Wetland Breaking News - December 2015

                     
   
IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES &
PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

 

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Wetland Breaking New: December 2015

All photos by
Jeanne Christie, ASWM

       

EDITOR'S NOTE


The holidays are upon us and despite all the craziness that they bring, they’re always a good reminder for me to count my blessings. Regardless of how many terrible things may be happening in the world, there are always just as many, if not more, truly wonderful things to be grateful for. In this edition of Wetland Breaking News, I have highlighted some of the uplifting stories in my Editor’s Choice section. For example, check out this collaborative effort by the Administration: Administration Announces Public-Private Innovation Strategy to Build a Sustainable Water Future. More and more often folks are realizing that we all have to come together to build trust and combine our strengths in order to truly create change, so efforts like this are encouraging. Another example of this can be found in this recent story: British Columbia, Alaska sign pact on protecting shared waterways and this one: US, Cuba sign first environmental accord since thaw.

It’s also always great to hear that all our hard work really is making a difference. In our State News section, you’ll read about how in Delaware, the Delmarva Fox Squirrel populations have recovered enough to be taken off the Endangered Species List. And even though state budgets have been in decline, money is still be dedicated to protect wetlands, like the $1 million that was awarded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to protect wetlands in New Jersey and the nearly $700k that the agency awarded to protect wetlands in New York.

And perhaps one of the biggest feel good news stories of the year is the recent one about the climate deal that was just passed in Paris. Of course the future is always uncertain, but the past can show us what a difference we can make every day through hard work, collaboration, and sound science. So as we enter the New Year, I hope you will find inspiration in our collective past accomplishments. And use that sense of pride to set your sights on all the great things that together, we can accomplish in the coming New Year.

Happy Holidays and Best Wishes for the New Year,

Marla J. Stelk, Editor
Wetland Breaking News

     
                     

Wetland Breaking News - December 2015

EDITOR'S CHOICE

Administration Announces Public-Private Innovation Strategy to Build a Sustainable Water Future

The White House – December 15, 2015
Last week, representatives of more than 190 nations agreed to an unprecedented global climate agreement that establishes a long-term, durable framework to address one of the gravest threats facing humanity. As the President said, the agreement in Paris creates a mechanism for us to continually tackle climate change in an effective way and begin the next phase of building a low-carbon, climate-resilient future while generating new jobs and industries. That’s why today the Administration is taking action to build upon the tremendous progress we’ve made here at home by announcing a new public-private water innovation strategy. This strategy includes an aggressive two-part approach led by Federal agencies to address the impacts of climate change on the use and supply of our nation’s water resources and calls on private sector and other stakeholder groups to help significantly scale up research and investment in water efficiency solutions. For full press release, click here.

Paris summit seals ambitious climate agreement

By Andrew Restuccia and Sara Stefanimi – Politico – December 12, 2015
Nearly 200 nations clinched a historic climate change deal on Saturday, pledging for the first time to marshal a global effort to fight climbing temperatures and rising seas and delivering a major victory to President Barack Obama, who has made the issue a core priority of his presidency. The pact is the most aggressive international plan ever put in place to combat climate change and comes after more than two decades of often tortured United Nations talks that have pitted the U.S. and other industrialized nations against poor countries over who should shoulder the burden for protecting the planet from the greenhouse gases spewed by smokestacks and tailpipes. For full story, click here.

British Columbia, Alaska sign pact on protecting shared waterways

Reuter – November 25, 2015
The Canadian province of British Columbia signed a memorandum of understanding with Alaska on Wednesday to protect transboundary rivers, watersheds and fisheries and be more involved in major mining developments in each other's territory. Under the agreement, a bilateral group will be created to monitor water quality in transboundary waters. The two regions will also work toward allowing government representatives and scientists to be involved in each other's environmental assessment and permitting processes for mining projects. For full story, click here.

US, Cuba sign first environmental accord since thaw

By Christine Armario – AP The Big Story – November 18, 2015
The United States and Cuba signed an agreement Wednesday to join forces and protect the vast array of fish and corals they share as countries separated by just 90 miles (140 kilometers), the first environmental accord since announcing plans to renew diplomatic relations. The memorandum signed by U.S. and Cuban officials in Havana directs scientists with the Florida Keys and the Texas Flower Garden Banks national sanctuaries to collaborate with researchers at two similarly fragile and protected reserves: Guanahacabibes National Park and the Banco de San Antonio, located on the island's westernmost region. For full story, click here.

ASWM’s Members’ Wetland Webinar – Wetlands and Nutrient Uptake - January 27, 2016

ASWM’s Members’ Wetland Webinar: Wetlands and Nutrient Uptake will be held on Wednesday, January 27, 2016 at 3:30 p.m. ET. Presented by Thomas Harcarik, Bill Schumacher, and Eric Saas, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. For more information and to register, click here. For more information and to register, click here.

Wetland Breaking News - December 2015

NATIONAL NEWS

$4 Million Grant Will Enhance Great Lakes Decision Making

Great Lakes Commission – December 15, 2015
The Nature Conservancy (nature.org/michigan) and the Great Lakes Commission (glc.org) will use a $4 million grant from the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation to implement Blue Accounting, a program being led by the two organizations to support future decision making on issues facing the Great Lakes. For full story, click here.

92 lawmakers, 22 states side with Farm Bureau in TMDL appeal

By Karl Blankenship – Bay Journal – December 15, 2015
More than 90 members of Congress, along with 22 states and several business trade groups, have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to take up the American Farm Bureau Federation’s challenge to the Chesapeake Bay cleanup plan. A similar coalition had supported the Farm Bureau when it took its case to the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, contending that the EPA exceeded its legal authority in establishing the Bay cleanup plan in December 2010, and that it could lead to the agency creating similar pollution reduction plans in other areas. For full story, click here.

E.P.A. Broke Law With Social Media Push for Water Rule, Auditor Finds

By Eric Lipton and Michael D. Shear – The New York Times – December 14, 2015
The Environmental Protection Agency engaged in “covert propaganda” and violated federal law when it blitzed social media to urge the public to back an Obama administration rule intended to better protect the nation’s streams and surface waters, congressional auditors have concluded. The ruling by the Government Accountability Office, which opened its investigation after a report on the agency’s practices in The New York Times, drew a bright line for federal agencies experimenting with social media about the perils of going too far to push a cause. Federal laws prohibit agencies from engaging in lobbying and propaganda. For full story, click here.

US agency rarely intervened in projects that could risk endangered species

By Oliver Milman – The Guardian – December 14, 2015
The US government has not halted a single project out of the 88,000 actions and developments considered potentially harmful to the nation’s endangered species over the past seven years, a new study has found. An analysis of assessments made by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that the agency very rarely used its powers to intervene in projects that could imperil any of the US’s endangered plants and animals, which currently number almost 1,600. For full story, click here.

$1-billion desalination plant, hailed as model for state, opens in Carlsbad

By Bradley J. Fikes – Los Angeles Times – December 14, 2015
With Monday's ceremonial opening of the Western Hemisphere's largest ocean desalination plant, a new era began for water use in San Diego County — and possibly for the entire parched state. California officials have been emphasizing water conservation, expansion of reservoirs and water recycling (irrigating landscapes with partially treated wastewater and even turning sewage into drinking water) as prime ways to survive the drought, which is about to enter its fifth year. For full story, click here.

USDA Announces $50 Million to Help Ag Producers Restore Wildlife Habitat

USDA NRCS – December 14, 2015
USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service is making available about $50 million this year in financial assistance to partner with agricultural producers who want to restore and protect habitat for seven focus species, including the gopher tortoise. Conservation efforts for the gopher tortoise are part of Working Lands for Wildlife, an innovative partnership that supports struggling landscapes and strengthens agricultural operations. For full news release, click here.

Supreme Court wades into major permitting squabble

By Robin Bravener and Jeremy P. Jacobs – E&E Publishing LLC – December 11, 2015
The Supreme Court agreed today to consider whether a federal determination that a wetland qualifies for Clean Water Act protection can be subject to a court challenge. The justices will hear U.S. Army Corps of Engineers v. Hawkes Co. Inc., setting the stage for what many see as the term's highest-profile environmental case. The Obama administration and property rights advocates had asked the Supreme Court to review whether Army Corps and U.S. EPA Clean Water Act jurisdictional determinations are subject to judicial review. For full story, click here.

House Votes to Ban Tiny Polluting Microbeads From Your Face Wash

By Lucy Bayly – NBC News – December 10, 2015
The House of Representatives voted this week to ban the use of microbeads in cosmetics, calling the tiny plastic spheres "unnecessary plastic pollution" in the nation's waterways. Recent studies estimate that plastic waste causes up to $13 billion a year in environmental damage. If passed in the Senate, the Microbead-Free Waters Act of 2015 will prohibit the manufacture of "rinse-off" cosmetics that contain "intentionally added plastic microbeads" as of 2017, ban their use in cosmetics starting in 2018, and prohibit their use in over-the-counter drugs from 2019. For full story, click here.

New Funding Opportunity for Coastal Watershed Restoration in Southeast New England

Contact: David Deegan – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – December 9, 2015
EPA is releasing a request for initial proposals under the first round of grant funds dedicated solely to the Southeast New England Program for coastal watershed restoration. EPA expects to award up to $7 Million over the 2016 and 2017 fiscal years to eligible applicants to fund innovative projects that will improve coastal water quality and habitat. For full news release, click here.

FY 2016 Request for Proposals from Indian Tribes and Intertribal Consortia for Nonpoint Source Management Grants Under Clean Water Act (CWA) Section 319

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – December 9, 2015
EPA is soliciting proposals pursuant to Section 319 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) from eligible tribes and intertribal consortia to develop and/or implement watershed-based plans and on-the-ground projects that will result in significant steps towards solving Nonpoint Source (NPS) impairments on a watershed-wide basis. Eligible entities are strongly encouraged to submit proposals that develop and/or implement watershed-based plans designed to protect unimpaired waters and/or restore NPS-impaired waters. Eligible tribes and intertribal consortia may apply for competitive funding by submitting a proposal for up to a maximum budget of $100,000 of federal CWA section 319 funding (plus the additional required match of the total project cost). For more information, click here. For documents, go here. Deadline to submit a proposal is January 15, 2016.

Researchers to Probe Links Between Human Activities, Water Quality

By Rory Halligan-Virginia Tech – newswise – December 8, 2015
Understanding human interactions with the natural environment can enhance the protection of surface water quality in lakes and streams. A multidisciplinary team of researchers will examine the linkages between humans and freshwater quality using a $1.8 million grant from the National Science Foundation’s Dynamics of Coupled Natural and Human Systems Program.The goal of the research project is to investigate human-natural feedbacks in freshwater systems by examining the linkages between land-use decision-making, water quality, and collective action taken by the public to protect water quality. For full story, click here.

New institute launched to help improve nation's soil health

By The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation and Farm Foundation – AG Professional – December 7, 2015
With more than one million organisms in a single teaspoon of Earth, soil is the starting point for plant, animal and human life. It is the foundation for society, providing the basis for food production, healthy families and economies. To ensure that soil continues to be a vital natural resource for generations to come, The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation and Farm Foundation, NFP, announced the formation of the Soil Health Institute. The announcement coincides with World Soil Day (Dec. 5) and celebrates the 2015 International Year of Soils. The Soil Health Institute's mission is to safeguard and enhance the vitality and productivity of the soil. It will work directly with conventional and organic farmers and ranchers, public- and private-sector researchers, academia, policymakers, government agencies, industry, environmental groups and consumers - everyone who benefits from healthy soils. For full story, click here.

Are humans using too much water?

By Eva Botkin-Kowacki – The Christian Science Monitor – December 6, 2015
Water is essential for life as we know it. But freshwater, the stuff we drink and use to grow crops, makes up just 2.5 percent of the Earth’s water, according to the US Geological Survey. Is that enough? How are humans manipulating this vital natural resource? And just how much are we using? Scientists set out to figure just how big the global freshwater footprint really is. That footprint could be more significant than previously thought, and it might just be because we’re trying to control it. For full story, click here.

National Academy of Sciences Releases Its Review of the Landscape Conservation Cooperatives

Landscape Conservation Cooperative Network – December 3, 2015
The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) today released its Review of the Landscape Conservation Cooperatives, which concludes that a landscape approach is needed to meet the nation’s conservation challenges and that the Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) provide a framework for addressing that need. For full story, click here.

Agency Seeks Monitoring of Mercury Pollution in Great Lakes

By John Flesher – abc news – December 3, 2015
The U.S. and Canada should more closely monitor atmospheric pollution from as far away as Asia that may be causing mercury levels to rise in some Great Lakes fish, an advisory agency said Thursday. Many of the stations that once monitored the mercury content of rain and snow in the region are no longer operating, according to a report by the International Joint Commission, which recommends policies to both nations' governments on their shared waterways. For full story, click here.

Habitat loss seen as rising threat to world's migratory birds

By Will Dunham – Reuters – December 3, 2015
Habitat destruction along routes taken by the world's migratory birds poses an increasing peril to these long-distance fliers, with a vast majority crossing terrain that nations are inadequately protecting, according to scientists. The researchers said on Thursday they tracked the migratory routes, stopover locations, breeding grounds and wintering locations of 1,451 migratory species and assessed about 450,000 protected areas like national parks and other reserves. They found 1,324 species, about 91 percent, journeyed through locales that were not safeguarded from threats like development. For full story, click here.

Farms near Lake Erie get millions

By Tom Henry – The Blade – November 30, 2015
Between 2008 and 2015, concentrated animal feeding operations in the western Lake Erie watershed have received more than $16.8 million in direct payments, cost-shares, and other subsidies from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, according to a report issued earlier this month by activist groups tracking the issue. The Less=More Coalition said in its Nov. 19 report, Follow the Manure: Factory Farms and the Lake Erie Algae Crisis, that millions of taxpayer dollars continued to be disbursed even as concerns about algal toxins rose following the 2014 Toledo water crisis. For full story, click here.

Board questions EPA draft report on fracking

By Don Hopey – PowerSource-Pittsburgh Post-Gazette – November 28, 2015
A review by an EPA advisory board says that a draft report on hydraulic fracturing did not support the conclusion that shale gas fracking hasn’t caused significant damage to the nation’s water supplies. The draft report by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Board raises questions about research, the lack of robust data and some of the language of the EPA’s fracking study draft, ordered by Congress to assess the risks to water supplies from hydraulic fracturing. Congress directed the EPA to create the advisory board in 1978 to review the quality and relevance of science the agency used to craft policy and regulations. For full story, click here.

EPA is developing guidelines for swimmers and toxic algae

By John Seewer – The Columbus Dispatch – November 27, 2015
New national guidelines are being developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to protect swimmers and kayakers from growing threats posed by toxic algae in lakes and rivers. The focus will be on people who might swallow water during recreational activities. The EPA issued a report to Congress last week saying that it also will be looking at whether new health advisories are needed on algae toxins in drinking water. For full story, click here.

National water quality database released to address nutrient challenges

By National Corn Growers Association – Ag Professional – November 20, 2015
The National Corn Growers Association and the Water Environment Research Foundation announced the completion of the Agricultural Best Management Practices Database at the American Water Resources Association’s Annual Conference on Water Resources. Along with other project sponsors, such as the United Soybean Board, this database was developed to create a centralized repository of agricultural best management practice performance studies related to water quality in agricultural areas. For full story, click here.

New Report: Spotted Turtle Among 10 U.S. Species Most Threatened by Habitat Fragmentation

Contact: Collette Adkins – Center for Biological Diversity – November 18, 2015
The spotted turtle has been named one of the 10 U.S. species most threatened by habitat fragmentation in a new report released today by the Endangered Species Coalition. The report, No Room to Roam: 10 American Species in Need of Connectivity and Corridors, highlights 10 rare or endangered species that lack safe, navigable corridors to connect them to important habitat or other populations. The spotted turtle ranges across eastern United States, but local population extinctions have caused its range to contract and fragment. For full news release, click here.

EPA Releases Strategic Plan for Protecting Drinking Water from Harmful Algal Blooms

By Joel Beauvais – EPA Connect – November 18, 2015
2015 brought a summer of green water, with many areas of the nation seeing a record year for the growth of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in rivers and lakes – including a 700-mile long bloom on the Ohio River and the largest bloom ever in Lake Erie. These HABs contain toxins that pose serious risks to our health and drinking water quality. EPA estimates that between 30 and 48 million people use drinking water from lakes and reservoirs that may be vulnerable to contamination by algal toxins. In 2014, the City of Toledo had to curtail drinking water use for three days as a result in Lake Erie, which supplies the city’s drinking water. For full blog post, click here.

USDA Announces $350M Available to Help States, Private Partners Protect and Restore Grasslands, Wetlands, and Working Lands

Contact: Ciji Taylor – USDA NRCS – November 16, 2015
Agricultural Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced the availability of $350 million to help landowners protect and restore key farmlands, grasslands and wetlands across the nation. The funding is provided through the Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP), created by the 2014 Farm Bill to protect critical water resources and wildlife habitat, and encourage private owners to maintain land for farming and ranching. Through the voluntary sale of an easement, landowners limit future development to protect these key resources. For full news release, click here.

 

Wetland Breaking News - December 2015STATE NEWS

CA: El Nino to Bring Relief, Not Cure, to Calif. Drought

By Irene Klotz – Discovery.com – December 15, 2015
A recurrent Pacific weather pattern known as El Nino is back in spades this year and is expected to bring some much-needed relief to drought-stricken California, research released on Tuesday shows. California receives about 40 percent of its rainfall every year from about 10 concentrated bands, according to a newly released historical study of atmospheric rivers, which spawn the storms. For full story, click here.

CA: Salmon RIP?

By Alastair Bland – East Bay Express – December 2, 2015
Last winter and spring, thousands of adult Chinook salmon nosed upstream past Richmond, through the Carquinez Straits and into the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, on their way to spawn in the Sacramento River. At about the same time, officials at Shasta Lake, a few miles north of Redding, did something that critics say was stupid, negligent, and illegal: They opened the spigot on the reservoir’s outflow pipes in order to send extra water downstream for farmers — and they didn’t save enough for the fish. For full story, click here.

CA: Tony Thurmond: Restoring wetlands is a green defense against rising bay

By Tony Thurmond – San Jose Mercury News – October 23, 2015
Climate change will harm people from all nations. But one segment of humanity is on the front lines: the poor. From the increased frequency of mega-storms like the one that devastated the Philippines in 2013 to rising seas displacing people of low-lying nations such as Bangladesh, it is the poor who will lose their homes first and suffer the gravest misfortunes. The same is true here in the Bay Area. Both extreme weather events and sea levels rise will hit lower income communities in "the flats" with shoreline flooding -- communities such as Richmond, Marin City, East Palo Alto, Alviso and Oakland. For full opinion, click here.

CO: Colorado Water Plan addresses agricultural water use

Ag Journal – December 8, 2015
Governor Hickenlooper recently released the long-awaited Colorado Water Plan. Colorado Cattlemen’s Association took an active role in working to shape the portion of the plan regarding agricultural water use. The organization's leadership and Water Committee are currently reviewing the plan and will provide further input and action items at a later date. The creation of this statewide plan has been a two-year process with wide engagement from all of Colorado’s agriculture community. The plan addresses the importance of agriculture to the state, as well as rural communities. For full story, click here.

DE: Delmarva Fox Squirrel Leaps off Endangered Species List

Contacts: Jessica Kershaw and Meagan Racey – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – November 13, 2015
The U.S. Department of the Interior today announced that due to concerted conservation efforts by states, landowners and others working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), the Delmarva Peninsula fox squirrel, one of the animals included on the first list of endangered species nearly a half century ago, is no longer at risk of extinction. For full press release, click here.

LA: Project offers new shoreline stabilization and restoration solutions for wetlands

By Andre Moreau – WAFB – December 10, 2015 – Video
Along the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway in Larose, there’s new promise in the restoration of Louisiana’s fragile coast. It’s a stabilization project America's Wetland Foundation believes can be the solution to saving the erosion eating away at the state. At the center of the project is a product called "Vegetated Ecoshield," a finely woven grid of plastic, embedded with vegetation, that’s placed in areas wherever saltwater intrusion has done damage for decades. For full story and to view video, click here.

MI: In Flint, Mich., there’s so much lead in children’s blood that a state of emergency is declared

By Yanan Wang – The Washington Post – December 15, 2015
For months, worried parents in Flint, Mich., arrived at their pediatricians’ offices in droves. Holding a toddler by the hand or an infant in their arms, they all have the same question: Are their children being poisoned? To find out, all it takes is a prick of the finger, a small letting of blood. If tests come back positive, the potentially severe consequences are far more difficult to discern. That’s how lead works. It leaves its mark quietly, with a virtually invisible trail. But years later, when a child shows signs of a learning disability or behavioral issues, lead’s prior presence in the bloodstream suddenly becomes inescapable. For full story, click here.

MI: New Zealand mudsnail Michigan's latest invasive species

By Keith Matheny – Detroit Free Press – November 25, 2015
Michigan has a new addition to its roster of Great Lakes aquatic invaders -- a tiny snail from Down Under, smaller than a grain of rice that could spell big trouble. And it's only known because the right person was at the right place, at the right time. For full story, click here.

MI: Science in Action - Restoring Fish Habitat in Urban Rivers

By Lynn Vaccaro – University of Michigan Water Center – November 18, 2015
Next spring, native fish, such as lake sturgeon, will have more places to spawn and safely incubate their eggs in the Detroit River. To compensate for historic habitat losses, Water Center specialists are helping to build a 4-acre fish spawning reef offshore from Wyandotte, Michigan. Although simple in concept, the planning and implementation of this restoration project has taken three years and the design draws upon many years of research. As the team facilitators, Water Center specialists help integrate the knowledge of biologists, engineers and stakeholders to ensure that restoration decisions are based on sound science while meeting management and other stakeholder needs. For full story, click here.

MN: In Minnesota's farm country, clean water is costly

By Josephine Marcotty and Tony Kennedy – Star Tribune – December 6 2016
Taxpayers spent nearly $125 million last year to clean up Minnesota lakes, streams and groundwater contaminated by farming, according to a Star Tribune analysis of state and federal budget data that highlight agriculture’s increasingly prominent role as a source of water pollution. That total amounts to more than half the annual budget of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, and it helps explain a contentious debate emerging across the state over agriculture and the environment. For full story, click here.

MO: Wetland restoration projects receive $3.1 million in funding

By Carter Stoddard – Missourian – December 14, 2015
This winter, private landowners in Boone County can apply for a chunk of a $3.1 million wetland restoration fund. Earlier this year, the U.S Department of Agriculture allocated $2.4 million to the Missouri Department of Conservation for projects to enhance wetlands in Missouri. The Conservation Department and organizations such as Ducks Unlimited provided $700,000 in support of the initiative, raising the available funds to $3.1 million. For full story, click here.

NJ: EPA Provides $1 Million to Protect Wetlands in New Jersey

Contact: John Martin – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – December 9, 2015
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded $1,073,000 to Ocean County College, the New Jersey Sports and Exhibition Authority, and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection to better protect wetlands throughout New Jersey. “Wetlands play a critical role in alleviating harmful effects of climate change, protecting against flooding and storm surges," said EPA Regional Administrator Judith A. Enck. "These grants will help strengthen shorelines and the health of wetlands, protecting water quality and fish and wildlife habitats." For full news release, click here.

NJ: Dirty Little Secrets: New Jersey Is Just a Storm Away from a Major Toxic Mess

By Scott Gurian – WNYC – December 8, 2015
F It was early on October 30, 2012, after the winds from Sandy had died down, when the call came in to the Coast Guard’s National Response Center hotline. Just before 5 a.m., a worker at the Motiva diesel terminal in Woodbridge said that flooding had caused an unknown quantity of fuel to leak into the Arthur Kill, between New Jersey and Staten Island. For full story, click here.

NY: EPA Provides $691,000 to Protect Wetlands throughout New York State

Contact John Martin – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – December 9, 2015
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded $690,940 to the Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe, the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, and the Research Foundation of SUNY, to better protect wetlands throughout New York. For full news release, click here.

PA: Study finds causes for mutant bass in Susquehanna River

By Don Hopey – Pittsburgh Post-Gazette – December 15, 2015
The Susquehanna River’s decade-long mutant bass mystery moved a cast closer to a solution with the release of study findings that for the first time identified herbicides and endocrine-disrupting compounds from agricultural sources as likely causes. The multi-year study released Monday by the state Department of Environmental Protection and the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission also found that pathogens and parasites are probable contributors to the mutations and population decline afflicting what was once one of the best bass fisheries in the eastern U.S. For full story, click here.

VT: Vermont targets roads to reduce Lake Champlain pollution

By Lisa Rathke – Bennington Banner – November 29, 2015
From paved city streets to hilly dirt roads, runoff from Vermont's roadways contributes more than 10 percent of the pollution flowing into Lake Champlain that fuels toxic algae blooms in its bays. A new law is targeting that erosion by soon requiring all cities and towns to inventory the more than 13,000 miles of municipal roads, and implement storm water management plans for roads at risk of polluting waterways. For paved roads, it could mean sweeping streets and removing sediment and cleaning out catch basins on a regular basis. For gravel roads, the work could include adding or widening ditches, lining them with stones or grass or upsizing culverts. For full story, click here.

VA: Dominion wants to drain coal ash ponds into local waterways

By Whitney Pipkin – Bay Journal – December 11, 2015
An environmental group was threatening to sue Dominion Virginia Power over the mere presence of its outmoded coal ash ponds near Quantico Creek’s intersection with the Potomac River when the power plant announced plans last month to do away with them — by draining them into the nearest waterway. For full story, click here.

VA: Long-awaited project to stem tide of erosion at DC area marsh

By Whitney Pipkin – Bay Journal – December 2, 2015
For hundreds who live within walking distance of the George Washington Memorial Parkway, the scenic road is more than a stoplight-less route from Mount Vernon to Washington, DC. Its expansive views of the Potomac River, with trails winding through and alongside a cattail-filled Dyke Marsh, make it the daily stomping grounds of dog walkers, marathon runners and bicycle commuters. But the most observant among them might notice that the views have been changing — disappearing, actually. For more than a half century, the marshy portion of this respite from city life has been shrinking at an ever-increasing rate. For full story, click here.

WI: Wisconsin DNR Prepares to Advance Waukesha Request to Borrow Great Lakes Water

Waste & Water Digest – December 9, 2015
The city of Waukesha, Wis.’s request to borrow Great Lakes water will be forwarded to Great Lakes states and provinces for review in early 2016. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) provided an official notice that it will forward Waukesha’s request under the Great Lakes Compact within 30 to 60 days. The DNR had issued a draft document in June that said Waukesha meets the requirements of the compact. Waukesha must find a new water supply to meet its current needs because the aquifer it has used to provide water has become tainted with naturally-occurring contaminants and is subject to unique geological features that have led to a severe drawdown of its aquifer. It is under a court order to provide a water supply that meets drinking water standards for the carcinogen radium. For full story, click here.

WI: GOP lawmakers propose bill shrinking state natural resource areas

By Todd Richmond – Wisconsin State Journal – December 1, 20165
Republican lawmakers began circulating a bill Monday that would ease the regulatory path for development on bodies of water, saying the changes would streamline state regulations and boost the economy. For full story, click here.

WI: Wetland ‘banks’ empty after developers take advantage of new rules

By Steven Verburg – LaCrosse Tribune – November 30, 2015
Builders have been eliminating wetland acreage at the fastest pace in at least a decade under a controversial state law that eased protections for the ecologically important lands. Cheered on by builders and developers who have long felt frustrated by water quality regulations, Republicans said Act 118 would put economic development needs in better balance with environmental protections. But 3½ years later a crucial element in the law’s provisions — replacement wetlands that were supposed to offset those eliminated by development — has been temporarily exhausted. For full story, click here.

 

Wetland Breaking News - December 2015

WETLAND SCIENCE NEWS

Leaving it to beavers: Communities make room for natural engineers

By Whitney Pipkin – Bay Journal – December 14, 2015
Once valued as little more than pelts, beavers are back in vogue and rebuilding their reputation as habitat engineers. It helps their cause that the dams they build as homes also create water quality-boosting wetlands and habitat for other species. In the process, the structures slow the flow of water and filter out sediment that would otherwise be on its way to the Chesapeake Bay. And a new study out of the Northeast suggests the dams, which can alter the course of entire river systems, can also substantially reduce the amount of nitrogen in them. For full story, click here.

Saturated buffers reduce nitrates in runoff from farms’ tile drains

By Rona Kobell – Bay Journal – December 14, 2015
A new technique to reduce nitrates flowing off farm fields, now being tested in the Midwest, holds promise for Chesapeake Bay watershed farmers. Called a saturated buffer, the practice focuses on reducing the amount of nitrate that can enter streams via tile drains. Tile drains, ubiquitous in the Midwest and quite common in parts of the Chesapeake Bay’s watershed as well, are a system of trenches and below-ground pipes that improve drainage so crops can grow. For full story, click here.

Acid trip: Great Lakes could face similar acidification risk as the seas

By Brian Bienkowski – The Daily Climate – December 8, 2015
As in the oceans, carbon dioxide from the atmosphere could throw off water chemistry in large freshwater bodies like the Great Lakes, putting the food web at risk. But the science remains unsettled and, according to researchers, must be bolstered if we are to understand what increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide means for freshwater. While most research on carbon dioxide (CO2) absorption from the atmosphere has focused on oceans and the resulting acidification, it is widely believed that CO2 levels also will rise in large freshwater lakes. Nascent research suggests this could be a problem for the foundation of Great Lakes’ food webs. For full story, click here.

UMD researcher helps develop method to measure how wetland restorations affect greenhouse gases

By Lindsey Feingold – The Diamonback Online – December 10, 2015
A University of Maryland researcher has helped develop a method for measuring how much the restoration of wetlands can help reduce greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. A team of scientists including environmental science and technology professor Brian Needelman spent the past four years on the project, collecting data and presenting them in a usable way. For full story, click here.

Autumn Was Warmest on Record for Lower 48

By Andrea Thompson – Climate Central – December 9, 2015
For those living in the eastern half of the country, this may come as no surprise. This autumn was the warmest on record for the contiguous U.S., with every state in the Lower 48 recording above-average temperatures from September through November, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Wednesday. For the year-to-date, this is the fifth warmest year going back to 1895 for the contiguous states, the agency said. That heat across the U.S. fits the global picture for the year, with 2015 expected to best 2014 as the hottest year in the books. The overwhelming cause for the chart-topping warmth is the excess heat trapped by greenhouse gases accumulating in Earth’s atmosphere. For full story, click here.

Activist: Re-frog America, build a sanctuary

By Brendan Bane – Santa Cruz Sentinel – December 2, 2015
In his mission to “re-frog America,” environmental activist Kerry Kriger is teaching kids how to build wildlife sanctuaries in their own backyards. As the leader of the environmental nonprofit Save the Frogs, Kriger tours the world building habitats for amphibians. He spent Wednesday orchestrating a wetlands restoration workshop at the Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, where he and other scientists showed attendees how to build their own freshwater wetlands. He’s back at the reserve on Thursday and on Friday he’ll meet with students at Pajaro Valley High School in Watsonville to build more frog habitats there. These projects are part of the larger re-frog campaign. For full story, click here.

Carbon sequestration in soil requires lazy microbes

By Brooks Hays – UPI – December 1, 2015
Three times the amount of carbon suspended in the atmosphere can be found sequestered underground -- the planet's soil stores approximately 9,170 gigatons of CO2. Until now, scientists didn't really understand why. A new study, published in the journal Nature Communications, suggests lazy microbes are to thank. Microbes in the soil break down organic matter into carbon dioxide and nitrogen, facilitating the transfer of carbon back into the above-ground cycle. So why don't they break down all of it? Why does some carbon and nitrogen get left behind? For full story, click here.

Poisonous amphibians may be more likely to go extinct

By Erin E.A. Ross – Mongabay – November 23, 2015
Amphibians occupy almost every ecological niche, from the highest tropical trees to the most fetid pools of desert water. Brightly colored and cryptically camouflaged, they have evolved an astounding array of defenses – about half of all amphibians are poisonous. But despite their adaptability, these animals are in serious trouble, all over the world. And now, it seems, their best defense may be their biggest weakness. According to a recent study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, poisonous amphibians may be more likely to go extinct than their benign counterparts.For full story, click here.

Congresswoman Defends NOAA Scientists from Lamar Smith 'Witch Hunt'

By Katherine Bagley – InsideClimate News – November 23, 2015
Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson delivered a blistering critique of a Republican campaign to discredit the work of federal climate scientists, branding the effort "hyper-aggressive oversight," a "fishing expedition" and an "ideological crusade." The months-long probe of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration researchers is being led by Texas Republican Lamar Smith, chair of the House science committee. Johnson is the committee's ranking democrat. "In six separate, and increasingly aggressive, letters," Johnson wrote in a Nov. 19 letter to Smith, "the only thing you accused NOAA of doing is engaging in climate science—i.e., doing their jobs." The letter charges Smith of "political posturing intended to influence public opinion" ahead of the Paris climate talks. For full story, click here.

Piping plovers losing breeding habitat to wetland drainage

Eurek Alert – November 19, 2015
Piping plovers, a federally threatened species of shorebirds, are likely losing wetland breeding habitat in the Great Plains as a result of wetland drainage, climate change or both, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey study. "Our findings suggest that if drainage continues, there will be continued declines in the amount of breeding habitat for piping plovers at wetlands in the Great Plains," said Lisa McCauley, who led the study as a USGS postdoctoral student and currently works at The Nature Conservancy. "Managers can use information from our study to better restore and conserve valuable wetland ecosystems for the protection of this species." For full story, click here.

New study casts doubt on how much sea levels may rise from the collapse of the Antarctic ice sheet

Environmental News Network – November 19, 2015
A new study by scientists in the UK and France has found that Antarctic ice sheet collapse will have serious consequences for sea level rise over the next two hundred years, though not as much as some have suggested. This study, published this week in the journal Nature, uses an ice-sheet model to predict the consequences of unstable retreat of the ice, which recent studies suggest has begun in West Antarctica. For full story, click here.

New report finds human-caused climate change increased the severity of many extreme events in 2014

NOAA – November 5, 2015
Human activities, such as greenhouse gas emissions and land use, influenced specific extreme weather and climate events in 2014, including tropical cyclones in the central Pacific, heavy rainfall in Europe, drought in East Africa, and stifling heat waves in Australia, Asia, and South America, according to a new report released today. The report, “Explaining Extreme Events of 2014 from a Climate Perspective” published by the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, addresses the natural and human causes of individual extreme events from around the world in 2014, including Antarctica. NOAA scientists served as three of the five lead editors on the report. For full story and to download the report, click here.

 

Wetland Breaking News: December 2015RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONS

Congressional Research Service Report: EPA and the Army Corps’ Rule to Define “Waters of the United States”

By Claudia Copeland – CRS – December 3, 2015
On May 27, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) jointly announced a final rule defining the scope of waters protected under the Clean Water Act (CWA). The rule revises regulations that have been in place for more than 25 years. Revisions are being made in light of 2001and 2006 Supreme Court rulings that interpreted the regulatory scope of the CWA more narrowly than the agencies and lower courts were then doing, and created uncertainty about the appropriate scope of waters protected under the CWA. To read full report, click here.

Methodology for Tidal Wetland and Seagrass Restoration, v1.0

Verified Carbon Standard – November 20, 2015
This methodology outlines procedures to quantify net greenhouse gas emission reductions and removals resulting from project activities implemented to restore tidal wetlands. Such activities include creating and/or managing the conditions required for healthy, sustainable wetland ecosystems. Projects applying this methodology are expected to generate greenhouse gas emission reductions and removals primarily by increasing both biomass and autochthonous soil organic carbon. Projects applying this methodology may be developed anywhere in the world. For more information, click here. To download Methodology, click here.

 

Wetland Breaking News: December 2015

POTPOURRI

The West Coast Groundfish Recovery: The Best Fish News You Haven’t Heard Yet

By Marla Finn – Civil Eats – December 16, 2015
Monterey, California, used to be an epicenter in the West Coast commercial fishing industry. But these days the city’s waterfront is full of restaurants serving shrimp and tilapia imported from China. And it’s not the only place doing so. Many small ports around the United States have fallen into disrepair as more Americans consume imported, often farmed seafood. But there’s also an evolution taking place in commercial fishing in some small port towns that might just bring them back to life. For full story, click here.

Spotted Turtle One of 10 Species with “No Room to Roam”

By Pat Seelinger – The Swamp School Blog – December 7, 2015
The spotted turtle was listed in the Endangered Species Coalition’s “No Room to Roam” report, released on November 18. The annual report lists 10 species in the United States that are the most threatened by habitat fragmentation. The report, titled “No Room to Roam: 10 American Species in Need of Connectivity and Corridors”, highlighted 10 species whose habitats have broken up to the point where there are very few safe, navigable corridors for the species to move between habitats or connect with other populations. Other species in the report included the pallid sturgeon and the smiling California tiger salamander. For full blog post, click here.

Paddling the peninsula, a journey through time

By Tom Horton – delmarvanow – November 27, 2015
I once read in a canoe magazine of a famously difficult passage in New England across 50 miles of open water. Most modern paddlers who tried it failed; yet Native Americans had done it routinely. Most likely, it was neither skill nor endurance we moderns lacked. It was time we were short of. Less obliged to clocks and back-to-work deadlines, “primitive” paddlers just hung out, hunted and told stories until conditions were ideal for crossing. For full opinion, click here.

Working for Clean Water is a Dream Come True

By Joel Beauvais – EPA Connect – November 24, 2015
I grew up in rural Connecticut in the Housatonic River watershed. My childhood revolved around water, whether it was swimming and fishing in the lakes and streams near my home or hiking in the forested foothills of the Berkshires. It’s a remarkably beautiful part of the country and its waters are a big part of that. But I also learned that problems can lurk beneath the surface, as we were taught early on not to eat the fish we caught because of legacy contamination. For full blog post, click here.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

WEBINARS

   

MEETINGS

   

TRAINING

 

SPECIAL EVENTS

 
WEBINARS          
                   
JANUARY 2016
                 
                   
January 13, 2016
11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. EST
      Sustain Our Great Lakes 2016 Funding Opportunity webinar          
                   

January 13, 2016
2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m. EST

      Environmental Law Institute's In-Lieu Fee Mitigation Training Webinar: Functional Assessments in Crediting          
                   

January 14, 2016
11:30 a.m. EST

     

USDA NRCS West National Technology Support Center is presenting this webinar on Soil Water Sensors for Agriculture - Theory and Issues

         

January 14, 2016
1:00 p.m. EST

     

The Swamp School’s 2016 Wetland Status and Trends

         
                   

January 14, 2016

1:00 p.m. EST
      SWS Webinar: Climate Change in the American Mind: What we think, feel, do and understand about global warming and how wetlands professionals can speak about it with their constituencies          
                   
January 19, 2016
10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m. EST
      Michigan Department of Environmental Quality webinar: E. coli in Surface Waters: Michigan's Statewide Bacterial Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL)          
                   
January 20, 2016
12:00 p.m. EST
      USDA NRCS West National Technology Support Center webinar: Grazing Strategies for Riparian and Wet Meadow Improvement in the Sagebrush Steppe          
                   

January 20, 2016
1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. EST

     

Atlantic Salmon Conservation Foundation (ASCF), in partnership with the Canadian Rivers Institute (CRI) webinar: Getting your feet wet: An introduction to water quality monitoring and data analysis

         
                   
January 21, 2016
2:00 p.m. EST
     

Forester University webinar: Voodoo Hydrology—Pitfalls of Urban Hydrology Methods & What You Need to Know

         
                   
January 21, 2016
3:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m. EST
      U.S. EPA, the National Association of Clean Water Agencies, and the Water Environmental Federation: Enabling the Water Resources Utility of the Future Webinar Series: Introduction: A New Look at Wastewater: A Valued Resource          
                   

January 27, 2016
3:30 p.m. EST

     

ASWM Members’ Wetland Webinar: Wetlands and Nutrient Uptake

         
                   
FEBRUARY 2016                  
                   
February 3, 2016
1:00 p.m. EST
      AWRA webinar: Climate Change Adaption: Flood          
                   

February 11, 2016

1:00 p.m. EST
      Webinar: Maps and Datasets for Blue Carbon Habitats is co-sponsored by the NOAA National Marine Protected Areas Center, the EBM Tools Network, OpenChannels.org, and MPA News          
                   

February 23, 2016
12:00 p.m.-12:45 p.m. CST

      FEMA Region 6 webinar: Using Flood Risk Products Virtual Brown Bag Webinar: "Using Percent Annual Chance Data"          
February 24, 2016
1:00 p.m. EST
      AWRA webinar: Climate Change Adaption: Drought Response and Governance          
                   
MEETINGS        
                   
JANUARY 2016                  
                   
January 4-6, 2016
Acme, Michigan
     

Northern Michigan Waterways Hazardous Material Spill Planning Committee (No-Spills) 2016 conference:

         
                   
January 10-14, 2016
Asilomar, California
      American Society of Naturalists Conference: Unifying Biological Principles Across Disciplines          
                   
January 10-14, 2016
New Orleans, Louisiana
      American Meteorological Society 96th Annual Meeting: Earth System Science in Service to Society          
                   
January 15-16, 2015
East Lansing, Michigan
      Stewardship Network: Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference          
                   
January 19-21, 2016
Sydney, Australia
      The International Society for the Study of Marine Bioinvasions: 9th International Conference on Marine Bioinvasions (ICMB-IX). Abstracts due by November 30, 2015.          
                   
January 19-21, 2016
Arlington, Virginia
      National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE): The Food-Energy-Water Nexus 16th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy, and the Environment          
                   
January 28-30, 2016
New Haven, Connecticut
      Yale Chapter of International Society of Tropical Foresters (ISTF): 22nd Annual ISTF Conference          
                   
FEBRUARY 2016          
                   
February 1-4, 2016
Tampa, Florida
      2016 Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill and Ecosystem Science Conference: One Gulf: Healthy Ecosystems, healthy communities          
                   
February 3-4, 2016
Wilmington, Delaware
      Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control: 2016 Delaware Wetlands Conference: Advancing Wetland Science and Conservation in the Mid-Atlantic Region          
                   
February 4-5, 2016
Wichita, Kansas
      2016 Kansas Natural Resources Conference (KNRC): Conversations on Conservation - Engaging landowners thru Effective Communication          
                   
February 4-7, 2016
Ocean City, Maryland
      Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education (MAEOE) Annual Conference: Today’s Youth, Tomorrow’s Stewards: Engaging Students, Schools and Communities          
                   
February 6, 2016
Clayton, New York
      Save The River’s 27th Annual Winter Environmental Conference          
                   
February 8-12, 2016
Anchorage, Alaska
      Alaska Forum on the Environment          
                   
February 9-11, 2016
St. Grand Junction, Colorado
      Tamarisk Coalition's 13th Annual Conference: The Road to Riparian Restoration          
                   
February 9-12, 2016
Tasmania, Australia
      Species on the Move International Conference          
                   
February 10-12, 2016
Nelson, New Zealand
      National Wetland Trust: National Wetland Restoration Symposium          
                   
February 11-13, 2016
Portland, Oregon
      New Partners for Smart Growth Conference: Practical Tools & Innovative Strategies for Creating Great Communities          
                   
February 16-18, 2016
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
      Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan: 11th Prairie Conservation and Endangered Species Conference          
                   
February 16-19, 2016
San Antonio, Texas
      International Erosion Control Association Conference: Environmental Connection          
                   
February 18-21, 2016
Nauvoo, Alabama
      Joint Annual Meeting of SEPARC and ALAPARC - Herp Conservation on Private Lands          
                   
February 21-24, 2016
San Diego, California
      National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA’s) 2016 Winter Conference:Back to Basics . . . Will Compliance Concerns Derail Efforts to Innovate?          
                   
February 21-26, 2016
New Orleans, Louisiana
      2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting          
                   
February 22-24, 2016
Denver, Colorado
     

International LiDAR Mapping Forum

         
                   
February 23-24, 2016
Albuquerque, New Mexico
      National Groundwater Association Conference: Hydrology and Water Quality in the Southwest          
                   
February 23-25, 2016
Washington, D.C.
     

Semiannual Meeting of the Great Lakes Commission and Great Lakes Day

         
                   
February 23-25, 2016
Green Bay, Wisconsin
      Wisconsin Wetlands Association 21st Annual Wetland Science Conference          
                   
February 24-25, 2016
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
      Computational Hydraulics International (CHI): 49th International Conference on Water Management Modeling. Call for papers due on February 3, 2016.          
                   
February 25-26, 2016
Albuquerque, New Mexico
      Xeriscape Council of New Mexico: 2016 Land & Water Summit: Creating a New Paradigm for Living in Arid Lands          
                   
MARCH 2016                  
                   
March 1-3, 2016
New Orleans, Louisiana
      RES/CON New Orleans          
                   
March 2-3, 2016
University of Michigan
Dearborn, Michigan
      Annual Great Lakes Areas of Concern Conference. Hosted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. More information will be available soon.          
                   
March 6-11, 2016
Sydney, Australia
      International Coastal Symposium (ICS2016): ‘Coasts in Space and Time’          
                   
March 7-10, 2016
Providence, Rhode Island
      American Water Works Association: Sustainable Water Management Conference          
                   
March 8-10, 2016
Seattle, Washington
      2016 Climate Leadership Conference          
                   
March 10-11, 2016
Denver, Colorado
      Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute 25th Anniversary Conference: Western Places/Western Spaces: Examining the Past, Exploring the Future          
                   
March 10-11, 2016
Wisconsin Dells
      Annual meeting of the Wisconsin Section of the American Water Resources Association (AWRA): 40 Years of Wisconsin Waters: Quantity, Quality, Technology          
                   
March 18-19, 2016
Baltimore, Maryland
      Ecological Society of America's 3rd Life Discovery - Doing Science Education Conference          
                   
March 20-22, 2016
Scottsdale, Arizona
      National Flood Determination Association 2016 Conference          
                   
March 21-24, 2016
San Diego, California
      Association for Environmental Health and Sciences Foundation, Inc.: 26th Annual International Conference on Soil, Water, Energy, and Air          
                   
March 22-24, 2016
Burlington, Vermont
      14th Annual Climate Prediction Application Science Workshop (CPASW): hosted by the NOAA National Weather Service Climate Services Branch, University of Vermont, and other climate services partners.          
                   
March 29-April 2, 2016
Vancouver, BC
      Society for Applied Anthropology 76th Annual Meeting          
                   
APRIL 2016                  
                   
April 3-7, 2016
Asheville, North Carolina
     

US-IALE 2016 Annual Meeting: Landscape Change

         
                   
April 8-10, 2016
Kutztown, Pennsylvania
      Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Ecological Society of America: 2016 annual meeting. Registration and abstract submission is scheduled to open early February.          
                   
April 12, 2016
Multiple Locations
      Center for Watershed Protection: 2016 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference. This conference will take place in multiple locations across the US. The two main sites are Atlanta and Sacramento, but additional hub locations will be announced soon. The conference will also be available as a webcast.          
                   
April 14-17, 2016
Orlando, Florida
      2016 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference          
                   

April 17-22, 2016

Vienna, Austria

      European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016. Call for abstracts due by January 13, 2016.          
                   

April 18-22, 2016
Coral Springs, Florida

     

University of Florida 6th National Conference:Ecosystem Restoration (NCER): Ecosystem Restoration in Action. Call for abstracts submission deadline: Friday, January 8, 2016 [5:00 PM Eastern].

         
                   
April 25-27, 2016
Anchorage, Alaska
      2016 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference. Abstract deadline is December 1, 2015.          
                   
MAY 2016                  
                   
May 2-6, 2016
Tampa, Florida
      National Water Quality Monitoring Council: 10th National Monitoring Conference: Working Together for Clean Water          
                   
May 3-6, 2016
Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
      4th International Symposium on Ocean in a High-CO2 World          
                   
May 4-6, 2016
Sharonville, Ohio
      Tinker’s Creek Watershed Partners and the Ohio Stormwater Association: 2016 Ohio Stormwater Conference          
                   
May 8-12, 2016
Towson University
Baltimore, Maryland
      International Society for Ecological Modelling Global Conference 2016          
                   
May 10-13, 2016
Fort Worth, Texas
      JT&A, Inc.: 2016 National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference          
                   
May 10-13, 2016
Rotterdam, The Netherlands
      4th International Climate Change Adaptation Conference: Adaptation Futures is the biennial conference of PROVIA (Global Programme of Research on Climate Change Vulnerability, Impacts and Adaptation          
                   
May 20-23, 2016
Mobile, Alabama
     

River Network: River Rally

         
                   
May 21-26, 2016
Sacramento, California
      Society for Freshwater Science annual meeting: Running on Empty: Increasing Demands on Freshwater Resources in the Face of a Changing Climate. Submit abstracts by January 29, 2016.          
                   
May 23-27, 2016
Busan, Korea
      World Fisheries Congress          
                   
May 31-June 3, 2016
Ann Arbor, Michigan
      23rd IAHR International Symposium on Ice. November 25th, 2015 abstracts due.          
                   
May 31-June 4, 2016
Corpus Christi, Texas
      Society of Wetland Scientist's 2016 Annual Meeting: Protecting wetland ecosystem services. Promoting stronger economies          
                   
JUNE 2016                  
                   
June 1-3, 2016
San Antonio, Texas
      Resource Institute: Southwest Stream Restoration Conference. Submit abstracts by January 15, 2016.          
                   
June 1-5, 2016 Anchorage, Alaska       79th Annual Ducks Unlimited National Convention          
                   
June 3-4 2016
Ames, Iowa
      5th Iowa State University Summer Symposium: Science Communication: Confronting the challenges of public participation in environmental, planning and health decision-making. Call for proposal deadline is January 29, 2016.          
                   
June 5-10, 2016
Santa Fe, New Mexico
      ASLO 2016 Summer Meeting          
                   
June 6–10, 201
Guelph, Ontario
      International Association for Great Lakes - 59th Annual Conference on Great Lakes Research: Great Lakes Solutions: Integrating Across Disciplines & Scales          
                   
June 12-14, 2016
Toronto, Canada
      Coastal Zone Canada Association: Coastal Zone Canada Conference          
                   
June 19-24, 2016
Grand Rapids, Michigan
      ASFPM's 40th Annual National Conference: "Great Lakes - Grand Partners"          
                   
JULY 2016          
                   
July 10-13, 2016
Broomfield, Colorado
      Natural Hazard Center: 41st Annual Natural Hazards Research and Applications Workshop. Proposal submissions due by January 15, 2016.          
                   
July 11-13, 2016
Sacramento, California
      2016 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: GIS and Water Resources          
                   
July 17-20, 2016
Illinois State University
Normal, Illinois
      24th North American Prairie Conference: From Cemetery Prairies to National Tallgrass Prairies          
                   
July 17-20, 2016
Madison, Wisconsin
      Society for Conservation Biology North America: 3rd North America Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB): Communicating Science for Conservation Action          
                   

July 18-20, 2016

Arlington, Virginia
      Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum. Abstracts due by December 10, 2015.          
                   
July 18-22, 2016
St. Augustine, Florida
      University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences: Mangrove & Macrobenthos Meeting. Call for abstracts deadline is December 20, 2015.          
                   
July 24-29, 2016
University of New England,
Biddeford, Maine
      2016 Gordon Research Conference: Unifying Ecology Across Scales: Linking the Levels from Physiological to Ecosystem Ecology          
                   
July 30-August 3, 2016
St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
      4th International Marine Conservation Congress (IMCC4): Making Marine Science Matter          
                   
AUGUST 2016          
                   
August 7-12, 2016
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
      2016 Ecological Society of America's (ESA) annual meeting          
                   
August 14-18, 2016 Chicago, Illinois       American Society of Civil Engineers: GEO Sustainability & Geoenvironment
         
                   
August 22-25, 2016 Indianapolis, Indiana       StormCon: Designing the Future of Stormwater. Call for papers deadline is December 9, 2015          
                   
August 27-September 2, 2016
Stockholm, Sweden
      2016 World Water Week. Abstract due by January 24, 2016.          
                   
SEPTEMBER 2016          
                   
September 1-10, 2016
Waikiki, Hawaii
      IUCN World Conservation Congress: Planet at the crossroads          
                   
September 19-24, 2016
Changshu, China
      INTECOL Wetland Working Group, People’s Government of Changshu, Nanjing University: 10th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference          
                   
September 27-30, 2016
Mount Royal University
Alberta, Canada
      Under Western Skies (UWS) is a biennial, interdisciplinary conference series on the environment with the theme Water: Events, Trends, Analysis. Call for proposal deadline is January 31, 2016.          
                   
OCTOBER 2016                  
                   
October 19-21, 2016
San Diego, California
      Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum - West Coast          
                   
DECEMBER 2016          
                   
December 10-15, 2016
New Orleans, Louisiana
      8th National Summit: Our Coasts, Our Future, Our Choice and 25th Biennial Meeting of The Coastal Society          
                   
TRAINING        
           
JANUARY 2016          
                   
January 5-8, 2016 Jackson, Mississippi       Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: ACOE Wetland Delineation, Waters of the US and Regional Supplement Training. For other dates and locations, go here.          
                   
January 11-19, 2016
Online
      UC Davis Extension online course: Sustainability and the Built Environment: An Overview Explore sustainability principles as they apply to the built environment—from the economic, environmental and social-equity perspectives          
                   
January 11-February 5, 2016
Online
      The Swamp School online course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments          
                   
January 11-April 1, 2016
Online
      The Swamp School online course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist          
                   
January 11-April 1, 2016
Online
     

The Swamp School online course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training

         
                   
January 13-March 31, 2016
Online
      Online Course: The Swamp School: Principles of Wetland Design          
                   
January 14-28, 2016
Lacey, Washington
      Coastal Training Program course: How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials          
                   
January 17-22, 2016
Oracle, Arizona
      CUAHSI and the University of Arizona course: Watershed Science Master Class          
                   
January 18-February 14, 2016
Online
     

The Swamp School online course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment

         
                   
January 25, 2016
Lacey, Washington
     

Coastal Training Program course: High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (MORNING SESSION ONLY)

         
                   
January 25, 2016
Lacey, Washington
      Coastal Training Program course: High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (BOTH MORNING AND AFTERNOON)          
                   
January 25-March 4, 2016
Online
      UC Davis Extension online course: Building Efficiencies: Low Carbon and Renewable Energies          
                   
January 26-28, 2016 Seattle Washington       National Environmental Training Center Course: ArcGIS 10: An Introduction to Environmental Applications          
                   
January 28-29, 2016
Denver, Colorado
      Urban Watershed Research Institute course: Modeling LID Performance with EPA SWMM 5          
                   
FEBRUARY 2016          
                   
February 3, 2016
Padilla Bay Reserve, Mount Vernon, Washington
     

Coastal Training Program course: Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats

         
                   

February 8-12, 2016
San Diego, California

     

Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation. For other dates and locations, go here.

         
February 8 - April 22, 2016
Online
      The Swamp School online class: Principles of Wetland Design          

February 17-18, 2016
Kauaʻi, Hawaii

     

Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher. For other dates and locations, go here.

         
                   
February 22-25, 2016
Oriskany, New York
      ASFPM is co-sponsoring the FEMA Emergency Management Institute (EMI) 273 course: Managing Floodplain Development Through the NFIP          
                   

February 23-25, 2016
Padilla Bay Reserve
Mt. Vernon, Washington

     

Coastal Training Program course: Environmental Negotiations

         
                   
February 25-26, 2016
Denver, Colorado
      Urban Watershed Research Institute course: Dam Safety Practices & Hydrology          
                   
MARCH 2016          
                   
March 3-4, 2016
Sacramento California
      UC Davis Extension course: Environmental Planning and Site Analysis          
                   
March 16-17, 2016
University of Phoenix-St. Louis Park, St. Lois Park, Minnesota
      Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) course: Habitat Site Restoration          
                   
March 17-18, 2016
Sacramento, California
      UC Davis Extension course: Planning and Environmental Law          
                   
March 22-24, 2016
Yakima, Washington
     

Coastal Training Program course: Environmental Negotiations (Eastern WA)

         
                   
March 24-25, 2016
Denver, Colorado
      Urban Watersheds Research Institute course: LID and BMP Selection, Design & Economics          
                   

March 29-31, 2016
Oracle, Arizona

     

2016 NASA/CUAHSI Remote Sensing Hydrology Workshop. Register by February 15, 2016.

         
                   

March 30-31, 2016

Lacey, Washington
     

Coastal Training Program course: Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington

         
                   
APRIL 2016                  
                   
April 4-6, 2016
Naples, Florida
      Everglades Wetland Research Park course: Creation and Restoration of Wetlands. Register by February 19, 2016 for a 10% discount.          
                   
JUNE 2016                  
                   
June 3, 2016
University at Buffalo
      University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Aquatic & Terrestrial Invasive Species Management          
                   
June 6-7, 2016
University at Buffalo
      University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Fundamentals of Stream Channel          
                   
June 8-9, 2016
University at Buffalo
      University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Watershed Management Planning, Assessment, & Monitoring          
                   
SPECIAL EVENTS 2015          
                   
February 2, 2016       World Wetlands Day 2016: Wetlands for our Future: Sustainable Livelihoods          
                   
May 21, 2016
Global
      World Fish Migration Foundation: World Fish Migration Day: Connecting Fish, Rivers and People. The World Fish Migration Day (WFMD) is a one day global-local event to create worldwide awareness on the importance of open rivers and migratory fish. This event is celebrated by over 1000 organizations around the globe.          
                   

For more wetland events, meetings, conferences, and courses nationwide, visit the ASWM calendar.

         
           

Wetland Breaking News - December 2015


INDEX

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • Administration Announces Public-Private Innovation Strategy to Build a Sustainable Water Future
  • Paris summit seals ambitious climate agreement
  • British Columbia, Alaska sign pact on protecting shared waterways
  • US, Cuba sign first environmental accord since thaw
  • ASWM’s Members’ Wetland Webinar – Wetlands and Nutrient Uptake – January 27, 2016

NATIONAL NEWS

  • $4 Million Grant Will Enhance Great Lakes Decision Making
  • 92 lawmakers, 22 states side with Farm Bureau in TMDL appeal
  • P.A. Broke Law With Social Media Push for Water Rule, Auditor Finds
  • US agency rarely intervened in projects that could risk endangered species
  • $1-billion desalination plant, hailed as model for state, opens in Carlsbad
  • USDA Announces $50 Million to Help Ag Producers Restore Wildlife Habitat
  • Supreme Court wades into major permitting squabble
  • House Votes to Ban Tiny Polluting Microbeads From Your Face Wash
  • New Funding Opportunity for Coastal Watershed Restoration in Southeast New England
  • FY 2016 Request for Proposals from Indian Tribes and Intertribal Consortia for Nonpoint Source Management Grants Under Clean Water Act (CWA) Section 319
  • Researchers to Probe Links Between Human Activities, Water Quality
  • New institute launched to help improve nation's soil health
  • Are humans using too much water?
  • National Academy of Sciences Releases Its Review of the Landscape Conservation Cooperatives
  • Agency Seeks Monitoring of Mercury Pollution in Great Lakes
  • Habitat loss seen as rising threat to world's migratory birds
  • Farms near Lake Erie get millions
  • Board questions EPA draft report on fracking
  • EPA is developing guidelines for swimmers and toxic algae
  • National water quality database released to address nutrient challenges
  • New Report: Spotted Turtle Among 10 U.S. Species Most Threatened by Habitat Fragmentation
  • EPA Releases Strategic Plan for Protecting Drinking Water from Harmful Algal Blooms
  • USDA Announces $350M Available to Help States, Private Partners Protect and Restore Grasslands, Wetlands, and Working Lands

STATE NEWS

  • CA: El Nino to Bring Relief, Not Cure, to Calif. Drought
  • CA: Salmon RIP?
  • CA: Wetlands clean water the natural way
  • CA: Tony Thurmond: Restoring wetlands is a green defense against rising bay
  • CO: Colorado Water Plan addresses agricultural water use
  • DE: Delmarva Fox Squirrel Leaps off Endangered Species List
  • LA: Project offers new shoreline stabilization and restoration solutions for wetlands
  • MI: In Flint, Mich., there’s so much lead in children’s blood that a state of emergency is declared
  • MI: New Zealand mudsnail Michigan's latest invasive species
  • MI: Science in Action - Restoring Fish Habitat in Urban Rivers
  • MN: In Minnesota's farm country, clean water is costly
  • MO: Wetland restoration projects receive $3.1 million in funding
  • NJ: EPA Provides $1 Million to Protect Wetlands in New Jersey
  • NJ: Dirty Little Secrets: New Jersey Is Just a Storm Away from a Major Toxic Mess
  • NY: EPA Provides $691,000 to Protect Wetlands throughout New York State
  • PA: Study finds causes for mutant bass in Susquehanna River
  • VT: Vermont targets roads to reduce Lake Champlain pollution
  • VA: Dominion wants to drain coal ash ponds into local waterways
  • VA: Long-awaited project to stem tide of erosion at DC area marsh
  • WI: Wisconsin DNR Prepares to Advance Waukesha Request to Borrow Great Lakes Water
  • WI: GOP lawmakers propose bill shrinking state natural resource areas
  • WI: Wetland ‘banks’ empty after developers take advantage of new rules

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • Leaving it to beavers: Communities make room for natural engineers
  • Saturated buffers reduce nitrates in runoff from farms’ tile drains
  • Acid trip: Great Lakes could face similar acidification risk as the seas
  • UMD researcher helps develop method to measure how wetland restorations affect greenhouse gases
  • Autumn Was Warmest on Record for Lower 48
  • Activist: Re-frog America, build a sanctuary
  • Carbon sequestration in soil requires lazy microbes
  • Poisonous amphibians may be more likely to go extinct
  • Congresswoman Defends NOAA Scientists From Lamar Smith 'Witch Hunt'
  • Piping plovers losing breeding habitat to wetland drainage
  • New study casts doubt on how much sea levels may rise from the collapse of the Antarctic ice sheet
  • New report finds human-caused climate change increased the severity of many extreme events in 2014

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • Congressional Research Service Report: EPA and the Army Corps’ Rule to Define “Waters of the United States”
  • Methodology for Tidal Wetland and Seagrass Restoration, v1.0

POTPOURRI

  • The West Coast Groundfish Recovery: The Best Fish News You Haven’t Heard Yet
  • Spotted Turtle One of 10 Species with “No Room to Roam”
  • Paddling the peninsula, a journey through time
  • Working for Clean Water is a Dream Come True

WEBINARS, MEETINGS, TRAINING

Webinars

  • Sustain Our Great Lakes 2016 Funding Opportunity webinar
  • Environmental Law Institute's In-Lieu Fee Mitigation Training Webinar: Functional Assessments in Crediting
  • USDA NRCS West National Technology Support Center webinar: Soil Water Sensors for Agriculture - Theory and Issues
  • The Swamp School’s 2016 Wetland Status and Trends
  • SWS Webinar: Climate Change in the American Mind: What we think, feel, do and understand about global warming and how wetlands professionals can speak about it with their constituencies
  • Michigan Department of Environmental Quality webinar: E. coli in Surface Waters: Michigan's Statewide Bacterial Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL)
  • Grazing Strategies for Riparian and Wet Meadow Improvement in the Sagebrush Steppe
  • Getting your feet wet: An introduction to water quality monitoring and data analysis
  • Voodoo Hydrology—Pitfalls of Urban Hydrology Methods & What You Need to Know
  • Introduction: A New Look at Wastewater: A Valued Resource
  • ASWM Members’ Wetland Webinar: Wetlands and Nutrient Uptake
  • AWRA webinar: Climate Change Adaption: Flood
  • Maps and Datasets for Blue Carbon Habitats
  • Using Flood Risk Products Virtual Brown Bag Webinar: "Using Percent Annual Chance Data"
  • AWRA webinar: Climate Change Adaption: Drought Response and Governance

Meetings

  • Keeping the Great Lakes Water Pure

· Unifying Biological Principles Across Disciplines

  • Earth System Science in Service to Society
  • Science, Practice & Art of Restoring Native Ecosystems Conference
  • 9th International Conference on Marine Bioinvasions (ICMB-IX)
  • The Food-Energy-Water Nexus 16th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy, and the Environment
  • Yale Chapter of International Society of Tropical Foresters (ISTF): 22nd Annual ISTF Conference
  • One Gulf: Healthy Ecosystems, healthy communities
  • Advancing Wetland Science and Conservation in the Mid-Atlantic Region
  • Conversations on Conservation - Engaging landowners thru Effective Communication
  • Today’s Youth, Tomorrow’s Stewards: Engaging Students, Schools and Communities
  • Save The River’s 27th Annual Winter Environmental Conference
  • Alaska Forum on the Environment
  • Tamarisk Coalition's 13th Annual Conference: The Road to Riparian Restoration
  • Species on the Move International Conference
  • National Wetland Trust: National Wetland Restoration Symposium
  • Practical Tools & Innovative Strategies for Creating Great Communities
  • 11th Prairie Conservation and Endangered Species Conference
  • International Erosion Control Association Conference: Environmental Connection
  • Joint Annual Meeting of SEPARC and ALAPARC - Herp Conservation on Private Lands
  • Back to Basics . . . Will Compliance Concerns Derail Efforts to Innovate?
  • 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting
  • International LiDAR Mapping Forum
  • Hydrology and Water Quality in the Southwest
  • Semiannual Meeting of the Great Lakes Commission and Great Lakes Day
  • 21st Annual Wetland Science Conference
  • 49th International Conference on Water Management Modeling
  • 2016 Land & Water Summit: Creating a New Paradigm for Living in Arid Lands
  • RES/CON New Orleans
  • Annual Great Lakes Areas of Concern Conference
  • International Coastal Symposium (ICS2016): ‘Coasts in Space and Time’
  • American Water Works Association: Sustainable Water Management Conference
  • 2016 Climate Leadership Conference
  • Western Places/Western Spaces: Examining the Past, Exploring the Future
  • 40 Years of Wisconsin Waters: Quantity, Quality, Technology
  • Ecological Society of America's 3rd Life Discovery - Doing Science Education Conference
  • National Flood Determination Association 2016 Conference
  • 26th Annual International Conference on Soil, Water, Energy, and Air
  • 14th Annual Climate Prediction Application Science Workshop (CPASW)
  • Society for Applied Anthropology 76th Annual Meeting
  • US-IALE 2016 Annual Meeting: Landscape Change
  • Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Ecological Society of America: 2016 annual meeting
  • Center for Watershed Protection: 2016 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference
  • 2016 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference
  • European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016
  • Ecosystem Restoration (NCER): Ecosystem Restoration in Action
  • 2016 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference
  • 10th National Monitoring Conference

· 4th International Symposium on: Ocean in a High-CO2 World

  • 2016 Ohio Stormwater Conference
  • International Society for Ecological Modelling Global Conference 2016
  • 2016 National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference
  • 4th International Climate Change Adaptation Conference: Adaptation Futures
  • River Network: River Rally
  • Running on Empty: Increasing Demands on Freshwater Resources in the Fae of a Changing Climate
  • World Fisheries Congress
  • 23rd IAHR International Symposium on Ice
  • Protecting wetland ecosystem services. Promoting stronger economies
  • Resource Institute: Southwest Stream Restoration Conference
  • 79th Annual Ducks Unlimited National Convention
  • Science Communication: Confronting the challenges of public participation in environmental, planning and health decision-making
  • ASLO 2016 Summer Meeting
  • Great Lakes Solutions: Integrating Across Disciplines & Scales
  • Coastal Zone Canada Association: Coastal Zone Canada Conference
  • ASFPM's 40th Annual National Conference: "Great Lakes - Grand Partners"
  • 41st Annual Natural Hazards Research and Applications Workshop
  • 2016 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: GIS and Water Resources
  • From Cemetery Prairies to National Tallgrass Prairies
  • 3rd North America Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB): Communicating Science for Conservation Action
  • Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum
  • University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences: Mangrove &Macrobenthos Meeting
  • 2016 Gordon Research Conference: Unifying Ecology Across Scales: Linking the Levels from Physiological to Ecosystem Ecology
  • 4th International Marine Conservation Congress (IMCC4): Making Marine Science Matter
  • 2016 Ecological Society of America's (ESA) annual meeting
  • American Society of Civil Engineers: GEO Sustainability &Geoenvironment
  • StormCon: Designing the Future of Stormwater
  • 2016 World Water Week
  • IUCN World Conservation Congress: Planet at the crossroads
  • 10th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference
  • Water: Events, Trends, Analysis
  • Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum - West Coast
  • 8th National Summit: Our Coasts, Our Future, Our Choice and 25th Biennial Meeting of The Coastal Society

Training

  • ACOE Wetland Delineation, Waters of the US and Regional Supplement Training
  • Sustainability and the Built Environment: An Overview Explore sustainability principles as they apply to the built environment—from the economic, environmental and social-equity perspectives
  • The Swamp School online course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments.
  • The Swamp School online course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
  • The Swamp School online course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School: Principles of Wetland Design
  • How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
  • Watershed Science Master Class
  • The Swamp School online course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment
  • High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (MORNING SESSION ONLY)
  • High Resolution Change Detection: Tracking Land Cover Change (BOTH MORNING AND AFTERNOON)
  • Building Efficiencies: Low Carbon and Renewable Energies
  • ArcGIS 10: An Introduction to Environmental Applications
  • Urban Watershed Research Institute course: Modeling LID Performance with EPA SWMM 5
  • Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • The Swamp School online class: Principles of Wetland Design
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher
  • ASFPM is co-sponsoring the FEMA Emergency Management Institute (EMI) 273 course: Managing Floodplain Development Through the NFIP
  • Coastal Training Program course: Environmental Negotiations
  • Urban Watershed Research Institute course: Dam Safety Practices & Hydrology
  • Environmental Planning and Site Analysis
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC)course: Habitat Site Restoration
  • UC Davis Extension course: Planning and Environmental Law
  • Coastal Training Program course: Environmental Negotiations (Eastern WA)
  • Urban Watersheds Research Institute course: LID and BMP Selection, Design & Economics
  • 2016 NASA/CUAHSI Remote Sensing Hydrology Workshop
  • Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
  • Everglades Wetland Research Park course: Creation and Restoration of Wetlands
  • University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Aquatic & Terrestrial Invasive Species Management
  • University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Fundamentals of Stream Channel
  • University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Watershed Management Planning, Assessment, & Monitoring

SPECIAL EVENTS

  • World Wetlands Day 2016: Wetlands for our Future: Sustainable Livelihoods
  • World Fish Migration Day: Connecting Fish, Rivers and People



Wetland Breaking News - December 2015

 

Wetland Breaking News

The Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News (WBN) is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those working in water resources and related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published for over fifteen years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.

Wetland Breaking News - December 2015The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to .

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled and Edited by Marla Stelk, Editor; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors. Executive Director: Jeanne Christie. Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399 Fax: 207-892-3089

All photos by Jeanne Christie, ASWM

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