Wetland Breaking News - February 2016

                     
   
IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES &
PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

 

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Wetland Breaking New: February 2016

All photos by
Jeanne Christie, ASWM

       

EDITOR'S NOTEWetland Breaking News - February 2016

The headlines this past month have been dominated with stories about water quality – spurred by the crisis in Flint, Michigan. And while not directly related to wetland management, the bigger subject of water quality is related as wetlands are a critical player in the world’s hydrological system and provide important water quality ecosystem services.

As bad as the situation is in Flint, it is the tip of the iceberg on what is an even worse reality – there are many more Flint’s out there. In my Editor’s Choice section, I recommend reading the article “Unsafe Lead Levels in Tap Water Not Limited to Flint.” I learned in this article that not only do corrosive agents in water sources (such as rivers, streams and lakes) release the lead in lead pipes into our drinking water, but undetected chloride from road salt can also corrode aged lead pipes running in to older homes. And as you browse through the State News section, you’ll see story after story about water pollution issues such as poultry waste in the Chesapeake Bay and a dioxane plume spreading toward Huron River. In Ohio and Wisconsin communities have unsafe levels of lead in their drinking water. And in Hoosick Falls, New York residents are dealing with groundwater contamination from two industrial plants.

Fingers are being pointed everywhere – and in particular at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Yet at the same time, the EPA is being accused of “overreaching” with the new Clean Water Rule and according to the article about Flint, “adjusted for inflation, the $100 million annual budget of the E.P.A.’s drinking water office has fallen 15 percent since 2006, and the office has lost more than a tenth of its staff.”

It will require more investment, not less, to fix our water quality crisis in this country. We have to research where all our lead service lines are and start prioritizing their replacement. We need to regulate activities that threaten the water quality of our streams and other water bodies that provide drinking water to our homes and our families. And we need to protect and restore our wetlands to assist with efforts to manage and protect our critical water resources.

Marla J. Stelk, Editor
Wetland Breaking News

     
                     

EDITOR'S CHOICE

House passes bill requiring EPA actions on lead-laced water

By Timothy Gardner – Planet Ark – February 12, 2016
The U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday easily passed a bill requiring federal environmental regulators to act faster when lead contamination is found in drinking water. The bill passed 416-2. It was crafted by Michigan Representatives Dan Kildee, a Democrat, and Fred Upton, a Republican, in the wake of Flint's drinking water crisis. The measure requires the Environmental Protection Agency to notify the public when concentrations of lead in drinking water rise above mandated levels and to create a plan to improve communication between the agency, utilities, states, and consumers. For full story, click here.

Unsafe Lead Levels in Tap Water Not Limited to Flint

By Michael Wines and John Schwartz – The New York Times – February 8, 2016
In Sebring, Ohio, routine laboratory tests last August found unsafe levels of lead in the town’s drinking water after workers stopped adding a chemical to keep lead water pipes from corroding. Five months passed before the city told pregnant women and children not to drink the water, and shut down taps and fountains in schools. In 2001, after Washington, D.C. changed how it disinfected drinking water, lead in tap water at thousands of homes spiked as much as 20 times the federally approved level. Residents did not find out for three years. When they did, officials ripped out lead water pipes feeding 17,600 homes — and discovered three years later that many of the repairs had only prolonged the contamination. For full story, click here.

EPA 'seeks to strengthen' safe water laws amid widespread testing concerns

By Oliver Milman – The Guardian – February 2, 2016
The US Environmental Protection Agency aims to “strengthen” existing safe water laws, in response to findings that many cities are downplaying the levels of lead in their water. Since news proliferated of dangerous lead contamination in Flint’s water, the Guardian revealed that numerous US cities and states, including Philadelphia, Detroit and Rhode Island, advise residents to run their faucets for several minutes the night before taking a sample of water for lead tests. The EPA, which has come under fire for its response to the Flint crisis and its reluctance to stamp out the altered tests, will work to clarify best practice with water authorities, a spokeswoman told the Guardian. An update to the 25-year-old lead and copper rule is expected in 2017 but the EPA said it would act in the meantime. For full story, click here.

How cases like Flint destroy public trust in science

By Chelsea Harvey – The Washington Post – January 27, 2016
As the investigation into the water crisis in Flint, Mich., continues to unfold, disturbing reports have arisen that raise questions about the integrity of government science agencies and their possible engagement in scientific misconduct or even outright science denial. It’s a component of the story that may represent the next major blow to public trust in science — a problem that is linked to everything from doubt over the existence of anthropogenic climate change to worries over the safety of vaccines. For full story, click here.

ASWM’s Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar: Water Rights & Wetland Restoration – February 23, 2016

ASWM’s Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar: Water Rights & Wetland Restoration will be held on – February 23, 2016 at 3:00 p.m. ET. Presented by Alan J. Leak, P.E., Program Manager, Water Rights and Infrastructure at RESPEC and Julie A. Merritt, Water Resources Specialist/Project Manager, WGM Group. For more information and to register, click here.

Future Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar: The Ecology, Engineering & Economics of Natural Coastal Defenses – March 1, 2016

NFFA webinar: The Ecology, Engineering & Economics of Natural Coastal Defenses will be held on March 1, 2016 3:00pm - 4:30pm ET. Presented by Mike Beck, The Nature Conservancy and Adjunct Professor in Ocean Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz. For more information and to register, click here.

NATIONAL NEWSWetland Breaking News - January 2016

The Environmental Impact of the U.S.-Mexico Border Wall

By Melissa Gaskill – Newsweek – February 14, 2016
A line of 18-foot-tall steel posts placed four inches apart cuts like a scar across the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge near McAllen, Texas. It’s a stretch of a barrier extending intermittently across 650 miles of the U.S.-Mexico border from California to Texas, and presidential candidates Ted Cruz, Donald Trump and Marco Rubio vow to enlarge it if elected. The barrier is intended to deter illegal immigration and smuggling. Whether it has achieved those aims remains unclear, but what is clear in this part of Texas is that sections of the barrier bisect and isolate public and private lands, threatening to decimate wildlife habitats and leaving communities on both sides of the border that rely on wildlife tourism to wither. For full story, click here.

USDA, Partners to Invest $720 Million in Large-Scale, Targeted Conservation Projects Across the Nation

Contact: Office of Communications – USDA – February 12, 2016
Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and partners across the nation together will direct up to $720 million towards 84 conservation projects that will help communities improve water quality, combat drought, enhance soil health, support wildlife habitat and protect agricultural viability. These projects make up the second round of the Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP) created by the 2014 Farm Bill. For full news release, click here.

Chesapeake Conservancy: Obama Budget Contains $29M for Bay

CBS Baltimore – February 10, 2016
The Chesapeake Conservancy says the Obama administration included $29 million in the fiscal 2017 budget for land conservation across the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The conservation group says the funding will help protect significant wildlife habitat and historical sites in Virginia and Maryland. Under the proposed spending plan, the National Park Service and other federal agencies would receive the funding. For full story, click here.

Environmentalists dismayed at proposed budget cuts to Great Lakes restoration programs

By James F. McCarty – Clevland.com – February 9, 2016
Environmental groups reacted with dismay today after it was learned that President Obama's proposed budget would cut $50 million from the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. The Great Lakes program currently is funded with $300 million. But the president's proposal would reduce that funding to $250 million – the third year in a row the president has recommended cutting funding to the initiative, said Todd Ambs, campaign director of the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition. For the past six years, the initiative has supported more than 2,900 projects in Ohio and the other seven Great Lakes states to restore fish and wildlife habitat, clean up toxic pollutants, combat invasive species, and reduce runoff from cities and farms. "Now is not the time to cut successful programs that protect our drinking water, jobs and way of life," Ambs said. For full story, click here.

President's FY 2017 Budget Request of $1.6 Billion for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Contact: Gavin Shire – U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service – February 9, 2016
President Obama’s Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 budget request for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) underscores the Administration’s commitment to building partnerships, strengthening management and using science to conserve wildlife and ecosystems. It emphasizes improving the resilience of communities and wild landscapes, enabling them to better adapt to a rapidly changing environment, and uses smart investments in conservation and landscape-level planning to improve the Service’s ability to facilitate economic growth, while avoiding and mitigating the impacts on wildlife and habitat. For full press release, click here.

Engineers struggle to put streams back into the urban landscape

By Brian Bienkowski – Environmental Health News – February 8, 2016
When Jacob Napieralski brought some kids from Detroit to his campus at University of Michigan-Dearborn, he got to show a few something for the first time: a river. The Rouge River, which empties into the Detroit River, borders the campus in the Detroit suburb. “I was amazed at how many kids had never seen a river before,” said Napieralski, an associate professor of geology at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. All the more ironic as Detroit’s historical landscape was crisscrossed with streams. Those streams got buried as city planners, to make way for orderly pavement and busy city life, buried streams underground. Detroit has buried more than 310 miles of stream channels since 1906. For full story, click here.

Views on coal mining clash in Senate hearing on stream protection rule

By Curtis Tate – McClatchyDC – February 3, 2016
An ongoing cultural battle between coal mining and environmental groups played out in a Senate hearing Wednesday over an Obama administration proposal to mitigate the impacts of coal mining activity on streams. The hearing, in the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, afforded an opportunity for mining interests and their mostly Republican supporters to hammer administration officials over the Stream Protection Rule, though the proposed rule itself isn’t to blame for coal’s troubles. In return, Democrats who support environmental groups got a chance to hit back using the recent water contamination crisis in Flint, Mich., though the lead-tainted water there was not the result of coal mining. For full story, click here.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Announces Over $20 Million in Grants to Conserve Coastal Wetlands

Contact Vanessa Kauffman – U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service – February 2, 2016
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe today announced over $20 million will be provided to 28 projects in 12 coastal states to protect, restore or enhance more than 10,000 acres of coastal wetlands and adjacent upland habitats under the National Coastal Wetlands Conservation Grant Program. State and local governments, private landowners, conservation groups and other partners will contribute over $20 million in additional funds to these projects, which acquire, restore or enhance coastal wetlands and adjacent uplands to provide long-term conservation benefits to fish and wildlife and their habitats. For full news release, click here.

EPA Releases Scientific Report Showing U.S. Coastal Waters a Mix of Good and Fair Health

Contact: Robert Daguillard – EPA-Yosemite – January 28, 2016
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today released the 2010 National Coastal Condition Assessment showing that more than half of the nation's coastal and Great Lakes nearshore waters are rated good for biological and sediment quality, while about one-third are rated good for water quality. In almost all coastal waters, however, contaminants in fish tissue pose a threat to sensitive predator fish, birds, and wildlife. The National Coastal Condition Assessment is part of a series of National Aquatic Resource Surveys (NARS) designed to advance the science of coastal monitoring and answer critical questions about the condition of waters in the United States. For full news release, click here.

USDA Seeks Proposals for Market-Based Wetland Protection Systems - Due March 28, 2016

Contact: Office of Communications – USDA – January 28, 2016
Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced the establishment of the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Wetland Mitigation Banking Program, made possible by the 2014 Farm Bill. Through the program, NRCS will provide $9 million to help states, local governments or other qualified partners develop wetland mitigation banks that restore, create, or enhance wetland ecosystems, broadening the conservation options available to farmers and ranchers so they can maintain eligibility for other USDA programs. For full news release, click here. Proposals are due to NRCS before 5:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time on March 28, 2016.

EPA science panel: Fracking study needs work

By James Fenton – Daily Times – January 24, 2016
In June, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency released a draft assessment of a study looking into hydraulic fracturing's potential impact on drinking water and concluded fracking was off the hook for water pollution. Now, a scientific panel made up of 30 expert analysts — hydrologists, geologists, scientists, many of them professors in the sciences — who oversaw the investigation, came back this month charging that the study lacked baseline testing that would have led to more insightful and revealing results. For full story, click here.

EPA Awards $32 Million to Tribes in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington

Indian Country Today Media Network – January 21, 2016
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has awarded $32 million to assist tribes in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington in developing environmental protection programs. The so-called capacity-building grants were part of the Indian Environmental General Assistance Program (GAP) and also serve to foster government-to-government relationships between tribes and the EPA, the federal agency said. “The funding helps tribes develop environmental protection programs and make informed decisions about issues that impact the health of their people and the quality of their environment,” the EPA said in a statement on January 14. For full story, click here.

EPA, Southern Co. and National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Recognize Five Star and Urban Waters Projects in the Southeast

Contact: Jason McDonald – EPA-Yosemite – January 19, 2016
Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and Southern Company met with 2014 Five Star and Urban Waters Program awardees to recognize and highlight their work to restore streams and watersheds. “EPA’s Five Star Restoration Grant Program promotes the revitalization and protection of our watersheds, lakes and streams,” said EPA Regional Administrator Heather McTeer Toney. Funds provided for these community-based projects improve environmental awareness and sustainability where residents work and play. For full news release, click here.

New Conservation Finance Network Website Will Be a Hub for News, Events and Community

Conservation Finance Network – January 15, 2016
We are pleased to announce the launch of the new Conservation Finance Network (CFN) website. This fresh site represents a new partnership between the CFN program at Island Press, Yale Center for Business and the Environment (CBEY), and The Conservation Fund (TCF). It will bring together news, training opportunities, and a professional community for conservation finance. To visit website, click here.

U.S. Governors Address Water

By Brett Walton – Circle of Blue – January 15, 2016
President Barack Obama did not directly mention water in the State of the Union speech on Tuesday night. References to climate change were the closest he came. But governors, in their State of the State addresses, are not as circumspect. Because water is managed primarily at the state and local level, state leaders often have an ardent interest in the topic — this year perhaps even more than usual. A potentially precedent-setting Clean Water Act lawsuit in Iowa filed a year ago forced state officials to look for new approaches to farm pollution. Drought in the American West prompted a reexamination of state water policies. And the slow draining of the Ogallala Aquifer, lifeblood of the Great Plains, continues to weigh on Kansas. For full story, click here.

EPA Launches Visualize Your Water Challenge to Find Solutions to Nutrient Pollution

Challenge.gov
Visualize Your Water is an exciting challenge that will equip high school students with new technology skills and help to broaden their understanding of nutrient pollution issues. Students will submit their best, most innovative visualization that tells a story about nutrient pollution in a local waterway. For more information, click here. Submission dates: January 13, 2016 - March 1, 2016.

West's water reservoir managers face big losses from evaporation

By Bruce Finley – The Denver Post – December 30, 2015
As water managers in the western United States increasingly consider new and expanded reservoirs to store more water, they face potentially huge losses from evaporation. Some are looking at underground storage, covering and shading reservoirs, and adjusting water levels to try to save hundreds of billions of gallons. Water equivalent to roughly 10 percent of the annual flow in the Colorado River is lost each year to evaporation from just two massive reservoirs, Lake Powell and Lake Mead, according to researchers at the University of Colorado. For full story, click here.

Improving Tools for Quantifying the Effectiveness of Conservation

By Joanna Nelson – Cool Green Science – December 4, 2015
Despite concerted efforts toward evidence-based and quantified conservation, understanding the effects and the effectiveness of conservation interventions lags far behind most other policy fields, such as poverty reduction or educational enrollment (Ferraro and Pattanayak 2006). For example, one of the primary tools of maintaining the diversity of life on Earth has been the establishment of legally protected areas. But conservation is still lacking quantifiable answers to important questions about their true effectiveness: Do protected areas conserve species, habitats, and other forms of biodiversity? Do protected areas protect the health, opportunities, and income of local people? For full blog post, click here.

Weyerhaeuser to Buy Timber Rival Plum Creek for $8.4 Billion

By Jen Skerritt – Bloomberg.com – November 9, 2015
Weyerhaeuser Co. agreed to buy Plum Creek Timber Co. for about $8.4 billion to create a real estate investment trust that will be the largest private owner of timberland in the U.S. The new company will own more than 13 million acres (5.3 million hectares) of timberland across the U.S. and produce lumber and wood-fiber boards used in construction. The companies said the merger will save $100 million of costs each year. For full story, click here.

 

STATE NEWSWetland Breaking News - February 2016

CA: Concrete-lined river seen as regulatory quagmire for EPA

By Jeremy P. Jacobs – E&E Publishing – February 1, 2016
The Los Angeles River brims with actors, directors and cameramen more often than water. The wide, concrete chute has appeared as a setting for car chases in the movies "Grease," "Repo Man," "Terminator 2" and many others. And while it usually has very little flowing water, the river figures to play a pivotal role in the implementation of the Obama administration's controversial Clean Water Rule that defines which wetlands and waterways qualify for federal Clean Water Act protections. A federal appeals court has put the rule -- also known as the Waters of the U.S. rule, or WOTUS -- on hold while challenges to its constitutionality play out in court. But should the rule survive, the Los Angeles River system -- a complicated network of channels, ditches, drains and other stormwater and flood control structures -- would establish important precedents for how the rule is implemented, legal experts say. For full story, click here.

CA: El Niño is Here, But California Is Still in Drought

By Andrea Thompson – Scientific America - Climate Central – January 30, 2016
A parade of El Niño-fueled storms has marched over California in the last few weeks, bringing bouts of much needed rain and snow to the parched state. But maps of drought conditions there have barely budged, with nearly two-thirds of the state still in the worst two categories of drought. So what gives? The short answer, experts say, is that the drought built up over several years (with help from hotter temperatures fueled in part by global warming) and it will take many more storms and almost assuredly more than a single winter—even one with a strong El Niño—to erase it. For full article, click here.

CA: A Backup Plan for the Delta Smelt

By Robin Meadows – Bay Nature – January 25, 2016
Luke Ellison is holding something most of us will never get to see: a Delta smelt. Graceful, iridescent, and about as long as my finger, these fish are so rare in the wild that just six adults were found during a sample survey of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta last spring. And the Delta is the only place in the world where this endangered species lives—in the wild, that is. Delta smelt also live in enormous round outdoor tanks and smaller tanks inside dimly lit trailers filled with the sound of running water. Crowded onto two acres near the edge of the Delta, the neat rows of tanks and trailers comprise the UC Davis Fish Conservation and Culture Laboratory (FCCL), which maintains a captive population of 10,000 smelt as a hedge against their extinction in the wild and another 10,000 for research. If the wild smelt die out, the captives will be released in an effort to keep the species going. Just 50 miles east of Berkeley, the lab, founded in 1996, feels a world away amid cow pastures, vineyards, and orchards. For full article, click here.

FL: Fracking opponent warns Florida will 'become more porous than Swiss cheese'

By Brendan Farrington – The Florida Times-Union – Jacksonville.com – January 27, 2016
The state House approved a bill Wednesday that would create regulations for fracking despite strong opposition from Democrats who said the oil and gas drilling practice could contaminate groundwater, damage the environment, make people sick and hurt Florida’s tourism industry. The House voted 73-45 in favor of the bill (HB 191) after more than an hour of debate, with only a handful of Republicans joining Democrats in opposition. For full story, click here.

FL: Shuttered power plants might evict manatees

By Casey Cumley – Tampa Bay Sarasota 10 News – January 20, 2016
Experts say 60 percent of the manatee population uses power plants for refuge when temperatures drop. Here's the problem: there's talk of those plants shutting down. "Here in King’s Bay we’re the manatee capital of the world," said Ivan Vicente, with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Citrus County. The constant 74-degree water in the natural spring resting areas for manatees could become real crowded real quick. "We expect a big influx of manatees moving into the springs," said Vicente. That’s because indicators lean toward coal-powered power plants could be shutting down in the next 10 to 20 years. For full story, click here.

IA: Iowa’s nasty water war

By Clay Masters – Politico Magazine – January 21, 2016
A year ago, the Des Moines Water Works, the state of Iowa’s largest water utility, filed suit against three rural counties, charging that for years they had been polluting the city’s drinking water with impunity. In Iowa, where courtesy and cooperation rule, this was tantamount to a declaration of war. The pollution in question is nitrates, a naturally occurring byproduct of nitrogen in soil but also of the fertilizer that farmers lavish on their crops. Excessive nitrates can choke a river with algae. In extreme cases they can kill infants under six months by robbing them of oxygen, a disorder called “blue baby syndrome.” For full article, click here.

LA: Marsh creation project slated for Golden Meadow

By Meredith Burns – Houma Today – January 14, 2016
A project to restore more than 60 acres of marsh in Golden Meadow is expected to start this spring. The project, broken into two phases, will help restore the area between Catfish Lake and the south Lafourche levee system. The Lafourche Parish Council voted Tuesday to work with Ducks Unlimited on the project and set aside $250,000. About $385,000 will come from the state’s Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority and $450,000 from ConocoPhillips. Leslie Suazo, coastal restoration coordinator for Ducks Unlimited, said the first phase of the project will build about 30 acres of marsh. The second, adjoining phase will build another 30 acres and help restore an additional 20 to 25 acres. For full story, click here.

MD: Md. lawmakers address poultry waste, oyster restoration

By Josh Magness – Delmarva Now – February 2, 2016
The signs were adorned with images of poultry because, when it came to advocating for environmental regulations, no one was going to play chicken. “Pick up after yourself, Big Chicken.” “Poultry poop pollutes.” “Big Chicken should clean up its own mess … NOT Maryland taxpayers.” These statements, emblazoned on Chesapeake Bay Foundation posters, might sound silly to the casual reader. But for environmental advocates, they represent a push to hold companies financially accountable for pollution they add to the Chesapeake Bay. For full story, click here.

MD: Curtis Bay plant faulted for releasing 12 times more nitrogen into bay than permitted

By Scott Dance – The Baltimore Sun – February 1, 2016
A Curtis Bay manganese processing plant that is the largest industrial polluter of Maryland waterways has, for the past two years, dumped 12 times more nitrogen into a Patapsco River tributary than its permit allows, state officials acknowledged Monday. Erachem Comilog Inc. discharged wastewater containing more than 350,000 pounds of nitrogen in 2014 and 2015, according to public documents gathered by the Baltimore Harbor Waterkeeper in a yearlong investigation. For full story, click here.

MD: Maryland court revives water pollution lawsuit against state

By Rona Kobell – Bay Journal – February 1, 2016
Property owners may be entitled to compensation if the state government fails to act to halt pollution that is a “known and longstanding public health hazard,” Maryland’s highest court has ruled. In a case that advocates say puts the state on notice to enforce environmental laws, a divided Court of Appeals declared in late January that a Caroline County woman can pursue her claim that she lost her family’s lake and campground because state and local officials didn’t address septic contamination from a nearby town. For full article, click here.

MI: Federal grant to provide wetland acreage for Lake Huron park

WTOL.com – February 10, 2016
Michigan is receiving a $900,000 grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to help conserve wetlands on the coast of Lake Huron. The funding will go to the state Department of Natural Resources to protect over 570 acres. Most of the property consists of declining wetland types, including globally rare dunes and swales. The acquisition will provide needed linkage between the north and south units of Negwegon State Park near Thunder Bay, an important stopover area for migrating shorebirds and songbirds. For full story, click here.

MI: DEQ plans to watch dioxane plume closely as it spreads toward Huron River

By Ryan Stanton – MLive – February 5, 2016
Michigan Department of Environmental Quality officials say they're going to closely monitor a slowly expanding dioxane plume in Ann Arbor as it gets closer to the Huron River in the years ahead.
But as it stands now, they're limited by Michigan law and court orders on what they can do from an enforcement standpoint. Though some pump-and-treat remediation efforts remain ongoing to reduce the amount of dioxane in the groundwater, the pollution is still spreading, and the DEQ can't require Pall Corp. to do a full-scale cleanup. For full story, click here.

MI: EPA under fire over Flint

By Timothy Cama – The Hill – January 30, 2016
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is under fire for its handling of the drinking water crisis in Flint, Mich. Michigan and its Department of Environmental Qualilty (DEQ) have the primary responsibility to keep Flint’s drinking water safe and free of lead. But critics say the federal agency is asleep at the wheel, not doing enough and not acting quickly to stop the problem from growing out of control. Flint's lead problems also hit the national spotlight while EPA was still defending itself from the toxic mine waste spill it caused in Colorado in August, another embarrassment for the agency. The controversy and continued finger-pointing over Flint at all levels of government have put the EPA on the defensive, spurring officials to go out of their way to show that they can handle their responsibilities. For full story, go here.

MN: Critics Say Proposed Sulfide Mine in Minnesota Threatens State's Watersheds

By Dylan Blaskey and Sarah Blaskey – Truthout – February 14, 2016
Over the last century, Minnesota's "Iron Range" has produced billions of tons of iron ore, as well as its less pure counterpart taconite, both key ingredients for US steel manufacturing. Iron mining successfully bolsters the state economy and supports a large, unionized labor force. Now, as the profitability of Minnesota iron is squeezed by a global oversupply and international competition, the state is looking into sulfide mining as a potential investment for the future. Thousands of critics, however, have registered concerns about the potential environmental impact of the proposed mines. Sulfide mines are notorious for producing highly toxic contaminants that easily leach into waterways. For full story, click here.

NH: New Hampshire gets $1 million to conserve Great Bay property

WCAX.com – February 2, 2016
New Hampshire is getting a $1 million federal grant to conserve the more than 1,100-acre Great Bay Estuary-Harvey Forest and Wetlands property in Epping and Nottingham counties. The service says the New Hampshire wetlands serve as important migrating, foraging and breeding habitat for fish and wildlife and in particular for the coastal dependent bird species that use freshwater wetlands and the Great Bay Estuary. For full story, click here.

NJ: Feds want to study Sussex County's Wallkill River after findings of sex mutations in fish

By Scott Fallon – NorthJersey.com – February 11, 2016
Federal scientists are recommending that a portion of the Wallkill River in Sussex County be studied in greater detail to find out why some male fish have developed female sexual traits, officials said Thursday. The Wallkill is one of six national wildlife refuge sites in the Northeast that scientists at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service want to study further due to the high incidence of smallmouth bass growing immature eggs in their testes. For full story, click here.

NJ: Christie OKs bill allowing oyster colonies in polluted water

By Wayne Parry, The Associated Press – philly.com – January 19, 2016
Gov. Chris Christie has signed a bill permitting researchers to grow oyster colonies in polluted waterways to try to improve water quality. The Republican presidential candidate on Tuesday signed a measure letting groups establish experimental oyster colonies in tainted waters like Raritan Bay, as long as the colonies are not visible to, or easily accessible by, the public. The state Department of Environmental Protection has prohibited such colonies for nearly six years, fearing that poachers could introduce potentially tainted seafood into the market, damaging New Jersey's $800 million shellfish industry. Changes to the bill required the state to allow the colonies once the research groups certify in writing that the oysters can't be easily seen or accessed. For full story, click here.

NY: NY to require manufacturers to pay for fouled water cleanup

By Mary Esch, Associated Press – Stamford Advocate – February 11, 2016
Two industrial companies will be held liable for the cleanup of a toxic chemical that found its way into an upstate New York village's drinking water, the acting state environmental commissioner said Thursday. The Department of Environmental Conservation sent a letter to New Jersey-based Honeywell International and Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics, part of a Paris-based global conglomerate, demanding that they enter into binding consent orders to finance a state Superfund cleanup launched four weeks ago in Hoosick Falls, a small village on the Vermont border. The agency said other companies may be identified later and held liable. For full story, click here.

NC: Costs of cleaning up Duke Energy toxic coal ash grow clearer

By Emery P. Dalesio, The Associated Press – Fay Observer – February 7, 2016
Giant earthmoving machines beep and grind as they drop 17-ton scoops of coal ash and dirt into dozens of railroad cars lined up for two-thirds of a mile at a site along the Virginia-North Carolina border, where the country's largest electricity company was responsible for one of the worst spills of the toxic, liquefied waste in U.S. history. Duke Energy Corp. will ship 1.5 million tons of residue from decades of burning coal for electricity to a contracted landfill about 130 miles away in central Virginia. The utility built 2 miles of railroad track just to connect existing rail lines with the excavation site. For full story, click here.

ND: Profit from wetland rules: Offer mitigation acres

By Mikkel Pates – Agweek – February 8, 2016
A dizzying collection of federal rules governing wetlands often creates headaches for farmers, but officials are striving to make compliance matters more consistent and efficient — maybe even a bit profitable. Jennifer Heglund, Natural Resources Conservation Service assistant state conservationist for compliance in Bismarck, N.D., says farmers can profit by putting restored wetlands into mitigation banks, which are then available for other farmers who want to drain. For full story, click here.

OH: Ohio village issued 2nd state EPA violation for lead problems

By Kim Palmer – Planet Ark – February 11, 2016
Ohio environmental officials gave a northeast Ohio village another violation for failure to submit two weekly water reports and not communicating test results to homeowners after elevated levels of lead were found in some of the drinking water in January. The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency's Tuesday notice is the latest complaint levied by the state against Sebring, 60 miles (97 km) southeast of Cleveland, after the agency found village officials failed to properly warn residents about water chemistry that caused corrosion in piping leading to 28 homes and one school building in January. For full story, click here.

OH: Critics say proposed state rules would allow companies to harm streams, wetlands

By Laura Arenschield – The Columbus Dispatch – January 11, 2016
The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency has proposed making it easier for companies to get the permits they need to build roads, pipelines or surface coal mines that could affect wetlands or streams. Environmental-advocacy groups across Ohio say the changes would just make it easier for companies to harm sensitive wetlands without allowing the public the chance to say anything about it. The EPA held a public hearing on the proposed changes Monday morning, the last public meeting before the Jan. 19 deadline to submit comments. The changes would affect water quality under a type of federal permit issued by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. For full story, click here.

PA: Proposed Budget Lacks Clean Water Funds

Public News Service – February 10, 2016
Environmentalists are concerned that the budget proposed by Gov. Tom Wolf on Tuesday is short of the resources needed to meet the state's clean water obligations. Harry Campbell, director of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Pennsylvania office says it will take almost $380 million a year just to implement the agricultural practices needed to meet 2025 clean water goals. "The budget that Gov. Wolf actually proposed overall, we believe needs further investments in some key programs in order to successfully implement Pennsylvania's new Clean Water Plan," says Campbell. For full story, click here.

PA: Pennsylvania Funding Restored Based on Clean Water Plan

Environmental Protection – February 3, 2016
The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection announced Feb. 2 that, based on the commonwealth's revised plan to improve clean water in the Susquehanna River watershed, extending into the Chesapeake Bay, EPA has restored $3 million in program funding to the department. The plan was developed collaboratively between DEP and the Pennsylvania departments of Agriculture and Conservation and Natural Resources. For full story, click here.

SD: Proposal would create wetland mitigation bank for farmers

Hastings Tribune – February 7, 2016
A proposal that's under federal review would establish a wetland mitigation credit system that could benefit farmers in South Dakota. The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced late last month that it's putting $9 million toward a new wetland mitigation program in an effort to distribute the mitigation dollars between state and local governments and private parties. The wetland mitigation bank proposal, which aims to spur conservation innovation nationwide, would be a platform for farmers to connect with conservationists to essentially trade wetlands credits. For full story, click here.

VT: USDA's New Video Highlights Wetland Restoration in Vermont

Contact: Amy Overstreet – VT Digger – February 11, 2016
The USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in Vermont recently produced a video showcasing conservation efforts dedicated to restoring and protecting wetlands in the state. NRCS, working with state and local conservation partners, have been working to restore and enhance land once only valued as potential farmland, or property for development. “We created this video to help people understand the ecological functions that wetland resources provide,” said Vicky Drew, NRCS State Conservationist. “Our hope is that private landowners with wetlands on their property will contact NRCS to learn how they can protect and improve them,” she said. For full news release, click here.

VA: VMRC approves funds to support wetlands grass plantings

By Bill Nachman – Gloucester-Mathews Gazette-Journal – February 3, 2016
The Virginia Marine Resources Commission voted unanimously Jan. 26 to approve a funding request to support submerged aquatic vegetation. The commission, meeting at its headquarters in Newport News, approved a total of $22,000: $11,000 from the Marine Fishing Improvement Fund and $11,000 from the Virginia Saltwater Recreational Fishing Development Fund. The funds will be used for research and SAV planting, mostly in the lower and middle sections of the Chesapeake Bay, including many areas off the Eastern Shore, said Laurie Naismith, VMRC spokesperson. For full article, click here.

VA: Virginia bill to save turtles goes to Senate

By Carol Vaughn – delmarvanow – January 29, 2016
A single sentence if added to Virginia law could save the lives of thousands of diamondback terrapins, an integral part of the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. The proposed addition reads: "The Commission shall require that a rectangular wire or plastic turtle reduction device measuring no more than 1¾ inches high and 4¾ inches long be firmly attached to each entrance or funnel in the lower chamber of each crab pot covered by a recreational gear license issued pursuant to this section." The legislation, SB 283, was introduced by Sen. Lynwood Lewis, a Democrat from the Eastern Shore, and was approved unanimously Jan. 28 in the Senate Agriculture, Conservation and Natural Resources Committee. Now it's headed to the full Senate for a vote. For full story, click here.

WA: New state-led clean water rule proposed

Contact: Sandy Howard – Washington Department of Ecology – February 3, 2016
The Department of Ecology today released a new draft clean water rule (also known as the fish consumption rule) that contains a more protective cancer risk rate, in keeping with the governor’s directive from October 2015. The federal Clean Water Act requires states to establish (and keep up to date) standards for how clean lakes, rivers and marine waters need to be for the health of people and fish, and to control pollution limits for businesses and municipalities permitted to discharge wastewater. For full news release, click here.

WA: Seattle seeks millions from Monsanto to clean up PCBs from Duwamish

By Lynda V. Mapes – The Seattle Times – January 26, 2016
The city of Seattle is suing to make Monsanto pay for cleanup of toxic PCBs from the city’s drainage system and the Duwamish River. Monsanto was the sole producer of PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) for commercial use in the U.S. from 1935 to 1977, and continued to profit from their sale for years even as its officials knew the chemicals were polluting the environment, causing harm to people and wildlife, said Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes. For full story, click here.

WI: Lead pipes, antiquated law threaten Wisconsin's drinking water quality

By Silke Schmidt and Dee J. Hall – Wisconsin Watch – February 1, 2016
Experts, and even some regulators, say existing laws are failing to protect Wisconsin and the nation from harmful exposure to lead in drinking water that leaches from aging plumbing — a danger illustrated by the public health crisis in Flint, Michigan. At least 176,000 so-called lead service lines connect older Wisconsin homes to the iron water mains that deliver municipal water, according to an estimate by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Milwaukee alone, where 60 percent of the state’s known lead-poisoned children live, has 70,000 lead service lines. For full story, click here.

Wetland Breaking News - February 2016WETLAND SCIENCE NEWS


Sea turtles riddled with deadly tumours

Bangkok Post – February 8, 2016
The young patient writhes on the operating table, kicking its flippers. A team of medical attendants turns it over, revealing an underbelly cluttered with tumours, some as big as golf balls. This endangered green sea turtle, about two years old and too young for the staff to know yet whether it is male or female, is infected with fibropapillomatosis, a potentially deadly disease caused by a type of herpes virus. Experts still don't understand quite how the virus spreads, or what causes it, though some research has pointed to agricultural runoff, pollution and global warming. For full opinion, click here.

Man-made underwater sound may have wider ecosystem effects than previously thought

ENN Environmental News Network – February 5, 2016
Underwater sound linked to human activity could alter the behavior of seabed creatures that play a vital role in marine ecosystems, according to new research from the University of Southampton. The study, reported in the journal Scientific Reports published by Nature, found that exposure to sounds that resemble shipping traffic and offshore construction activities results in behavioral responses in certain invertebrate species that live in the marine sediment. For full story, click here.

Latest 'Bay Barometer' shows uneven restoration progress

By Karl Blankenship – Bay Journal – February 4, 2016
Migratory fish have more rivers in the Bay to swim, and underwater grass beds are growing, but streamside forest plantings and wetland restoration have lagged badly in recent years, a new report from the state-federal Chesapeake Bay Program shows. It's Bay Barometer, an annual assessment of the Chesapeake region’s pollution reduction and habitat restoration efforts, found uneven progress toward meeting the 11 goals set in the Bay Watershed Agreement adopted in 2014. While much of the information has already been publicly released, the report compiles it to offer an overview of restoration efforts. For full article, click here.

Climate change will remove birds' control over hatching eggs: study

By Peter Hannam – The Sydney Morning Herald – February 3, 2016
It's an odd quirk of nature that birds - even chickens - typically lay just one egg a day, and many species rely on all the eggs in the clutch hatching on the same day. Parent birds control incubation by modifying the temperature that triggers embryo development, which is one way that species ensure roughly synchronous hatching. However, climate change - particularly the increase in the frequency and intensity of heatwaves - will take some of that control away from birds, causing some eggs to hatch earlier than others, according to new research published in the Royal Society Open Science journal on Wednesday. For full story, click here.

Nutrient field studies starting to show results

By Chris Kick – Farm and Dairy – February 1, 2016
Scientists are actively pursuing answers to how nutrients are moving and leaving farmers’ fields in the western Lake Erie basin, and the results could be a little surprising. Mark Williams, a Columbus-based soil drainage researcher with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, gave Ohio Farmers Union members an update on research regarding tile drainage and surface runoff. He said phosphorus loss through tiles was considered negligible in the 1980s, because the focus at the time was on nitrogen drainage. But now that phosphorus is showing up in the water, researchers are trying to figure out why, to help combat the growth of toxic algal blooms. For full story, click here.

Wetlands conservation milestone for WWF

World Wildlife Fund – February 1, 2016
The designation of wetlands for conservation with WWF support reached over 100 million hectares worldwide with the declaration of seven sites in Zimbabwe under the Ramsar convention. The news comes just ahead of World Wetlands Day on 2 February and following the identification of water crises as one of the top three global risks, according to the World Economic Forum’s Global Risk Report 2016. With this year’s World Wetlands Day focusing on wetlands and livelihoods, a number of sites such as Lake Chivero, the primary water supply for Zimbabwe’s capital city Harare, are of particular significance. “When we mark World Wetlands Day, we are reminding people that water doesn’t come from a tap; it comes from healthy wetland ecosystems,” said Lifeng Li, WWF International’s Director of Freshwater. For full story, click here.

Healthy Ground, Healthy Atmosphere: Recarbonizing the Earth's Soils

By Nancy Averett – eph - Environmental Health Perspectives – February 2016
On a bright October morning Dave Brandt tromps through the middle of his central Ohio wheat field. The grain was harvested months ago, but there isn’t an inch of bare dirt anywhere. Instead, more than 10 varieties of plants, including crimson clover, pearl millet, and Austrian winter peas, form a “cover crop cocktail” that stretches all the way to the road bordering his property. “This will be here all winter,” Brandt says. “And in the spring, we’ll plant corn right into this.” Brandt hasn’t tilled his soil since 1972, when he rented his first 600 acres of farmland to grow wheat, corn, and soybeans. And by keeping plants on his land in various stages of growth and decomposition, Brandt appears to have increased the amount of carbon in his soil over the years. For full story, click here.

Storks Are Skipping Migration to Stay Home and Eat Garbage

By Hannah Waters – Audubon – January 28, 2016
As beautiful as migration may be to watch, the impulse behind it is entirely practical—species are searching for better sources of winter food. But what if they could find food even when the weather turns cold? That’s the conundrum facing the White Stork, a gorgeous white bird that typically trades in its summer digs in Europe for winters in southern Africa. In recent years, more and more White Storks are choosing to stay closer to home and scrounge for easy pickings in landfills and fish farms. For full story, click here.

Soil productivity cut by climate change, making societies more marginal: studies

By Peter Hannan – The Sydney Morning Herald – January 28, 2016
The health of the world's soils hinges on the abundance and diversity of the microbes and fungi they contain, and environmental changes including from global warming will undermine their ability to support humans and other species, according to two new studies. While animal and plant diversity has long been understood to be important, the multiple roles of soils – from the decomposition of organic matter to nutrient cycling and carbon fixing – have been less researched. One of the studies, published in Nature Communications on Thursday, examined microbial diversity in 78 drylands on all inhabited continents and 179 sites in Scotland. It found that the loss of varieties – such as from climate change increasing arid zones – undermined the services the soils provided. For full story, click here.

Canada Just Announced A Major Pipeline Reform

By Katie Valentine – Think Progress – January 28, 2016
Oil and gas pipelines now have a new hurdle to clear before they’re approved in Canada. Pipelines and natural gas export terminals proposed in the country will now be subject to a climate test, which will seek to determine how the project will impact greenhouse gas emissions, Canadian officials announced Wednesday. That test will take into account the “upstream” impacts of a project — meaning the emissions from the extraction of the oil or gas that the pipeline would carry or the gas the terminal would store — as well as the emissions created from building and maintaining the project. For full story, click here.

Precision conservation: mapping the watershed meter by meter

By Leslie Middleton – Bay Journal – January 24, 2016
A handful of young computer professionals, most fresh out of college or graduate school, work at stand-up workstations, or sit, using ergonomic ‘balance balls’ as chairs. They peer intently at screens checkered with aerial images of farms, forests and subdivisions. Here, in a workroom at the nonprofit Chesapeake Conservancy in Annapolis, they are re-imaging the Chesapeake Bay watershed and creating new ways to envision restoration, conservation and public access to the Bay and its rivers. For full article, click here.

Ocean species mix as sea ice melts, with unknown consequences

By Amy Kraft – CBS News – January 22, 2016
Melting Arctic ice is not only opening up new passageways for ships. Birds and marine species are also traveling to uncharted waters. Seabird McKeon, a marine biologist with the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, and his colleagues compiled a list of the marine birds and mammals that have been spotted in the wrong ocean. The results, published recently in the journal Global Change Biology, included species such as gray whales, killer whales, and seabirds like the northern gannet -- birds and mammals crossing into waters where they hadn't set foot or fin for thousands of years. For full story, click here.

How to shelter mountain streams in a changing world

Krista Langlois – High Country News – January 18, 2016
If you’ve ever dreamed about fishing in the West, chances are you’ve pictured something like the South Fork of the Flathead, an achingly beautiful turquoise river tumbling over multicolored pebbles and wending through the deep forest of northwest Montana. Wade Fredenberg is among the few lucky enough to have grown up fishing there, and his childhood recollections read like a passage from Norman Maclean’s legendary book A River Runs Through It. Fredenberg is now a U.S. Fish and Wildlife biologist, and the gleaming 20-pound bull trout of his youth are increasingly rare. The trout have been devastated by mining pollution, agricultural runoff and non-native fish, and surviving populations are threatened by rising stream temperatures. Yet while their trajectory from abundance to scarcity is a story we know all too well, Fredenberg and his colleagues believe that new research can turn the narrative around — not just for bull trout, but for other cold-water fish species across the West as well. For full story, click here.

Study: Oceans trapping heat at accelerating rate

By Seth Borenstein, Associated Press – Inside Bay Area News – January 18, 2016
The amount of man-made heat energy absorbed by the seas has doubled since 1997, a study released Monday showed. Scientists have long known that more than 90 percent of the heat energy from man-made global warming goes into the world's oceans instead of the ground. And they've seen ocean heat content rise in recent years. But the new study, using ocean-observing data that goes back to the British research ship Challenger in the 1870s and including high-tech modern underwater monitors and computer models, tracked how much man-made heat has been buried in the oceans in the past 150 years. The world's oceans absorbed approximately 150 zettajoules of energy from 1865 to 1997, and then absorbed about another 150 in the next 18 years, according to a study published Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change. For full story, click here.

Climate change disaster is biggest threat to global economy in 2016, say experts

By Larry Elliott – The Guardian – January 14, 2016
A catastrophe caused by climate change is seen as the biggest potential threat to the global economy in 2016, according to a survey of 750 experts conducted by the World Economic Forum. The annual assessment of risks conducted by the WEF before its annual meeting in Davos on 20-23 January showed that global warming had catapulted its way to the top of the list of concerns. A failure of climate change mitigation and adaptation was seen as likely to have a bigger impact than the spread of weapons of mass destruction, water crises, mass involuntary migration and a severe energy price shock – the first time in the 11 years of the Global Risks report that the environment has been in first place. For full story, click here.

Global mercury emissions down 30 percent as coal use drops: USGS

Reuters – January 13, 2016
Global emissions of mercury from manmade sources fell 30 percent from 1990 to 2010, in part from decreasing use of coal, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reported on Wednesday. The greatest decline of the toxic pollutant was in Europe and North America, offsetting increases in Asia, the agency said, citing an international study. The findings challenge longstanding assumptions on emission trends and show that local and regional efforts can have a major impact, it said. For full story, click here.

U.S. Restricts Movement of Salamanders, for Their Own Good

By Carl Zimmer – The New York Times – January 12, 2016
The Fish and Wildlife Service is barring the door against 201 species of salamanders, making it illegal to import them or move them across state lines, the agency announced on Tuesday. Scientists hope the ban will help prevent a devastating outbreak from driving native salamander species extinct. In 2013, scientists in the Netherlands discovered a species of fungus infecting native fire salamanders. Later research revealed that the fungus, called Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans, or Bsal, was carried by Asian salamanders that were imported into Europe as pets. While the fungus was harmless to the Asian amphibians, it was lethal to the Dutch ones. Although Bsal has continued to spread in Europe, there is no sign that it has taken hold in the United States. For full story, click here.

Grass-planting change boosts coastal wetland restoration success

Ecology Global Network – November 13, 2015
When restoring coastal wetlands, common practice calls for leaving space between new plants to prevent overcrowding and reduce competition for nutrients and sunlight. That’s likely all wrong. A new study, conducted to restore degraded salt marshes in Florida and the Netherlands, has found that clumping newly planted marsh grasses next to each other, with little or no space in between, can spur positive interactions between the plants. In some test plots, plant density and vegetative cover increased by as much as 300 percent by season’s end. For full story, click here.

 

RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONSWetland Breaking News - February 2016

Tools, Strategies and Lessons Learned from EPA Green Infrastructure Technical Assistance Projects

PA – January 28, 2016
Urban stormwater continues to be a persistent and growing source of water pollution across the United States. Climate change is leading to more intense weather events and dwindling water supplies. Together these conditions stress the performance of the nation’s water infrastructure. Green infrastructure is an adaptable and multifunctional approach to stormwater management and climate resiliency with many benefits for communities. To read more and to download this report, click here.

Revised guide to supporting coastal wetland programs and projects using climate finance and other financial mechanisms

IUCN – January 4, 2016
Coastal wetlands have been the focus of conservation and restoration efforts for over a century with the goal of preserving biodiversity and generating benefits to local communities. A diverse portfolio of financing sources has been used for supporting conservation and restoration activities including philanthropy, multi- and bilateral aid, in-country governmental funding, tourism-related and other usage fees, and fees and levies associated with wetlands-centric extractive industries. More recently coastal wetlands have also been recognized for their carbon storage and sequestration value, and conversely the emissions released when these ecosystems are degraded or destroyed, opening the door for wetland managers to explore funding sources directed towards climate mitigating efforts. Governments, international actors (NGOs and academia) and local communities around the world are now increasingly supporting coastal wetland restoration and conservation as a climate change mitigation strategy. To read more and to download this report, click here.

 

Wetland Breaking News - February 2016POTPOURRI

What Scalia's Death Means For Climate Change

By John Upton – Climate Central – February 14, 2016
Just days after a U.S. Supreme Court ruling clouded the future of a new United Nations climate pact, the passing of one of its justices has boosted the pact's chances of succeeding. Supreme Court justice Antonin Scalia died at a resort in Texas on Saturday. Scalia, 79, was the court's conservative leader and his death means it is now more likely that key EPA rules that aim to curb climate pollution from the power industry will be upheld. For full story, click here.

Two-Thirds of the World Faces Severe Water Shortages

By Nicholas St. Fleur – The New York Times – February 12, 2016
About four billion people, or two-thirds of the world’s population, face severe water shortages during at least one month every year, far more than was previously thought, according to Arjen Y. Hoekstra, a professor of water management at the University of Twente in the Netherlands. In a paper published Friday in the journal Science Advances, Dr. Hoekstra and his colleague Mesfin M. Mekonnen designed a computer model to create what they say is a more accurate picture of water scarcity around the world. Severe water scarcity can lead to crop failure and low crop yields, which could cause food price increases as well as famine and widespread starvation. For full story, click here.

As Parks Reach Centennial, Obama Budget Requests $860 Million for Upgrades

By Kate Sheppard – Huffington Post – February 9, 2016
The Obama administration is requesting $860 million to repair and upgrade our national parks to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service. The proposed parks budget -- part of a total Department of the Interior budget request of $13.4 billion -- includes $300 million in mandatory spending and $560 million in discretionary spending for 2017. It would fund restoration and maintenance projects in the parks over the next 10 years. The Obama administration released its $4 trillion budget proposal on Tuesday. The budget also requests $135 million to fund a "Centennial Challenge" program that would match federal funds with private donations to support the parks. Congress created the National Park System, which has been called "America's Best Idea," in 1916. The parks will celebrate their centennial anniversary on Aug. 25. But heading into what should be a celebratory year, the parks face a backlog of maintenance work that would cost nearly $12 billion to complete. For full story, click here.

The New Microbead Ban Won't Solve the Microplastic Pollution Problem

By Emily J. Gertz – Takepart – February 7, 2016
A new study linking microplastic pollution to low reproductive rates in Pacific oysters underscores the need to overhaul the use of petroleum-based plastics, according to a leading American ecotoxicologist.
“The reason why we study these species is because we know they’re indicators for what is happening to us,” said environmental chemist Sherri Mason of the State University of New York at Fredonia, whose work has documented widespread microplastic contamination in aquatic ecosystems. “People are ingesting microplastics when they eat shellfish and other seafood.” For full story, click here.

Asia shrimp farmers restock mangrove "supermarket" by going organic

By Alisa Tang – Thomas Reuters Foundation – February 1, 2016
Surakit Laeaddee walks along the narrow banks of earth dividing his organic shrimp and fish ponds, rests under the shade of a tree he recently planted, and points to the lush mangroves marking out his plot. Too many trees invite birds that prey on his seafood stock. But planting just enough, on a fifth of his 10 hectares (24 acres), cools the ponds and improves soil and water quality, boosting the health, reproduction and survival of his shrimp and fish. For full story, click here.

Historic deal to protect Canada rainforest from logging

By Julie Gordon – Reuters – February 1, 2016
British Columbia on Monday unveiled a historic agreement to protect a massive swath of rainforest along its coastline, having reached a deal that marries the interests of First Nations, the logging industry and environmentalists after a decade of often-tense negotiations. Under the agreement, about 85 percent of forest within the Great Bear Rainforest would be protected, with the other 15 percent available for logging under the "most stringent" standards in North America, environmental groups involved in the talks said. For full story, click here.

German Forest Ranger Finds That Trees Have Social Networks, Too

By Sally McGrane – The New York Times – January 29, 2015
In the deep stillness of a forest in winter, the sound of footsteps on a carpet of leaves died away. Peter Wohlleben had found what he was looking for: a pair of towering beeches. “These trees are friends,” he said, craning his neck to look at the leafless crowns, black against a gray sky. “You see how the thick branches point away from each other? That’s so they don’t block their buddy’s light.” Before moving on to an elderly beech to show how trees, like people, wrinkle as they age, he added, “Sometimes, pairs like this are so interconnected at the roots that when one tree dies, the other one dies, too.” For full story, click here.

Protecting Our Coastal Waters

By Benita Best-Wong – Our Planet, Our Home – EPA Blog – January 28, 2016
America’s coastal waters are a source of life for people and marine life that reside near them. While some of us may think of our coastal waters as a great place to enjoy swimming, fishing, kayaking, boating and other fun water recreation activities, for many communities, they are much more than that. Many people’s livelihoods, whether based on fishing or tourism, depend on clean and safe coastal waters. And, in the case of the Great Lakes, surrounding communities rely on coastal waters to generate precious drinking water. For full blog post, click here.

Even Turtles Need "Me Time"

By Elizabeth Preston – Hakai Magazine – January 27, 201
Wildlife is a big draw for ocean-going tourists, from whale watching to trips in search of sharks, rays, dolphins, and penguins. On the Greek island of Zakynthos, visitors set their sights on turtles. The island hosts up to 800 loggerhead sea turtles each year, the largest known breeding population in the Mediterranean. All things considered, Zakynthos’s turtles have it pretty good: the Greek government banned watersports in 1991 and established a national marine park in 1999. Turtle-spotting tours, meanwhile, have become an income source for locals. Yet as new research shows, even well-intentioned ecotourism may have negative consequences when animals don’t follow human schedules. For full article, click here.

Dogs May Be Our Best Conservation Aids

By Candice Gaukel Andrews – Good Nature Travel – January 26, 2016
Radio collars, GPS tracking devices and remote-controlled drones—when it comes to monitoring wildlife, it’s easy to get caught up in high-tech devices. It turns out, however, that our best tool for endangered species conservation work might be the least technological of all. Dogs rescued from animal shelters are now finding employment in the conservation field—and the field is better for it. By using dogs to track scat, scents emitted from invasive plants and contraband items in cargo and luggage, our canine friends are saving wildlife, rooting out alien flora and locating poachers—all without damaging the environment or causing stress to wildlife. For full blog post, click here.

Female Fish Eggs Found Inside of Male Fish Testicles

EcoWatch – January 12, 2016
A study published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service found large-scale evidence of intersex in smallmouth and largemouth bass in the Northeast U.S., an indicator of endocrine disruption. The study, published in the journal Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, looks at 19 U.S. National Wildlife Refuges and is the first reconnaissance survey of this scope. The study found that the prevalence of testicular oocytes across all samples was 85 percent and 27 percent for male small- and largemouth bass, respectively. For full story, click here.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

WEBINARS

   

MEETINGS

   

TRAINING

 

SPECIAL EVENTS

 
WEBINARS
                   
FEBRUARY 2016
                   

February 23, 2016
12:00 p.m.-12:45 p.m. CST

      FEMA Region 6 webinar: Using Flood Risk Products Virtual Brown Bag Webinar: "Using Percent Annual Chance Data"          
                   
February 23, 2016
3:00 p.m. EST
      ASWM’s Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar: Water Rights & Wetland Restoration          
                   
February 24, 2016
1:00 p.m. EST
      AWRA webinar: Climate Change Adaption: Drought Response and Governance          
                   

February 25, 2016
1:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m. EST

      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Webcast: EPA Releases Scientific Report Showing U.S. Coastal Waters a Mix of Good and Fair Health          
                   
February 26, 2016
1:00p.m.-2:00 p.m. EST
      In cooperation with the Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM), the American Planning Association (APA) presents this webinar on Adapting Urban Vacant Land to Mitigate Hazards          
                   
MARCH 2016
                   
March 1, 2016
3:00 p.m. EST
      Future Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) webinar: The Ecology, Engineering & Economics of Natural Coastal Defenses          
                   
March 3, 2016
2:00 p.m. EST
      Forester University webinar: Stormwater Performance Assessment: Inspection, Testing, and Monitoring          
                   

March 9, 2016
11:00 a.m. EST

      Sustain Our Great Lakes webinar: Lessons Learned from Fish Spawning Reef Restoration in the St. Clair-Detroit River System          
                   
March 29 2016
1:00 p.m.-1:45 p.m. EST
      Using Flood Risk Products Virtual Brown Bag Webinar: "Using Depth Grid Data"          
                   
MEETINGS
                   
FEBRUARY 2016
                   
February 21-24, 2016
San Diego, California
      National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA’s) 2016 Winter Conference:Back to Basics . . . Will Compliance Concerns Derail Efforts to Innovate?          
                   
February 21-26, 2016
New Orleans, Louisiana
      2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting          
                   

February 22, 2016
New York, NY

      Sponsored by the Committee on Environmental Law, Michael G. Mahoney, Chair; Environmental Law Institute (ELI); and Sabin Center for Climate Change Law, Columbia Law School meeting: New York State Environmental Year in Review          
                   
February 22-24, 2016
Denver, Colorado
     

International LiDAR Mapping Forum

         

February 23, 2016

Washington, DC
      The Environmental Law Institute: The Circular Economy: Regulatory and Commercial Law Implications. Attend in person or via webinar.          
                   
February 23-24, 2016
Albuquerque, New Mexico
      National Groundwater Association Conference: Hydrology and Water Quality in the Southwest          
                   
February 23-25, 2016
Washington, D.C.
     

Semiannual Meeting of the Great Lakes Commission and Great Lakes Day

         
                   
February 23-25, 2016
Green Bay, Wisconsin
      Wisconsin Wetlands Association 21st Annual Wetland Science Conference          
                   
February 24-25, 2016
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
      Computational Hydraulics International (CHI): 49th International Conference on Water Management Modeling. Call for papers due on February 3, 2016.          
                   
February 25-26, 2016
Albuquerque, New Mexico
      Xeriscape Council of New Mexico: 2016 Land & Water Summit: Creating a New Paradigm for Living in Arid Lands          
                   

February 28, 2016
Greenwich, New York

      The Battenkill Conservancy winder speaker series: The Value of Source Water Protection          
                   
MARCH 2016
                   
March 1-3, 2016
New Orleans, Louisiana
      RES/CON New Orleans          
                   
March 2-3, 2016
University of Michigan
Dearborn, Michigan
      Annual Great Lakes Areas of Concern Conference. Hosted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. More information will be available soon.          
                   

March 3, 2016
Washington, DC

      The Environmental Law Institute and Perkins Coie LLP course: Environmental Markets -- The Master Class. Attend in person or via webinar.          
                   
March 6-11, 2016
Sydney, Australia
      International Coastal Symposium (ICS2016): ‘Coasts in Space and Time’          
                   
March 7-10, 2016
Providence, Rhode Island
      American Water Works Association: Sustainable Water Management Conference          
                   
March 8-10, 2016
Seattle, Washington
      2016 Climate Leadership Conference          
                   

March 9, 2016
Washington, DC

      Law Seminars International conference or webcast: Natural Resource Damages 101          
                   
March 10-11, 2016
Denver, Colorado
      Rocky Mountain Land Use Institute 25th Anniversary Conference: Western Places/Western Spaces: Examining the Past, Exploring the Future          
                   
March 10-11, 2016
Washington, DC
      Law Seminars International Fifth Annual Advanced Conference: Natural Resource Damages Evolving Strategic, Tactical and Substantive Issues          
                   
March 10-11, 2016
Wisconsin Dells
      Annual meeting of the Wisconsin Section of the American Water Resources Association (AWRA): 40 Years of Wisconsin Waters: Quantity, Quality, Technology          
                   

March 11-13, 2016
Monte Vista, Colorado

      Monte Vista Crane Festival. This year’s 33rd annual festival includes bus tours to Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuge.          
                   

March 11-13, 2016
Florida State University
Tallahassee, Florida

      13th Annual Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference          
                   

March 12-13, 2016
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

      The Fifth International Conference: Advances in Applied Science and Environmental Engineering          

March 17, 2016
Southbury, CT

      Connecticut Association of Wetland Scientists (CAWS) 2016 Annual Meeting and Environmental Conference          
                   
March 18-19, 2016
Baltimore, Maryland
      Ecological Society of America's 3rd Life Discovery - Doing Science Education Conference          
                   

March 19, 2016
Waterford, MI

      Michigan State University: Protecting Your Shoreline: A Workshop for Inland Lakefront Property Owners          
                   
March 19-20, 2016
Miami University
Oxford, Ohio
      2016 Midwest Ecology and Evolution Conference (MEEC)          
                   
March 20-22, 2016
Scottsdale, Arizona
      National Flood Determination Association 2016 Conference          
                   
March 21-24, 2016
San Diego, California
      Association for Environmental Health and Sciences Foundation, Inc.: 26th Annual International Conference on Soil, Water, Energy, and Air          
                   
March 22-24, 2016
Burlington, Vermont
      14th Annual Climate Prediction Application Science Workshop (CPASW): hosted by the NOAA National Weather Service Climate Services Branch, University of Vermont, and other climate services partners.          
                   
March 29-31, 2016
Oracle, Arizona
      2016 NASA/CUAHSI Remote Sensing Hydrology Workshop.          
                   
March 29-April 2, 2016
Vancouver, BC
      Society for Applied Anthropology 76th Annual Meeting          
                   
APRIL 2016
                   
April 3-7, 2016
Asheville, North Carolina
     

US-IALE 2016 Annual Meeting: Landscape Change

         
                   
April 7-9, 2016
Waterville, Maine
      Colby College conference: Community, Culture, and Conservation: Sustaining Landscapes and Livelihoods. The deadline for abstracts in February 15, 2016.          
                   
April 8-10, 2016
Kutztown, Pennsylvania
      Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Ecological Society of America: 2016 annual meeting. Registration and abstract submission is scheduled to open early February.          
                   
April 12, 2016
Multiple Locations
      Center for Watershed Protection: 2016 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference. This conference will take place in multiple locations across the US. The two main sites are Atlanta and Sacramento, but additional hub locations will be announced soon. The conference will also be available as a webcast.          
                   
April 13-19, 2016
Arcata, California
      21st Annual Godwit Days Spring Migration Bird Festival          
                   
April 14-17, 2016
Orlando, Florida
      2016 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference          
                   

April 17-22, 2016
Vienna, Austria

      European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016          
                   

April 18-22, 2016
Coral Springs, Florida

     

University of Florida 6th National Conference:Ecosystem Restoration (NCER): Ecosystem Restoration in Action. Call for abstracts submission deadline: Friday, January 8, 2016 [5:00 PM Eastern].

         
                   
April 20-21, 2016
Hartford, Connecticut
      The New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission (NEIWPCC) 27th Annual Nonpoint Source Pollution Conference          
                   
April 22-24, 2016
Marble Falls, Texas
      Balcones Canyonlands National Wildlife Refuge: Balcones Songbird Festival          
                   
April 25-27, 2016
Anchorage, Alaska
      2016 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference          
                   
MAY 2016
                   
May 2-6, 2016
Tampa, Florida
      National Water Quality Monitoring Council: 10th National Monitoring Conference: Working Together for Clean Water          
                   
May 3-6, 2016
Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
      4th International Symposium on Ocean in a High-CO2 World          
                   
May 4-6, 2016
Sharonville, Ohio
      Tinker’s Creek Watershed Partners and the Ohio Stormwater Association: 2016 Ohio Stormwater Conference          
                   
May 7, 2016
Stanford University
      Stanford Chapter of the Society for Conservation Biology: 17th Bay Area Conservation Biology Symposium. Submit an abstract by March 25, 2016.          
                   
May 8-12, 2016
Towson University
Baltimore, Maryland
      International Society for Ecological Modelling Global Conference 2016          
                   
May 9-10, 2016
Baton Rouge, Louisiana
      Louisiana Sea Grant conference: Data Flow: Grand Challenges in Water Systems Modeling, Data Management, and Integration          
                   
May 10-13, 2016
Fort Worth, Texas
      JT&A, Inc.: 2016 National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference          
                   
May 10-13, 2016
Rotterdam, The Netherlands
      4th International Climate Change Adaptation Conference: Adaptation Futures is the biennial conference of PROVIA (Global Programme of Research on Climate Change Vulnerability, Impacts and Adaptation          
                   
May 16-18, 2016
Saratoga Springs, New York
      New York State Floodplain and Stormwater Managers Association:16th Annual Meeting. Abstracts due by January 22, 2016.          
                   
May 17-20, 2016
Potsdam, Germany
      Society of Wetland Scientist European Chapter: 11th annual meeting on Wetland - Science and Society knowledge transfer, conservation conflicts and restoration management          
                   
May 18-10, 2016
Toronto, Canada
     

Canadian Water Network's Blue Cities 2016: Water Resiliency for the New Normal

         
                   
May 20-23, 2016
Mobile, Alabama
     

River Network: River Rally

         
                   
May 21-26, 2016
Sacramento, California
      Society for Freshwater Science annual meeting: Running on Empty: Increasing Demands on Freshwater Resources in the Face of a Changing Climate. Submit abstracts by January 29, 2016.          
                   
May 22-29, 2016
University of Washington
Friday Harbor Laboratories
      ScienceFilm 7-day immersion workshop: Introduction to Science Film Making          
                   
May 23-27, 2016
Busan, Korea
      World Fisheries Congress          
                   
May 31-June 3, 2016
Ann Arbor, Michigan
      23rd IAHR International Symposium on Ice. November 25th, 2015 abstracts due.          
                   
May 31-June 4, 2016
Corpus Christi, Texas
      Society of Wetland Scientist's 2016 Annual Meeting: Protecting wetland ecosystem services. Promoting stronger economies          
                   
JUNE 2016
                   
June 2016       Lake Michigan Coastal Awareness Month: Celebrate the Coast: Fresh, Water, Fun! The Lake Michigan Coastal Program and partners are working together to develop a wide variety of events to celebrate the diversity and beauty of the Lake Michigan Coastal Region. Events highlight natural, cultural and historic resources in the Coastal Region of Indiana - Lake, Porter, and LaPorte counties.          
                   
June 1-3, 2016
San Antonio, Texas
      Resource Institute: Southwest Stream Restoration Conference. Submit abstracts by January 15, 2016.          
                   
June 1-5, 2016 Anchorage, Alaska       79th Annual Ducks Unlimited National Convention          
                   
June 3-4 2016
Ames, Iowa
      5th Iowa State University Summer Symposium: Science Communication: Confronting the challenges of public participation in environmental, planning and health decision-making. Call for proposal deadline is January 29, 2016.          
                   
June 5-10, 2016
Santa Fe, New Mexico
      ASLO 2016 Summer Meeting          
                   
June 6–10, 2016
Guelph, Ontario
      International Association for Great Lakes - 59th Annual Conference on Great Lakes Research: Great Lakes Solutions: Integrating Across Disciplines & Scales          
                   

June 8, 2016
Linthicum Heights, Maryland

      The CWEA (Chesapeake Water Environmental Association) Stormwater Seminar: Beyond Nutrients: Case Studies and Tools for Addressing TMDLs. Abstract deadline is February 29, 2016.          
                   
June 12-14, 2016
Toronto, Canada
      Coastal Zone Canada Association: Coastal Zone Canada Conference          
                   
June 19-24, 2016
Honolulu, Hawai’i
      13th International Coral Reef Symposium: Bridging Science to Policy          
                   
June 19-24, 2016
Grand Rapids, Michigan
      ASFPM's 40th Annual National Conference: "Great Lakes - Grand Partners"          
                   
June 20-22, 2016
University of Massachusetts -Amherst
      Fish Passage 2016 International Conference: River Connectivity Best Practices and Innovations. Abstracts are due by February 24, 2016.          
                   

June 21-22, 2016
Galway, Ireland

      Civil Engineering, Microbiology and Ryan Institute, National University of Ireland: Inaugural International Conference on Natural and Constructed Wetlands: Interactions between Scientists and Engineers          
                   
JULY 2016
                   
July 10-13, 2016
Broomfield, Colorado
      Natural Hazard Center: 41st Annual Natural Hazards Research and Applications Workshop. Proposal submissions due by January 15, 2016.          
                   
July 11-13, 2016
Sacramento, California
      2016 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: GIS and Water Resources          
                   
July 12-15, 2016
St. Louis University
St. Louis, Missouri
      River Flow 2016 Eighth International Conference: Fluvial Hydraulics          
                   
July 17-20, 2016
Illinois State University
Normal, Illinois
      24th North American Prairie Conference: From Cemetery Prairies to National Tallgrass Prairies          
                   
July 17-20, 2016
Madison, Wisconsin
      Society for Conservation Biology North America: 3rd North America Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB): Communicating Science for Conservation Action          
                   

July 18-20, 2016

Arlington, Virginia
      Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum. Abstracts due by December 10, 2015.          
                   
July 18-22, 2016
St. Augustine, Florida
      University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences: Mangrove & Macrobenthos Meeting. Call for abstracts deadline is December 20, 2015.          
                   
July 19-21, 2016
Breckenridge, Colorado
      Resource Institute's Rocky Mountain Stream Restoration Conference. Submit an abstract by January 31, 2016.          
                   
July 19-23, 2016
Kaliningrad, Russia
      European Association of Remote Sensing Laboratories: 2nd Student Workshop on Ecology and Optics of Coastal Zones          
                   
July 24-29, 2016
University of New England,
Biddeford, Maine
      2016 Gordon Research Conference: Unifying Ecology Across Scales: Linking the Levels from Physiological to Ecosystem Ecology          
                   
July 30-August 3, 2016
St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
      4th International Marine Conservation Congress (IMCC4): Making Marine Science Matter          
                   
AUGUST 2016
                   
August 3-4, 2016
Gifford Pinchot State Park
Lewisberry, Pennsylvania
      Wetland Restoration and Training LLC: Wetland Restoration Workshop. Participants will help design and restore wetlands. Contact Betsy Leppo (mailto:) for more information.          
                   
August 7-12, 2016
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
      2016 Ecological Society of America's (ESA) annual meeting          
                   
August 14-18, 2016 Chicago, Illinois       American Society of Civil Engineers: GEO Sustainability & Geoenvironment
         
                   
August 22-25, 2016 Indianapolis, Indiana       StormCon: Designing the Future of Stormwater. Call for papers deadline is December 9, 2015          
                   

August 23-25, 2016
Salt Lake City, Utah

      22nd National Nonpoint Source (NPS) Monitoring Workshop. Abstracts due by March 4, 2016.          
                   
August 27-
September 2, 2016

Stockholm, Sweden
      2016 World Water Week. Abstract due by January 24, 2016.          
                   
SEPTEMBER 2016
                   
September 1-10, 2016
Waikiki, Hawaii
      IUCN World Conservation Congress: Planet at the crossroads          
                   

September 8-10, 2016

Tulcea, Romania
      Romanian Limnogeographical Association (RLA): 3rd International Conference “Water resources and wetlands          
September 19-24, 2016
Changshu, China
      INTECOL Wetland Working Group, People’s Government of Changshu, Nanjing University: 10th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference          
                   
September 27-30, 2016
Mount Royal University
Alberta, Canada
      Under Western Skies (UWS) is a biennial, interdisciplinary conference series on the environment with the theme Water: Events, Trends, Analysis          
                   
OCTOBER 2016
                   
October 19-21, 2016
San Diego, California
      Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum - West Coast          
                   

October 20-22, 2016

American Museum of Natural History
New York, NY
      The Center for Biodiversity and Conservation and its partners invite graduate students, post-docs, and early-career professionals to take part in the seventh annual Student Conference on Conservation Science – New York (SCCS-NY). Abstract submissions accepted: March 1-April 8, 2016          
                   
October 28-30, 2016
Minneapolis, Minnesota
      Land Trust Alliance Rally 2016 National Land Conservation Conference. Call for presentations due by February 22, 2016.          
                   
NOVEMBER 2016
                   

November 1-4, 2016
Banff, Alberta, Canada

      North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) Symposium: Science to Stewardship: Balancing Economic Growth and Lake Sustainability. Submit abstract by May 6, 2016.          
                   
November 14-17, 2016
Orlando, Florida
      2016 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference          
                   
DECEMBER 2016
                   
December 10-15, 2016
New Orleans, Louisiana
      8th National Summit: Our Coasts, Our Future, Our Choice and 25th Biennial Meeting of The Coastal Society          
                   
TRAINING
           
FEBRUARY 2016
                   
February 22-25, 2016
Oriskany, New York
      ASFPM is co-sponsoring the FEMA Emergency Management Institute (EMI) 273 course: Managing Floodplain Development Through the NFIP          
                   

February 22-March 18, 2016
Online

      The Swamp School Online Course: Phase 1 Environmental Site Assessment          
                   

February 23-25, 2016
Padilla Bay Reserve
Mt. Vernon, Washington

     

Coastal Training Program course: Environmental Negotiations

         
                   
February 24-25, 2016
Charleston, South Carolina
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement (Atlantic & Gulf Coastal Plain). Eastern Mountains/Piedmont: December 12-13, 2016, Atlanta, GA.          
                   
February 25-26, 2016
Denver, Colorado
      Urban Watershed Research Institute course: Dam Safety Practices & Hydrology          
                   
February 29-March 11, 2016
Front Royal, Virginia
      Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation course: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology          
                   
MARCH 2016
                   
March 3-4, 2016
Sacramento California
      UC Davis Extension course: Environmental Planning and Site Analysis          
                   
March 7-April 1, 2016
Online
      The Swamp School Online Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments          
                   
March 7-May 27, 2016
Online
      The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training          
                   
March 8-July 21, 2016
Online
      Forest University online: Surface Water Master Class Series          
                   
March 14-April 8, 2016
Online
      The Swamp School Online Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment          
                   
March 14-April 22, 2016
Online
      The Swamp School: Wetland Delineation Field Workshop and Online Training. Field Training: April 26-27, 2016          
                   
March 14-June 13, 2016
Online
      The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator. Field test date: Friday, June 10, 2016 in Pittsburgh, PA.          
                   
March 16-17, 2016
University of Phoenix-St. Louis Park, St. Lois Park, Minnesota
      Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC) course: Habitat Site Restoration          
                   

March 16-20, 2016
Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences

      The Earth Institute Center for Environmental Sustainability (EICES) course: Coral Reef Ecology: Bermuda          
                   
March 17-18, 2016
Sacramento, California
      UC Davis Extension course: Planning and Environmental Law          
                   
March 22-24, 2016
Yakima, Washington
     

Coastal Training Program course: Environmental Negotiations (Eastern WA)

         
                   
March 24-25, 2016
Denver, Colorado
      Urban Watersheds Research Institute course: LID and BMP Selection, Design & Economics          
                   
March 29, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Endangered Species Act Overview. This course will also be held on September 27, 2016 in Atlanta, GA.          
                   

March 29-31, 2016
Oracle, Arizona

     

2016 NASA/CUAHSI Remote Sensing Hydrology Workshop. Register by February 15, 2016.

         
                   

March 30-31, 2016
Lacey, Washington

     

Coastal Training Program course: Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington

         
                   
APRIL 2016
                   
April 4-6, 2016
Naples, Florida
      Everglades Wetland Research Park course: Creation and Restoration of Wetlands. Register by February 19, 2016 for a 10% discount.          

April 4-June 24, 2016

Online
      The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Botanist          
                   
April 4-June 24, 2016.
Online
      The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training          
                   
April 4-July 1, 2016
Online
      The Swamp School Online Workshop: Principles of Wetland Design          
                   
April 11-May 6, 2016
Online
      The Swamp School Online Course: Phase 1 Environmental Site Assessment          
                   
April 21, 2016
Denver, Colorado
      Urban Watersheds Research Institute course: FIRM Map Revisions – Technical/Administrative Aspects          
                   
MAY 2016
                   
May 3-5, 2016
Asheville, North Carolina
      North Carolina State University Stream Restoration Program course: Stream Morphology Assessment          
                   

May 4-July 29, 2016
Online

      The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training          
                   
May 9-10, 2016
Charleston, South Carolina
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Hydrophytic Vegetation (Coastal Plain). Piedmont: August 8-9, 2016 in Atlanta, GA          
                   
May 9-July 29, 2016
Online
     

The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist

         
                   

May 16-June 10, 2016
Online

     

The Swamp School Online Program: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment

         

May 16-June 10, 2016
Online

     

The Swamp School Online Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments

         

May 19-20, 2016
Washington, DC

      Environmental Law Institute course: Clean Water Act 2016: Law and Regulation (ELI/ALI CLE Course of Study)          
                   
May 23-27, 2016
Eastern Kentucky University
      Wetland Restoration and Training LLC: Wetland Design and Restoration Techniques. Field course at Maywoods, 8:30am to 4:30pm each day and on May 30–June 3, 2016: Online Reading and Assessment. Instructors: Tom Biebighauser and Dr. Stephen Richter          
                   
May 23-June 19, 2016
North Cascades Mountains
Mazama, Washington
      Pacific Biodiversity Institute: Conservation Science and Leadership Course          
                   
May 30-June 10, 2016
Eastern Kentucky University
      Wetland Restoration and Training LLC is offering Wetland Assessment and Monitoring training. June 13–17, 2016: Online Reading and Assessment. Instructor: Dr. Stephen Richter          
                   
JUNE 2016
                   

June 1-3, 2016
Texas State University
San Marcos, TX

      Bayesian Workshop for Ecologists and Wildlife Biologists          
                   
June 3, 2016
University at Buffalo
      University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Aquatic & Terrestrial Invasive Species Management          
                   
June 6-7, 2016
University at Buffalo
      University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Fundamentals of Stream Channel          
                   
June 6-10, 2016
Charleston, South Carolina
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Basic Wetland Delineation. Other dates: March 14-18, 2016 in Atlanta, GA; and October 3-7, 2016, Atlanta, GA.          
                   
June 6-August 19, 2016
Online
      The Swamp School Online Workshop: Principles of Wetland Design          
                   
June 6-August 26, 2016
Online
     

The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training

         
                   
June 8-9, 2016
University at Buffalo
      University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Watershed Management Planning, Assessment, & Monitoring          
                   

June 13-July 8, 2016
Online

      The Swamp School Online Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment          

June 13-September 2, 2016
Online

     

The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator

         
                   

June 19-26, 2016
Paris, France

      CERES of the Ecole Normale Supérieure: Summer School on Modelling Environmental Resilience          
                   
JULY 2016                  
                   
July 11-September 30, 2016
Online
      The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Botanist          
                   
AUGUST 2016
                   
August 8-9, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Hydrophytic Vegetation (Piedmont). Coastal Plain: May 9-10, 2016 in Charleston, SC          
                   
SEPTEMBER 2016
                   
September 12-13, 2016
Charleston, South Carolina
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes          
                   

September 26-
October 7, 2016
Front Royal, Virginia

     

Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation course: Spatial Ecology, Geospatial Analysis and Remote Sensing for Conservation

         
                   
September 27, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Endangered Species Act Overview. This course will also be held on March 29, 2016 in Atlanta, GA.          
                   
OCTOBER 2016
                   
October 3-7, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Basic Wetland Delineation. Other dates: March 14-18, 2016 in Atlanta, GA; and June 6-10, 2016 in Charleston, SC.          
                   
October 11-12, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species.
         
                   
NOVEMBER 2016
                   
November 2-4, 2016
Raleigh, North Carolina
      North Carolina State University Stream Restoration Program course: Natural Channel Design Principles          
                   
November 14-15, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology (Piedmont. Coastal Plain: April 4-5, 2016 in Charleston, SC.          
                   
DECEMBER 2016
                   
December 12-13, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement (Eastern Mountains/Piedmont). Atlantic & Gulf Coastal Plain: February 24-25, 2016, Charleston, SC.          
                   
SPECIAL EVENTS 2015
                   

February 20, 2016
Christmas, Florida

      Orlando Wetlands Festival          
                   
February 25-28, 2016
Port Aransas, Texas
      Port Aransas Chamber of Commerce/Tourist Bureau: Whooping Crane Festival          
                   

March 12, 2016
Cambridge, NY

      The Battenkill Conservancy Eagle Watch          
                   
May 21, 2016
Global
      World Fish Migration Foundation: World Fish Migration Day: Connecting Fish, Rivers and People          
                   

For more wetland events, meetings, conferences, and courses nationwide, visit the ASWM calendar.

         
           


INDEX

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • House passes bill requiring EPA actions on lead-laced water
  • Unsafe Lead Levels in Tap Water Not Limited to Flint
  • EPA 'seeks to strengthen' safe water laws amid widespread testing concerns
  • How cases like Flint destroy public trust in science
  • ASWM’s Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar: Water Rights & Wetland Restoration – February 23, 2016
  • Future Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar: The Ecology, Engineering & Economics of Natural Coastal Defenses – March 1, 2016

NATIONAL NEWS

  • The Environmental Impact of the U.S.-Mexico Border Wall
  • USDA, Partners to Invest $720 Million in Large-Scale, Targeted Conservation Projects Across the Nation
  • Chesapeake Conservancy: Obama Budget Contains $29M for Bay
  • Environmentalists dismayed at proposed budget cuts to Great Lakes restoration programs
  • President's FY 2017 Budget Request of $1.6 Billion for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
  • Engineers struggle to put streams back into the urban landscape
  • Views on coal mining clash in Senate hearing on stream protection rule
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Announces Over $20 Million in Grants to Conserve Coastal Wetlands
  • EPA Releases Scientific Report Showing U.S. Coastal Waters a Mix of Good and Fair Health
  • USDA Seeks Proposals for Market-Based Wetland Protection Systems - Due March 28, 2016
  • EPA science panel: Fracking study needs work
  • EPA Awards $32 Million to Tribes in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington
  • EPA, Southern Co. and National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Recognize Five Star and Urban Waters Projects in the Southeast
  • New Conservation Finance Network Website Will Be a Hub for News, Events and Community
  • U.S. Governors Address Water
  • EPA Launches Visualize Your Water Challenge to Find Solutions to Nutrient Pollution
  • West's water reservoir managers face big losses from evaporation
  • Improving Tools for Quantifying the Effectiveness of Conservation
  • Weyerhaeuser to Buy Timber Rival Plum Creek for $8.4 Billion

STATE NEWS

  • CA: Concrete-lined river seen as regulatory quagmire for EPA
  • CA: El Niño is Here, But California Is Still in Drought
  • CA: A Backup Plan for the Delta Smelt
  • FL: Fracking opponent warns Florida will 'become more porous than Swiss cheese'
  • FL: Shuttered power plants might evict manatees
  • IA: Iowa’s nasty water war
  • LA: Marsh creation project slated for Golden Meadow
  • MD: Md. lawmakers address poultry waste, oyster restoration
  • MD: Curtis Bay plant faulted for releasing 12 times more nitrogen into bay than permitted
  • MD: Maryland court revives water pollution lawsuit against state
  • MI: Federal grant to provide wetland acreage for Lake Huron park
  • MI: DEQ plans to watch dioxane plume closely as it spreads toward Huron River
  • MI: EPA under fire over Flint
  • MN: Critics Say Proposed Sulfide Mine in Minnesota Threatens State's Watersheds
  • NH: New Hampshire gets $1 million to conserve Great Bay property
  • NJ: Feds want to study Sussex County's Wallkill River after findings of sex mutations in fish
  • NJ: Christie OKs bill allowing oyster colonies in polluted water
  • NY: NY to require manufacturers to pay for fouled water cleanup
  • NC: Costs of cleaning up Duke Energy toxic coal ash grow clearer
  • ND: Profit from wetland rules: Offer mitigation acres
  • OH: Ohio village issued 2nd state EPA violation for lead problems
  • OH: Critics say proposed state rules would allow companies to harm streams, wetlands
  • PA: Proposed Budget Lacks Clean Water Funds
  • PA: Pennsylvania Funding Restored Based on Clean Water Plan
  • SD: Proposal would create wetland mitigation bank for farmers
  • VT: USDA's New Video Highlights Wetland Restoration in Vermont
  • VA: VMRC approves funds to support wetlands grass plantings
  • VA: Virginia bill to save turtles goes to Senate
  • WA: New state-led clean water rule proposed
  • WA: Seattle seeks millions from Monsanto to clean up PCBs from Duwamish
  • WI: Lead pipes, antiquated law threaten Wisconsin's drinking water quality

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • Sea turtles riddled with deadly tumours
  • Man-made underwater sound may have wider ecosystem effects than previously thought
  • Latest 'Bay Barometer' shows uneven restoration progress
  • Climate change will remove birds' control over hatching eggs: study
  • Nutrient field studies starting to show results
  • Wetlands conservation milestone for WWF
  • Healthy Ground, Healthy Atmosphere: Recarbonizing the Earth's Soils
  • Storks Are Skipping Migration to Stay Home and Eat Garbage
  • Soil productivity cut by climate change, making societies more marginal: studies
  • Canada Just Announced A Major Pipeline Reform
  • Precision conservation: mapping the watershed meter by meter
  • Ocean species mix as sea ice melts, with unknown consequences
  • How to shelter mountain streams in a changing world
  • Study: Oceans trapping heat at accelerating rate
  • Climate change disaster is biggest threat to global economy in 2016, say experts
  • Global mercury emissions down 30 percent as coal use drops: USGS
  • U.S. Restricts Movement of Salamanders, for Their Own Good
  • Grass-planting change boosts coastal wetland restoration success

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • Tools, Strategies and Lessons Learned from EPA Green Infrastructure Technical Assistance Projects
  • Revised guide to supporting coastal wetland programs and projects using climate finance and other financial mechanisms

POTPOURRI

  • What Scalia's Death Means For Climate Change
  • Two-Thirds of the World Faces Severe Water Shortages
  • As Parks Reach Centennial, Obama Budget Requests $860 Million For Upgrades
  • The New Microbead Ban Won't Solve the Microplastic Pollution Problem
  • Asia shrimp farmers restock mangrove "supermarket" by going organic
  • Historic deal to protect Canada rainforest from logging
  • German Forest Ranger Finds That Trees Have Social Networks, Too
  • Protecting Our Coastal Waters
  • Even Turtles Need "Me Time"
  • Dogs May Be Our Best Conservation Aids
  • Female Fish Eggs Found Inside of Male Fish Testicles

WEBINARS, MEETINGS, TRAINING

Webinars

  • FEMA Region 6 webinar: Using Flood Risk Products Virtual Brown Bag Webinar: "Using Percent Annual Chance Data"
  • ASWM’s Improving Wetland Restoration Success Project Webinar: Water Rights & Wetland Restoration
  • AWRA webinar: Climate Change Adaption: Drought Response and Governance
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Webcast: EPA Releases Scientific Report Showing U.S. Coastal Waters a Mix of Good and Fair Health
  • Adapting Urban Vacant Land to Mitigate Hazards
  • Future Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) webinar: The Ecology, Engineering & Economics of Natural Coastal Defenses
  • Forester University webinar: Stormwater Performance Assessment: Inspection, Testing, and Monitoring
  • Sustain Our Great Lakes webinar: Lessons Learned from Fish Spawning Reef Restoration in the St. Clair-Detroit River System
  • Using Flood Risk Products Virtual Brown Bag Webinar: "Using Depth Grid Data"

Meetings

  • Back to Basics . . . Will Compliance Concerns Derail Efforts to Innovate?
  • 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting
  • New York State Environmental Year in Review
  • International LiDAR Mapping Forum
  • The Circular Economy: Regulatory and Commercial Law Implications
  • Hydrology and Water Quality in the Southwest
  • Semiannual Meeting of the Great Lakes Commission and Great Lakes Day
  • 21st Annual Wetland Science Conference
  • 49th International Conference on Water Management Modeling
  • 2016 Land & Water Summit: Creating a New Paradigm for Living in Arid Lands
  • The Battenkill Conservancy winder speaker series: The Value of Source Water Protection
  • RES/CON New Orleans
  • Annual Great Lakes Areas of Concern Conference
  • The Environmental Law Institute and Perkins Coie LLP course: Environmental Markets -- The Master Class
  • International Coastal Symposium (ICS2016): ‘Coasts in Space and Time’
  • American Water Works Association: Sustainable Water Management Conference
  • 2016 Climate Leadership Conference
  • Law Seminars International conference or webcast: Natural Resource Damages 101
  • Western Places/Western Spaces: Examining the Past, Exploring the Future
  • Natural Resource Damages Evolving Strategic, Tactical and Substantive Issues
  • 40 Years of Wisconsin Waters: Quantity, Quality, Technology
  • Monte Vista Crane Festival
  • 13th Annual Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference
  • Advances in Applied Science and Environmental Engineering
  • Connecticut Association of Wetland Scientists (CAWS) 2016 Annual Meeting and Environmental Conference
  • Ecological Society of America's 3rd Life Discovery - Doing Science Education Conference
  • Michigan State University: Protecting Your Shoreline: A Workshop for Inland Lakefront Property Owners
  • 2016 Midwest Ecology and Evolution Conference
  • National Flood Determination Association 2016 Conference
  • 26th Annual International Conference on Soil, Water, Energy, and Air
  • 14th Annual Climate Prediction Application Science Workshop (CPASW)
  • Remote Sensing Hydrology Workshop
  • Society for Applied Anthropology 76th Annual Meeting
  • US-IALE 2016 Annual Meeting: Landscape Change
  • Community, Culture, and Conservation: Sustaining Landscapes and Livelihoods
  • Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Ecological Society of America: 2016 annual meeting
  • Center for Watershed Protection: 2016 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference
  • 21st Annual Godwit Days Spring Migration Bird Festival
  • 2016 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference
  • European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016
  • Ecosystem Restoration (NCER): Ecosystem Restoration in Action
  • 27th Annual Nonpoint Source Pollution Conference
  • Balcones Canyonlands National Wildlife Refuge: Balcones Songbird Festival
  • 2016 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference
  • 10th National Monitoring Conference
  • 4th International Symposium on: Ocean in a High-CO2 World
  • 2016 Ohio Stormwater Conference
  • Stanford Chapter of the Society for Conservation Biology: 17th Bay Area Conservation Biology Symposium
  • International Society for Ecological Modelling Global Conference 2016
  • Data Flow: Grand Challenges in Water Systems Modeling, Data Management, and Integration
  • 2016 National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference
  • 4th International Climate Change Adaptation Conference: Adaptation Futures
  • New York State Floodplain and Stormwater Managers Association:16th Annual Meeting
  • Society of Wetland Scientist European Chapter: 11th annual meeting on Wetland - Science and Society knowledge transfer, conservation conflicts and restoration management
  • River Network: River Rally
  • Running on Empty: Increasing Demands on Freshwater Resources in the Fae of a Changing Climate
  • ScienceFilm 7-day immersion workshop: Introduction to Science Film Making
  • World Fisheries Congress
  • 23rd IAHR International Symposium on Ice
  • Protecting wetland ecosystem services. Promoting stronger economies
  • Lake Michigan Coastal Awareness Month: Celebrate the Coast: Fresh, Water, Fun!
  • Resource Institute: Southwest Stream Restoration Conference
  • 79th Annual Ducks Unlimited National Convention
  • Science Communication: Confronting the challenges of public participation in environmental, planning and health decision-making
  • ASLO 2016 Summer Meeting
  • Great Lakes Solutions: Integrating Across Disciplines & Scales
  • CWEA (Chesapeake Water Environmental Association) Stormwater Seminar: Beyond Nutrients: Case Studies and Tools for Addressing TMDLs
  • Coastal Zone Canada Association: Coastal Zone Canada Conference
  • 13th International Coral Reef Symposium: Bridging Science to Policy
  • ASFPM's 40th Annual National Conference: "Great Lakes - Grand Partners"
  • Fish Passage 2016 International Conference: River Connectivity Best Practices and Innovations
  • Inaugural International Conference on Natural and Constructed Wetlands: Interactions between Scientists and Engineers
  • 41st Annual Natural Hazards Research and Applications Workshop
  • 2016 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: GIS and Water Resources
  • River Flow 2016 Eighth International Conference: Fluvial Hydraulics
  • From Cemetery Prairies to National Tallgrass Prairies
  • 3rd North America Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB): Communicating Science for Conservation Action
  • Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum
  • University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences: Mangrove & Macrobenthos Meeting
  • Resource Institute's Rocky Mountain Stream Restoration Conference
  • 2nd Student Workshop on Ecology and Optics of Coastal Zones
  • 2016 Gordon Research Conference: Unifying Ecology Across Scales: Linking the Levels from Physiological to Ecosystem Ecology
  • 4th International Marine Conservation Congress (IMCC4): Making Marine Science Matter
  • Wetland Restoration Workshop
  • 2016 Ecological Society of America's (ESA) annual meeting
  • American Society of Civil Engineers: GEO Sustainability & Geoenvironment
  • StormCon: Designing the Future of Stormwater
  • 2016 World Water Week
  • IUCN World Conservation Congress: Planet at the crossroads
  • 3rd International Conference “Water resources and wetlands”
  • 10th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference
  • Water: Events, Trends, Analysis
  • Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum - West Coast
  • Student Conference on Conservation Science – New York (SCCS-NY)
  • Land Trust Alliance Rally 2016 National Land Conservation Conference
  • North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) Symposium: Science to Stewardship: Balancing Economic Growth and Lake Sustainability
  • 2016 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference
  • 8th National Summit: Our Coasts, Our Future, Our Choice and 25th Biennial Meeting of The Coastal Society

Training

  • Managing Floodplain Development Through the NFIP
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Phase 1 Environmental Site Assessment
  • Coastal Training Program course: Environmental Negotiations
  • Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement (Atlantic & Gulf Coastal Plain)
  • Urban Watershed Research Institute course: Dam Safety Practices & Hydrology
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation course: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology
  • Environmental Planning and Site Analysis
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • Forest University online: Surface Water Master Class Series
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment
  • Wetland Delineation Field Workshop and Online Training
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center (NWETC)course: Habitat Site Restoration
  • Coral Reef Ecology: Bermuda
  • UC Davis Extension course: Planning and Environmental Law
  • Coastal Training Program course: Environmental Negotiations (Eastern WA)
  • Urban Watersheds Research Institute course: LID and BMP Selection, Design & Economics
  • Endangered Species Act Overview
  • 2016 NASA/CUAHSI Remote Sensing Hydrology Workshop
  • Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
  • Everglades Wetland Research Park course: Creation and Restoration of Wetlands
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Botanist
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Workshop: Principles of Wetland Design
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Phase 1 Environmental Site Assessment
  • FIRM Map Revisions – Technical/Administrative Aspects
  • North Carolina State University Stream Restoration Program course: Stream Morphology Assessment
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • Hydrophytic Vegetation (Coastal Plain)
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
  • The Swamp School Online Program: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments
  • Environmental Law Institute course: Clean Water Act 2016: Law and Regulation (ELI/ALI CLE Course of Study)
  • Wetland Restoration and Training LLC: Wetland Design and Restoration Techniques
  • Pacific Biodiversity Institute: Conservation Science and Leadership Course
  • Wetland Restoration and Training LLC: Wetland Assessment and Monitoring
  • Bayesian Workshop for Ecologists and Wildlife Biologists
  • University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Aquatic & Terrestrial Invasive Species Management
  • University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Fundamentals of Stream Channel
  • Basic Wetland Delineation
  • The Swamp School Online Workshop: Principles of Wetland Design
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Watershed Management Planning, Assessment, & Monitoring
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator
  • CERES of the Ecole Normale Supérieure: Summer School on Modelling Environmental Resilience
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Botanist
  • Hydrophytic Vegetation (Piedmont)
  • Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
  • Spatial Ecology, Geospatial Analysis and Remote Sensing for Conservation
  • Endangered Species Act Overview
  • Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
  • Natural Channel Design Principles
  • Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology (Piedmont)
  • Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement (Eastern Mountains/Piedmont)

SPECIAL EVENTS

  • Snow Goose Festival of the Pacific Flyway
  • World Wetlands Day 2016: Wetlands for our Future: Sustainable Livelihoods
  • Winter Wings Bird Festival
  • Florida Scrub-Jay Festival
  • Two Rivers National Wildlife Refuge: Eagle Watching Open House
  • Orlando Wetlands Festival
  • Whooping Crane Festival
  • World Fish Migration Day: Connecting Fish, Rivers and People


Wetland Breaking News - December 2015

Wetland Breaking News

The Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News (WBN) is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news Wetland Breaking News - February 2016relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those working in water resources and related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published for over fifteen years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.

The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to .

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled and Edited by Marla Stelk, Editor; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors. Executive Director: Jeanne Christie. Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399 Fax: 207-892-3089

All photos by Jeanne Christie, ASWM


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