Wetland Breaking News - November 2015

                     
   
IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES &
PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

 

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Wetland Breaking New: November 2015

All photos by
Jeanne Christie, ASWM

       

EDITOR'S NOTE

As much as I wanted to write a lovely little homey Editor’s Note this month about Thanksgiving and all the wonderful things that I and the staff at ASWM are thankful for, the terrorist attacks in Paris have been weighing heavily on my mind. I believe, however, that these themes are not necessarily at odds. I am thankful that we live in a land of plenty; however, most of the world does not. Several experts predict that as our demand for natural resources expands we will see greater and greater conflict for people who are competing for food, water and shelter. In fact, in March, a report published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences identified recent drought and water shortages as one of the factors that led to the Syrian uprising. As scientists, we know that the earth can replenish our natural resources if it has enough time and if we are responsible stewards – but do we know when we’ve reached the threshold? And what happens when we cross it?

In the United States, we are fortunate in that we have felt very little impact from our high demand on natural resources. In many respects, this is because we have exported our demand by moving our manufacturing of goods overseas. Not only has this resulted in a significant loss of American jobs, but it has also created a disconnect among Americans regarding our high demand for consumer goods and the subsequent impacts to the environment that our demand creates via extraction and manufacturing activities abroad. See my Editor’s Choice news stories about how U.S. demand for oil is straining international water supplies and about water pollution in the Tijuana River Valley.

Climate change is one of the impacts connected to a high consumption lifestyle and it is impacting every country across the globe. See the stories in my Editor’s Choice section on Papua New Guinea and South Africa. And it’s not only humans that are being impacted, it’s also our flora and fauna – see the story on how our melting glaciers are threatening Antarctic ocean life. And many experts claim that climate change and terrorism are connected.

We need to start thinking about how our lifestyle choices impact the rest of the world. We need to start looking at the world’s stock of natural resources, not just our own. See the story about the new map of the Earth’s groundwater stocks. Initiatives like this can help us plan for the future. I am thankful that the world is composed mostly of humane, loving and innovative individuals. The terrorists of the world are a miniscule portion of the human population. I have faith that the vast majority of us can and will come up with ways to not only better manage our natural resources but also adjust our lifestyles in order to allow our natural resources to renew and provide basic necessities such as food, clean water and shelter. So this Thanksgiving, I am thankful for all of you who are doing just that by protecting and restoring our valuable wetland resources. Thank you!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Marla J. Stelk, Editor
Wetland Breaking News

     
                     

Wetland Breaking News - November 2015

EDITOR'S CHOICE

New map of Earth's groundwater to help estimate when it may run out

By Magda Mis –Thomson Reuters Foundation – November 16, 2015
The first map showing the world's hidden groundwater was published on Monday, bringing us closer to estimating how much there is, and when it will run out if we over-use the resource. Using data and computer models, an international team of researchers estimated that less than six percent and perhaps as little as one percent of water found close to the Earth's surface is renewable in a human lifetime. "This has never been known before," Tom Gleeson of Canada's University of Victoria and the lead author of the study, said in a statement. "We already know that water levels in lots of aquifers are dropping. We're using our groundwater resources too fast - faster than they're being renewed." For full story, click here.

U.S. Thirst for Oil Straining International Water Supplies

By Bobby Magill – Climate Central – November 16, 2015
Rising energy demand is straining freshwater supplies globally, especially in the developing world, and U.S. oil demand is disproportionately responsible for that strain, a new study says. Global freshwater resources are a critical climate issue because global warming could threaten drinking water supplies for billions of people worldwide, as droughts become more severe, seas rise and precipitation patterns change across the globe. For full story, click here.

Why Climate Change and Terrorism Are Connected

By Justin Worland – Time.com – November 15, 2015
Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders used the terrorist attacks in Paris to call for action to address climate change at a primary debate Saturday. But, while the plea attracted ridicule across the political spectrum, many academics and national security experts agree that climate change contributes to an uncertain world where terrorism can thrive. For full story, click here.

One-Third of Papua New Guineans Suffering Drought Crisis

By Catherine Wilson – IPS News – November 13, 2015
An estimated one-third of the population of Papua New Guinea, the most populous Pacific Island state, is now suffering from the country’s worst drought this century and experts predict El Nino’s influence will carry on through March 2016.Dickson Guina, Chairman of the National Disaster Committee, told IPS that 2.4 million people across most of the nation’s 22 provinces are confronting a critical lack of food and water. There are also reports of many schools and hospitals forced to close as water shortages disrupt their operations. For full story, click here.

Scientists say melting glaciers are now threatening Antarctic ocean life

By Chelsea Harvey – The Washington Post – November 13, 2015
Much of the scientific work on the fascinating and unique organisms occupying the seas around Antarctica has focused on concerns that rising temperatures will upend these communities. But that’s not the only aspect of climate change we should be worrying about, scientists say. New research suggests that melting glaciers, which produce runoff water that carries extra sediment down into the ocean in the form of silt or clay particles, could be causing big changes in some Antarctic communities. For full story, click here.

Gulf Hypoxia Battle Still In Early Rounds

By Lisa Heacox – CropLife – November 7, 2015
It took decades for the hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico to develop. It’s going to take decades to wipe out. That’s the most recent conclusion not only of a February 2015 EPA report but of the many groups that have been developing and implementing strategies to prevent nutrient losses. For full story, click here.

Draft National Wetland Condition Assessment Released For Comment

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – November 5, 2015
EPA has released the draft National Wetland Condition Assessment, the first national assessment of the ecological condition of the nation's wetlands. The draft report describes the results of a nationwide probabilistic survey of wetlands conducted in the spring and summer of 2011 by EPA and its state and tribal partners. Results are based on ecological data collected at more than 1,000 sites across the country using standardized field protocols and include estimates of wetland area in "good", "fair", or "poor" condition, nationally and by major ecoregion. EPA is seeking comment on the draft. Read more here.

South Africa to name two more provinces as drought disaster areas

By Ed Stoddard – Reuters – November 4, 2015
South Africa's drought-hit northern Mpumalanga and Limpopo provinces will be declared disaster areas for agriculture this week or next, an official said on Wednesday, a development that will make them eligible for emergency assistance from the National Treasury.Ben Kgakatsi, director of risk management in the department of agriculture, also told Reuters that the sugar-growing province of KwaZulu-Natal would soon be declared a disaster area for agriculture. The province has already been declared as such for general water supplies. For full story, click here.

The Rundown on Water Pollution in the Tijuana River Valley

By Brooke Binkowski – KCET.org – October 21, 2015
It's been weeks since the last substantial rain, but standing puddles and muddy spots still remain on trails on both sides of the international border along the San Diego and Tijuana coastline. Entire sections of trails and roads that meander from the Tijuana River Valley's marshlands in San Diego to Friendship Park at the international border wall get washed out or flooded after every downpour. The coastal border region is particularly vulnerable to rains. Storms send muck and sewage down canyons, into channels, and finally gets discharged into the Tijuana River and the Pacific Ocean, prompting pollution warnings and beach closures in both countries. Contamination and cross-border pollution has been a fraught topic for years, but never more so than now, ahead of a rainy season in which a historically powerful El Niño appears imminent. For full story, click here.

Status and Trends Report on State Wetland Programs in the United States

The Association of State Wetland Managers (ASWM) has released a new study of state-level wetland work in all fifty states. ASWM’s national study is designed to: 1) assess status and trends; 2) identify models and lessons learned; and 3) document information and program development needs. Information gathered for each state includes a focus on status of program activity, focusing on EPA’s Core Elements Framework. In addition to the report, a clickable map on ASWM’s Wetland Program Webpage allows users to access individual state summaries for each of the 50 states. For more information, go here. To download the Status and Trends Report, go here.

Environmental Solutions for Communities Grant Program 2016 Request for Proposals

National Fish and Wildlife Foundation
Wells Fargo and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) seek to promote sustainable communities through Environmental Solutions for Communities by supporting highly-visible projects that link economic development and community well-being to the stewardship and health of the environment. Approximately $2,460,000 is available nationwide for 2016 projects. For more information, go here. Proposals due by December 19, 2015 by 11:59 p.m. Eastern.

Wetland Mapping Consortium (WMC) Webinar: NWI Standards & Dataset: A Cornerstone for Decision-Support- December 9, 2015

Wetland Mapping Consortium (WMC) Webinar: NWI Standards & Dataset: A Cornerstone for Decision-Support will be held on Wednesday, December 9, 2015 at 12:00 p.m. ET. Presenters will be Mitch Bergeson, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service; Andy Robertson, Saint Mary's University; and Megan Lang, University of Maryland. For more information and to register, click here.

ASWM’s Members’ Wetland Webinar – Climate-Smart Conservation for Wetlands - December 9, 2015

ASWM’s Members’ Wetland Webinar: Climate-Smart Conservation for Wetlandswill be held on Wednesday, December 9, 2015at 3:00 p.m. ET. Presented by Dr. Burce A. Stein, Senior Director, Climate Adaptation and Resilience, National Wildlife Federation.For more information and to register, click here.

ASWM’s Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar: Improving Wetland Restoration "Success": What We've Learned
So Far –
December 15, 2015

ASWM’s Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar: Improving Wetland Restoration "Success": What We've Learned So Farwill be held on December 15, 2015 at 3:00 p.m. ET. Presented by Jeanne Christie, Executive Director and Marla Stelk, Policy Analyst, Association of State Wetland Managers.For more information and to register, click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wetland Breaking News - November 2015

NATIONAL NEWS

Seeking Nominations for EPA's Local Government Advisory Committee

Washington Stormwater Center – November 18, 2015
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Local Government Advisory Committee (LGAC) is a federal advisory committee chartered for 30 elected and appointed officials of state, local and tribal government. The LGAC provides critical advice to the EPA on the development and implementation of Agency programs at the local level. EPA's Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Relations is soliciting nominations by December 14, 2015 to fill up to 8 to 10 vacancies on the LGAC by March 2016. Nominees who are being considered are those individuals who currently hold elected or appointed positions in state, local and tribal government and who have demonstrated local leadership in community sustainability and sustainable development; public health and health disparities; air and water quality issues; climate change and climate resiliency; green jobs and economic initiatives; and energy and environmental financing. For more information, click here. View Federal Register Notice here.

USDA announces $350 million available to help states, private partners protect and restore grasslands, wetlands, and working lands

Contact: Ciji Taylor – USDA NRCS – November 16, 2015
Agricultural Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced the availability of $350 million to help landowners protect and restore key farmlands, grasslands and wetlands across the nation. The funding is provided through the Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP), created by the 2014 Farm Bill to protect critical water resources and wildlife habitat, and encourage private owners to maintain land for farming and ranching. Through the voluntary sale of an easement, landowners limit future development to protect these key resources. For full news release, click here.

Sustainable food management: a win for water

By Luke Wolfgang – EPA’s Healthy Water Blog – November 12, 2015
The recent announcement of a national food wastereduction goal to cut food waste in half by 2030 has great promise for not only getting more of the bounty of our food supply to those in need, but also reducing methane generated in landfills. But did you know that reducing food waste – in 2013, estimated at 35 million tons in the US – also helps reduce water consumption and promote healthy waters? EPA helps universities, grocery stores, sports stadiums, hospitals, and prisons divert food waste from landfills through the Food Recovery Challenge (FRC). For full blog post, click here.

U.S. states, cities seek to defend Obama's carbon rule in court

By Ayesha Rascoe – PlanetArk – November 5, 2015
More than two dozen U.S. states and cities asked a federal court Tuesday to let them help defend the Obama administration's carbon emissions reduction plan from legal challenges being brought by other states. California, New York, Iowa and Virginia were among the 18 states who filed a motion to intervene in lawsuits now pending in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit seeking to overturn the Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Power Plan. Cities including New York, Chicago and Philadelphia are also participating in the effort to intervene. "In the face of overwhelming scientific evidence, reckless politicians and polluters want to gut the president's clean air plans," California Governor Jerry Brown said in a statement. "Today, California and its partners stand together in fighting these pernicious and dangerous lawsuits." For full story, click here.

Sportsmen Win a Clean-Water Victory, But the Fight Isn’t Over

By Bob Marshall – Field & Stream – The Conservationist Blog – November 5, 2015
Few recent conservation battles have been better at showing sportsmen just what they can still accomplish, and who their true friends are in Congress, than the fight over the clean water rule. This week was another example. On Tuesday the Senate effectively killed the cynically titled “Federal Water Quality Protection Act”, S.1140. The only thing this act would have protected was the continued loss of protection for 20 million acres of wetlands critical to fish and wildlife – including most waterfowl nesting grounds and cold-water trout streams – not to mention human health. For full blog post, click here.

Make the Season Bright at a National Wildlife Refuge

Contact: Vanessa Kauffman – U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service – November 4, 2015
Chop your own fir tree. Take a sleigh ride past wintering elk. Participate in the annual Christmas Bird Count. Enjoy the holiday season at a national wildlife refuge near you. Check out some of the free, family-friendly holiday-season activities that refuges will host through the New Year. Visit our special events calendar here for added listings as the holidays draw closer. National wildlife refuges, managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, are part of America’s rich natural heritage. They have been so since 1903, when President Theodore Roosevelt established the first national wildlife refuge on Pelican Island in Florida.Refuges offer chances to see an almost unparalleled array of wildlife, including many of the nation’s most beloved and spectacular species. Find one by you here. For more information, go here.

Bid to block Obama’s water rule falls short

By Timothy Cama – The Hill – November 3, 2015
The Senate failed Tuesday to move forward with a GOP-led bill to overturn the Obama administration’s rule expanding its authority over small waterways. The legislation, sponsored by Sen. John Barrasso (R-Wyo.), would have repealed the Environmental Protection Agency’s “Waters of the United States” rule and given the agency guidelines to re-write it, while exempting numerous waterways and consulting various stakeholders.For full story, click here.

Obama order requires agencies to offset environmental impacts of development

By Gregory Korte – USA Today – November 3, 2015
Federal agencies will be required to take additional steps to offset the environmental impacts of development under a presidential memorandum signed by President Obama Tuesday. The new policy expands on the federal government's 26-year-old "no net loss" wetlands policy, first established under President George H.W. Bush, which requires that any wetlands that are destroyed by human development be replaced somewhere else. The Obama policy applies that concept to any natural resource — not just wetlands — and also encourages agencies to replace those resources even before they're destroyed. For full story, click here.

Wetland case seen as 'no-brainer' for Supreme Court review

By Robin Bravender – E&E Publishing, LLC – October 30, 2015
Legal experts predicted today that the Supreme Court will review a major water case in what may become the court's biggest environmental battle of this term. The court is considering whether to take on a case, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers v. Hawkes Company Inc., that involves assessing whether federal regulators' determinations of areas qualifying for Clean Water Act protections may be challenged in court. For full story, click here.

New NOAA Guidance Promotes Living Shorelines for Improving Habitats

NOAA Habitat Conservation – October 28, 2015
NOAA has released a Guidance for Considering the Use of Living Shorelines, which outlines how we promote living shorelines as a shoreline stabilization technique. Along sheltered coasts, living shorelines can preserve and improve habitats and the benefits they provide and promote resilient communities. To read more, go here. To download Guidance, go here.

Proposed federal rule would protect streams near mines

By Edward Graham – The Durango Herald – October 28, 2015
A new stream-protection rule to protect waterways from surface coal mining contamination was met with stiff resistance by Senate Republicans on Tuesday during a hearing of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee. The rule, which was proposed by the Department of Interior’s Office of Surface Mining, would promote better safeguards, oversight and protection for streams near mines. OSM has been working for the last six years to update environmental regulations for streams and other ecosystems surrounding surface mines. For full story, click here.

South Dakota scientist says USDA censored pesticide research

By Josephine Marcotty – StarTribune – October 28, 2015
A highly regarded federal scientist filed a whistleblower complaint Wednesday against the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), charging that he was punished for publicizing research showing a link between pesticides and the decline in bees and other pollinators. For full story, click here.

Nitrates a Costly, Persistent Problem for Small Towns

By Grant Gerlock – Net Nebraska.org – October 23, 2015
Earlier this year, Des Moines, Iowa, made news when the city announced it would sue farmers in a legal battle over fertilizer. The city’s water supply from the Des Moines and Raccoon Rivers often surpasses the legal limit for nitrates (10 mg/L), which commonly appear in water contaminated by runoff from farm fields. Too many nitrates are a health hazard, particularly for infants whose blood can lose its ability to absorb oxygen. So nitrates must be reduced or removed, but cleaning nitrates from the city’s water is a huge expense. When nitrate levels rise above the safe drinking water limit, Des Moines fires up a filtering system that costs thousands of dollars to operate each day. For full story, click here.

Wetlands Protections on Hold, Chesapeake Cleanup Under Attack

By Bob Marshall – Field & Stream – The Conservationist Blog – October 21, 2015
Say these two words: Clean water. Did a shiver of fear just run down your spine? Did you see the end of economic expansion in your state, the loss of millions of jobs, the collapse of private property rights and a federal government taking over everything you hold dear? I thought not. Yet many industries—and the politicians they support—have made “clean water” the two most terrifying words in the English language (besides climate change). That’s why they have successfully petitioned a U.S. District Court to delay implementation on the new wetlands guidance under the Clean Water Act. For full blog post, click here.

Obama leaving mark on contentious law -- with scant Hill input

Phil Taylor and Corbin Hiar – E&E Publishing, LLC – October 21, 2015
The Obama administration is quietly reshaping the Endangered Species Act in hopes of tempering congressional critics and avoiding courtroom battles. Over the past several years, the administration has pushed a series of administrative reforms that it says will make the 1973 law more nimble, transparent and legally defensible. It has shifted course on how the law is applied, utilizing incentives over regulations to coax industry and private landowners to save vanishing habitats. "The law has inherent flexibility," said Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe. "We can apply that flexibility thoughtfully, and we can catalyze conservation, not command it." Lawmakers and Western governors want to legislatively overhaul the law -- a tall task in a deeply partisan Congress. But the law has already evolved significantly under President Obama and will continue to be molded by the next administration. For full story, click here.

Collaboration can save the Mississippi River Watershed

By Mississippi River Cities & Towns Initiative – AG Professional – October 15, 2015
A diverse group of more than 400 businesses, associations, government agencies, science organizations, academic institutions and non-profit organizations released the first-ever report card evaluating the condition of one of our nation’s most storied and central waterways. This effort, known as America’s Watershed Initiative, was undertaken to provide information on the challenges facing the waters and lands that make up the 31-state Mississippi River Watershed and the 250 rivers that flow into it. For full story, click here.

USDA to Invest $30 million to Help Protect Wetlands in Six States

Contact: Office of Communications – USDA – October 15, 2015
Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture will award $30 million to projects in six states to protect, restore and enhance wetlands on private and tribal agricultural lands. The projects are being funded under the Wetland Reserve Enhancement Partnership (WREP), a program authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill. "Through locally led partnerships like these, USDA is targeting conservation in the places that make sense, allowing us to address local concerns," Vilsack said. "These projects will improve water quality, prevent flooding, enhance wildlife habitat and meet increasing conservation challenges on over 19,000 acres of wetlands." For full news release, click here.

U.S. Appeals Court Blocks EPA Water Rule Nationwide

By Brent Kendall and Amy Harder – The Wall Street Journal – October 9, 2015
A federal appeals court on Friday temporarily blocked an Environmental Protection Agency regulation that would bring more waterways and wetlands under federal protection, in the latest sign the effort could face an uphill legal battle. The order, issued on a 2-1 vote from the Cincinnati-based Sixth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, was a preliminary boost for a group of 18 states that challenged the EPA regulation. The rule seeks to bring smaller bodies of water at the outer edges of watersheds under the Clean Water Act and was issued jointly with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. For full story, click here.

Incorporating Natural Infrastructure and Ecosystem Services in Federal Decision-Making

By Tamara Dickinson, Timothy Male, Ali Zaidi – White House Blog – October 7, 2015
Our natural world provides critical contributions that support and protect our communities and economy. For instance, Louisiana’s coastal wetlands provide billions of dollars worth of flood protection and other benefits. Preserving and restoring forests in the Catskill Mountains enables New York City to access clean water at a cost several times less than the cost of building a new water-filtration plant. And current efforts to plant trees along Oregon’s salmon-rich rivers will improve local water quality – saving costs associated with installing expensive machinery to achieve the same purpose. For full blog post, click here.

 

Wetland Breaking News - November 2015STATE NEWS

CA: Gov. Brown extends California's water limits: 'We are in a new era.'

By Molly Jackson – The Christian Science Monitor – November15, 2015
Governor Jerry Brown prepared Californians to enter their fifth year of a seemingly interminable drought on Friday by extending an executive order that mandated a 25-percent reduction in water usage across the state. The original order, issued in April, could now be extended until October 2016 if the drought persists through January. For full story, click here.

CA: Mercury in San Francisco Bay

By Arwen Curry – KQED-QUEST – November 5, 2015 – Video
Dr. Jane Hightower’s sick patients weren’t getting better, and she wanted to know why. Some of the California Pacific Medical Center physician’s well-heeled patients were coming into her clinic complaining of fatigue, or trouble thinking – an on-and-off feeling of not being well. Sometimes it was problems with vision, hearing, nausea and vomiting, or a metallic taste in the mouth. In 1999, she began keeping a tally of what they ate. Fish, it turned out – a lot of it. Specifically large fish, like shark, tuna, swordfish, cod and ahi tuna. A possible cause began to emerge for their ailments: mercury, a potent neurotoxin that builds up in fish and can cause serious illness. For full story and to view video, click here.

CA: Ceremony near San Pablo Bay marks planned rebirth of wetlands

By John King – SFGate – October 26, 2015 – Video
After 10 years of planning and three years of site preparation, it took less than a minute Sunday for workers to scrape a hole in a levee and begin the renewal of 1,000 acres of former North Bay marshlands. The mechanical excavator scooped aside a few buckets of dirt. Muddy water spurted and then flowed into the waiting basin. Now all that’s needed is time. For full story and to view video, click here.

CO: Colorado disputes key part of EPA mine report

By Dan Elliott – Associate Press – Napa Valley Register – November 12, 2015
Colorado officials say they didn’t endorse an Environmental Protection Agency cleanup operation that caused a massive spill of toxic wastewater from an inactive mine, disputing a key claim by federal agencies that state experts signed off on the plan. For full story, click here.

DE: Budget gaps strain Delaware's progress toward federal Chesapeake Bay restoration goals

By Annie Ropeik – Delaware Public – November 6, 2015
By 2025, Chesapeake Bay watershed states aim to drastically reduce the amount of pollutants and sediment they put into bay waterways. Using everything from new stormwater equipment to tree plantings, they're working toward ambitious goals set by the Environmental Protection Agency six years ago. But states like Delaware aren't on track to meet 2017 halfway point milestones. As Delaware Public Media's Annie Ropeik reports, a lack of state funding is limiting options -- and failing to meet EPA goals could only make it worse.For full story, click here.

FL: Ranchlands Continue Successful Transformation to Wetlands

Florida Water Daily – November 16, 2015
The transformation of ranchlands into water-cleaning wetlands continues as the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) approved a construction contract to build the southern Stormwater Treatment Area (STA) at Lakeside Ranch. These specialized wetlands in western Martin County are designed to remove phosphorus from stormwater before it reaches Lake Okeechobee.“Reducing the amount of phosphorus entering Lake Okeechobee is an important component of the overall strategy to improve water quality in the lake and in the Everglades,” said SFWMD Governing Board member Kevin Powers. “Building this next phase of wetlands at Lakeside Ranch will increase the project’s already proven ability to reduce nutrient loads to the lake.” For full story, click here.

LA: Projects restore Terrebonne wetlands

By Keith Magill – Daily Comet – November 16, 2015
Three projects have restored more than 2,500 acres of wetlands in Terrebonne Parish.
Nearly 50 people gathered Tuesday at the Falgout Canal Marina in Theriot to celebrate the $2.2 million worth of work's completion.Money came from Ducks Unlimited, ConocoPhillips, Apache Louisiana Minerals, the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority and the North American Wetlands Conservation Council and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association.“The Gulf Coast is the continent's single most important wintering area for waterfowl, and it's being lost at a staggering rate,” Ducks Unlimited Coastal Restoration Specialist Leslie Suazo said in a news release. “Protecting and restoring coastal marsh and prairie habitat is a top priority for Ducks Unlimited. Our Gulf Coast Initiative addresses the need for coastal restoration through direct habitat delivery and advocacy, guided by the best available science.” For full story, click here.

LA: Cooperation is key to federal program to save coast

By Meredith Burns – Houmat Today – October 14, 2015
For those involved with coastal Louisiana restoration and protection, a law that funnels federal money to local projects has been a model for cooperation between federal, state and local entities. Money from the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act, which has grown from about $30 million to nearly $80 million annually, helps pay for projects benefiting wetlands. For full story, click here.

ME: Water too warm for cod in U.S. Gulf of Maine; stock near collapse

By Alister Doyle – PlanetArk – October 30, 2015
A rapid warming of the Gulf of Maine off the eastern United States has made the water too hot for cod, pushing stocks toward collapse despite deep reductions in the number of fish caught, a U.S. study showed on Thursday.The Gulf of Maine had warmed faster than 99 percent of the rest of the world's oceans in the past decade, influenced by shifts in the Atlantic Gulf Stream, changes in the Pacific Ocean and a wider trend of climate change, it said.Scientists said the findings showed a need to take more account of changing water temperatures in managing global fish stocks usually based on historical data of catches. For full story, click here.

ME: As Gulf of Maine warms, puffins recast as canaries in a coal mine

By Colin Woodard – The Portland Press Herald – October 26, 2015 – Video
The puffins are having a better year. On a late June day, the adults are landing on the rocky shore of this 7-acre bird sanctuary in flights of three or four, their bright red and yellow beaks stuffed with sand lance, tiny haddock and white hake, sometimes a herring or two. They look about, unruffled after a 30- or 40-mile round-trip sortie over Muscongus Bay and the open ocean south of Pemaquid Point and Monhegan, then duck into the rocky hideaways where their hungry chicks are waiting. Puffins – penguin-like in their comical stoicism – were virtually wiped out in Maine in the mid-19th century by hungry fishermen, who threw nets over their hideaways to catch them by the thousands. Restored to midcoast islands by scientists, they have a threatened status in Maine and were recently listed as endangered in Europe, where Icelanders caught and consumed them as a delicacy just five years ago.For full story, click here.

MD: Oyster restoration effort underway in Patapsco River

By Timothy B. Wheeler – The Baltimore Sun – October 22, 2015 – Video
It's been more than a century since oysters thrived in the Patapsco River, but on Thursday two groups unveiled an ambitious plan to try to bring them back to the Chesapeake Bay's most degraded tributaries. The Waterfront Partnership, an Inner Harbor business group, and the Chesapeake Bay Foundation announced plans to plant 5 million hatchery-spawned baby oysters over the next five years near Fort Carroll, an abandoned 19th-century military installation in the lower Patapsco, just beyond the Key Bridge.For full story, click here.

MI: Lake Erie algae plan targets Detroit River sewage discharges

By Garret Ellison – MLive – November 4, 2015
Michigan environmental officials plan to modify pollution permit limits for a Metro Detroit sewage plant as part of an effort to reduce harmful algal bloom-fueling phosphorus in the Western Lake Erie basin. The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality announced a six-point draft plan on Wednesday, Nov. 4 as a step toward reducing Michigan's phosphorus input to Lake Erie by 40 percent over the next decade. For full story, click here.

MI: $10M EPA grant funds Great Lakes coastal wetlands research

By Garret Ellison – MLive – October 8, 2015
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has given Central Michigan University another $10 million from the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative to study coastal wetlands over the next five years. The money follows a $10 million EPA grant to CMU for similar research in 2012. "The information collected by Central Michigan researchers will be used to assess ecosystem health and to prioritize areas for habitat protection and restoration," said Susan Hedman, regional EPA administrator. For full story, click here.

MN: Wetland restoration aims to help clean up Clearwater Chain

SFGate – October 28, 2015
The Clearwater River squiggled toward Minnesota Highway 15, where Dennis Loewen perched on the rim of a box culvert midway down the embankment, lowering a modified snow rake into sluggish, chocolatey water.At the end of the pole was an instantaneous flow gauge. Moving left to right, at each of 12 stops, Loewen, the Clearwater River Watershed District's assistant administrator, called depth and flow readings back to Cole Loewen, CRWD administrator (who is also Dennis' son).Two-point-three.Zero-point-zero-three.The river meanderings are man-made. The adjacent Kingston Wetland is altered. A man-made ditch, County Ditch 46, constructed in about 1916 to drain farm fields, is what led to the wetland alterations and, eventually, the re-meandering.The Kingston Wetland restoration project, a five-year, $689,248 undertaking meant to clean up downstream lakes by boosting dissolved oxygen and cutting the amount of phosphorus entering the Clearwater River, officially wrapped up in September, the St. Cloud Times reported.For full story, click here.

MO: Pieces coming together for Webb City wetland, grassland restoration

By Mike Pound – Joplin Globe – October 28, 2015
An off-the-cuff remark by William Runkle sparked a plan that will help remove zinc from the city's wastewater, a plan that is coming closer to fruition.Runkle, Webb City's wastewater utility director, said he was talking to Mark Doolan, project manager for the Environmental Protection Agency, about the ongoing cleanup of land in the area scarred by decades of lead and zinc mining.“I said: ‘Why don’t you build me a wetland?’ and we laughed,” Runkle said.But the more the two men discussed it, the more the wetland idea made sense.For full story, click here.

NJ: N.J. moving ahead with plans to create wetlands at Liberty State Park

By Scot Fallon – NorthJersey.com – October 23, 2015
Amid a much-maligned push by the Christie administration to bring more private development to Liberty State Park, the state is moving ahead with long-delayed plans that many are applauding: creating 30 acres of wetlands in an area filled with contaminated soil. For full story, click here.

NJ: New Jersey ban on using oysters to clean waterways to remain under new rules

By Scot Fallon – NorthJersey.com – October 23, 2015
New Jersey’s ban on using oysters to naturally clean up waterways like the Hackensack River will essentially remain in effect under new rules issued Monday by the Christie Administration. Despite a recent push in the Legislature to lift the ban, environmental advocates said the new rules make it virtually impossible to return their oyster reefs to state waters. Oysters have been used to help clean some of the nation’s most well-known bodies of water and wetlands from Chesapeake Bay to the Everglades by removing heavy metals and other contaminants. For full story, click here.

NM: Gone Dry: Without funding, state stalls plans to study the effect of drought on rivers, wells and the New Mexico economy

By Laura Paskus – Santa Fe Reporter – November 4, 2015
Last year, New Mexico state lawmakers set aside $100,000 to study the state’s water supply. With that budget, five climate scientists, economists, engineers and hydrologists from the University of New Mexico, New Mexico State University and the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology had some specific, statewide goals. They needed to figure out how drought might affect rivers and reservoirs, groundwater supplies and the state’s economy—and then identify vulnerabilities and policy strategies. But a year later, the money is gone. Citing a drop in state revenue, the New Mexico State Legislature has now pulled back funding for the group—known as the New Mexico Universities Working Group on Water Supply Vulnerabilities. For full story, click here.

NY: Ecosystems Are Dying as Long Island Contends With a Nitrogen Bomb

By Brett Walton – Circle of Blue – November 4, 2015
Thousands of dead bunker fish and hundreds of diamondback turtles washed ashore last May in Peconic Bay on the east end of Long Island, New York. Fed by warming waters and a stream of nitrogen, a foul bloom of algae had so depleted the estuary of oxygen that marine life suffocated. The waters of the bay swirled red and brown. The late-spring algae bloom was the beginning of a seasonal occurrence that has become distressingly common: a toxic summer in the waters of Long Island, the claw-like banner of land that extends 190-kilometers (118-miles) from Brooklyn to the Hamptons. Aureococcus, or brown tide, covered the south shore in June. Cochlodinium, or rust tide, appeared in Shinnecock Bay and Sag Harbor in early September. Between Memorial Day and Labor Day, at least 15 lakes were overwhelmed by microcystis, a toxin produced by blue-green algae. For full story, click here.

NY: Lake Ontario Water Level Plan Tests Attitudes Toward Environment

By Codi Kozacek – Circle of Blue – October 28, 2015
All the force of the Great Lakes—the largest system of fresh surface water in the world—rushes into the St. Lawrence River and shatters the land into spangles of forest, mist, and water. This is the Thousand Islands region, a labyrinth of more than 1,800 islands where 226-meter-long (740-foot-long) freighters nose their way along the St. Lawrence Seaway into the heart of North America. The river rolls past the castle homes of 19th-century millionaires and wends through leafy coves and expanses of shallow marshlands. But what appears as a thriving and verdant natural haven is in reality a landscape under assault. Lee Willbanks pilots his boat along the shores of Grindstone Island, the fourth largest island in the St. Lawrence, and points to a wetland in Flynn Bay. It is a mass of waving cattails, as close together as bristles on a brush and as uniform as a field of corn. Absent are the sedges and grasses, the rushes and meandering water channels that provide food and shelter for birds, fish, and mammals. For full story, click here.

NY: Once a fetid mess, now serene wetland: NYC waters transform

By Colleen Long, Associate Press – Seattle PI – October 24, 2015
Amid the crammed concrete and steel of Brooklyn, a ribbon of clear water stretches out into a vast bay. Tall grass rustles along the undulating shoreline, where bursts of golden flowers, pines and cacti flourish in the soft sand. This is what would have been here pre-us. Pre-European development," said John McLaughlin, director of the office of ecological services at New York City's department of environmental protection.For full story, click here.

NC: EPA: N.C. risking federal takeover of environmental regulation

Winston-Salem Journal – November 18, 2015
North Carolina’s recent tactic of blocking citizens from challenging state permits for industrial polluters could result in a federal takeover of the state’s regulatory program. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has put state officials on notice that North Carolina’s strategy is putting the state at risk of losing its authority to regulate industrial water pollution and air pollution. Since receiving the warning two weeks ago, the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality is downplaying the incident as a misunderstanding.For full story, click here.

NC: DEQ pushes back against environmentalists’ criticism

By Craig Jarvis – The News & Observer – November 2, 2015 – Video
Tired of getting punched in the nose by environmentalists, the state’s environmental protection agency on Monday swung back in a video defending North Carolina’s new deregulation law.The video features Tom Reeder, Department of Environmental Quality assistant secretary, saying environmental groups have misled the public about the impact of the Regulatory Reform Act of 2015. Its dozens of provisions affect a range of issues, but most of the attention has been brought by environmental advocates who call it the Polluter Protection Act. For full story and to view video, click here.

NC: McCrory Caps a Busy Year for Environmental Rewrites

By Gabe Rivin – North Carolina Health News – October 28, 2015
Gov. Pat McCrory has given his signature to a bill that eliminates several environmental rules, including requirements for idling trucks and farmers who want to burn agricultural plastics. In signing HB 765 on Oct. 22, McCrory capped a 2015 legislative session that included numerous efforts to redefine the state’s rules for polluters. For full story, click here.

OH: Summer's toxic-algae bloom on Lake Erie was the worst on record

By Laura Arenschield – The Columbus Dispatch – November 10, 2015
It official: The algae bloom that covered Lake Erie this past summer was the biggest and baddest ever recorded. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced that finding today, saying this past summer’s toxic-algae bloom was more severe even than the 2011 bloom, which stretched along the shoreline from Toledo to Cleveland. This past summer’s bloom was bigger, though. As it sprawled toward Cleveland, it migrated toward the center of Erie rather than sticking to the coast. For full story, click here.

OK: Oil production possibly linked to Oklahoma quakes since 1930s: USGS

By Heide Brandes – Reuters – October 22, 2015
Oklahoma earthquakes may have been related to oil production activities as early as the 1930s, a study released this week by the U.S. Geological Survey said. Oklahoma has seen a surge in seismic activity in recent years and is recording 2.5 earthquakes daily of a magnitude 3 or greater, a rate 600 times greater than observed before 2008, the Oklahoma Geological Survey said in April. "Several lines of evidence further suggest that most of the significant earthquakes in Oklahoma during the 20th century may also have been induced by oil production activities," Susan Hough, USGS seismologist and lead author of the study, said in a statement on Tuesday. "Deep injection of waste water, now recognized to potentially induce earthquakes, in fact began in the state in the 1930s," she said. The study says the recent earthquakes in central and eastern United States may be primarily caused by the injection of wastewater in deep disposal wells. For full story, click here.

PA: Pennsylvania Farm Bureau aligns with American Farm Bureau to appeal ChesapeakeBay plan in Supreme Court

Pennsylvania Business Daily – November 10, 2015
The Pennsylvania Farm Bureau (PFB), the American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) and agricultural and development stakeholders recently requested that the U.S. Supreme Court hear an appeal of a federal decision upholding an EPA action affecting Chesapeake Bay. The consortium of citizens is concerned about the effect of the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) implementation of a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, saying it will negatively impact farm families, communities and the rural economy in general. For full story, click here.

UT: Coal or sage grouse? State, federal officials at odds on Utah mine proposal

By Darryl Fears –The Washington Post – November 14, 2015
In a sparsely populated county in southern Utah, man is imitating nature.Just as male sage grouse posture and threaten to brawl over turf during mating rituals, state and federal officials are in a tense standoff over a coal-mining operation’s proposed expansion near the habitat of birds in the area. Federal officials say a move by Alton Coal onto 3,600 acres controlled by the Interior Department could decimate the tiny population of sage grouse there. State officials say the mine’s growth would create sorely needed jobs, with displaced sage grouse easily flying to another spot nearby. For full story, click here.

VA: Wetland, wildlife impact raised at water meeting

By John R. Crane – GoDanRiver.com – October 28, 2015
Pittsylvania County residents expressed concerns during a meeting Wednesday night about the town of Chatham’s proposal to double its daily withdrawal of water from about 425,000 gallons to nearly 900,000 gallons. Barbara Hudson, who lives along Roaring Fork Lake, said taking water from the lake would have disastrous effects on wetlands and wildlife. Residents also suspect the water would go to agricultural interests — including an integrated poultry industry complex.For full story, click here.

WA: Taking the pulse of Puget Sound

By Kimberly Cauvel – goskagit – November 8, 2015
The state’s effort to improve the health of Puget Sound is moving slowly, even with a variety of fish-focused projects in motion throughout the Skagit River watershed, from major dike setbacks to minor culvert replacements.In a State of the Sound Report released last week, the Puget Sound Partnership describes the progress to restore this inlet of the Pacific Ocean as largely stagnant.The partnership is seeing mixed results. For full story, click here.

WI: Safe, clean drinking water eludes many Wisconsinites

By Ron Seely – WisconsinWatch.org – November 8, 2015
In this place, hundreds of thousands of people face the specter of drinking water from wells that is unsafe, tainted by one or more contaminants such as arsenic or nitrate. In this place, for some, even brushing their teeth or cooking a meal can give pause because of the risk of lead from aging water pipes. The dangers to children, often more susceptible to pollutants than adults, and even pets and livestock, cause nagging fear. For full story, click here.

WI: Citizens Claim Wisconsin Not Complying With Clean Water Act, Demand EPA Action

By Susan Bence – WUWM Milwaukee Public Radio – October 21, 2015
The Wisconsin DNR is being accused of failing to comply with the Clean Water Act. Sixteen citizens are claiming that Wisconsin has had “long-standing water problems from poor implementation and enforcement” of the Act. Tuesday, Midwest Environmental Advocates filed a request with the EPA demanding an investigation. For full story, click here.

WI: Celebrating Wisconsin’s Wetlands of International Importance

By Tracy Hames – Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin – October 6, 2015
As executive director for Wisconsin Wetlands Association, I have had the chance to visit hundreds of beautiful wetlands across our state. And while I love every Wisconsin wetland, it’s especially fun to visit rare wetland types like Chiwaukee Prairie along the Lake Michigan shore in southeast Wisconsin. Wisconsin Wetlands Association recognized this rare wetland as a Wetland Gem® in 2009, and just recently I joined more than 150 government officials and nonprofit conservation group members at an event celebrating its designation as a Wetland of International Importance. The designation makes Chiwaukee Prairie Illinois Beach Lake Plain the 39th designated Wetland of International Importance in the United States. For full blog post, click here.

 

Wetland Breaking News - November 2015

WETLAND SCIENCE NEWS

Global Emissions Reductions Have Already Saved the U.S. $60 Billion, Report Says

By NaveenaSadasivam – InsideClimate News – November 5, 2015
Global action to reduce carbon dioxide has produced at least $60 billion in economic benefits to the U.S. in the last five years, according to a new analysis. It also concludes that current rates of emission reductions worldwide could contribute another $2 trillion in the next 15 years. The report was published Thursday by the Institute for Policy Integrity, a think tank and advocacy organization at the New York University School of Law, and concluded that the U.S. will gain far more from global efforts on climate change in damages avoided to the economy, public health and the environment than proposed regulations would cost. For full story, click here.

Algae Bloom off Pacific Coast Blamed for Marine Mammal Poisoning

By Jes Burns – Oregon Public Broadcasting - OPB – November 3, 2015
Scientists have found dozens of poisoned dolphins, whales and sea lions off the coast of Washington, Oregon and California this year. They tested positive for a toxin caused by a massive algae bloom this summer in the Pacific Ocean. Toxic domoic acid is produced by algae in the ocean, and this year the algae are thriving in the largest bloom ever recorded here. Marine mammals are poisoned when they eat fish that are contaminated. For full story, click here.

Planting In Clumps Boosts Wetland Restoration Success

Contact: Tim Lucas – Duke Environment – November 2, 2015
When restoring coastal wetlands, it’s long been common practice to leave space between new plants to prevent overcrowding and reduce competition for nutrients and sunlight. It turns out, that’s likely all wrong. A new Duke University-led study, conducted to restore degraded salt marshes in Florida and the Netherlands, has found that clumping newly planted marsh grasses next to each other, with little or no space in between, can spur positive interactions between the plants and boost growth and survival by 107 percent, on average, by the end of one growing season. For full story, click here.

Asian carp move closer to Lake Michigan: Solutions?

By Michael D. Regan – The Christian Science Monitor – November 2, 2015
Three electric fences. That is all that is preventing the Asian carp from swimming into the Great Lakes, even as evidence shows the destructive fish are creeping closer to the world's largest body of freshwater, and as calls for the federal government to curb the spread of the invasive species have become as voracious as the fish's appetite. For full story, click here.

Europe's Mars rover to target ancient wetland

By Daniel Clery – Science – October 29, 2015
European planetary scientists are still building the roving laboratory they plan to send to Mars in 2018, but now they know where it will land: OxiaPlanum. Clay deposits and landforms suggest this ancient region once hosted lakes, rivers, and a delta, making it just the sort of place to dig for signs of possible martian life. That is the mission of the ExoMars 2018 rover, one component of a multipart joint mission by the European Space Agency (ESA) and its Russian counterpart, Roscosmos. The landing site—chosen after intense discussions at the ESA's technology center in Noordwijk, the Netherlands—beat out three other candidates. One "must" for all four ExoMars sites was clay: fine-grained sediment that, on Earth, is deposited by water and is excellent at preserving the remains of ancient organisms. At OxiaPlanum, the clays were covered by other material for billions of years and then recently uncovered by wind erosion. The long burial may have shielded them from ionizing radiation from space that could destroy organic molecules near the surface.For full story, click here.

Minnesota loons remain under close watch in their migration to Gulf of Mexico

By C. B. Bylaner – Star Tribune – October 29, 2015
Just what impact the Deepwater Horizon oil spill will have on the loon population is unknown. Minnesota’s loons have begun to migrate south, and as they do scientists and citizens are tracking migration routes and wintering locations with pinpoint precision. New satellite telemetry research has surprisingly shown that three Minnesota loons have spent much of the past year in the Atlantic Ocean near or north of Nova Scotia. In addition, some birds even tell wildlife biologists how deep and often they dive, which is up to 150 feet deep in the south end of Lake Michigan. For full story, click here.

U.S. Rivers Show Few Signs of Improvement from Historic Nitrate Increases

USGS – October 28, 2015
During 1945 to 1980, nitrate levels in large U.S. rivers increased up to fivefold in intensively managed agricultural areas of the Midwest, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey study. In recent decades, nitrate changes have been smaller and levels have remained high in most of the rivers studied. The greatest increases in river nitrate levels coincided with increased nitrogen inputs from livestock and agricultural fertilizer, which grew rapidly from 1945 to 1980. In some urbanized areas along the East and West coasts during the same period, river nitrate levels doubled. Since 1980, nitrate changes have been smaller as the increase in fertilizer use has slowed in the Midwest and large amounts of farmland have been converted to forest or urban land along the East coast. For full story, click here.

Invasive species exploit a warming Gulf of Maine, sometimes with destructive results

By Colin Woodard – Portland Press Herald – October 28, 2015
Until two years ago, if you had walked down to the shore of Maquoit Bay at low tide, you would have seen a meadow of eelgrass stretching nearly as far as the eye could see across the exposed seafloor. Here near the head of the bay, the sea grass stretched for two miles to the opposite shore, creating a vast nursery for the shellfish and forage species of Casco Bay, of which Maquoit is a part. Now there’s only mud. For full story, click here.

Sonoma County farmland to return to become natural wetland

The Sacramento Bee – October 26, 2015
Sonoma County restoration project aims to make 1,000 acres of farmland a tidal marsh basin over the next 25 years. The Santa Rosa Press Democrat reports that supporters and partners of the Sonoma Land Trust gathered Sunday to watch an excavator break through a Sears Point levee, allowing saltwater to flood over the reclaimed oat fields. Officials say it will take decades for the marshland's vegetation and wildlife to return. For full story, click here.

New Website Highlights State Practices for Climate Adaptation

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – October 24, 2015
State water agencies across the country are starting to integrate climate change considerations into the Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act programs they administer. Short descriptions have been developed of innovative practices that state water agencies are currently implementing to reduce their vulnerability to climate-related impacts and to build resilience to climate change. These select state practices can serve as useful models for other state agencies seeking to make water programs more resilient to climate change. In addition, water resource planners and decision-makers from local and tribal governments and other entities may find these practices to be helpful. For more information, click here.

A new species of giant tortoise was just discovered in the Galapagos

By Rachel Feltman – The Washington Post – October 22, 2015
According to new genetic analysis, a population of giant tortoises living in the Galapagos Islands is in fact a distinct, previously unknown species. Researchers described the new species, now officially known as Chelonoidis donfaustoi, in a study published Wednesday in PLOS ONE. The tortoises were thought to be part of a species (Chelonoidis porter) with another, larger population living a few miles away on the same island, Santa Cruz. The larger population — which boasts about 2,000 tortoises — lives mostly in a protected national park. But the new species, which lives on the Eastern side of the island, is made up of just about 250 individuals.For full story, click here.

Bees found farming fungus for first time to feed larvae

By Rachel David – New Scientist – October 22, 2015
Flowers are not enough, it seems. For the first time, bees have been discovered farming fungus to provide extra food for their larvae.Though farming is well known in many social insects, such as ants and termites, bees have always been thought to depend solely on pollen and nectar for sustenance. But for the Brazilian stingless bee, Scaptotrigonadepilis, fungus may mean the difference between life and death.What’s more, if other bees also depend on fungus for survival, the discovery has serious implications for the use of fungicides in agriculture.Cristiano Menezes of the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation, was studying the bees in the lab and originally mistook the white Monascus fungus growing in their hive for contamination.For full story, click here.

Restoration Spotlight: Invasive plants got your goat?

By Scott Bosse – Chesapeake Bay News Blog – October 22, 2015
Invasive species, or plants and animals that have been introduced to an area, can cause harm when they establish themselves at the expense of native wildlife. These invaders pose a threat to native species by outcompeting them for resources like food and habitat that are necessary for survival. Often, these species expand their range and population numbers at such a rapid pace that landowners and wildlife managers struggle to contain their spread. For full blog post, click here.

San Francisco Bay: Race to build wetlands is needed to stave off sea-level rise, scientists say

By Paul Rogers – San Jose Mercury News – October 18, 2015
San Francisco Bay is in a race against time, with billions of dollars of highways, airports, homes and office buildings at risk from rising seas, surging tides and extreme storms driven by climate change. And to knock down the waves and reduce flooding, 54,000 acres of wetlands -- an area twice the size of the city of San Francisco -- need to be restored around the bay in the next 15 years. That's the conclusion of a new report from more than 100 Bay Area scientists and 17 government agencies that may help fuel a regional tax measure aimed at addressing the looming crisis. For full story, click here.

Two U.S. Representatives Seek Justice Department Inquiry into Exxon

By David Hasemyer – InsideClimate News – October 16, 2015
Two California congressmen have called on U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch to open an investigation into whether ExxonMobil violated federal laws by "failing to disclose truthful information" about climate change. Democratic Reps. Mark DeSaulnier and Ted Lieu, both members of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, said they were "alarmed" by the possibility that Exxon withheld significant climate change information and went so far as to try to discredit the science confirming global warming. For full story, click here.

Chesapeake waters are warming, study finds, posing challenges to healing bay

By Timothy B. Wheeler – The Baltimore Sun – October 14, 2015
The Chesapeake Bay's waters are warming, in some places more rapidly than the region's air temperatures, researchers from the University of Maryland say. If unchecked, scientists say, the trend could complicate costly, long-running efforts to restore the ailing estuary, worsen fish-suffocating dead zones and alter the food web on which the bay's fish and crabs depend. For full story, click here.

17 Candidate Species Found to No Longer Warrant Listing Due to Conservation Successes

Contact: Brian Hires – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – October 7, 2015
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) completed status reviews for 17 species that were candidates for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and found that all are now doing well and no longer warrant listing. These species will be removed from the ESA Candidate List. These findings represent years of collaborative efforts across the United States to conserve and restore once-imperiled species and their habitats and eliminate the need for ESA protection. For full press release, click here.

Climate Scientist Faces Backlash for Urging Investigation of Fossil Fuel Companies

By Katherine Bagley – InsideClimate News – October 7, 2015
A climate scientist who was the lead signatory on a letter urging President Obama to launch a federal investigation into whether fossil fuel companies "knowingly deceived the American people about the risks of climate change" is now facing an investigation by Congress because of his part in the letter. Jagadish Shukla, a climate scientist at George Mason University in Virginia, received notice Oct. 1 that the non-profit research organization he runs, the Institute of Global Environment and Society (IGES), will soon be investigated by the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology for suspected misuse of federal funding. For full story, click here.

Scientists play catch up as new chemicals contaminate Great Lakes birds

By Brian Bienkowski – Environment Health News – October 6, 2015
Stain repellent and fire retardant chemicals that scientists know little about are increasingly showing up in herring gull eggs around the Great Lakes, spurring concern for potential health impacts. The gulls are considered a sentinel species, and the contaminants appearing in their eggs paint a picture of a shifting chemical profile in the Great Lakes, which holds about 20 percent of the world’s fresh surface water. While legacy pollutants, such as mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), still persist, a growing list of esoteric pollutants is showing up in wildlife. For full story, click here.

 

Wetland Breaking News: November 2015RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONS

A Community-Based Flood Insurance Option

National Academies Press 2015
River and coastal floods are among the nation's most costly natural disasters. One component in the nation's approach to managing flood risk is availability of flood insurance policies, which are offered on an individual basis primarily through the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). For more information, click here.

 

 

 

 

Wetland Breaking News: November 2015

POTPOURRI

Brazil mining flood could devastate environment for years

By Stephen Eisenhammer – Reuters – November 15, 2015
The collapse of two dams at a Brazilian mine has cut off drinking water for a quarter of a million people and saturated waterways downstream with dense orange sediment that could wreck the ecosystem for years to come.Nine people were killed, 19 are still listed as missing and 500 people were displaced from their homes when the dams burst at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil on Nov. 5. The sheer volume of water disgorged by the dams and laden with mineral waste across nearly 500 km is staggering: 60 million cubic meters, the equivalent of 25,000 Olympic swimming pools or the volume carried by about 187 oil tankers. For full story, click here.

China’s Wildlife Disappearing, New Report Says

By Te-Ping Chen – The Wall Street Journal China Realtime Blog – November 13, 2015
China’s wildlife is vanishing at an alarming clip, a new report has found.The Middle Kingdom’s population of terrestrial vertebrates – including mammals, amphibians, birds, reptiles – has fallen by nearly one half over the past four decades, according to the World Wildlife Fund.That gloomy stat is in keeping with trends around the globe, which saw the number of vertebrates drop by 52% between 1970 and 2010, WWF said. For full blog post, click here.

EU plans to tackle throw-away economy: document

By Barbara Lewis – PlanetArk – November 5, 2015
EU regulators plan to make it easier to repair or re-use anything from electrical appliances to buildings, saying in a draft document that instruction manuals need to explain how to mend, rather than just throw away goods.The European Commission has said it is "a passionate believer" in the business argument to move from a throw-away economy to a circular one based on more recycling and less waste. It is expected to outline a strategy to make the European Union's economy more sustainable in December. For full story, click here.

Shipwrecks posing threat to US waters hold many unknowns

By John Seewer – AP News – October 31, 2015
Dozens of shipwrecks scattered along America's coasts are thought to be holding oil and certainly will start leaking someday as corrosion eats away at their tanks.Preventing that just isn't possible, experts say, because funding for such a huge effort doesn't exist and there are too many unknowns about the locations of those wrecks and the cargo left inside. Some are simply too deep to reach. For full story, click here.

Egypt finds way to make salt water drinkable with half the energy

By Lucy Schouten – The Christian Science Monitor – October 28, 2015
The Nile River has long been central to the life of Egyptians, who have crowded along its banks since before the time of the pharaohs. But today, Egypt operates under a water shortage that is only worsening as the population grows. With rapid growth and development, Egypt has a fixed supply of water available from the Nile, due to treaties with upstream nations, according to a news release by the American University in Cairo. The country is limited to 55 billion cubic meters annually, but the demand is closer to 80 billion cubic meters, according to a 2011 study by the United Nations Environment Program. For full story, click here.

Hydropower Doesn’t Need Any More Loopholes

By Scott Bosse – American Rivers Blog – September 18, 2015
A bill pending in the U.S. Senate would give the hydroelectric industry and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission the kind of unconditional authority more akin to what the Robber Barons enjoyed in the late 1800s, than to what reasonable people might expect today. For full blog post, click here.

 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

WEBINARS

   

MEETINGS

   

TRAINING

     
                   
WEBINARS          
                   
DECEMBER 2015                  
                   
December 2, 2015
9:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m. EST
      Atlantic Salmon Conservation Foundation in partnership with the Canadian Rivers Institute Webinar: The hidden importance of small coastal streams          
                   
December 2, 2015
1:00 p.m. EST
     

Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Ocean Prosperity Roadmap: Fisheries and Beyond

         
                   
December 2, 2015
1:00 p.m.-2:30 .p.m EST
     

Association of Climate Change Officers (ACCO) Webinar Series: Data Center Efficiency: What Climate Change, Energy & Sustainability Professionals Should Know

         
                   
December 2, 2015
3:30 p.m. EST
      Northeast Climate Science Center (NECSC) webinar Massachusetts Wildlife Climate Action Tool          
                   
December 3 and 10, 2015
1:00 p.m. EST
      The Swamp School’s Wetland Tree Webinar – 2 part webinar          
                   
December 8, 2015       EPA's Green Infrastructure Program 2015 Webcast Series: Ahead of the Curve – Implementing Green Infrastructure in Rural and Growing Communities. Information will be available here in late November.          
                   
December 9, 2015
3:00 p.m. EST
      ASWM Members’ Wetland Webinar: Climate-Smart Conservation for Wetlands          
                   
December 10, 2015
2:00 p.m. EST
     

American Planning Association Webinar: Hazard Mitigation Implementation

         
                   
December 10, 2015
2:00 pm-3:00 pm EST
      Great Lakes Phragmites Collaborative Webinar Series: Remote Sensing Series Part II: Applying Adaptive Management to the Control of non-native Phragmites australis in the Midwest          
                   
December 10, 2015
2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m. EST
     

Environmental Law Institute Webimar: In-Lieu Fee Mitigation Training Webinar Series: Performance Standards

         
                   
December 15, 2015
3:00 p.m. EST
      ASWM’s Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar: Improving Wetland Restoration "Success": What We've Learned So Far          
                   
December 16, 2015 12:00 p.m.-1:00 p.m. EST       EPA Webinar: Ecosystem Services Approaches to Restoring a Sustainable Chesapeake Bay and its Tributary Watersheds          
                   
JANUARY 2016
                 
                   

January 13, 2016
2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m. EST

      Environmental Law Institute's In-Lieu Fee Mitigation Training Webinar: Functional Assessments in Crediting          

January 14, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET

     

The Swamp School’s 2016 Wetland Status and Trends

         
                   

January 14, 2016

1:00 p.m. EST
      SWS Webinar: Climate Change in the American Mind: What we think, feel, do and understand about global warming and how wetlands professionals can speak about it with their constituencies          
                   

January 20, 2016
1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. ET

     

Atlantic Salmon Conservation Foundation (ASCF), in partnership with the Canadian Rivers Institute (CRI) webinar: Getting your feet wet: An introduction to water quality monitoring and data analysis

         
                   

January 27, 2016
3:00 p.m. ET

     

ASWM Members’ Wetland Webinar: Wetlands and Nutrient Uptake

         
                   
FEBRUARY 2016                  
                   

February 11, 2016

1:00 p.m. EST
      Webinar: Maps and Datasets for Blue Carbon Habitats is co-sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, the EBM Tools Network, OpenChannels.org, and MPA News          
                   

February 23, 2016
12:00 p.m.-12:45 p.m. CDT

      FEMA Region 6 webinar: Using Flood Risk Products Virtual Brown Bag Webinar: "Using Percent Annual Chance Data"          
                   
MEETINGS        
                   
DECEMBER 2015                  
                   
December 1-2, 2015
Hartford CT
      Restore America's Estuaries (RAE), in partnership with the Connecticut Institute for Resilience and Climate Adaptation (CIRCA): Living Shorelines: Sound Science, Innovative Approaches, Connected Community          
                   
December 1-2, 2015
Washington, DC
      Renewable Natural Resources Foundation: Congress on Sustaining Western Water          
                   
December 1-3, 2015
Memphis, Tennessee
      Soil and Water Conservation Society: Nutrient Management and Edge of Field Monitoring: From the Great Lakes to the Gulf          
                   
December 2-4, 2015
Washington, DC
      NatureServe and USGS are co-organizing an NSF-funded workshop: Promoting Synergy in the Innovative Use of Environmental Data          
                   
December 3-4, 2015
Berkeley, California
      Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Fundamentals Academies - Northern California Regional Workshop          
                   
December 7-9, 2015
San Diego, CA
      American Water Works Association (AWWA): 2015 International Water & Climate Forum : Adapt – Mitigate – Evolve          
                   
December 8, 2015
Shepherdstown, West Virginia
      Potomac Watershed Partnership: Winter 2015 Information Exchange. The Exchange is free and open to the public.          
                   

December 8-10, 2015

Bozeman, Montana

      2015 Montana State University Extension: Climate Science Conference          
                   
December 10, 2015
Washington, DC
      Environmental Law Institute seminar: CERCLA@35: Looking Back, Looking Forward          
                   
December 14-18, 2015
San Francisco, California
      American Geophysical Union (AGU): 2015 AGU Fall Meeting          
                   
JANUARY 2016                  
                   
January 4-6, 2016      

Northern Michigan Waterways Hazardous Material Spill Planning Committee (No-Spills) 2016 conference:

         
                   
January 10-14, 2016
Asilomar, California
      American Society of Naturalists Conference: Unifying Biological Principles Across Disciplines          
                   
January 10-14, 2016
New Orleans, LA
      American Meteorological Society 96th Annual Meeting: Earth System Science in Service to Society          
                   
January 15-16, 2015
East Lansing, Michigan
      Stewardship Network: Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference          
                   
January 19-21, 2016
Sydney, Australia
      The International Society for the Study of Marine Bioinvasions: 9th International Conference on Marine Bioinvasions (ICMB-IX). Abstracts due by November 30, 2015.          
                   
January 19-21, 2016
Arlington, Virginia
      National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE): The Food-Energy-Water Nexus 16th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy, and the Environment          
                   
January 28-30, 2016
New Haven, Connecticut
      Yale Chapter of International Society of Tropical Foresters (ISTF): 22nd Annual ISTF Conference          
                   
FEBRUARY 2016          
                   
February 1-4, 2016
Tampa, Florida
      2016 Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill and Ecosystem Science Conference: One Gulf: Healthy Ecosystems, healthy communities          
                   
February 3-4, 2016
Wilmington, Delaware
      Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control: 2016 Delaware Wetlands Conference: Advancing Wetland Science and Conservation in the Mid-Atlantic Region          
                   
February 4-5, 2016
Wichita, Kansas
      2016 Kansas Natural Resources Conference (KNRC): Conversations on Conservation - Engaging landowners thru Effective Communication          
                   
February 4-7, 2016
Ocean City, Maryland
      Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education (MAEOE) Annual Conference: Today’s Youth, Tomorrow’s Stewards: Engaging Students, Schools and Communities          
                   
February 8-12, 2016
Anchorage, AK
      Alaska Forum on the Environment          
                   
February 9-11, 2016
St. Grand Junction, CO
      Tamarisk Coalition's 13th Annual Conference: The Road to Riparian Restoration          
                   
February 9-12, 2016
Tasmania, Australia
      Species on the Move International Conference          
                   
February 10-12, 2016
Nelson, New Zealand
      National Wetland Trust: National Wetland Restoration Symposium
         
                   
February 11-13, 2016
Portland, Oregon
      New Partners for Smart Growth Conference: Practical Tools & Innovative Strategies for Creating Great Communities          
                   
February 16-18, 2016
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
      Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan: 11th Prairie Conservation and Endangered Species Conference          
                   
February 16-19, 2016
San Antonio, Texas
      International Erosion Control Association Conference: Environmental Connection          
                   
February 18-21, 2016
Nauvoo, Alabama
      Joint Annual Meeting of SEPARC and ALAPARC - Herp Conservation on Private Lands          
                   
February 21-24, 2016
San Diego, CA
      National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA’s) 2016 Winter Conference:Back to Basics . . . Will Compliance Concerns Derail Efforts to Innovate?          
                   
February 21-26, 2016
New Orleans, Louisiana
      2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting          
                   
February 23-24, 2016
Albuquerque, New Mexico
      National Groundwater Association Conference: Hydrology and Water Quality in the Southwest          
                   
February 23-25, 2016
Green Bay, Wisconsin
      Wisconsin Wetlands Association 21st Annual Wetland Science Conference          
                   
February 24-25, 2016
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
      Computational Hydraulics International (CHI): 49th International Conference on Water Management Modeling. Call for papers due on February 3, 2016.          
                   
February 25-26, 2016
Albuquerque, New Mexico
      Xeriscape Council of New Mexico: 2016 Land & Water Summit: Creating a New Paradigm for Living in Arid Lands          
                   
MARCH 2016                  
                   
March 1-3, 2016
New Orleans, LA
      RES/CON New Orleans          
                   
March 2-3, 2016
University of Michigan
Dearborn, MI
      Annual Great Lakes Areas of Concern Conference. Hosted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. More information will be available soon.          
                   
March 6-11, 2016
Sydney, Australia
      International Coastal Symposium (ICS2016): ‘Coasts in Space and Time’          
                   
March 7-10, 2016
Providence, Rhode Island
      American Water Works Association: Sustainable Water Management Conference          
                   
March 8-10, 2016
Seattle, Washington
      2016 Climate Leadership Conference          
                   
March 10-11, 2016
Denver, Colorado
      Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute 25th Anniversary Conference: Western Places/Western Spaces: Examining the Past, Exploring the Future          
                   
March 18-19, 2016
Baltimore, MD
      Ecological Society of America's 3rd Life Discovery - Doing Science Education Conference
         
                   
March 20-22, 2016
Scottsdale, Arizona
      National Flood Determination Association 2016 Conference          
                   
March 21-24, 2016
San Diego, California
      Association for Environmental Health and Sciences Foundation, Inc.: 26th Annual International Conference on Soil, Water, Energy, and Air          
                   
March 22-24, 2016
Burlington, Vermont
      14th Annual Climate Prediction Application Science Workshop (CPASW): hosted by the NOAA National Weather Service Climate Services Branch, University of Vermont, and other climate services partners.          
                   
March 29-April 2, 2016
Vancouver, BC
      Society for Applied Anthropology 76th Annual Meeting          
                   
APRIL 2016                  
                   
April 12, 2016
Multiple Locations
      Center for Watershed Protection: 2016 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference. This conference will take place in multiple locations across the US. The two main sites are Atlanta and Sacramento, but additional hub locations will be announced soon. The conference will also be available as a webcast.          
                   

April 17-22, 2016

Vienna, Austria

      European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016. Call for abstracts due by January 13, 2016.          
                   

April 18-22, 2016
Coral Springs, Florida

     

University of Florida 6th National Conference:Ecosystem Restoration (NCER): Ecosystem Restoration in Action. Call for abstracts submission deadline: Friday, January 8, 2016 [5:00 PM Eastern].

         
                   
April 25-27, 2016
Anchorage, Alaska
      2016 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference. Abstract deadline is December 1, 2015.          
                   
MAY 2016                  
                   
May 2-6, 2016
Tampa, Florida
      National Water Quality Monitoring Council: 10th National Monitoring Conference: Working Together for Clean Water          
                   
May 3-6, 2016
Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
      4th International Symposium on Ocean in a High-CO2 World          
                   
May 4-6, 2016
Sharonville, Ohio
      Tinker’s Creek Watershed Partners and the Ohio Stormwater Association: 2016 Ohio Stormwater Conference          
                   
May 8-12, 2016
Towson University
Baltimore, Maryland
      International Society for Ecological Modelling Global Conference 2016          
                   
May 10-13, 2016
Fort Worth, Texas
      JT&A, Inc.: 2016 National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference          
                   
May 10-13, 2016
Rotterdam, The Netherlands
      4th International Climate Change Adaptation Conference: Adaptation Futures is the biennial conference of PROVIA (Global Programme of Research on Climate Change Vulnerability, Impacts and Adaptation          
                   
May 20-23, 2016
Mobile, Alabama
     

River Network: River Rally

         
                   
May 21-26, 2016
Sacramento, California
      Society for Freshwater Science annual meeting: Running on Empty: Increasing Demands on Freshwater Resources in the Face of a Changing Climate. Submit abstracts by January 29, 2016.          
                   
May 23-27, 2016
Busan, Korea
      World Fisheries Congress          
                   
May 31-June 3, 2016
Ann Arbor, Michigan
      23rd IAHR International Symposium on Ice. November 25th, 2015 abstracts due.          
                   
May 31-June 4, 2016
Corpus Christi, Texas
      Society of Wetland Scientist's 2016 Annual Meeting          
                   
JUNE 2016                  
                   
June 1-3, 2016
San Antonio, TX
      Resource Institute: Southwest Stream Restoration Conference. Submit abstracts by January 15, 2016.          
                   
June 1-5, 2016 Anchorage, Alaska       79th Annual Ducks Unlimited National Convention          
                   
June 3-4 2016
Ames, Iowa
      5th Iowa State University Summer Symposium: Science Communication: Confronting the challenges of public participation in environmental, planning and health decision-making. Call for proposal deadline is January 29, 2016.          
                   
June 5-10, 2016
Santa Fe, NM
      ASLO 2016 Summer Meeting          
                   
June 6–10, 201
Guelph, Ontario
      International Association for Great Lakes - 59th Annual Conference on Great Lakes Research: Great Lakes Solutions: Integrating Across Disciplines & Scales          
                   
June 12-14, 2016
Toronto, Canada
      Coastal Zone Canada Association: Coastal Zone Canada Conference          
                   
June 19-24, 2016
Grand Rapids, Michigan
      ASFPM's 40th Annual National Conference: "Great Lakes - Grand Partners"          
                   
JULY 2016          
                   
July 10-13, 2016
Broomfield, Colorado
      Natural Hazard Center: 41st Annual Natural Hazards Research and Applications Workshop. Proposal submissions due by January 15, 2016.          
                   
July 11-13, 2016
Sacramento, CA
      2016 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: GIS and Water Resources
         
                   
July 17-20, 2016
Illinois State University
Normal, Illinois
      24th North American Prairie Conference: From Cemetery Prairies to National Tallgrass Prairies
         
                   
July 17-20, 2016
Madison, Wisconsin
      Society for Conservation Biology North America: 3rd North America Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB): Communicating Science for Conservation Action
         
                   

July 18-20, 2016

Arlington, VA
      Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum. Abstracts due by December 10, 2015.          
                   
July 18-22, 2016
St. Augustine, Florida
      University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences: Mangrove & Macrobenthos Meeting. Call for abstracts deadline is December 20, 2015.          
                   
July 30-August 3, 2016
St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
      4th International Marine Conservation Congress (IMCC4): Making Marine Science Matter          
                   
AUGUST 2016          
                   
August 7-12, 2015
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
      2016 Ecological Society of America's (ESA) annual meeting          
                   
August 14-18, 2016 Chicago, Illinois       American Society of Civil Engineers: GEO Sustainability & Geoenvironment
         
                   
August 22-25, 2016 Indianapolis, Indiana       StormCon: Designing the Future of Stormwater. Call for papers deadline is December 9, 2015          
                   
August 27-September 2, 2016
Stockholm, Sweden
      2016 World Water Week. Abstract due by January 24, 2016.          
                   
SEPTEMBER 2015          
                   
September 1-10, 2016
Waikiki, Hawaii
      IUCN World Conservation Congress: Planet at the crossroads          
                   
September 19-24, 2016
Changshu, China
      INTECOL Wetland Working Group, People’s Government of Changshu, Nanjing University: 10th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference          
                   
September 27-30, 2016
Mount Royal University
Alberta, Canada
      Under Western Skies (UWS) is a biennial, interdisciplinary conference series on the environment with the theme Water: Events, Trends, Analysis. Call for proposal deadline is January 31, 2016.          
                   
DECEMBER 2015          
                   
December 10-15, 2016
New Orleans, Louisiana
      8th National Summit: Our Coasts, Our Future, Our Choice and 25th Biennial Meeting of The Coastal Society          
                   
TRAINING        
           
DECEMBER 2015          
                   
December 1-2, 2015
Anchorage, Alaska
      Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Habitat Site Restoration          

December 1-3, 2015

Mt. Vernon, Washington
     

Coastal Training Program course: Climate Adaptation for Coastal Communities

         
                   
December 3-4, 2015
Denver, Colorado
      Urban Watersheds Research Institute Course: Floodplain Hydraulics Using HEC RAS - 2015          
                   
December 3-4, 2015
Gainesville, Florida
      Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: Wetland Permitting Training. For other dates and locations, go here.          
                   
December 3-4, 2015
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan course: Problem and Atypical Wetland Delineation (Piedmont)          
                   
December 7-11, 2015
Front Royal, Virginia
      Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Statistical Downscaling of Global Climate Models in SDSM 5.2          
                   
December 7, 2015 -
March 21, 2016
      The Swamp School's Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training          
                   
December 7, 2015-
March 21, 2016
      The Swamp School's Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator          
                   
December 8-10, 2015 McClellan, California       Floodplain Management Association: 2D HEC-RAS Modeling Course          
                   
December 9, 2015
St. Michaels, Maryland
      Environmental Concern course: WOW! The Wonders of Wetlands          
                   
December 11, 2015
St. Michaels, Maryland
      Environmental Concern course: POW! The Planning of Wetlands
         
                   
December 15-19, 2015
San Diego, California
      Aarcher Institute: The Original Environmental Compliance Bootcamp          
                   
JANUARY 2016          
                   
January 5-8, 2016 Jackson, Mississippi       Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: ACOE Wetland Delineation, Waters of the US and Regional Supplement Training. For other dates and locations, go here.          
                   
January 11-19, 2016
Online
      UC Davis Extension online course: Sustainability and the Built Environment: An Overview Explore sustainability principles as they apply to the built environment—from the economic, environmental and social-equity perspectives          
                   
January 13-March 31, 2016       Online Course: The Swamp School: Principles of Wetland Design          
                   
January 14-28, 2016
Lacey, Washington
      Coastal Training Program course: How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials          
                   
January 17-22, 2016
Oracle, Arizona
      CUAHSI and the University of Arizona course: Watershed Science Master Class          
                   
January 25, 2016
Lacey, Washington
     

Coastal Training Program course: High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (MORNING SESSION ONLY)

         
                   
January 25, 2016
Lacey, Washington
      Coastal Training Program course: High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (BOTH MORNING AND AFTERNOON)          
                   
January 25-March 4, 2016
Online
      UC Davis Extension online course: Building Efficiencies: Low Carbon and Renewable Energies          
                   
January 26-28, 2016 Seattle Washington       National Environmental Training Center Course: ArcGIS 10: An Introduction to Environmental Applications          
                   
FEBRUARY 2016          
                   
February 3, 2016
Padilla Bay Reserve, Mount Vernon, Washington
     

Coastal Training Program course: Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats

         
                   

February 8-12, 2016
San Diego, California

     

Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation. For other dates and locations, go here.

         
                   

February 17-18, 2016Kauaʻi, Hawaii

     

Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher. For other dates and locations, go here.

         
                   
February 22-25, 2016
Oriskany, New York
      ASFPM is co-sponsoring the FEMA Emergency Management Institute (EMI) 273 course: Managing Floodplain Development Through the NFIP          
                   

February 23-25, 2016
Padilla Bay Reserve
Mt. Vernon, Washington

     

Coastal Training Program course: Environmental Negotiations

         
                   
MARCH 2016          
                   
March 3-4, 2016
Sacramento California
      UC Davis Extension course: Environmental Planning and Site Analysis          
                   
March 16-17, 2016
University of Phoenix-St. Louis Park, St. Lois Park, Minnesota
      Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) course: Habitat Site Restoration          
                   
March 22-24, 2016
Yakima, Washington
     

Coastal Training Program course: Environmental Negotiations (Eastern WA)

         
                   

March 30-31, 2016

Lacey, Washington
     

Coastal Training Program course: Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington

         
                   
APRIL 2016                  
                   
April 4-6, 2016
Naples, Florida
      Everglades Wetland Research Park course: Creation and Restoration of Wetlands. Register by February 19, 2016 for a 10% discount.          
                   
SPECIAL EVENTS 2015          
                   
November 28, 2015       The Wetlands Institute: Wetland Wonderland          
                   
February 2, 2016       World Wetlands Day 2016: Wetlands for our Future: Sustainable Livelihoods          
                   
May 21, 2016
Global
      World Fish Migration Foundation: World Fish Migration Day: Connecting Fish, Rivers and People. The World Fish Migration Day (WFMD) is a one day global-local event to create worldwide awareness on the importance of open rivers and migratory fish. This event is celebrated by over 1000 organizations around the globe.          
                   

For more wetland events, meetings, conferences, and courses nationwide, visit the ASWM calendar.

         
           

 

Wetland Breaking News - Novebmer 2015


INDEX

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • New map of Earth's groundwater to help estimate when it may run out
  • U.S. Thirst for Oil Straining International Water Supplies
  • Why Climate Change and Terrorism Are Connected
  • One-Third of Papua New Guineans Suffering Drought Crisis
  • Scientists say melting glaciers are now threatening Antarctic ocean life
  • Gulf Hypoxia Battle Still In Early Rounds
  • Draft National Wetland Condition Assessment Released For Comment
  • South Africa to name two more provinces as drought disaster areas
  • The Rundown on Water Pollution in the Tijuana River Valley
  • Status and Trends Report on State Wetland Programs in the United States
  • Environmental Solutions for Communities Grant Program 2016 Request for Proposals
  • Wetland Mapping Consortium (WMC) Webinar: NWI Standards & Dataset: A Cornerstone for Decision-Support - December 9, 2015
  • ASWM’s Members’ Wetland Webinar –Climate-Smart Conservation for Wetlands - December 9, 2015
  • ASWM’s Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar: Improving Wetland Restoration "Success": What We've Learned So Far – December 15, 2015

NATIONAL NEWS

  • Seeking Nominations for EPA's Local Government Advisory Committee
  • USDA announces $350 million available to help states, private partners protect and restore grasslands, wetlands, and working lands
  • Sustainable food management: a win for water
  • U.S. states, cities seek to defend Obama's carbon rule in court
  • Sportsmen Win a Clean-Water Victory, Bu the Fight Isn’t Over
  • Make the Season Bright at a National Wildlife Refuge
  • Bid to block Obama’s water rule falls short
  • Obama order requires agencies to offset environmental impacts of development
  • Wetland case seen as 'no-brainer' for Supreme Court review
  • New NOAA Guidance Promotes Living Shorelines for Improving Habitats
  • Proposed federal rule would protect streams near mines
  • South Dakota scientist says USDA censored pesticide research
  • Nitrates a Costly, Persistent Problem for Small Towns
  • Wetlands Protections on Hold, Chesapeake Cleanup Under Attack
  • Obama leaving mark on contentious law -- with scant Hill input
  • Collaboration can save the Mississippi River Watershed
  • USDA to Invest $30 million to Help Protect Wetlands in Six States
  • U.S. Appeals Court Blocks EPA Water Rule Nationwide
  • Incorporating Natural Infrastructure and Ecosystem Services in Federal Decision-Making

STATE NEWS

  • CA: Gov. Brown extends California's water limits: 'We are in a new era.'
  • CA: Mercury in San Francisco Bay
  • CA: Ceremony near San Pablo Bay marks planned rebirth of wetlands
  • CO: Colorado disputes key part of EPA mine report
  • DE: Budget gaps strain Delaware's progress toward federal Chesapeake Bay restoration goals
  • FL: Ranchlands Continue Successful Transformation to Wetlands
  • LA: Projects restore Terrebonne wetlands
  • LA: Cooperation is key to federal program to save coast
  • ME: Water too warm for cod in U.S. Gulf of Maine; stock near collapse
  • ME: As Gulf of Maine warms, puffins recast as canaries in a coal mine
  • MD: Oyster restoration effort underway in Patapsco River
  • MI: Lake Erie algae plan targets Detroit River sewage discharges
  • MI: $10M EPA grant funds Great Lakes coastal wetlands research
  • MN: Wetland restoration aims to help clean up Clearwater Chain
  • MO: Pieces coming together for Webb City wetland, grassland restoration
    NJ: N.J. moving ahead with plans to create wetlands at Liberty State Park
  • NJ: New Jersey ban on using oysters to clean waterways to remain under new rules
  • NM: Gone Dry: Without funding, state stalls plans to study the effect of drought on rivers, wells and the New Mexico economy
  • NY: Ecosystems Are Dying as Long Island Contends With a Nitrogen Bomb
  • NY: Lake Ontario Water Level Plan Tests Attitudes Toward Environment
  • NY: Once a fetid mess, now serene wetland: NYC waters transform
  • NC: EPA: N.C. risking federal takeover of environmental regulation
  • NC: DEQ pushes back against environmentalists’ criticism
  • NC: McCrory Caps a Busy Year for Environmental Rewrites
  • OH: Summer's toxic-algae bloom on Lake Erie was the worst on record
  • OK: Oil production possibly linked to Oklahoma quakes since 1930s: USGS
  • PA: Pennsylvania Farm Bureau aligns with American Farm Bureau to appeal Chesapeake Bay plan in Supreme Court
  • UT: Coal or sage grouse? State, federal officials at odds on Utah mine proposal
  • VA: Wetland, wildlife impact raised at water meeting
  • WA: Taking the pulse of Puget Sound
  • WI: Safe, clean drinking water eludes many Wisconsinites
  • WI: Citizens Claim Wisconsin Not Complying With Clean Water Act, Demand EPA Action
  • WI: Celebrating Wisconsin’s Wetlands of International Importance

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • Global Emissions Reductions Have Already Saved the U.S. $60 Billion, Report Says
  • Algae Bloom off Pacific Coast Blamed for Marine Mammal Poisoning
  • Planting In Clumps Boosts Wetland Restoration Success
  • Asian carp move closer to Lake Michigan: Solutions?
  • Europe's Mars rover to target ancient wetland
  • Minnesota loons remain under close watch in their migration to Gulf of Mexico
  • U.S. Rivers Show Few Signs of Improvement from Historic Nitrate Increases
  • Invasive species exploit a warming Gulf of Maine, sometimes with destructive results
  • Sonoma County farmland to return to become natural wetland
  • New Website Highlights State Practices for Climate Adaptation
  • A new species of giant tortoise was just discovered in the Galapagos
  • Bees found farming fungus for first time to feed larvae
  • Restoration Spotlight: Invasive plants got your goat?
  • San Francisco Bay: Race to build wetlands is needed to stave off sea-level rise, scientists say
  • Two U.S. Representatives Seek Justice Department Inquiry into Exxon
  • Chesapeake waters are warming, study finds, posing challenges to healing bay
  • 17 Candidate Species Found to No Longer Warrant Listing Due to Conservation Successes
  • Climate Scientist Faces Backlash for Urging Investigation of Fossil Fuel Companies
  • Scientists play catch up as new chemicals contaminate Great Lakes birds

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • A Community-Based Flood Insurance Option

POTPOURRI

  • Brazil mining flood could devastate environment for years
  • China’s Wildlife Disappearing, New Report Says
  • EU plans to tackle throw-away economy: document
  • Shipwrecks posing threat to US waters hold many unknowns
  • Egypt finds way to make salt water drinkable with half the energy
  • Hydropower Doesn’t Need Any More Loopholes

WEBINARS, MEETINGS, TRAINING

Webinars

  • The hidden importance of small coastal streams
  • Ocean Prosperity Roadmap: Fisheries and Beyond
  • Data Center Efficiency: What Climate Change, Energy & Sustainability Professionals Should Know
  • Massachusetts Wildlife Climate Action Tool
  • The Swamp School’s Wetland Tree Webinar – 2 part webinar
  • EPA's Green Infrastructure Program 2015 Webcast Series: Ahead of the Curve – Implementing Green Infrastructure in Rural and Growing Communities
  • ASWM Members’ Wetland Webinar: Climate-Smart Conservation for Wetlands
  • American Planning Association Webinar: Hazard Mitigation Implementation
  • Remote Sensing Series Part II: Applying Adaptive Management to the Control of non-native Phragmites australis in the Midwest
  • Environmental Law Institute: In-Lieu Fee Mitigation Training Webinar: Performance Standards
  • ASWM’s Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar: Improving Wetland Restoration "Success": What We've Learned So Far
  • EPA Webinar: Ecosystem Services Approaches to Restoring a Sustainable Chesapeake Bay and its Tributary Watersheds
  • SWS: Wetlands and Agriculture
  • Environmental Law Institute's In-Lieu Fee Mitigation Training Webinar: Functional Assessments in Crediting
  • The Swamp School’s 2016 Wetland Status and Trends
  • SWS Webinar: Climate Change in the American Mind: What we think, feel, do and understand about global warming and how wetlands professionals can speak about it with their constituencies
  • Getting your feet wet: An introduction to water quality monitoring and data analysis
  • ASWM Members’ Wetland Webinar: Wetlands and Nutrient Uptake
  • Maps and Datasets for Blue Carbon Habitats
  • FEMA Region 6 webinar: Using Flood Risk Products Virtual Brown Bag Webinar: "Using Percent Annual Chance Data"

Meetings

  • Living Shorelines: Sound Science, Innovative Approaches, Connected Community
  • Renewable Natural Resources Foundation: Congress on Sustaining Western Water
  • Nutrient Management and Edge of Field Monitoring: From the Great Lakes to the Gulf
  • Promoting Synergy in the Innovative Use of Environmental Data
  • Climate Fundamentals Academies - Northern California Regional Workshop
  • 2015 International Water & Climate Forum: Adapt – Mitigate – Evolve
  • Potomac Watershed Partnership: Winter 2015 Information Exchange
  • 2015 Montana State University Extension: Climate Science Conference
  • Environmental Law Institute seminar: CERCLA@35: Looking Back, Looking Forward
  • American Geophysical Union (AGU): 2015 AGU Fall Meeting
  • Keeping the Great Lakes Water Pure
  • Unifying Biological Principles Across Disciplines
  • Earth System Science in Service to Society
  • Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference
  • 9th International Conference on Marine Bioinvasions (ICMB-IX)
  • The Food-Energy-Water Nexus 16th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy, and the Environment
  • Yale Chapter of International Society of Tropical Foresters (ISTF): 22nd Annual ISTF Conference
  • One Gulf: Healthy Ecosystems, healthy communities
  • Advancing Wetland Science and Conservation in the Mid-Atlantic Region
  • Conversations on Conservation - Engaging landowners thru Effective Communication
  • Today’s Youth, Tomorrow’s Stewards: Engaging Students, Schools and Communities
  • Alaska Forum on the Environment
  • Tamarisk Coalition's 13th Annual Conference: The Road to Riparian Restoration
  • Species on the Move International Conference
  • National Wetland Trust: National Wetland Restoration Symposium
  • Practical Tools & Innovative Strategies for Creating Great Communities
  • 11th Prairie Conservation and Endangered Species Conference
  • International Erosion Control Association Conference: Environmental Connection
  • Joint Annual Meeting of SEPARC and ALAPARC - Herp Conservation on Private Lands
  • Back to Basics . . . Will Compliance Concerns Derail Efforts to Innovate?
  • 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting
  • Hydrology and Water Quality in the Southwest
  • 21st Annual Wetland Science Conference
  • 49th International Conference on Water Management Modeling
  • 2016 Land & Water Summit: Creating a New Paradigm for Living in Arid Lands
  • RES/CON New Orleans
  • Annual Great Lakes Areas of Concern Conference
  • International Coastal Symposium (ICS2016): ‘Coasts in Space and Time’
  • American Water Works Association: Sustainable Water Management Conference
  • 2016 Climate Leadership Conference
  • Western Places/Western Spaces: Examining the Past, Exploring the Future
  • Ecological Society of America's 3rd Life Discovery - Doing Science Education Conference
  • National Flood Determination Association 2016 Conference
  • 26th Annual International Conference on Soil, Water, Energy, and Air
  • 14th Annual Climate Prediction Application Science Workshop (CPASW)
  • Society for Applied Anthropology 76th Annual Meeting
  • Center for Watershed Protection: 2016 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference
  • European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016
  • Ecosystem Restoration (NCER): Ecosystem Restoration in Action
  • 2016 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference
  • 10th National Monitoring Conference
  • 4th International Symposium on: Ocean in a High-CO2 World
  • 2016 Ohio Stormwater Conference
  • International Society for Ecological Modelling Global Conference 2016
  • 2016 National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference
  • 4th International Climate Change Adaptation Conference: Adaptation Futures
  • River Network: River Rally
  • Running on Empty: Increasing Demands on Freshwater Resources in the Fae of a Changing Climate
  • World Fisheries Congress
  • 23rd IAHR International Symposium on Ice
  • Protecting wetland ecosystem services. Promoting stronger economies
  • Resource Institute: Southwest Stream Restoration Conference
  • 79th Annual Ducks Unlimited National Convention
  • Science Communication: Confronting the challenges of public participation in environmental, planning and health decision-making
  • ASLO 2016 Summer Meeting
  • Great Lakes Solutions: Integrating Across Disciplines & Scales
  • Coastal Zone Canada Association: Coastal Zone Canada Conference
  • ASFPM's 40th Annual National Conference: "Great Lakes - Grand Partners"
  • 41st Annual Natural Hazards Research and Applications Workshop
  • 2016 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: GIS and Water Resources
  • From Cemetery Prairies to National Tallgrass Prairies
  • 3rd North America Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB): Communicating Science for Conservation Action
  • Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum
  • University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences: Mangrove & Macrobenthos Meeting
  • 4th International Marine Conservation Congress (IMCC4): Making Marine Science Matter
  • 2016 Ecological Society of America's (ESA) annual meeting
  • American Society of Civil Engineers: GEO Sustainability & Geoenvironment
  • StormCon: Designing the Future of Stormwater
  • 2016 World Water Week
  • IUCN World Conservation Congress: Planet at the crossroads
  • 10th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference
  • Water: Events, Trends, Analysis
  • 8th National Summit: Our Coasts, Our Future, Our Choice and 25th Biennial Meeting of The Coastal Society

Training

  • Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Habitat Site Restoration
  • Climate Adaptation for Coastal Communities
  • Floodplain Hydraulics Using HEC RAS – 2015
  • Wetland Permitting Training
  • Problem and Atypical Wetland Delineation (Piedmont)
  • Statistical Downscaling of Global Climate Models in SDSM 5.2
  • The Swamp School's Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School's Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator
  • Floodplain Management Association: 2D HEC-RAS Modeling Course
  • Environmental Concern course: WOW! The Wonders of Wetlands
  • Environmental Concern course: POW! The Planning of Wetlands
  • Aarcher Institute: The Original Environmental Compliance Bootcamp™
  • ACOE Wetland Delineation, Waters of the US and Regional Supplement Training
  • Sustainability and the Built Environment: An Overview Explore sustainability principles as they apply to the built environment—from the economic, environmental and social-equity perspectives
  • The Swamp School: Principles of Wetland Design
  • How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
  • Watershed Science Master Class
  • High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (MORNING SESSION ONLY)
  • High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (BOTH MORNING AND AFTERNOON)
  • Building Efficiencies: Low Carbon and Renewable Energies
  • ArcGIS 10: An Introduction to Environmental Applications
  • Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher
  • ASFPM is co-sponsoring the FEMA Emergency Management Institute (EMI) 273 course: Managing Floodplain Development Through the NFIP
  • Coastal Training Program course: Environmental Negotiations
  • Environmental Planning and Site Analysis
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) course: Habitat Site Restoration
  • Coastal Training Program course: Environmental Negotiations (Eastern WA)
  • Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
  • Everglades Wetland Research Park course: Creation and Restoration of Wetlands

SPECIAL EVENTS

  • The Wetlands Institute: Wetland Wonderland
  • World Wetlands Day 2016: Wetlands for our Future: Sustainable Livelihoods
  • World Fish Migration Day: Connecting Fish, Rivers and People

Wetland Breaking News - November 2015

Wetland Breaking News - October 2015

 

Wetland Breaking News

The Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News (WBN) is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those working in water resources and related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published for over fifteen years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.

The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to .

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled and Edited by Marla Stelk, Editor; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors. Executive Director: Jeanne Christie. Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399 Fax: 207-892-3089

All photos by Jeanne Christie, ASWM

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