaining and Protecting Ecological Values of Water  
 
 MAY 2018
       
May 4-5, 2018
San Diego, CA
  P3 Water Summit: Solving Water Challenges Through Partnerships   
       
May 8-11, 2017
Louisville, KY 
  National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Invest in the Environment   
       
May 20-24, 2018
Detroit, MI
  Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting: Navigating Boundaries in Freshwater Science  
       
May 29-June 1, 2018
Denver, CO
  Society of Wetland Scientists 2018 Annual Meeting: Wetland Science: Integrating Research, Practice and Policy - An Exchange of Expertise   
       
JUNE 2018
       
June 10-13, 2018
Washington, DC
  National Flood Conference   
       
June 10-15, 2018
Victoria, B.C. Canada 
  ASLO (Association for the Science of Limnology and Oceanography) 2018 Summer Meeting  
       
June 12-15, 2018
Jyväskylä, Finland
  Scientific Committee of the Society for Conservation Biology Europe Section's 5th European Congress for Conservation Biology (ECCB 2018)  
       
June 17-22, 2018 
Phoenix, AZ
  Association of State Floodplain Managers Annual Conference: Managing Floods Where Mountains Meet the Desert. Call for presentations deadline is October 13, 2017  
 
JULY 2018
       
July 10-12, 2018   US Water Alliance: One Water Summit  
       
July 21-26, 2018
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  North American Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB): Conservation Science, Policy, & Practice: Connecting the Urban to the Wild
T
he call for proposals will close on October 7, 2017.
 
       
AUGUST 2018   
       
August 5-10, 2018
New Orleans, LA
  2018 ESA Annual Meeting  
       
August 13-16, 2018
Asheville, NC
  North Carolina State University: EcoStream Conference

 
       
August 26-30, 2018
New Orleans, LA
  National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration (NCER)
Call for Session Proposals due by October 1, 2017
 
       
August 26-31, 2018
Stockholm, Sweden
  SIWI: World Water Week: Water, ecosystems and human development  
       
TRAINING
       
SEPTEMBER 2017
       
September 25-26, 2017
Tuckerton, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants   
       
September 25-27, 2017
Bordentown, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Wetland Construction: Principles, Planning and Design   
       
September 27-29, 2017
Clovis, NM
  Wetlands Assessment using the New Mexico Rapid Assessment Method (NMRAM) for Playa Wetlands Version 1.0   
       
September 28, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Exploring Wetland Wildlife  
       
September 28, 2017
Woodend Sanctuary
Chevy Chase, MD
  Audubon Naturalist Society Course: How to Read Your Stream  
       
September 28, 2017 
Saukville, WI
  University of Wisconsin-Milwaukke College of Letters & Science Field Station Workshop: Invasive Plant Management Technique  
       
OCTOBER 2017
       
October 2-5, 2017
Hilliard, OH
  MBI (Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Wetland Delineation  
       
October 2-6, 2017
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
October 2-30, 2017
Online 
  The Swamp School Workshop: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment  
       
October 2-30, 2017
Online 
  The Swamp School Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments  
       
October 2-30, 2017
Online 
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Hydrology    
       
October 2-December 25, 2017
Online 
  The Swamp School Course: Basic Wetland Delineation Training  
       
October 7-8, 2017
Ball State University
Muncie, IN
  Course: Wetland Construction Training
Instructor: Tom Biebighauser
Register here.
 
       
October 9-13, 2017
Barcelona, Spain
  Transmitting Science, the Institut Catalá de Paleontologia Miquel, Crusafont and the Centre de Restauració i Interpretació Paleontològica Course: Comparative Approaches in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Science    
       
October 11, 2017
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Introduction to Wetland Identification   
       
October 12-14, 2017
Klamath Falls, OR
  Society for Ecological Restoration Northwest Workshop: Aquatic and Riparian Ecosystems: Interactions, Management, and Restoration East of the Cascades  
       
October 13, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Politics and Policymaking   
       
October 14-17, 2017
Iselin, NJ
  National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop  
       
October 16-27, 2017
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute Spatial Ecology, Geospatial Analysis and Remote Sensing for Conservation  
       
October 16-30, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School On-Demand Workshop: What is a "Waters of the US?"  
       
October 17-19, 2017
Boulder, CO
  CUAHSI and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Training Workshop: The Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System  
       
October 18, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Planning Tools to Create Healthy Communities  
       
October 18-19, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Workshop: Tree Identification  
       
October 20, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Land Use Planning for Non-Planners: An Introduction to Planning in California   
       
October 20, 2017
Sacramento, CA 
  UC Davis Extension Course: CEQA: A Step-by-Step Approach
 
 
       
October 22-25, 2017
Tampa, FL
  American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America: 2017 International Annual Meeting: Managing Global Resources for a Secure Future  
       
October 23, 2017
New Brunswick, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Understanding Advanced Stormwater Management Techniques  
       
October 23-26, 2017
Teatown Lake Reservation
Westchester County, NY
  The Swamp School: Wetland Delineation Training
 
 
       
October 23-27, 2017
Asheville, NC
  Resource Institute Course: Level I - Applied Fluvial Morphology  
       
October 24-27, 2017
National Conservation Training Center
Shepherdstown, WV 
  Stream Mechanics: Stream Functions Pyramid Workshop   
       
October 26, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Building Stream Buffers  
       
October 26-27, 2017
Denver, CO
  Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Stormwater Green Drainage Design Using EPA SWMM-LID  
       
October 27, 2017 
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: EIR/EIS Preparation and Review
 
 
       
October 27, 2017-
November 3, 2017

Portland, OR 
  Portland State University Course: River Restoration Project Design   
       
NOVEMBER 2017
       
November 2-3, 2017
Charleston, SC
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
November 6-9, 2017
Columbus, OH
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: ACOE Wetland Delineation, Waters of the US and Regional Supplement Training  
       
November 6-
December 4, 2017

Online
  The Swamp School Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment   
       
November 6, 2017-
January 29, 2018

Online
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training   
       
November 6, 2017-
January 29, 2018

Online
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Botanist  
       
November 7-9, 2017
Gainseville, FL
  CUAHSI and the University of Florida 3-day Training Workshop: Using In-Situ Water Quality Sensors - Lagrangian and Eulerian Applications  
       
November 8, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Mitigation Measure Development and Monitoring  
       
November 8, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetland Pollinators  
       
November 9, 2017
Stetson University College of Law
Gulfport, FL
  Fifth Annual ELI-Stetson Wetlands Workshop: Conserving the Coasta: The State of Marine Ecosystems and Coastal Compensatory Mitigation  
       
November 11, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern, Inc. Course: Life in a Chesapeake Bay Marsh Tour  
       
November 13-14, 2017
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands, and Hydrology (Coastal Plain or Piedmont)  
       
November 13-16, 2017
Richmond, VA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: Wetland Delineation Training  
       
November 13-17, 2017
Portland, OR
  U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Training: Climate-Smart Conservation with Scenario Planning
 
       
November 15, 2017 
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Streambank Assessment and Restoration    
       
November 15-16, 2017
Richmond, VA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: Regional Supplment Wetland Delineation Training. For other dates, go here.  
       
November 16-17, 2017;
December 14-14, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Environmental Planning and Site Analysis   
       
November 17, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Air Quality Analysis  
       
November 29, 2017 
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: The General Plan in California  
 
DECEMBER 2017 
   
December 1, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Water Quality Regulation and Permitting    
       
December 4-5, 2017
Washington, DC 
  American Law Institute Continuing Legal Education: Clean Water Act: Law and Regulation 2017    
       
December 4-18, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals   
       
December 4-18, 2017
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Habitat Conservation Plans  
       
December 4, 2017-
February 26, 2018

Online
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator  
       
December 4, 2017-
February 26, 2018

Online
  The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design  
       
December 4, 2017-
February 26, 2018
Online 
   The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training   
       
December 6-8, 2017
Davis, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems  
       
December 7, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetlands of the World   
       
December 8, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Habitat Conservation Planning  
       
December 13, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: POW! The Planning of Wetlands   
       
December 13-15, 2017
Davis, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: GIS for Forestry Application  
       
December 14, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern, Inc.: WOW! WOW! Facilitator   
       
December 14, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Implementing Citizen Science In Your Outdoor Classroom  
       
JANUARY 2018 
       
January 17-19, 2018
Knoxville, TX
  NIMBioS Investigative Workshop: Modeling Ecotoxicological Dynamics Subject to Stoichiometric Constraints  
       
FEBRUARY 2018   
       
February 21-22, 2018
Oakland, CA
  National Living Shorelines Tech Transfer Workshop  
       
MARCH 2018   
       
March 12-16, 2018
Asheville, NC
  Resource Institute: Level 1 - Applied Fluvial Morphology
 
       
March 12-23, 2018
Asheville, NC
  Resource Institute: Level II - River Morphology and Application  
   
SPECIAL EVENTS
       
September 23, 2017
Cape May, NJ
  Fall Migration Festival  
       
September 25, 2017
Valencia, PA
  5th Annual Wildbird Recovery: Fall Migration Festival  
October 5, 2017 
Los Angeles, CA
  A Climate Series for the Ages
October 5 – Climate Change Cliff Notes
October 19 – Earth and Human Climate
November 2 – A Tale of Two Cities in a Hotter World: Los Angeles and Beijing
November 16 – Imagined Futures for a Hotter Planet
 
       
October 13-15, 2017
Houma, LA
  2017 Voice of Wetlands Festival  
       
       

    
       


EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • Cost of fighting U.S. wildfires topped $2 billion in 2017
  • Coastal wetlands dramatically reduce property losses during hurricanes
  • Pruitt stars in industry video promoting WOTUS repeal
  • Farm bill pays high dividends for people and the environment
  • Beyond compensation: the insurance industry's role in climate resilience
  • A New Insurance Market to Protect People, Places, and Economies

NATIONAL NEWS

  • EPA will reconsider Obama-era safeguards on coal waste
  • It's a small world after all, say scientists warning of sand scarcity
  • Climate Skeptics Could Snag EPA Science Adviser Slots
  • Visitors Threaten River in One of Southwest’s Most Popular Parks
  • Alert: Nature, on the Verge of Bankruptcy
  • New 5-Year Report Shows 101.6 Million Americans Participated in Hunting, Fishing & Wildlife Activities
  • EPA under Trump shrinks to near Reagan-era staffing levels
  • Trump official’s flounder ruling clouds Atlantic coast fish conservation
  • Deadly Fish Virus Spreading in Pacific Northwest
  • While Trump Keeps Monument Plan Secret, Proponents Tout Their Economic Benefits
  • Plastic fibres found in tap water around the world, study reveals
  • Investors Offer New Source of Conservation Funding
  • Trump reversed regulations to protect infrastructure against flooding just days before Hurricane Harvey
  • Army Corps of Engineers working to restore Chesapeake, one river at a time
  • State lawyers use Pruitt's playbook against him — by suing
  • Trump’s Interior Department moves to stop mountaintop removal study
  • Federal court upholds state's right to stop natural gas pipeline under the Clean Water Act
  • Trump administration urged to avoid salmon protection rules
  • Against the Stream: The Future of the Federal Clean Water Rule
  • 10 states back California agencies in fight with tribe over groundwater
  • EPA’s Pruitt gathers input for WOTUS redo

STATE NEWS

  • AK: As Arctic Sea Ice Disappears, 2,000 Walruses Mob Remote Alaska Beach
  • AZ: EPA Announces $2.86 Million to Improve Tribal Lands in Arizona
  • AR: Court Lets Exxon off Hook for Pipeline Spill in Arkansas Neighborhood
  • CA: Study: Heavy Storms May Be Enough to Recharge California Groundwater
  • FL: Florida’s Poop Nightmare Has Come True
  • FL: Construction to begin next year on Ocala wetland park
  • IA: Gov. Reynolds cuts ribbon on Abner Bell wetland
  • ME: ‘Not one drop’ of Poland Spring bottled water is from a spring, lawsuit claims
  • MD: Bloede Dam Removal Project Begins in Patapsco Valley State Park
  • MD: EPA cuts funding for Chesapeake Bay Journal, threatening publication's future
  • MD: Sea level is rising. Delmarva refuge's solution? Build taller marshes
  • MD: Pilot project planned to dredge Conowingo sediments
  • MI: Flint water crisis legal bills top $15M with far to go in criminal cases
  • MI: Menominee Tribe seeks stricter federal oversight in Michigan mine fight.
  • MI: Warming rivers threaten iconic Michigan fish
  • MN: To protect wild rice, officials suggest new sulfate rule
  • MT: Governor Bullock Declares Drought Disaster in 31 Counties, 6 Indian Reservations
  • NV: Nevada wants out of Superfund listing at mine
  • NH: Squam Lake’s loons are suffering, and unexpected pollution part of the problem
  • NM: New Mexico Project Would Pipe Rural Groundwater 150 Miles to Big City
  • NC: NC sues company accused of polluting Cape Fear River
  • OH: Algal blooms cost Ohio homeowners $152 million over six years
  • OR: USFS begins Glaze Meadow wetland restoration project
  • OR: Hillsboro embarks on major restoration at Jackson Bottom Wetlands
  • OR: Tillamook County enacts new wetland process
  • PA: About half of Lancaster County farmers inspected didn't have required conservation plans
  • PA: Pennsylvania Contemplates Bottom-Up Bay Plan
  • TX: The Exploding Chemical Plant Outside Houston Faces Its First Lawsuit
  • TX: Receding Floodwaters in Houston Expose Long-Term Health Risk
  • VT: Fish & Wildlife manages popular wetland area to promote bird habitat, improve water quality
  • VA: Virginia gets $2.7M from NOAA to protect, restore coastal communities
  • VA: The James River at 45: From toilet to treasure, it's a modern-day survival tale
  • WA: Yakima Basin water-rights case coming to a close
  • WI: Scott Walker’s Foxconn deal waives all environmental regulations and permits

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • Asia's glaciers to shrink by a third by 2100, threatening water supply of millions
  • 6 Questions on Hurricane Irma, Harvey and Climate Change
  • Wild Horses: Adored by the Public, but Destroying Water Resources
  • As trees come down, some hidden homes are disappearing
  • Increasing effective decision-making for coastal marine ecosystems
  • UCI, JPL investigators find direct evidence of sea level ‘fingerprints’
  • Monarchs in western U.S. risk extinction, scientists say
  • 240-year-old nautical maps show coral loss is much worse than we knew
  • Unnatural Surveillance: How Online Data Is Putting Species at Risk
  • Unraveling a major cause of sea ice retreat in the Arctic Ocean
  • URI researcher says invasive plants change ecosystems from the bottom up
  • New research: Acid zone in Chesapeake Bay could harm oysters
  • VIMS uses drones to find, study algal blooms
  • Pop-up Wetlands Helping Migrating Shorebirds
  • Earth Matters: ‘Instant wetlands’ may help solve water quality challenges
  • Unprecedented levels of nitrogen could pose risks to Earth's environment
  • Officials tour Blackwater marsh restoration project
  • Stitching Together Forests Can Help Save Species, Study Finds
  • Mangrove-planting drones on a mission to restore Myanmar delta
  • The Trump administration just disbanded a federal advisory committee on climate change
  • New study validates East Antarctic ice sheet should remain stable even if western ice sheet melts
  • Frogs adapted to pesticides get more parasites
  • A Bottom-up Boost for Coastal Habitat
  • Out of the Frying Pan, into the Wetlands
  • Sea level modelling predicts dire consequences within 80 years for wetlands worldwide
  • Lakes Are Being A-Salted
  • USDA office told to use ‘weather extremes’ instead of 'climate change'
  • EPA Science Integrity Panel Says Pruitt’s Climate Denial Is Permissible

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • New Online Water Quality Standard Variance Building Tool
  • Range position and climate sensitivity: The structure of among-population demographic responses to climatic variation
  • Nature‐based Solutions to Climate Change Adaptation in Urban Areas: Linkages between Science, Policy and Practice
  • A framework for assessing and implementing the co-benefits of nature-based solutions in urban areas
  • Environmental Aspects of Integrated Flood Management: Case Studies

POTPOURRI

  • River and Water Conservation Organizations’ Role in Disaster Management
  • Momentum against glyphosate spraying picks up
  • Federal auditors say US nuclear dump running out of room
  • EPA chief says ready to further relax fuel standards due to hurricanes
  • Climate, Power, Money and Sorrow: Lessons Of Hurricane Harvey
  • Bloom and Bust
  • Houston's Flood Is a Design Problem
  • As a city grows, its impact on rivers doesn’t have to
  • States Are Using Social Cost of Carbon in Energy Decisions, Despite Trump's Opposition
  • Forget ‘the environment’: we need new words to convey life’s wonders

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

WEBINARS, MEETINGS, TRAINING

Webinars

  • Society of Wetland Scientist Webinar: Subtropical wetlands: comparing primary producer diversity and dominance and addressing restoration challenges
  • Land Trust Alliance Webinar: Voting for Conservation Dollars: What Does It Take to Pass a Ballot Measure? Environmental Law Institute Webinar: Emerging Environmental Issues in Native Communities (Part 2)
  • Center for Climate and Energy Solutions Webinar: Using Climate Data in the Real World
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Webinar: Inspiring Lifelong Wetland and Coastal Habitat Stewards through Citizen Science
  • Webinar: Farm Bill Conservation Programs: Collaboration between USFWS and USDA
  • Webinar: Coastal Conservancy Webinar: A Coast for All of Us, Part 2
  • AWRA Webinar: Miami Beach's Aggressive Action Toward Climate Change Adaptation, Part 1
  • Association of State Floodplain Managers Webinar: No Rise, No Problem! Managing Infrastructure in the Floodway
  • AWRA Webinar: Adaptation Strategies for Miami Beach, Part 2: Green Infrastructure, Resilience, and Groundwater
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Bringing Better Site Design into The 21st Century
  • Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance Webinar: The Iowa Watershed Approach: A New Paradigm for Flood Resilience
  • USDA NRCS Science and Technology Webinar: Restoring Native Plant Communities: Soil and Hydrology Suited Planning Tools
  • Association of State Floodplain Managers Webinar: Webinar: After the Disaster: Mitigating Infrastructure Against Flooding Using 406 Mitigation Assistance
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Modeling for Water Quality

Meetings

  • Ohio Environmental Council: Student Sustainability Leaders Conference
  • Wildlife Society 24th Annual Conference
  • Michigan Wetlands Association: 2017 Wetlands Conference Innovations in Wetland Protection and Management
  • 1st International Conference on Community Ecology (ComEc)
  • International Conference: Global Challenges and Date-Driven Sciences
  • 2nd National Conference Protection Pollinators in Urban Landscapes
  • Natural Areas Association: Natural Areas Conference
  • SilviLaser 2017
  • Center for Biodiversity and Conservation and its partners: 2017 Student Conference on Conservation Science
  • 2017 RARGOM Annual Science Meeting: Ocean and Coastal Acidification: Causes and Potential Consequences for Ecological and Sociological Systems in the Gulf of Maine
  • 13th Annual Maryland Association of Floodplain and Stormwater Managers (MAFSM) Conference
  • 2017 Mid-Atlantic Water Resources Conference: Water Research: Building Knowledge and Innovative Solutions
  • Counting the true costs of climate change
  • Society of Wetland Scientists: 2017 North Central Chapter Annual Meeting
  • Ohio Wetlands Association Wetlands Science Summit: Working Wetlands for Water Quality
  • 48th Annual Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium
  • California Department of Water Resources, Urban Streams Restoration Program, Riparian Habitat Joint Venture: 2017 Riparian Summit - Confluence to Influence
  • Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: 13th Annual Great Lakes Restoration Conference
  • 4th Life Discovery – Doing Science Biology Education Conference
  • 4th World Conference on Climate Change: Today's Progress and Tomorrow's Climate Challenges
  • 2017 International Annual Meeting, "Managing Global Resources for a Secure Future"
  • 6th International Symposium: Marine and Freshwater Toxins Analysis
  • Environmental Law Institute Workshop: Blueprint for Change: New Approaches and Needed Changes to Managing Natural Resource Risks, Liabilities and Opportunities
  • 2017 NJAFM Annual Conference
  • 2017 ASBPA National Coastal Conference: Beaches, Bays and Beyond
  • Michigan Aquatic Restoration Conference
  • Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2017 National Land Conservation Conference
  • 6th Annual Lacawac Ecology Conference
  • 9th Canadian Science Policy Conference
  • 2017 AWRA Annual Conference
  • Coastal Estuarine Research Federation (CERF) Conference: Coastal Science at the Inflection Point: Celebrating Successes & Learning from Challenges
  • Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment: Young Environmental Scholars (YES) Annual Conference
  • International Association for Great Lakes Research: State of Lake Michigan Conference
  • Kansas Water Office Governor's Conference: Future of Water in Kansas
  • Greenbuild WaterBuild Summit: Rising Above: Using Innovative Solutions to Build Resilience
  • 5th Annual ELI-Stetson Wetlands Workshop: Conserving the Coasts: The State of Marine Ecosystems and Coastal Compensatory Mitigation
  • 9th US Symposium on Harmful Algae: Training the next generation
  • Geomatics Atlantic 2017
  • International Symposium on Environmental and Sustainability Agriculture Development
  • Maryland Water Monitoring Council Annual Conference
  • AGU Fall Meeting
  • ICHA 2017: 19th International Conference on Harmful Algae
  • 27th Annual No Spills Conference: New and Innovative Technology for Spill Prevention & Response
  • American Society of Naturalists Conference
  • Future Harvest CASA Annual Cultivate the Chesapeake Foodshed Conference
  • Species Range Shifts & Local Adaptation: Challenging ecologcial and evolutionary ideas and assumptions
  • 2018 Delaware Wetlands Conference
  • Maryland Association for Environmental & Outdoor Education Expand Your Influence! Empowering Citizens Action for the Environment
  • International LiDAR Mapping Forum
  • 2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting
  • Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Wetland Science Conference
  • Climate Leadership Conference
  • Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute: 2018 Western Places/Western Spaces
  • Southeast Regional Conference for Community and Land Conservation
  • 21st Annual NFDA Conference
  • American Water Works Association: Sustainable Water Management Conference
  • US-IALE 2018 Annual Meeting
  • 2018 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference; GIS & Water Resources X: Spatial Analysis of Watersheds: Ecological, Hydrological, and Societal Responses
  • University of Florida: 12th International Symposium on Biogeochemistry of Wetlands
  • Instream Flow Council: Flow 2018
  • P3 Water Summit: Solving Water Challenges Through Partnerships
  • National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Invest in the Environment 
  • Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting: Navigating Boundaries in Freshwater Science
  • SWS 2018 Annual Meeting: Wetland Science: Integrating Research, Practice and Policy - An Exchange of Expertise
  • National Flood Conference
  • ASLO 2018 Summer Meeting
  • Scientific Committee of the Society for Conservation Biology Europe Section's 5th European Congress for Conservation Biology
  • Association of State Floodplain Managers Annual Conference: Managing Floods Where Mountains Meet the Desert
  • US Water Alliance: One Water Summit
  • North American Congress for Conservation Biology: Conservation Science, Policy, & Practice: Connecting the Urban to the Wild
  • 2018 ESA Annual Meeting
  • North Carolina State University: EcoStream Conference
  • National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration (NCER) 
  • SIWI: World Water Week: Water, ecosystems and human development

Training

  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Wetland Construction: Principles, Planning and Design
  • Wetlands Assessment using the New Mexico Rapid Assessment Method (NMRAM) for Playa Wetlands Version 1.0
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Exploring Wetland Wildlife
  • Audubon Naturalist Society Course: How to Read Your Stream
  • University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee College of Letters & Science Field Station Workshop: Invasive Plant Management Techniques
  • MBI (Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Wetland Delineation
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • The Swamp School Workshop: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment
  • The Swamp School Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Hydrology
  • The Swamp School Course: Basic Wetland Delineation Training
  • Course: Wetland Construction Training
  • Course: Comparative Approaches in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Science
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Introduction to Wetland Identification
  • Society for Ecological Restoration Northwest Workshop: Aquatic and Riparian Ecosystems: Interactions, Management, and Restoration East of the Cascades
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Politics and Policymaking
  • National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Spatial Ecology, Geospatial Analysis and Remote Sensing for Conservation
  • The Swamp School On-Demand Workshop: What is a “Waters of the US?”
  • CUAHSI and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Training Workshop: The Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Planning Tools to Create Healthy Communities
  • Highlands Biological Station Workshop: Tree Identification
  • UC Davis Extension Course Land Use Planning for Non-Planners: An Introduction to Planning in California
  • UC Davis Extension Course: CEQA: A Step-by-Step Approach
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Understanding Advanced Stormwater Management Techniques
  • The Swamp School: Wetland Delineation Training
  • Resource Institute Course: Level I – Applied Fluvial Morphology
  • Stream Mechanics: Stream Functions Pyramid Workshop
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Building Stream Buffers
  • Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Stormwater Green Drainage Design Using EPA SWMM-LID
  • UC Davis Extension Course: EIR/EIS Preparation and Review
  • Portland State University Course: River Restoration Project Design 
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Basic: Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum – SC
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: ACOE Wetland Delineation, Waters of the US and Regional Supplement Training
  • The Swamp School Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Botanist
  • CUAHSI and the University of Florida 3-day Training Workshop: Using In-Situ Water Quality Sensors - Lagrangian and Eulerian Applications
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Mitigation Measure Development and Monitoring
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetland Pollinators
  • Fifth Annual ELI-Stetson Wetlands Workshop: Conserving the Coasts: The State of Marine Ecosystems and Coastal Compensatory Mitigation
  • Environmental Concern, Inc. Course: Life in a Chesapeake Bay Marsh Tour
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands, and Hydrology (Coastal Plain or Piedmont)
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: Wetland Delineation Training
  • U.S Fish & Wildlife Service Training: Climate Smart Conservation with Scenario Planning
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Streambank Assessment and Restoration
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • UC Davis Extension Course Environmental Planning and Site Analysis
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Air Quality Analysis
  • UC Davis Extension Course: The General Plan in California
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Water Quality Regulation and Permitting
  • American Law Institute Continuing Legal Education: Clean Water Act: Law and Regulation 2017
  • The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
  • The Swamp School Course: Habitat Conservation Plans
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
  • The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetlands of the World
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Habitat Conservation Planning
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: POW! The Planning of Wetlands
  • UC Davis Extension Course: GIS for Forestry Application
  • Environmental Concern, Inc.: WOW! WOW! Facilitator
  • Environmental Concern Course: Implementing Citizen Science In Your Outdoor Classroom
  • NIMBioS Investigative Workshop: Modeling Ecotoxicological Dynamics Subject to Stoichiometric Constraints
  • National Living Shorelines Tech Transfer Workshop
  • Resource Institute: Level 1 - Applied Fluvial Morphology
  • Resource Institute: Level II - River Morphology and Application

SPECIAL EVENT

  • Fall Migration Festival
  • 5th Annual Wildbird Recovery: Fall Migration Festival
  • A Climate Series for the Ages
  • 2017 Voice of Wetlands Festival
       
       
Wetland Breaking News - September 2017
 
 

Wetland Breaking News - March 2016

The Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News (WBN) is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those working in water resources and related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published Wetland Breaking News - January 2017for over fifteen years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to .

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled and Edited by Marla Stelk, Editor; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors. Executive Director: Jeanne Christie. Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399 Fax: 207-892-3089
All photos by Jeanne Christie, ASWM
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