Wetland Breaking News - March 2016

                     
   
IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES &
PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

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Wetland Breaking News - March 2016

All photos by
Jeanne Christie, ASWM

       

EDITOR'S NOTE

Spring is right around the corner in Maine. The days are getting warmer and longer, the birds are returning from their winter habitats, and spring flowers are beginning to bloom. We sprung our clocks forward last weekend and the official first day of spring is coming up this weekend. It’s an exciting time for Wetland Breaking News - March 2016Mainers as the winters here can be very long, dark and cold.

This was not our normal Maine winter, however. Yes it was a long, dark season, but most of the big winter snow storms missed us this year, passing instead to our south to hit the mid-Atlantic more often than not. It’s a drastic change from last winter when we had so much snow that most of us wondered if we would ever see the ground again.

El Nino has certainly played a part in the strange winter weather patterns we experienced across the entire nation this year, but there is no denying that our climate is changing rapidly. In this issue of Wetland Breaking News, you’ll find several stories that discuss the rate at which our climate is changing such as “Seas are now rising faster than they have in 2,800 years, scientists say” in our Wetland Science News section. You’ll find stories that highlight the complexity of climate change science and public policy, such as “These experts say Congress is ‘legislating scientific facts’ — and wrong ones, too” and “Study suggests salt marshes could persist despite rising sea levels.” We’ve also included stories that highlight the risks and proposed solutions associated with a rapidly changing climate such as “Scientists look at role of wetlands in battle against climate change.”

Any solutions we come up with will require intra and inter-national cooperation – we cannot solve the climate crisis on our own. The recent story about the meeting between Canada’s new Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and President Obama where they announced they were unified in their fight against climate change is encouraging. I personally hope it’s a sign for more meaningful change in future national climate change policies. And now is the perfect time for it - spring is, after all, the season of change, growth and new beginnings.

Wetland Breaking News - March 2016Happy spring!

Marla J. Stelk, Editor
Wetland Breaking News

     
                     


EDITOR'S CHOICEWetland Breaking News - March 2016

Reshaping the Chesapeake Bay, one living shoreline at a time

By Gabriel Popkin – The Washington Post– March 14, 2016
“Where we’re standing was open water,” boasted Bhaskar Subramanian on a sun-soaked and unseasonably warm morning last fall. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources environmental scientist was standing on a sandy, crescent-shaped beach. Behind him, two small curved jetties, made of rock and covered in grasses, jutted into Chesapeake Bay. For full story, click here.

USDA invests $25 million in watersheds to improve water quality

By USDA – AGProfessional – February 29, 2016
Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced an investment of $25 million targeted to help agriculture producers improve water quality in high-priority streams and rivers across the country. Through the National Water Quality Initiative (NWQI), USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) will help agricultural producers in 187 priority watersheds apply conservation measures that contribute to cleaner water downstream. For full story, click here.

2015 National Environmental Scorecard Reveals Most Anti-Environmental Congress in History

Contact: Seth Stein – League of Conservation Voters – February 24, 2016
The League of Conservation Voters (LCV) today released the 2015 National Environmental Scorecard tallying the performance of every member of Congress on the year’s key environmental votes. The Scorecard is available in both English and Spanish at scorecard.lcv.org. Last year President Obama lead the way to unprecedented victories when it came to confronting the climate crisis, even as he battled the most anti-environmental Congress in American history,” said LCV President Gene Karpinski. For full press release, click here.

Court to hear case against Obama's water rule

By Timothy Cama – The Hill – February 22, 2016
A Cincinnati-based federal appeals court ruled Monday that it has the jurisdiction to hear numerous consolidated challenges to the Obama administration’s contentious water pollution rule. The Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit rejected calls from opponents of the regulation to dismiss their cases and allow them to first go to lower courts with their challenges to the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) rule. For full story, click here.

Fixing the Greater Florida Everglades-Once and For All

By Bill Mitsch – Linkedin-Pulse – February 13, 2016
There is currently major concern being expressed throughout Florida about the recent pulses of an excessive amount of polluted farm water from Lake Okeechobee (aka Lake O) into the Caloosahatchee River to the west and into the St. Lucie River to the east by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. For full story, click here.

Research points to unprofitable land use

By Jane Fyksen – Agri-ViewGood Nel – February 2, 2016
A new study from a multidisciplinary team led by Iowa State University agronomists shows significant portions of Iowa farmland consistently lose money. The research could influence many farmers to change how they use some of the acres they devote to corn and soybeans. Elke Brandes, a postdoctoral research associate in agronomy and lead author of the new study, said spotty soil conditions and other agronomic challenges in fields across Iowa reduce yields enough to make some acres unprofitable. From a strict dollars-and-cents perspective, Brandes said the low yields produced on those acres fall short of the cost of inputs such as fertilizers and herbicides. For full story, click here.

A Controversial EPA Rule Is Pitting Small Farmers Against Big Agribusiness

By Natasha Geiling – Think Progress – January 14, 2016
In May, when the EPA released its final version of the Clean Water Rule — meant to clarify which waters are under the jurisdiction of the Clean Water Act — the agency cheered the broad reach of the rule, arguing that it would protect the drinking water of some 117 million Americans, or roughly a third of the population. But when Sen. Joni Ernst (R-IA) introduced a resolution to kill the EPA’s Clean Water Rule back in November, she seemed especially concerned with the rule’s impact on a single group in particular: farmers and ranchers, who comprise just two percent of the population. For full story, click here.

Wetland Mapping Consortium (WMC) Workshop Webinars – March 30, 2016

Working towards an Automated Wetlands Mapping Process: Successes, Failures, and Potential for the Future – 3:30-4:00 p.m. ET. Presented by Robb McLeod, Ducks Unlimited

Wetland Breaking News - March 2016Multi-Criteria Restoration Prioritization: Applying Landscape Level Wetland Functional Assessments for Watershed Planning & Decision Support – 4:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m. ET. Presented by Andy Robertson, Saint Mary's University of Minnesota

National Wetlands Inventory Version 2 – Surface Waters and Wetlands - 4:30 p.m.-5:00 p.m. ET. Presented by Mitch Bergeson, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

For more information and to register, click here.

Wetland Breaking News - March 2016

NATIONAL NEWSWetland Breaking News - March 2016

Military checks for water contamination at 664 sites

By Jennifer McDrmott, Associated Press – The Press Enterprise – March 10, 2016
The military is beginning to check whether chemicals from its firefighting foam may have contaminated groundwater at hundreds of sites nationwide, according to the Defense Department. The Navy began sampling water at bases in December. Eighty-five sites will be checked in California alone. At a naval landing field in Virginia, the U.S. Navy is now giving its personnel bottled water and testing wells in the nearby rural area after the discovery of perfluorinated chemicals in drinking water. Several congressmen are raising concerns about the safety of drinking water near two former Navy bases in suburban Philadelphia because of firefighting foam. For full story, click here.

Obama: US, Canada 'fully united in combating climate change'

By Timothy Cama – The Hill – March 10, 2016
President Obama gleefully welcomed a new partner in the fight against climate change Thursday, saying the United States and Canada are on the same page. n a press conference alongside Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Obama outlined their matching ideologies and some of the steps they've agreed to take. “I’m especially pleased to say the United States and Canada are fully united in combating climate change,” Obama said. For full story, click here.

USDA Commits $20 Million to Innovative Conservation Projects

Contact: Office of Communications – USDA – March 7, 2016
Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced the availability of up to $20 million in competitive grants through the Conservation Innovation Grants (CIG) program. The program aims to spark the development and adoption of cutting-edge conservation technologies and approaches for farmers, ranchers and other landowners. For full news release, click here.

New Investment Model for Green Infrastructure to Help Protect Chesapeake Bay

The Nature Conservancy – March 7, 2016
In an effort to reduce the polluting effects of stormwater on regional waterways, Prudential Financial is investing $1.7 million towards a new pilot collaboration between The Nature Conservancy and Encourage Capital called District Stormwater LLC (DS). The announcement was made today at a White House event hosted by the Council on Environmental Quality. This new venture is expected to prevent the runoff of millions of gallons of pollutant-laden stormwater from the nation’s capital into the nearby Potomac and Anacostia rivers. Stormwater runoff is now the fastest-growing source of water pollution both in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed and worldwide. For full press release, click here.

Service Distributes $1.1 Billion to State Wildlife Agencies to Support Conservation, Outdoor Recreation, and Job Creation

Contact: Christina Meister – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – March 7, 2016
The keystone of annual funding for state wildlife agencies was put into place on March 6, 2016 with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s distribution of $1.1 billion in revenues generated by the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration and Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration acts. The funding, which supports critical state environmental conservation and recreation projects throughout the nation, derives from excise taxes paid by the hunting, boating and angling industries on firearms, bows and ammunition (Pittman-Robertson), and sportfishing tackle, some boat engines and small engine fuel (Dingell-Johnson). For full press release, click here.

Alarm over lead found in drinking water at US schools

By Kate Galbraith – The Guardian – March 1, 2016
Several schools across the US have either discovered or acted upon evidence of high levels of lead in their drinking water in the wake of the crisis in Flint, Michigan; with one leading expert warning the cases could mark “the tip of the iceberg”. Yanna Lambrinidou, who is an affiliate faculty member in science, technology and society at Virginia Tech, the university that helped uncover the extremely elevated levels of lead in Flint, said schools are especially vulnerable to contamination from ageing pipes, faucets and valves. For full story, click here.

Supreme Court shoots down challenge to cleanup plan

By Robin Bravender – E&E Publishing, LLC – February 29, 2016
The Supreme Court today rejected an industry-led effort to topple U.S. EPA's Chesapeake Bay cleanup plan. In a short order issued this morning, the court refused to hear an appeal of a lower court's decision that upheld EPA's "pollution diet" for the watershed. The American Farm Bureau Federation and its allies, including 22 states and dozens of lawmakers, had urged the justices to take the case, arguing that EPA's plan violates the Clean Water Act. For full story, click here.

Monarch Butterfly Migration Rebounds, Easing Some Fears

By Victoria Burnett – The New York Times – February 27, 2016
After years of being ravaged by severe weather and shrinking habitats, the monarch butterflies hibernating in the Mexican mountains rebounded last year, kindling cautious hope that one of the insect world’s most captivating migrations may yet survive. The World Wildlife Fund said at a news conference here on Friday that the orange-and-black butterflies, which fly more than 2,500 miles each year from Canada and the United States to a cluster of mountain forests in Mexico, covered about 10 acres this winter, an area more than three times as large as the space they covered last year. For full story, click here.

These experts say Congress is ‘legislating scientific facts’ — and wrong ones, too

By Chris Mooney – The Washington Post – February 26, 2016
A group of forest scientists, ecologists and climate researchers has sent a strongly worded letter to the U.S. Senate, arguing that pending bipartisan energy legislation incorrectly claims that burning trees for energy is carbon neutral. “Legislating scientific facts is never a good idea, but is especially bad when the ‘facts’ are incorrect,” say the researchers, led by Phil Duffy, president of the Woods Hole Research Center. “We urge you and other members of the Senate to reconsider this well-intentioned legislation and eliminate the misrepresentation that forest bioenergy is carbon-neutral.” The letter is endorsed by 65 researchers, including a number of leaders of forest science, and also endorsed by several scientific societies. For full story, click here.

Republican candidates' calls to scrap EPA met with skepticism by experts

By Oliver Milman – The Guardian – February 26, 2016
Amid prolonged bickering with his rivals, Donald Trump outlined a fairly radical proposal during Thursday’s Republican debate: to scrap the US Environmental Protection Agency. Typically there was little policy detail. But it was clear that the EPA – and its $8bn budget – would be on the chopping block should the Republican frontrunner become president. For full story, click here.

House Republicans seek to open up national forests to mining and logging

Oliver Milman – The Guardian – February 24, 2016
Congress is to consider two bills that would allow states to hand over vast tracts of federal land for mining, logging or other commercial activities – just weeks after the arrest of an armed militia that took over a wildlife refuge in Oregon in protest at federal oversight of public land. The legislation, which will be presented to the House committee on natural resources on Thursday, would loosen federal authority over parts of the 600m acres (240m hectares), nearly one-third of the land mass of the US, it administers. For full story, click here.

Canada and U.S. to reduce phosphorus 40% to improve Lake Erie water

By Environmental Protection Agency – Ag Professional – February 23, 2016
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy and Canada’s Environment and Climate Change Minister Catherine McKenna announced that Canada and the U.S. have adopted targets to reduce phosphorus entering affected areas of Lake Erie by 40 percent. The targets announced will minimize the extent of low oxygen “dead zones” in the central basin of Lake Erie; maintain algae growth at a level consistent with healthy aquatic ecosystems; and maintain algae biomass at levels that do not produce toxins that pose a threat to human or ecosystem health. For full story, click here.

National Wildlife Federation to Sue Pipeline Safety Administration to Protect Communities, Wildlife from Oil Spill in the Great Lakes

By Jordan Lubetkin – The National Wildlife Federation – February 22, 2016
The National Wildlife Federation today officially sent a notice of intent to sue the federal agency largely responsible for overseeing oil pipeline safety. The notice asserts that the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) had no authority to authorize the transport of oil through pipelines that run through the Straits of Mackinac and navigable waters in Michigan’s Upper and Lower Peninsulas. PHMSA also incorrectly authorized the transport of oil through pipelines on land without assessing the impacts on the environment, fish, and wildlife, including the impacts on endangered and threatened species, such as the Piping Plover and Kirtland’s Warbler. For full article, click here.

EPA Releases Drinking Water Mapping Application to Protect Source Waters

Contact: Robert Daguillard – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – February 19, 2016
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today released DWMAPS – the Drinking Water Mapping Application to Protect Source Waters. This robust, online mapping tool provides the public, water system operators, state programs, and federal agencies with critical information to help them safeguard the sources of America’s drinking water. DWMAPS allows users to learn about their watershed and understand more about their water supplier. DWMAPS also lets users see if sources of their drinking water are polluted and if there are possible sources of pollution that could affect their communities’ water supply. DWMAPS can even guide users to ways they can get involved in protecting drinking water sources in their community. For full news release, click here.

Updated Policy Re-affirms Federal-State Collaboration on Implementing the ESA

Contacts: Brain Hires and Connie Barclay – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service – February 19, 2016
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service (together the Services) have updated a long-standing policy on the role of state fish and wildlife agencies in implementing the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The updated policy, developed in coordination with state fish and wildlife agencies, re-affirms the commitment for engagement and collaboration between the Services and state agencies on many aspects of ESA implementation. For full press release, click here.

New web site aims to help public track Bay restoration

By Timothy B. Wheeler – Bay Journal – February 17, 2016
People wanting to know if the Bay is being saved now have a handy new place online where they can check. The Chesapeake Bay Program has launched “Chesapeake Progress,” a website designed to provide “accurate, up-to-date and accessible information” about what’s been done to achieve the restoration goals and outcomes spelled out under the 2014 Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement. For full article, click here.

Maryland takes Virginia to court over coal ash plan on the Potomac

By Pamela Wood – The Baltimore Sun – February 16, 2016
Fearing a potential threat to the Potomac River and the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland is wading into a water pollution controversy in Virginia, appealing a decision that allows a power company to drain treated water from coal ash ponds into a creek that flows into the Potomac. For full story, click here.

U.S. House passes controversial bill on NSF research

By Jeffrey Mervis – cience/AAAS – February 11, 2016
As expected, the House of Representatives yesterday passed HR 3293 by a 236 to 178 vote. Lawmakers voted largely along party lines, with just seven Democrats voting in favor of the bill and four Republicans against. After the Wednesday vote, leaders of the House science committee’s majority and minority blocs issued dueling statements. For full article, click here.

John A. Rapanos, who vowed 'Fight to the death' against EPA, dies at 80

By Clark Hughes – MLIVE – February 11, 2016
John A. Rapanos, the feisty developer from Midland whose war with state and federal environmental regulators gained national attention a decade ago and changed U.S. Clean Water Act enforcement, has died. He was 80 years old. Rapanos' decades-long fight over 54 acres he owned in Bay County's Williams Township and Midland County brought him a criminal conviction in federal court and saw a lawsuit over the U.S. Clean Water Act go all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. He was hailed as a hero to property rights advocates. For full story, click here.

A Look at Obama's Final Budget Proposal

The Associated Press – abc News – February 9, 2016
Obama's budget for the Agriculture Department includes a proposed $12 billion over 10 years to help feed schoolchildren from low-income families during the summer. Nearly 22 million low-income children receive free and reduced-price meals during the school year, but just a fraction of those kids receive meals when school is out. Benefits under the proposed program would be loaded onto a debit card that can only be used for food at grocery stores. For full story, click here.

 

STATE NEWSWetland Breaking News - March 2016

AK: Court upholds federal plan to protect vast polar bear habitat in Alaska

By Oliver Milman – The Guardian – March 1, 2016
A federal government plan to protect a vast area of the US Arctic as habitat for polar bears has been upheld by an appeals court, overturning a previous victory by the state of Alaska and fossil fuel lobbyists against the designation. The US court of appeals for the ninth circuit reversed a lower-court decision that the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s protection of 187,000 square miles of Alaska’s northern coast – an area larger than California – was too extensive and arbitrary. For full story, click here.

CA: Pits of drilling waste threaten water, air safety, report charges

By Peter Fimrite – San Francisco Chronicle – March 7, 2016
Hundreds of open pits containing toxic waste produced by oil and gas drilling are threatening groundwater in California, and regulators have failed to protect drinking and irrigation water supplies from the danger, an environmental watchdog group concludes in a report set to be released Monday. Oil industry leaders deny that the pits, which are primarily in the Central Valley, have contaminated any groundwater. But the report by Clean Water Action argues that oversight of the waste is so flimsy that the state should immediately prohibit disposal of wastewater in the evaporation pits. For full story, click here.

CA: The disappearing wetlands in California’s Central Valley

By Paige Blankenbuehler – High Country News – February 29, 2016
Each year, 181 species of waterfowl, shorebirds and riparian birds flock to California’s Central Valley to nest between March and July. The space they roost in is already limited: There are just 19 wetlands, comprised of National Wildlife Refuges and State Wildlife Areas, spread across little more than 270 square miles in the valley’s 22,500-square-mile expanse. But over the past five years during the state’s historic drought, those birds have returned, only to find once watery areas no longer suitable for nesting. If dry conditions persist, the little remaining space could disappear. For full story, click here.

CA: OC launches wetland project to improve water quality and wildlife habitats

Southern California Public Radio – 89.3 KPCC – February 23, 2016
Orange County has launched a $1.1 million wetland project to improve water quality and wildlife habitats near Aliso Creek. Officials kicked off the construction of the Dairy Fork Wetland and Habitat Restoration Project in Aliso Viejo in a ceremony Monday. The wetland is designed to treat runoff from 1,500 acres of commercial and residential areas within Aliso Viejo, Lake Forest, Laguna Hills and Laguna Woods. For full story, click here.

FL: FPL nuclear plant canals leaking into Biscayne Bay, study confirms

By Jenny Staletovich – Miami Herald – March 7, 2016
A radioactive isotope linked to water from power plant cooling canals has been found in high levels in Biscayne Bay, confirming suspicions that Turkey Point’s aging canals are leaking into the nearby national park. According to a study released Monday by Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez, water sampling in December and January found tritium levels up to 215 times higher than normal in ocean water. The report doesn’t address risks to the public or marine life but tritium is typically monitored as a “tracer” of nuclear power plant leaks or spills. For full story, click here.

FL: Florida drops bill to open fracking in the Everglades after public outcry

By Richard Luscombe – The Guardian – March 3, 2016
Environmentalists in Florida are celebrating the failure of an oil industry-backed bill they say would have opened a pathway to fracking in the ecologically sensitive Everglades wetlands. State lawmakers unexpectedly dropped the measure in a hearing in Tallahassee on Tuesday, just as they were about to begin debate on the controversial, high-pressure drilling practice, bowing instead to a groundswell of public opinion. For full story, click here.

FL: Florida shores yellow, brown and black all over

By Jenny Staletovich – Miami Herald – February 28, 2016
What’s yellow, brown and black all over? After a bruising watery winter on the heels of a dry summer, Florida’s water. In July, a stinky stain scientist call yellow fog spread across Florida Bay after a regional drought killed miles of seagrass. This month, water managers began flushing Lake Okeechobee, a vast shallow bowl more than twice the size of New York City, into the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico following record rain. A familiar wave of black water thick with sediment soon flowed east, spreading to corals on the northern remnants of the state’s reef tract. On the west coast, water turned a muddy brown. For full story, click here.

FL: Record 6,250 manatees spotted in Florida

Phys.org – February 25, 2016
The number of manatees in the waters around Florida have reached a new peak of at least 6,250, conservationists said Thursday, a record reflecting years of efforts to protect the marine mammals. The count is up slightly from the 6,063 spotted last year, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said in a statement, citing results from surveys conducted by 11 organizations. Last month, the US Fish and Wildlife Service proposed downgrading the manatee's status from endangered, a designation given to species on the brink of extinction, to threatened. For full story, click here.

IA: Conservation study: Millions spent, but no lasting gains

By Donnelle Eller – The Des Moines Register – February 8, 2016
A study of eight high-priority watersheds in Iowa found little increase in acres devoted to two key farm conservation practices over a three-year period, indicating taxpayers are getting minimal additional environmental benefits despite millions of dollars spent. The Environmental Working Group's report, being released Sunday, comes as Iowa lawmakers are expected to weigh proposals this year that would ramp up financing for farm conservation practices to help clean the state's rivers, lakes and streams — including a $4.7 billion plan from Gov. Terry Branstad. For full story, click here.

KS: EPA and Franklin County, Kan., Reach Settlement on Clean Water Act Violations

Contact: Angela Brees – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – March 2, 2016
EPA Region 7 reached a settlement with Franklin County, Kan., that requires the county to resolve its National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit violations under the Clean Water Act. As part of the settlement, the county is required to pay a cash penalty of $20,000.EPA investigations at the Franklin County Construction and Demolition Landfill and Transfer Station in Ottawa in April 2015 found solid waste in storm drains, and the potential for contaminated stormwater runoff coming from scrap metal piles and other solid wastes. The county also failed to conduct self-inspections, monitor stormwater quality, and conduct an annual comprehensive site evaluation. As part of the settlement, the county is required to submit a report describing how it came into compliance with its NPDES permit within 90 days in addition to the cash penalty. For full news release, click here.

LA: Louisiana black bear to be removed from endangered species list

By Todd Masson – NOLA.com - The Times-Picayume – March 4, 2016
The Louisiana black bear will formally be removed from the national endangered species list Thursday in a ceremony to be attended by U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell. The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries announced last year that bear populations had recovered enough in the state to make the delisting imminent, but the March 10 ceremony will make it official. For full story, click here.

MD: Waterkeepers: Removal of waterways from federal pollution rules may violate Clean Water Act

By Christina Jedra – Capital Gazette – March 9, 2016
The Environmental Protection Agency may have broken federal law by removing dozens of Maryland waterways from its impaired water list, according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday. Six area waterkeeping organizations allege the EPA violated the Clean Water Act when officials excused 53 river segments — some in Anne Arundel County — from "total maximum daily load" requirements in 2012, according to the lawsuit filed in federal district court in Washington, D.C. For more information, click here.

MD: Squabbles threaten future of Chesapeake’s oyster restoration

By Timothy B. Wheeler – Bay Journal – March 9, 2016
Stocked with more than 2 billion hatchery-spawned oysters, Harris Creek became the crown jewel of an ambitious effort to revive the Chesapeake Bay’s depleted shellfish population. As it was being completed last fall, scientists, politicians and others made pilgrimages to the Choptank River tributary to witness Maryland and the federal government working together to restore 375 acres of reefs with young bivalves. Now, the “largest oyster restoration project on the planet,” as one environmental group called it, has become a timeworn example of another sort – of political intervention in the stewardship of the Bay’s iconic shellfish. For full article, click here.

MD: On the Bay: Waterway permit process changed

By Christina Jedra – Capital Gazette – February 24, 2016
The Army Corps of Engineers' Baltimore District released for public comment a proposal to renew and revise the permit that allows work in state waters. The corps suggests updating the Maryland State Programmatic General Permit with "two new authorized activities for culvert pipe grouting and stormwater management facilities," a news release states. The current version of the permit went into effect Oct. 1, 2011 and expires Sept. 30. The permit will be valid for five years and applies to "navigable waters, streams, rivers, other open waters and wetlands within Maryland," the release said. For full story, click here.

MI: Flint to stop sending water bills until credits applied

By Jennifer Chambers – The Detroit News – March 9, 2016
Flint’s mayor has suspended the mailing of utility bills to residents to give the city time to apply credits to water bills. Mayor Karen Weaver said on Wednesday that city employees “are doing everything they can” to get accounts in order, including making adjustments and obtaining the proper computer programs to calculate and apply adjustments and credits to the city’s more than 85,000 active and inactive utility accounts on record from April 2014 to present. For full story, click here.

MI: EPA chief: Protective film building up in Flint pipes

By Jacob Carah – The Detroit News – March 1, 2016
Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy said the city’s lead levels are dropping as the municipal water system builds up a protective biofilm in the pipes. McCarthy, who on Tuesday visited Flint for a second time, said the pipes are recoating with a phosphate barrier that prevents lead from leaching into the drinking water. Flint’s system was reconnected to Detroit’s water supply in October, which has corrosion treatment that is healing the more than 8,000 lead service lines. “Our phosphate levels, for the first time with confidence, are also improving,” McCarthy said. For full story, click here.

MI: EPA Again Postpones Enbridge Fine for 2010 Kalamazoo River Spill

By David Hasemyer – InsideClimate News – February 19, 2016
Negotiations between Enbridge Inc. and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have been extended again over a fine that could exceed $100 million for violations under the Clean Water Act in the pipeline operator’s 2010 Kalamazoo River disaster. The spill of highly toxic tar sands oil fouled a 40-mile stretch of the river in Michigan. It was the biggest inland oil spill in U.S. history and resulted in a massive cleanup that kept the river closed for nearly two years. The cleanup has cost the company more than $1.2 billion. In addition, Enbridge has already been assessed almost $83 million in penalties by other state and federal authorities. For full story, click here.

MN: Report warns of contaminated central Minnesota groundwater

By Steve Karnowski – Associate Press Star Tribune – February 25, 2016
Up to 60 percent of the groundwater monitoring wells sampled across a swath of central and eastern Minnesota are contaminated with nitrates well above the safe drinking water standard, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency said Thursday in a report that highlights growing concerns about the state's drinking water. Some of the affected cities include Becker, Clear Lake, Cold Spring, Hastings, Goodhue, Adrian and Park Rapids, the report said. They lie in a region of shallow sand and gravel aquifers. A 2014 report from the Minnesota Department of Health estimated the treatment costs statewide were in the billions of dollars, including $9 million for Hastings and $11 million for Park Rapids.For full story, click here.

NV: Walker River Paiutes to develop tribal water quality standards

Contact: Margot Perez-Sullivan – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – March 2, 2016
Today, the U.S. EPA announced the approval of the Walker River Paiute Tribe’s application for “Treatment in a similar manner as a State” under Sections 303 and 401 of the Clean Water Act. Jared Blumenfeld, EPA’s Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest, presented the signed Certificate of Achievement in a meeting with the Tribal Chairman, Bobby Sanchez, at the Walker River Paiute Tribe Administration Building in Shurz, Nev. “I am pleased to announce that the Walker River Paiute’s will now exercise their own authority under the Clean Water Act,” said Mr. Blumenfeld, EPA’s Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “The waters on this land are integral to the tribe’s health and culture.” For full news release, click here.

NJ: Lead Fear Forces Water Ban in 30 New Jersey School Buildings

By The Associated Press – abc News – March 9, 2016
Elevated levels of lead caused officials in New Jersey's largest school district on Wednesday to shut off water fountains at 30 school buildings until more tests are conducted, but officials said they don't believe the contamination poses any serious health risks. Newark Public Schools notified the state Department of Environmental Protection on Monday that annual testing found levels ranging from non-detected to above the Environmental Protection Agency's action level for lead, which is 15 parts per billion. That level requires additional testing, monitoring and remediation. For full story, click here.

NJ: Toxic Passaic River to Get $1.38 Billion Cleanup Over 10 Years

By Noah Remnick – The New York Times – March 4, 2016
The Passaic River was once the backbone of an industrial corridor, snaking through this stretch of northern New Jersey and sustaining the factories and plants that cropped up alongside it. But now, the river’s banks are dotted by deserted manufacturing sites while the waterway remains scarred after decades as a dumping ground for industrial pollutants that linger in the water and have seeped into the soil. These days in Newark, the Passaic, rather than serve as a draw, is something to be avoided, known by residents for the stench of its murky waters and the signs along the banks warning them not to eat the fish or the blue claw crabs they pull from it. For full story, click here.

NM: State cautions snowmelt may stir up mine spill debris

By Rebecca Moss – Santa Fe New Mexican – February 27, 2016
The New Mexico Environment Department issued a warning late last week that melting snowpack may stir up toxic contaminants lying in sediment beneath Northern New Mexico’s waterways, the result of thousands of pounds of heavy metals released in wastewater that spilled from an abandoned Colorado mine last summer. The department warns that the swelling waters in the San Juan and Animas rivers, as snowmelt runs down from the San Juan Mountains in Colorado, will cause toxic heavy metals dormant in the river’s sediment beds to once again create dangerous levels of pollution to waters used by the Navajo Nation and other northwestern New Mexico communities for drinking, agriculture and livestock. For full story, click here.

NY: This New York storm barrier could have slowed down Sandy. But European settlers ate it.

By Darryl Fears – The Washington Post – March 10, 2016
New York’s settlers worked up quite an appetite building what became one of the largest cities in the world. They ate oysters in the harbor like they were going out of style. They picked oysters from their reefs by hand in Raritan Bay starting in the 1600s. Subsequent generations kept at it, with rakes and tongs, and as the reefs declined, early New Yorkers used “dredges towed from sloops and schooners,” a new study says. By the early 20th Century, 220,000 acres of reef covering 350 square miles was gone, according to The Big Oyster, a book on their history in the city. For full story, click here.

NY: State pollution investigation of Hoosick Falls widens

By Scott Waldman – Politico New York – March 2, 2016
The state is investigating at least 11 possible contaminated or illegal dumping sites in the Hoosick Falls area, according to multiple sources with knowledge of the probe. The proliferation of the pollution in a variety of sites confirms that pollution in the village goes far beyond the Saint-Gobain facility that state officials have determined is responsible for the PFOA in the municipal water supply and could make finding a new water source more challenging. Some of the private wells have also tested for extremely high levels of PFOA, more than 30 times the federal Environmental Protection Agency’s recommended limit of 100 parts per trillion. Some are miles from the factory site, and are likely polluted with PFOA after illegal dumping from the factory. For full story, click here.

NY: Debate Lingers Over Massive Clean-up of Hudson River

By Michael Hill – The Hour – February 28, 2016
Dredging operations to clean chemicals from the upper Hudson River may have finally ended after six years and $1.5 billion but some advocates are pushing for another round. The effort by a coalition of environmental groups is the latest chapter in a fight that has ebbed and flowed over decades about how to handle PCBs discharged into the river by General Electric Co. They argue the river won't be truly clean unless dredge crews return, while Environmental Protection Agency focuses on the progress made along the 40-mile stretch of river north of Albany. For full story, click here.

NC: Outcry Prompts Dominion to Make Coal Ash Wastewater Cleaner

By Zahra Hirji – InsideClimate News – March 10, 2016
Dominion Virginia Power agreed this week to adopt stricter standards than Virginia requires for treating coal-related wastewater before it is dumped into local waterways, bowing to pressure from environmentalists and local officials. The settlement comes after activists and others challenged the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality's (DEQ) approval of permits for Dominion to treat and dispose of wastewater from open-air ponds containing coal ash, a byproduct of burning coal, at its Bremo and Possum Point power stations. For full story, click here.

NC: DEQ cites Duke for leaky coal ash ponds

By Matthew Burns and Tyler Dukes – WRAL.com – March 4, 2016
The state Department of Environmental Quality on Friday issued violations against Duke Energy for allowing wastewater to leak from coal ash basins at 12 facilities. The violations were issued for unauthorized discharges of wastewater at the following Duke plants: Allen Steam Station, Asheville Steam Station, Belews Creek Steam Station, Buck Steam Station, Cape Fear Steam Electric Generating Plant, Cliffside Steam Station, Dan River Combined Cycle Plant, Lee Steam Electric Plant, Marshall Steam Station, Mayo Steam Electric Power Plant, Roxboro Steam Electric Plant and Weatherspoon Steam Electric Plant. For full story, click here.

NC: Critics: Shoreline Permits Need Reform

By Trista Talton – Coastal Review – February 10, 2016
In most cases, permits for bulkheads are pretty easy to come by in North Carolina. Federal and state regulators approve most with little review. Permits for living shorelines projects, however, can take months because regulators review each individually. Proponents of living shorelines have complained for years that this imbalance creates a disincentive for property owners to use a more natural form of erosion control that research is showing is better for the environment than bulkheads. For full story, click here.

OH: Injections of wastewater rise in Ohio despite lull in fracking

By Laura Arenschield – The Columbus Dispatch – March 7, 2016
The amount of fracking wastewater pumped underground in Ohio increased by more than 15 percent last year, even as shale drilling has slowed nationwide, according to new numbers from the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Ohio took in nearly 29 million barrels of fracking wastewater in 2015, according to a Dispatch analysis of department data. That is about 4 million more barrels than in 2014. For full story, click here.

OH: Public pans Army Corps of Engineers' plan to dump toxic river sediment into Lake Erie

By James F. McCarty – Cleveland.com – March 2, 2016
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers found scant public support Tuesday night for its proposal to dump contaminated Cuyahoga River sediment into Lake Erie nine miles offshore. The Army Corps, which dredges the six-mile Cleveland shipping channel twice a year, requires an Ohio EPA permit to perform open-lake dumping of thousands of tons of dredged river sediment. For full story, click here.

OK: Oklahoma Puts Limits on Oil and Gas Wells to Fight Quakes

By Michael Wines – The New York Times – March 7, 2016
Facing a six-year barrage of increasingly large earthquakes, Oklahoma regulators are effectively ordering the state’s powerful oil-and-gas industry to substantially cut back the underground disposal of industry wastes that have caused the tremors across the state. Facing a six-year barrage of increasingly large earthquakes, Oklahoma regulators are effectively ordering the state’s powerful oil-and-gas industry to substantially cut back the underground disposal of industry wastes that have caused the tremors across the state.For full story, click here.

OR: Oregon lawmakers approve hemp, wetland, drought, wildfire bills

By Mateusz Perkowski – Capital Press – March 8, 2016
While the 2016 legislative session in Oregon was often dominated by controversies over the minimum wage and renewable energy, lawmakers also passed several less controversial bills that will impact farmers and ranchers. For full story, click here.

PA: Pennsylvania families win $4.2 million damages in fracking lawsuit

By David DeKok – Planet Ark – March 11, 2016
A federal jury ruled on Thursday that Cabot Oil & Gas Co must pay more than $4.2 million in damages to two families in northeastern Pennsylvania who said the company's fracking operations contaminated their ground water. For full story, click here.

TX: Bill would allow North Texas reservoir to bypass federal regulators

By Michael E. Young – The Scoop Blog - The Dallas Mornign News – February 9, 2016
With population growth in Collin and adjoining counties booming and demand for water on the rise, Rep. Sam Johnson has submitted a first-of-its-kind bill to Congress that would exempt a proposed Fannin County reservoir from federal oversight for construction and operation. “Without this [Lower Bois d’Arc Creek] Reservoir, water demand in Collin County will outstrip our available water resources by the year 2020,” Johnson’s office said. “This situation is a dire one – this wouldn’t merely affect the watering of lawns; this would impact actual water taps in homes and businesses.” For full blog post, click here.

UT: Will the Great Salt Lake be reduced to dust?

By Amy Joi O’Sonoghue – Desert News – February 25, 2016
Blame it on the pioneers and the historical diversions from a trio of rivers. The waters of the Great Salt Lake have shrunk by 48 percent and its levels diminished by 11 feet since pioneers first arrived in 1847. A white paper exploring the impacts of water development on the Great Salt Lake and Wasatch Front was released late Wednesday, providing a cautionary message on further development that warrants a strong examination of the benefits, and the costs. For full story, click here.

WA: Virginia allows Dominion to exceed toxic limits for James River dumping

By Mike Valerio – NBC 12 – March 6, 2016 – Video
Dominion Virginia Power is now allowed to release toxic chemicals at triple the levels considered harmful to aquatic health in the James River, according to a state-approved permit for the corporation’s Bremo Power Station in Fluvanna. According to an NBC12 review of the permit, Dominion is approved to begin releasing quantities of arsenic and hexavalent chromium exceeding Virginia’s chronic pollution standards. Freshwater fish and aquatic life begin to die a few days after the limits are surpassed. For full story and to view video, click here.

WA: Drugs found in Puget Sound salmon from tainted wastewater

By Lynda V. Mapes – The Seattle Times – February 25, 2016
Puget Sound salmon are on drugs — Prozac, Advil, Benadryl, Lipitor, even cocaine. Those drugs and dozens of others are showing up in the tissues of juvenile chinook, researchers have found, thanks to tainted wastewater discharge. The estuary waters near the outfalls of sewage-treatment plants, and effluent sampled at the plants, were cocktails of 81 drugs and personal-care products, with levels detected among the highest in the nation. For full story, click here.

WA: Palouse farmers honored for commitment to clean water

Contact: Brook Beeler – Washington Department of Ecology – February 17, 2016
The Palouse-Rock Lake Conservation District is being recognized for leadership in making on-the-ground improvements that benefit healthy farms and protect clean water. The Washington Department of Ecology presented district staff and the board of supervisors with an Environmental Excellence award today, the agency’s highest honor. The district has worked with private landowners to reduce erosion and improve shade along 40 miles of streams and rivers in the Palouse region by planting more than 100,000 native trees. For full news release, click here.

WV: West Virginia receives $1 million to fund water quality project

WOWKTV.com – March 7, 2016
According to a news release, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and partners across the nation together will direct up to $720 million towards 84 conservation projects that will help communities improve water quality, combat drought, enhance soil health, support wildlife habitat and protect agricultural viability. These projects make up the second round of the Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP) created by the 2014 Farm Bill. For full story, click here.

Wetland Breaking News - March 2016 - Join ASWM

WETLAND SCIENCE NEWSWetland Breaking News - March 2016

A 'smeary' Lake Erie sees progress, setbacks

By Brian Bienkowski – Environmental Health News – March 10, 2016
When Dr. Suess wrote his iconic children’s book "The Lorax" in 1971, he took a swipe at the Great Lakes.
"They'll walk on their fins and get woefully weary, in search of some water that isn't so smeary. I hear things are just as bad up in Lake Erie." If the line doesn’t ring a bell, don’t worry: It was removed after Ohio Sea Grant employees wrote the author to fill him in on the major strides in improving the lake’s health. Lake Erie and its four great cousins have benefited mightily from cleanup and research in the 45 years since Dr. Suess penned what became his personal favorite. However, from plummeting prey fish populations to poopy Michigan rivers, grave threats to the region's ecosystems remain, scientists and officials said at the annual Michigan Water Heritage conference held at Michigan State University Tuesday. For full story, click here.

Increasing levels of flame retardants in smallmouth bass threaten Lake Erie fish consumers

By Morgan Linn – Great Lakes Echo – March 10, 2016
Levels of hazardous flame retardants in most Great Lakes fish are declining – or at least researchers thought they were. But a new study shows that this isn’t the case for Lake Erie smallmouth bass, an important game fish. And the contaminated fish threatens the health of some of those who eat them. For full story, click here.

Could a new plastic-eating bacteria help combat this pollution scourge?

By Karl Mathiesen – The Guardian – March 10, 2016
Nature has begun to fight back against the vast piles of filth dumped into its soils, rivers and oceans by evolving a plastic-eating bacteria – the first known to science. In a report published in the journal Science, a team of Japanese researchers described a species of bacteria that can break the molecular bonds of one of the world’s most-used plastics - polyethylene terephthalate, also known as PET or polyester. The Japanese research team sifted through hundreds of samples of PET pollution before finding a colony of organisms using the plastic as a food source. For full story, click here.

Soviet collapse might explain mysterious trend in global methane emissions

By Carolyn Gramling – Science Magazine – March 10, 2016
From cow farts to factory emissions, there are a lot of ways to add methane to the atmosphere. Since the Industrial Revolution, the concentration of this potent greenhouse gas has risen rapidly and steadily, climbing from 700 parts per billion (ppb) in 1750 to more than 1800 ppb in 2015. But from 1999 to 2006, that increase temporarily leveled out, mystifying scientists. Now, a new study identifies the likeliest culprit behind the plateau—and singles out what may have kick-started the latest methane jump. For full story, click here.

Regenerating degraded dirt

By Britt E. Erickson – Chemical & Engineering News – March 7, 2016
It’s hard to find a bare spot on the more than 800 acres farmed by Cory Atkins of Seaford, Del. Even in the dead of winter, a carpet of ankle-high ryegrass blankets the soil where he plans to grow soybeans in the spring. In other fields, wheat and barley sown last fall poke through the dirt next to remnants of sunflowers, clover, and radishes.“These cover crops hold the dirt in place and put nutrients back in the ground,” Atkins says. They also increase soil organic matter—the dark material, called humus, in the top layer of dirt. That layer contains cellulose, starch, lignin, and other molecules from the decomposition of plants and animal residues, plus a slew of biochemicals produced by earthworms and other organisms that live in soil. For full story, click here.

Scientists turn to bowhead whales for clues to algal biotoxin in the Arctic

Arctic Newswire – March 6, 2016
Temperatures in Arctic waters are warming and sea ice is diminishing. With that could come the potential for harmful algal blooms that produce toxins that can affect marine life. Pacific Northwest scientists are now turning to Arctic bowhead whales to get a better idea of the potential ramifications of toxin exposure caused by the algae. For full story, click here.

Road salt putting human, aquatic lives on a collision course

By Karl Blankenship – Bay Journal – March 3, 2016
Just a couple days before January’s “snowzilla” storm buried much of the region under 2 feet of snow, District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser apologized for the city’s “inadequate response” to less than an inch of snow that left motorists variously sliding though icy streets or stranded in backups. Since 1938, when New Hampshire began experimentally salting winter roads, the substance has increasingly become an effective — and cost-effective — way to combat the slippery effects of ice and snow. Nationwide, 10 times as much salt goes on the road as is used to season all processed foods. But as with food, too much salt in freshwater is harmful. It’s a growing problem that threatens efforts to protect stream health in the Chesapeake watershed, and even in the Bay itself. For full article, click here.

Supreme Court backs EPA this time, refuses to block controls on toxic mercury

By Joby Warrick – The Washington Post – March 3, 2016
A month after it hobbled the Obama administration’s signature regulation on climate change, the Supreme Court declined Thursday to block a different air-pollution rule that seeks to cut toxic emissions from the nation’s power plants. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. rejected a request to stay the Mercury and Air Toxic Standards rule, adopted by the Environmental Protection Agency three years ago to tighten restrictions on a class of harmful pollutants that are byproducts of burning coal. For full story, click here.

Trees vital to improving stream quality, study finds

By Sandi Martin – Phys.org – March 2, 2016
Want better streams? Plant some trees, according to a University of Georgia study.
Researchers from UGA's Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources found that where landowners cut down the forests that bordered streams—turning them into pastures or lawns—the structure and even the amount of aquatic habitat changes dramatically. For full story, click here.

BP oil spill damage 'dramatically diminished', scientists say

By Mark Schleifstein – NOLA .com – The Times-Picayume – March 2, 2016
Damage to wetlands, insects and fish along Louisiana's coast from millions of gallons of oil spewing into the Gulf of Mexico after the BP Deepwater Horizon disaster is finally on the downswing. Despite the unprecedented size of the spill and its acute effects on wildlife, the recovery after five years is not unexpected, said three researchers during last week's American Geophysical Union's Ocean Sciences meeting in New Orleans. For full story, click here.

Harnessing the Power of the Mississippi for Restoration

By Kristin Tracz – Walton Family Foundation– March 1, 2016 – Video
For many communities along the Mississippi River, 2016 started off chaotically as torrential downpours in Illinois and Missouri led to record-setting floods. Farther south, in Louisiana, state officials opened the Bonnet Carré spillway for the first time since 2011 to reduce pressure on the levees that protect New Orleans and other communities from flooding. While this move to divert floodwaters kept the levees intact, it also shines a light on Louisiana’s ongoing land loss crisis and how the river can be used to solve it. For full story and to view video, click here.

Study suggests salt marshes could persist despite rising sea levels

Chesapeake Bay Program – February 26, 2016
Salt marshes may be more resilient to the effects of rising sea levels than previously thought, according to a recent study from the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS). Climate change is expected to bring a multitude of changes to the Chesapeake Bay region, including a rise in sea levels. As waters rise, marshes and wetlands are predicted to be overcome by water and disappear faster than wetland plants can move to higher ground, meaning a loss of important habitat that traps pollution and provides food and shelter to fish, shellfish and birds. For full blog post, click here.

US lawmakers expand probe of climate study

By Jeff Tollefson – Nature – February 26, 2016
Republicans in the US House of Representatives are expanding their request for documents related to a major climate study by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Agency researchers — led by Thomas Karl, director of NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information in Asheville, North Carolina — published the analysis last June in Science1. After updating and correcting problems with the temperature record, the team found no sign of an apparent pause in global warming that had been described in previous studies. For full story, click here.

Glyphosate persistence raises questions

By Rebecca Trager – Royal Society of Chemistry – February 25, 2016
The widely used weedkiller glyphosate persists in water and soil longer than previously recognised, and human exposures to glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) are rising, experts from various universities as well as environmental health and consumer groups have concluded in a new scientific review. Field studies cited in the report show the half-life of glyphosate in soil ranges between a few days to several months, or even a year, depending on soil composition. The authors say the research demonstrates that soil sorption and degradation of glyphosate vary significantly depending on the soil’s physical, chemical, and biological properties. For full story, click here.

We Can Save Individual Species – But Can We Save Entire Ecosystems?

By Daniel Ackerman – Ensia – February 23 2016
The 1973 Endangered Species Act has rescued numerous individual species from extinction in the United States — think Rocky Mountain wolves or Florida crocodiles, for instance. But as the climate changes and humans continue to modify the landscape in a frenzy of plows, pastures and pavement, single species are not the only things in need of protection from extinction. Entire ecosystems — biological communities created through millions of years of evolutionary interactions between organisms — are at risk as well. Saving single species alone will not restore the intricate tapestry of relationships that shape ecosystems. To protect the habitat that supports those species and preserve services we humans rely on, from cleansing water for our cities and homes to buffering impacts of climate change, we need to save not just species, but also ecosystems, from extinction. For full story, click here.

Study says climate change pushes fish toward poles, threatening food source for poor

By Chris Arsenault – Planet Ark – February 22, 2016
Climate change is pushing fish toward the planet's North and South poles, robbing traditionally poorer countries closer to the Equator of crucial natural resources, U.S. biologists said in a study published on Wednesday. Key species of fish are migrating away from temperate zones and toward the poles as global temperatures rise, according to a research team from Rutgers University, Princeton University, Yale University and Arizona State University. For full story, click here.

Seas are now rising faster than they have in 2,800 years, scientists say

By Chris Mooney – The Washington Post – February 22, 2016
A group of scientists says it has now reconstructed the history of the planet’s sea levels arcing back over some 3,000 years — leading it to conclude that the rate of increase experienced in the 20th century was “extremely likely” to have been faster than during nearly the entire period. For full story, click here.

De-Extinction, a risky ecological experiment

By Liza Lester – Ecological Society of Americ – February 19, 2016
De-extinction (bringing extinct species back from the dead) has been riding a wave of enthusiasm, fueled by Steward Brand’s TED talk and several prominent books and articles. But for a project that aspires to use materials from the past to build a better future, de-extinction is doing a poor job of using past experience with biological invasions to temper that enthusiasm. For full blog post, click here.

How different are wild salmon from farm salmon? A lot, DNA shows

By Cathaleen Chen – The Christian Science Monitor – February 18, 2016
Within just one generation, hatchery-born salmon can become drastically different from their counterparts in the wild, with hundreds of variations at the genetic level.Looking specifically at the steelhead trout salmon, researchers at Oregon State University, in collaboration with the Oregon Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, found more than 700 genetic variations between farm-raised and wild salmon. The differences have long been theorized to exist. The survival and reproduction gaps between the two fish point to the rapid adaptation of hatchery fish to their confined environments. When fish born in hatcheries are released to the wild, for instance, they have a far harder time reproducing than compared to their indigenous cousins. For full story, click here.

The Fate of Sediment When Freshwater Meets Saltwater

Contacts: Greg Noe and Jon Campbell – U.S. Geological Survey – February 17, 2016
Two recent USGS investigations have measured sedimentation rates along the barely perceptible slope of rivers as they empty into estuaries. The findings of these studies have important implications for the restoration of estuaries — for example, the Chesapeake Bay — and their resilience in the face of sea level rise. The studies compared the sedimentation rates found in upriver tidal freshwater swamps (located at the furthest inland reach of tides) to the rate found in brackish water marshes downstream at the lowest reaches of the rivers. For full news release, click here.

Experts call on feds to re-evaluate the world’s most heavily used herbicide

By Brian Bienkowski – Environmental Health News – February 17, 2016
U.S. and European health officials need to take a fresh look at assumptions about the safety and health impacts of glyphosate herbicides, according to a group of health scientists worried about the chemicals’ explosive worldwide growth. A scientific review released Tuesday warns that use of glyphosate has skyrocketed, growing 15-fold in the 20 years since "Roundup Ready" genetically engineered crops were introduced. Government health agencies, they said, have failed to adequately monitor how much of the herbicide is getting into food and people and what impacts it might be having on our health. For full story, click here.

Scientists look at role of wetlands in battle against climate change

Phsy.org – February 16, 2016
The role rainforests play through storing carbon in the battle against climate change is well understood, but Deakin University scientists now believe the humble swamp, or freshwater wetland, could be up to 50 times more effective. A team of Deakin researchers from Deakin's Centre for Integrative Ecology within the School of Life and Environmental Sciences are now undertaking an Australian-first study to investigate how wetland areas could help us to win the battle against climate change. For full story, click here.

Obama says confident in legal footing after Supreme Court carbon decision

By Jeff Mason and Valerie Volcovici – Reuters – February 11, 2016
U.S. President Barack Obama on Thursday called the Supreme Court's decision to delay implementation of his administration's Clean Power Plan "unusual" and expressed confidence that the White House would prevail. "We’re very confident that we’re on strong legal footing here," he told a group of Democratic donors in California in his first public remarks about the move. In Washington, Gina McCarthy, Obama's head of the Environmental Protection Agency, told state energy and environmental regulators that the ruling "is not going to slow us down." The Supreme Court on Tuesday delivered a blow to the plan, the centerpiece of Obama's climate change policy and backbone of his administration's commitment to cut greenhouse gas emissions pledged last year in Paris. For full story, click here.

Algal Bloom May Be Linked To Alzheimer's, Researchers Say

By Sara Jerome – Water Online – February 10, 2016
Researchers say algae found in freshwater lakes and reservoirs may be linked to illnesses including Alzheimer’s Disease and Motor Neurone Disease (MND). They published their findings last month in the scholarly journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The researchers focused on BMAA, a toxin produced by cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are also known as blue-green algae. The researchers found that “chronic exposure to the environmental toxin BMAA can trigger neurodegeneration in vulnerable individuals,” the study said. For full story, click here.

Climate Data Now Key to Disaster Preparedness, First Responders Say

By Katherine Bagley – InsideClimate News – February 2, 201
Climate change—and the extreme weather associated with it—is changing the way U.S. emergency response organizations operate, from how they spend their money to where they pre-position resources, a panel of military, emergency and climate science experts said Monday. "We pay a lot of money to have our military prepared to do something we really don't want them to have to do: go to war," said Joseph Nimmich, deputy administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency. "Well, we also need a FEMA and national infrastructure to deal with those catastrophic events we hope never happen… but are inevitable." For full story, click here.

 

RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONSWetland Breaking News - March 2016

Protecting and Restoring Riparian Areas

By Jon Kusler – Association of State Wetland Managers – March 2016
This paper briefly examines the functions and values of “riparian” areas. It suggests some priority measures states, local governments, federal agencies, and not for profit organizations can take to better protect and restore riparian areas. To download this report, click here.

Model Riparian Protection Ordinance

By Jon Kusler – Association of State Wetland Managers – March 2016
The model ordinance provided in this paper is designed to help local communities develop their own “riparian” ordinance and has been prepared as a “stand alone” ordinance. However critical provisions could be extracted for inclusion in broader ordinances. To download this report, click here.

Progress and Challenges of Testing the Effectiveness of Stream Restoration in the Pacific Northwest Using Intensively Monitored Watersheds

Taylor Francis Online – January 28, 2016
Across the Pacific Northwest, at least 17 intensively monitored watershed projects have been implemented to test the effectiveness of a broad range of stream restoration actions for increasing the freshwater production of salmon and steelhead and to better understand fish–habitat relationships. We assess the scope and status of these projects and report on challenges implementing them. We suggest that all intensively monitored watersheds should contain key elements based on sound experimental design concepts and be implemented within an adaptive management framework to maximize learning. The most significant challenges reported by groups were (1) improving coordination between funders, restoration groups, and researchers so that restoration and monitoring actions occur based on the project design and (2) maintaining consistent funding to conduct annual monitoring and evaluation of data. However, we conclude that despite these challenges, the intensively monitored watershed approach is the most reliable means of assessing the efficacy of watershed-scale restoration. For abstract and to download full report, click here.

The Stream-Catchment (StreamCat) Dataset: A Database of Watershed Metrics for the Conterminous United States

Wiley Online Library – December 8, 2016 is this alright
Stream environments reflect, in part, the hydrologic integration of upstream watershed characteristics (Allan, 2004). These characteristics can include both natural (e.g., climate, geology, and soils) and anthropogenic (e.g., agriculture and urbanization) features, and understanding their distribution and composition within watersheds is critical to river research and management. We present a new, publically available database of watershed features for several million streams within the conterminous United States (U.S.). This database provides an easily accessible suite of landscape metrics for scientists and managers to analyze, map, and understand the distribution of characteristics and conditions of the Nation's rivers and streams. For full technical paper, click here.

 

POTPOURRIWetland Breaking News - March 2016

MDC (Michigan Design Council) Launches First Annual Michigan Design Prize – A Water Based Challenge

MDC – March 14, 2016
The Michigan Design Prize is an annual competition celebrating exceptional Michigan industrial design talent. Participants tackle a singular design challenge linked to Michigan and larger societal issues. Participation is open to all K-12 Michigan schools, instructors, administrators, and their students. Submissions due at the end of May. For more information, click here.

The miracle of Kolkata's wetlands – and one man's struggle to save them

By Patrick Barkham – The Guardian – March 9, 2016
The trees on the streets of Kolkata in January are dusty, like neglected pot plants. At traffic lights, salesmen offer feather dusters for drivers to wipe their grimy cars. Shrubs are planted on the central reservation of the city’s new flyovers, surrounded by the implausible boasts on signs proclaiming a “clean and green” city. But the most frequently recurring poster, above almost every street corner, appeals for investors to “Come to Bengal – Ride the Growth”. Kolkata, a famously cultured city of 14.5 million people – once the second city of the British empire after London – is keen to catch up with Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai and Bangalore, the dynamic and rapidly modernising megacities of the fastest growing major economy in the world. Kolkata is also a low-lying city, on average it is barely five metres above sea level, served by two major rivers and surrounded by waterways. Its unique wetlands to the east are under pressure from developers like never before, just when they might prove most useful. Hundreds of buildings, from luxury apartments to colleges to more modest homes, are going up in an area, which is supposedly protected from development by law. For full story, click here.

Amazonian tribe in Peru takes hostages after oil spill

REUTERS – March 7, 2016
An indigenous community in the Peruvian Amazon took at least eight public officials hostage to demand help from the central government after an oil spill polluted its lands, authorities said Monday. The Wampis community of Mayuriaga seized a grounded military helicopter late on Sunday, holding crew members and several officials to press for inclusion in the emergency response plan, said German Velasquez, the president of state-owned energy company Petroperu. A rupture in Petroperu's 40-year-old pipeline spilled 1,000 barrels of oil in Mayuriaga on Feb. 3, nine days after a leak in the same duct poured 2,000 barrels near eight other indigenous communities in the same Amazonian region. For full story, click here.

The Marine Corps is planning a $50-million effort to help save desert tortoises. But will it work?

By Louis Sahagun – Los Angeles Times – March 6, 2016
The Marine Corps is gearing up to airlift 1,185 desert tortoises from prospective combat training grounds to nearby terrain where they won't be crushed by military equipment. One of the largest translocations of tortoises ever to be undertaken is expected to launch this month as mitigation for congressional approval to expand the Marine Corps' Air Ground Combat Center by about 165 square miles, much of it prime habitat. But there is concern that the $50-million effort will hasten the disappearance of federally threatened tortoises in California's drought-stricken Mojave Desert, where the number of breeding adults has fallen by about 50% over the last decade, according to a recent survey by federal biologists. For full story and to view video, click here.

Federal authorities reject plan for development with 2,200 homes near Grand Canyon

By William Yardley – Los Angeles Times – March 4, 2016
A years-long effort to turn a tiny town near the south rim of Grand Canyon National Park into the site of 2,200 new homes and a sprawling commercial area was rejected Friday by federal officials. They cited threats to the area's fragile water supply and other environmental concerns but also remarkably widespread opposition reflected in tens of thousands of public comments. For full story, click here.

How protecting the environment changes human nature

By Chelsea Harvey – The Washington Post – March 4, 2016
Establishing nature preserves and other types of protected areas is one of the most common conservation strategies — and its benefit to the environment is clear. What’s less obvious, though, is how these protected areas affect the human communities nearby. It’s an important question to consider, not only from a social standpoint, but from a conservation perspective as well: If a local community reacts negatively to the establishment of a preserve — which changes the ways in which they’re permitted to interact with the environment — it may be less likely that the protections will last or be successful in the long run. For full story, click here.

WTO swats down India's massive solar initiative

By Clayton Aldern – Grist – February 24, 2016
The World Trade Organization delivered a blow to India’s ambitious solar power program on Wednesday at the behest of the United States. So much for all that nice chatter about international climate cooperation back in December. Responding to a U.S. complaint, a WTO dispute panel ruled that several provisions of India’s National Solar Mission were “inconsistent” with international trade norms. For full story, click here.

Economists keep saying we should put a price on nature. Now they've finally done it

By Chelsea Harvey – The Washington Post – February 8, 2016
Putting a price on nature may seem like an impossible task, but economists believe that finding a way to calculate the value of natural resources is crucial when it comes to deciding whether our use of a resource is sustainable. Natural resources are capital assets, economists have argued, in the same way that land, buildings and stocks are considered assets — and spending money to protect these resources should be viewed as an investment in the future rather than just another cost. For full story, click here.

 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

WEBINARS

   

MEETINGS

   

TRAINING

 

SPECIAL EVENTS

 
WEBINARS
                   
MARCH 2016
                   
March 24, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
      The Swamp School webinar: Principles of the Rosgen Stream Classification System          
                   
March 29 2016
1:00 p.m.-1:45 p.m. EST
      Using Flood Risk Products Virtual Brown Bag Webinar: "Using Depth Grid Data"          
                   
APRIL 2016                  
                   
April 13, 2016
1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m. ET
      Great Lakes Sea Grant Network Crude Move Webinar Series: Understanding Hazards, Risk and Security          
                   
April 21, 2016
2:00 p.m. ET
      AWRA webinar: Proactive Flood and Drought Management Volume II: Case Studies from Around the US          
                   
MAY 2016                  
                   
May 4, 2016
1:00 p.m. ET
      AWRA webinar: Use - and Abuse - of Science in Water Resource Policy and Management          
                   
JUNE 2016                  
                   
June 15, 2016
1:00-2:00 p.m. ET
      Great Lakes Sea Grant Network webinar: Spill Response Requirements and Regional Capacity: Regulations and Resources          
                   
MEETINGS
                   
MARCH 2016
                   
March 19, 2016
Waterford, MI
      Michigan State University: Protecting Your Shoreline: A Workshop for Inland Lakefront Property Owners          
                   
March 19-20, 2016
Miami University
Oxford, Ohio
      2016 Midwest Ecology and Evolution Conference (MEEC)          
                   
March 20-22, 2016
Scottsdale, Arizona
      National Flood Determination Association 2016 Conference          
                   
March 21-24, 2016
San Diego, California
      Association for Environmental Health and Sciences Foundation, Inc.: 26th Annual International Conference on Soil, Water, Energy, and Air          
                   
March 22-24, 2016
Burlington, Vermont
      14th Annual Climate Prediction Application Science Workshop (CPASW): hosted by the NOAA National Weather Service Climate Services Branch, University of Vermont, and other climate services partners.          
                   
March 29-31, 2016
Oracle, Arizona
      2016 NASA/CUAHSI Remote Sensing Hydrology Workshop          
                   
March 29-April 2, 2016
Vancouver, BC
      Society for Applied Anthropology 76th Annual Meeting          
                   
March 31-April 1, 2016
Texas A&M University
      17th Annual Ecological Integration Symposium: Ecological Perspectives in Sustainability
         
                   
APRIL 2016
                   
April 3-7, 2016
Asheville, North Carolina
     

US-IALE 2016 Annual Meeting: Landscape Change

         
                   
April 4-6, 2016
Baltimore, Maryland
      Center for Climate Preparedness and Community Resilience: Local Solutions: Eastern Regional Climate Preparedness Conference
         
                   
April 7-9, 2016
Waterville, Maine
      Colby College conference: Community, Culture, and Conservation: Sustaining Landscapes and Livelihoods
         
                   
April 8-10, 2016
Kutztown, Pennsylvania
      Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Ecological Society of America: 2016 annual meeting.
         
                   
April 9, 2016
San Jose, California
      Coyote Howl Conference          
                   
April 12, 2016
Multiple Locations
      Center for Watershed Protection: 2016 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference. This conference will take place in multiple locations across the US. The two main sites are Atlanta and Sacramento, but additional hub locations will be announced soon. The conference will also be available as a webcast.          
                   
April 11-14, 2016
Chicago, Illinois
      The National Association of Environmental Professionals (NAEP): 41st Annual Conference: Charting the Next 40 Years of Environmental Stewardship          
                   
April 12, 2016
Multiple Locations
      Center for Watershed Protection: 2016 National Watershed &Stormwater Conference. This conference will take place in multiple locations across the US.          
                   
April 12-13, 2016
Jacksonville, Florida
      Governors' South Atlantic Alliance: South Atlantic Living Shorelines Summit          
                   
April 13-19, 2016
Arcata, California
      21st Annual Godwit Days Spring Migration Bird Festival          
                   
April 14-17, 2016
Orlando, Florida
      2016 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference          
                   
April 16, 2016
Accokeek, Maryland
      Alice Ferguson Foundation’s Annual Potomac River Watershed Cleanup
         
                   
April 17-22, 2016
Vienna, Austria
      European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016          
                   
April 18-22, 2016
Coral Springs, Florida
      University of Florida 6th National Conference:Ecosystem Restoration (NCER): Ecosystem Restoration in Action          
                   
April 20-21, 2016
Hartford, Connecticut
      The New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission (NEIWPCC) 27th Annual Nonpoint Source Pollution Conference          
                   
April 21-22, 2016
Cleveland, Ohio
      Levin College of Urban Affairs: Water Resilient Cities Conference: Climate Change, Infrastructure, Economies, and Governance in the Great Lakes Basin
         
                   
April 22-24, 2016
Marble Falls, Texas
      Balcones Canyonlands National Wildlife Refuge: Balcones Songbird Festival          
                   
April 25, 2016
Madison, Wisconsin
      Tenth Annual Nelson Institute: Earth Day Conference
         
                   
April 25-27, 2016
Anchorage, Alaska
      2016 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference          
                   
April 28-30, 2016
Boyne Falls, Michigan
      Michigan Inland Lakes Partnership: 2016 Michigan Inland Lakes Convention: A Formula for Successful Lake Protection and Management
         
                   
MAY 2016
                   
May 2-6, 2016
Tampa, Florida
      National Water Quality Monitoring Council: 10th National Monitoring Conference: Working Together for Clean Water          
                   
May 3-6, 2016
Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
      4th International Symposium on Ocean in a High-CO2 World          
                   
May 4-6, 2016
Sharonville, Ohio
      Tinker’s Creek Watershed Partners and the Ohio Stormwater Association: 2016 Ohio Stormwater Conference          
                   
May 7, 2016
Stanford University
      Stanford Chapter of the Society for Conservation Biology: 17th Bay Area Conservation Biology Symposium. Submit an abstract by March 25, 2016.          
                   
May 8-12, 2016
Baltimore, Maryland
      International Society for Ecological Modelling Global Conference 2016          
                   
May 9-10, 2016
Baton Rouge, Louisiana
      Louisiana Sea Grant conference: Data Flow: Grand Challenges in Water Systems Modeling, Data Management, and Integration          
                   
May 10-13, 2016
Fort Worth, Texas
      JT&A, Inc.: 2016 National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference          
                   
May 10-13, 2016
Rotterdam, The Netherlands
      4th International Climate Change Adaptation Conference: Adaptation Futures
         
                   
May 16-18, 2016
Saratoga Springs, New York
      New York State Floodplain and Stormwater Managers Association:16th Annual Meeting          
                   
May 17-20, 2016
Potsdam, Germany
      Society of Wetland Scientist European Chapter: 11th annual meeting on Wetland - Science and Society knowledge transfer, conservation conflicts and restoration management          
                   
May 18-10, 2016
Toronto, Canada
     

Canadian Water Network's Blue Cities 2016: Water Resiliency for the New Normal

         
                   
May 20-May 21, 2016
Washington, D.C.
      2016 National Parks BioBlitz          
                   
May 20-23, 2016
Mobile, Alabama
     

River Network: River Rally

         
                   
May 21-26, 2016
Sacramento, California
      Society for Freshwater Science annual meeting: Running on Empty: Increasing Demands on Freshwater Resources in the Face of a Changing Climate          
                   
May 22-29, 2016
University of Washington
      ScienceFilm 7-day immersion workshop: Introduction to Science Film Making          
                   
May 23-27, 2016
Busan, Korea
      World Fisheries Congress          
                   
May 31-June 3, 2016
Ann Arbor, Michigan
      23rd IAHR International Symposium on Ice          
                   
May 31-June 4, 2016
Corpus Christi, Texas
      Society of Wetland Scientist's 2016 Annual Meeting: Protecting wetland ecosystem services. Promoting stronger economies          
                   
JUNE 2016
                   
June, 2016       Lake Michigan Coastal Awareness Month: Celebrate the Coast: Fresh, Water, Fun! The Lake Michigan Coastal Program and partners are working together to develop a wide variety of events to celebrate the diversity and beauty of the Lake Michigan Coastal Region. Events highlight natural, cultural and historic resources in the Coastal Region of Indiana - Lake, Porter, and LaPorte counties.          
                   
June 1-3, 2016
San Antonio, Texas
      Resource Institute: Southwest Stream Restoration Conference          
                   
June 1-5, 2016 Anchorage, Alaska       79th Annual Ducks Unlimited National Convention          
                   
June 3-4, 2016
Ames, Iowa
      5th Iowa State University Summer Symposium: Science Communication: Confronting the challenges of public participation in environmental, planning and health decision-making          
                   
June 5-10, 2016
Santa Fe, New Mexico
      ASLO 2016 Summer Meeting          
                   
June 6–10, 2016
Guelph, Ontario
      International Association for Great Lakes - 59th Annual Conference on Great Lakes Research: Great Lakes Solutions: Integrating Across Disciplines & Scales          
                   
June 8, 2016
Linthicum Heights, Maryland
      The CWEA (Chesapeake Water Environmental Association) Stormwater Seminar: Beyond Nutrients: Case Studies and Tools for Addressing TMDLs          
                   
June 8-10, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      US Water Alliance: One Water Summit 2016          
                   
June 12-14, 2016
Toronto, Canada
      Coastal Zone Canada Association: Coastal Zone Canada Conference          
                   
June 12-16, 2016
San Marcos, Texas
      12th International Congress: Biology of Fish          
                   
June 19-22, 2016
Chicago, Illinois
      American Water Works Association: Annual Conference & Exposition: Uniting the World of Water          
                   
June 19-24, 2016
Honolulu, Hawai’i
      13th International Coral Reef Symposium: Bridging Science to Policy          
                   
June 19-24, 2016
Grand Rapids, Michigan
      ASFPM's 40th Annual National Conference: "Great Lakes - Grand Partners"          
                   
June 20-22, 2016
University of Massachusetts -Amherst
      Fish Passage 2016 International Conference: River Connectivity Best Practices and Innovations
         
                   

June 21-22, 2016
Galway, Ireland

      Civil Engineering, Microbiology and Ryan Institute, National University of Ireland: Inaugural International Conference on Natural and Constructed Wetlands: Interactions between Scientists and Engineers          
                   
JULY 2016
                   
July 10-13, 2016
Broomfield, Colorado
      Natural Hazard Center: 41st Annual Natural Hazards Research and Applications Workshop
         
                   
July 11-13, 2016
Sacramento, California
      2016 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: GIS and Water Resources          
                   
July 12-15, 2016
St. Louis University
St. Louis, Missouri
      River Flow 2016 Eighth International Conference: Fluvial Hydraulics          
                   
July 17-20, 2016
Illinois State University
Normal, Illinois
      24th North American Prairie Conference: From Cemetery Prairies to National Tallgrass Prairies          
                   
July 17-20, 2016
Madison, Wisconsin
      Society for Conservation Biology North America: 3rd North America Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB): Communicating Science for Conservation Action          
                   
July 18-20, 2016
Arlington, Virginia
      Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum          
                   
July 18-22, 2016
St. Augustine, Florida
      University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences: Mangrove & Macrobenthos Meeting          
                   
July 19-21, 2016
Breckenridge, Colorado
      Resource Institute's Rocky Mountain Stream Restoration Conference          
                   
July 19-23, 2016
Kaliningrad, Russia
      European Association of Remote Sensing Laboratories: 2nd Student Workshop on Ecology and Optics of Coastal Zones          
                   
July 24-29, 2016
University of New England,
Biddeford, Maine
      2016 Gordon Research Conference: Unifying Ecology Across Scales: Linking the Levels from Physiological to Ecosystem Ecology          
                   
July 30-August 3, 2016
St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
      4th International Marine Conservation Congress (IMCC4): Making Marine Science Matter          
                   
AUGUST 2016
                   
August 3-4, 2016
Gifford Pinchot State Park
Lewisberry, Pennsylvania
      Wetland Restoration and Training LLC: Wetland Restoration Workshop. Participants will help design and restore wetlands. Contact Betsy Leppo (mailto:) for more information.          
                   
August 7-12, 2016
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
      2016 Ecological Society of America's (ESA) annual meeting          
                   
August 14-18, 2016 Chicago, Illinois       American Society of Civil Engineers: GEO Sustainability & Geoenvironment
         
                   
August 21-25, 2016
Kansas City, Missouri
      The American Fisheries Society 146th Annual Meeting: Fisheries Conservation and Management: Making Connections and Building Partnerships          
                   
August 22-25, 2016 Indianapolis, Indiana       StormCon: Designing the Future of Stormwater. Call for papers deadline is December 9, 2015          
                   
August 22-25, 2016
Asheville, North Carolina
      NC State University EcoStream - Stream Ecology and Restoration Conference          
                   
August 23-25, 2016
Salt Lake City, Utah
      22nd National Nonpoint Source (NPS) Monitoring Workshop          
                   
August 27-
September 2, 2016

Stockholm, Sweden
      2016 World Water Week          
                   
SEPTEMBER 2016
                   
September 1-10, 2016
Waikiki, Hawaii
      IUCN World Conservation Congress: Planet at the crossroads          
                   

September 8-10, 2016

Tulcea, Romania
      Romanian Limnogeographical Association (RLA): 3rd International Conference “Water resources and wetlands          
                   
September 19-24, 2016
Changshu, China
      INTECOL Wetland Working Group, People’s Government of Changshu, Nanjing University: 10th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference          
                   
September 27-30, 2016
Mount Royal University
Alberta, Canada
      Under Western Skies (UWS) is a biennial, interdisciplinary conference series on the environment with the theme Water: Events, Trends, Analysis          
                   
OCTOBER 2016
                   
October 17-20, 2016
Boise, Idaho
      4th Northern Rockies Invasive Plants Council Conference          
October 18-21, 2016
University of California, Davis
      The Natural Areas Association: 2016 Natural Areas Conference. Submit an abstract by May 2, 2016.          
October 19-21, 2016
San Diego, California
      Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum - West Coast          
                   

October 20-22, 2016

American Museum of Natural History
New York, NY
      The Center for Biodiversity and Conservation and its partners invite graduate students, post-docs, and early-career professionals to take part in the seventh annual Student Conference on Conservation Science – New York (SCCS-NY). Abstract submissions accepted: March 1-April 8, 2016          
                   
October 28-30, 2016
Minneapolis, Minnesota
      Land Trust Alliance Rally 2016 National Land Conservation Conference. Call for presentations due by February 22, 2016.          
                   
October 30-November 2, 2016
Phoenix, Arizona
      American Water Works Association: Water Infrastructure Conference & Exposition          
NOVEMBER 2016
                   

November 1-4, 2016
Banff, Alberta, Canada

      North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) Symposium: Science to Stewardship: Balancing Economic Growth and Lake Sustainability. Submit abstract by May 6, 2016.          
November 13-17, 2016
Indianapolis, Indiana
      American Water Works Association: Water Quality Technology Conference® & Exposition          
November 14-17, 2016
Orlando, Florida
      2016 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference          
                   
DECEMBER 2016
                   
December 10-15, 2016
New Orleans, Louisiana
      8th National Summit: Our Coasts, Our Future, Our Choice and 25th Biennial Meeting of The Coastal Society          
                   
TRAINING
 
MARCH 2016
                   
March 22-24, 2016
Yakima, Washington
     

Coastal Training Program course: Environmental Negotiations (Eastern WA)

         
                   
March 24-25, 2016
Denver, Colorado
      Urban Watersheds Research Institute course: LID and BMP Selection, Design & Economics          
                   
March 29, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Endangered Species Act Overview. This course will also be held on September 27, 2016 in Atlanta, GA.          
                   

March 30-31, 2016
Lacey, Washington

     

Coastal Training Program course: Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington

         
                   
APRIL 2016
                   
April 4-5, 2016
Charleston, South Carolina
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology (Coastal Plain). Piedmont: November 14-15, 2016, Atlanta, GA.          
April 4-6, 2016
Naples, Florida
      Everglades Wetland Research Park course: Creation and Restoration of Wetlands. Register by February 19, 2016 for a 10% discount.          
                   
April 4-June 24, 2016
Online
      The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Botanist          
                   
April 4-June 24, 2016.
Online
      The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training          
                   
April 4-July 1, 2016
Online
      The Swamp School Online Workshop: Principles of Wetland Design          
                   
April 11-May 6, 2016
Online
      The Swamp School Online Course: Phase 1 Environmental Site Assessment          
                   
April 21, 2016
Denver, Colorado
      Urban Watersheds Research Institute course: FIRM Map Revisions – Technical/Administrative Aspects          
                   
April 26-29, 2016
Dallas, Texas
      The Wetland Training Institute, Inc. will hold a course on Federal Wetland / Waters Regulatory Policy. This course will also on December 5-8, 2016 in Santa Fe, NM.          
                   
April 29, 2016
Sacramento, California
      UC Davis Extension course: Streambank Assessment and Restoration          
                   
MAY 2016
                   
May 3-5, 2016
Asheville, North Carolina
      North Carolina State University Stream Restoration Program course: Stream Morphology Assessment          
                   

May 4-July 29, 2016
Online

      The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training          
                   
May 9-10, 2016
Charleston, South Carolina
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Hydrophytic Vegetation (Coastal Plain). Piedmont: August 8-9, 2016 in Atlanta, GA          
                   
May 9-July 29, 2016
Online
     

The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist

         
                   
May 15-28, 2016
Castleton, Vermont
      The Northeast Section of the The Wildlife Society, in cooperation with Castleton State College and the Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife: Wildlife Field Course          
                   

May 16-June 10, 2016
Online

     

The Swamp School Online Program: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment

         

May 16-June 10, 2016
Online

     

The Swamp School Online Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments

         
                   
May 18, 2016
Sacramento, California
      UC Davis Extension course: Tribal Water Law and Policy          
                   
May 19-20, 2016
Washington, DC
      Environmental Law Institute course: Clean Water Act 2016: Law and Regulation (ELI/ALI CLE Course of Study)          
                   
May 22-28, 2016
Steuben, Maine
      The Eagle Hill Institute summer seminar on Better Birding: Field Skills For Advancing Birdwatchers. For a list of other courses, click here.          
                   
May 23-27, 2016
Eastern Kentucky University
      Wetland Restoration and Training LLC: Wetland Design and Restoration Techniques. Field course at Maywoods, 8:30am to 4:30pm each day and on May 30–June 3, 2016: Online Reading and Assessment. Instructors: Tom Biebighauser and Dr. Stephen Richter          
                   
May 23-June 19, 2016
Mazama, Washington
      Pacific Biodiversity Institute: Conservation Science and Leadership Course          
                   
May 30-June 10, 2016
Eastern Kentucky University
      Wetland Restoration and Training LLC is offering Wetland Assessment and Monitoring training. June 13–17, 2016: Online Reading and Assessment. Instructor: Dr. Stephen Richter          
                   
JUNE 2016
                   

June 1-3, 2016
Texas State University
San Marcos, TX

      Bayesian Workshop for Ecologists and Wildlife Biologists          
June 1-15, 2016
Fairbanks, Alaska
      The University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF course: Arctic Alaska Environmental Change. Open to undergraduate and graduate students interested in Arctic environmental change, the 3-credit course.          
                   
June 3, 2016
University at Buffalo
      University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Aquatic & Terrestrial Invasive Species Management          
                   
June 6-7, 2016
University at Buffalo
      University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Fundamentals of Stream Channel          
                   
June 6-10, 2016
Charleston, South Carolina
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Basic Wetland Delineation. Other dates: March 14-18, 2016 in Atlanta, GA; and October 3-7, 2016, Atlanta, GA.          
                   
June 6-10, 2016
Collins, Colorado
      USGS/CUAHSI Summer Short Course: Runoff Predictions in Ungauged Basins (PUB)          
                   
June 6-August 19, 2016
Online
      The Swamp School Online Workshop: Principles of Wetland Design          
                   
June 6-August 26, 2016
Online
     

The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training

         
                   
June 8-9, 2016
Buffalo, New York
      University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Watershed Management Planning, Assessment, & Monitoring          
                   
June 12-June 18, 2016
Steuben, Maine
      The Eagle Hill Institute summer field course: Creative Writing: Finding Your Native Voice. For a list of other courses, go here.          
                   
June 13-July 18, 2016
University of Montana Polson, Montana
      The Flathead Lake Biological Station course: Field Ecology
         
                   
June 13-July 8, 2016
Online
      The Swamp School Online Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment          
                   
June 13-September 2, 2016
Online
      The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator          
                   
June 15-29, 2016
Armonk, New York
      Louis Calder Center - Biological Field Station of Fordham University: Freshwater Algae Identification Intensive Summer Workshop          
                   

June 19-June 25, 2016
Steuben, Maine

      The Eagle Hill Institute summer field course: Species Identification and Assessment of Northeastern Freshwater Fish Assemblages. For a list of other courses, click here.          
                   

June 19-June 25, 2016
Steuben, Maine

      The Eagle Hill Institute summer field course: Plate Tectonics of the Appalachians: A Traveling Geology Course, Maine to Quebec. For a list of other courses, click here.          
                   

June 19-June 25, 2016

Steuben, Maine

      The Eagle Hill Institute summer field course: Moths and Butterflies Identification, Specimen Preparation, and Taxonomy. For a list of other courses, click here.          
                   

June 19-26, 2016
Paris, France

      CERES of the Ecole Normale Supérieure: Summer School on Modelling Environmental Resilience          
                   
June 26-July 2, 2016
Steuben, Maine
      The Eagle Hill Institute summer field workshop: Seashore Subjects in Pen & Ink and Color Pencil. For a list of other courses, click here.          
                   
June 26-July 2, 2016
Steuben, Maine
      The Eagle Hill Institute summer field seminar: Dragonflies and Damselflies Field Techniques and Identification. For a list of other courses, click here.          
                   
June 26-July 2, 2016
in Steuben, Maine
      The Eagle Hill Institute summer field seminar: Mosses, Liverworts and Sphagnums. For a list of other courses, click here.          
                   
JULY 2016                  
                   
July 3-9, 2016
Steuben, Maine
      Eagle Hill Institute course: Sedges and Rushes Identification and Ecology. For a list of other courses, go here. Instructor: Dr. Anton A. Reznicek, University of Michigan Herbarium.          
                   
July 10–July 16, 2016
Steuben, Maine
      The Eagle Hill Institute summer field seminar: Crustose Lichen Identification. For a list of other courses, click here.          
                   

July 10–16, 2016
Steuben, Maine

      The Eagle Hill Institute summer field seminar: Native Bees as Pollinators Diversity, Ecology, Conservation, and Habitat Enhancement. For a list of other courses, click here.          
                   
July 11-22, 2016
Milford, Iowa
      Iowa Lakeside Laborator course: Ecology of Algal Blooms          
                   
July 11-September 30, 2016
Online
      The Swamp School Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training          
                   
July 12-15, 2016
State College, Pennsylvania
      The Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Planning Hydrology, Vegetation, and Soils for Constructed Wetlands          
                   

July 17–July 23, 2016
Steuben, Maine

      The Eagle Hill Institute summer field course: Introduction to Beetles Diversity, Identification, and Natural History in Maine and Around the World. For a list of other courses, go here.          
                   

July 17-23, 2016
Steuben, Maine

      Eagle Hill Institute course: Wetland Identification, Delineation, and Associated Ecology. For a list of other courses, go here. Instructors: Matt Schweisberg, Wetland Strategies and Solutions, LLC and Joe Homer.          
                   

July 24-30, 2016
Steuben, Maine

      Eagle Hill Institute course: Restoration of Stream Processes - Field Applications. For a list of other courses, go here.          
                   

July 25-August 5, 2016
Polson, Montana

      The Flathead Lake Biological Station course: Lake Ecology          
                   

July 31-August 6, 2016
Steuben, Maine

      The Eagle Hill Institute summer field course: Mushroom Identification for New Mycophiles: Foraging for Edible and Medicinal Mushroom. For a list of other courses, click here.          
                   

July 31-August 6, 2016
Steuben, Maine

      The Eagle Hill Institute summer field course: The Rocky Coast: Ecology, Botany, and Pattern: Northern Forest Atlas Course:No Keys or Lectures,Lots of Diagrams & Problems. For a list of other courses, click here.          
                   
AUGUST 2016
                   
August 3-4, 2016
Lewisberry, Pennsylvania
      Wetland Restoration and Training LLC will hold a Wetland Restoration Workshop at Gifford Pinchot State Park. Participants will help design and restore wetlands. Contact Betsy Leppo (mailto:) for more information.          
                   
August 7-13, 2016
Steuben, Maine
      The Eagle Hill Institute seminar: Slime Molds: Miniature Marvels of Nature. For a list of other courses, click here.          
                   
August 7-13, 2016
Steuben, Maine
      The Eagle Hill Institute seminar: The EPT Taxa (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera): Taxonomy and Stream Biomonitoring. For a list of other courses, click here.          
                   
August 8-9, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Hydrophytic Vegetation (Piedmont). Coastal Plain: May 9-10, 2016 in Charleston, SC          
                   
August 13-20, 2016
Land O'Lakes, Wisconsin
      PaleoEcological Observatory Network (PaLEON course: Assimilating Long-Term Data into Ecosystem Models          
                   
August 14-20, 2016
Steuben, Maine
      Eagle Hill Institute course: Coastal and Inland Forests of Maine: Identification and Ecology of Trees and Shrubs. For a list of other courses, go here. Instructor: Eric Jones, University of Maine at Machias          
                   

August 14-20, 2016

Steuben, Maine
      The Eagle Hill Institute course: Taxonomy and Biology of Ferns and Lycophytes. For a list of other courses, go here.          
                   
August 15-19, 2016
Arlington, Wisconsin
      The Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Basic Wetland Delineation          
                   
August 21-27, 2016
Steuben, Maine
      The Eagle Hill Institute course: Polypores and Other Wood-inhabiting Fungi. For a list of other courses, click here.          
                   

August 21 - August 27, 2016

Steuben, Maine

      The Eagle Hill Institute course: Field Methods for Studying Avian Migration. For a list of other courses, click here.          
                   

August 28-September 3, 2016
Steuben, Maine

      The Eagle Hill Institute summer field course: Introduction to Coastal Maine Birds: Identification, Taxonomy, Ecology. For a list of other courses, go here.          
                   

August 28-September 3, 2016
Steuben, Maine

      The Eagle Hill Institute summer field course: Marine Benthic Macroinvertebrates, Communities, and Habitats. For a list of other courses, click here.          
                   
SEPTEMBER 2016
                   

September 4-10, 2016
Steuben, Maine

      The Eagle Hill Institute summer field course: Exploring Medicinal Plants of Maine (and beyond), For a list of other courses, go here.          
                   

September 4-10, 2016
Steuben, Maine

      The Eagle Hill Institute summer field course: Field Ornithology: Shorebirds & Seabirds of Downeast Maine. For a list of other courses, go here.          
                   
September 12-13, 2016
Charleston, South Carolina
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes          
                   

September 12-16, 2016
Covington, Louisiana

      The Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Basic Wetland Delineation          
                   

September 15-18, 2016
San Diego, California

      The Wetland Training Institute course: Riparian Habitat Restoration in the Arid Southwest          
                   

September 26-30, 2016
Portage, Wisconsin

      The Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Basic Wetland Delineation          
                   

September 26-
October 7, 2016
Front Royal, Virginia

     

Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation course: Spatial Ecology, Geospatial Analysis and Remote Sensing for Conservation

         
                   
September 27, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Endangered Species Act Overview. This course will also be held on March 29, 2016 in Atlanta, GA.          
                   
OCTOBER 2016
                   
October 3-7, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Basic Wetland Delineation. Other dates: March 14-18, 2016 in Atlanta, GA; and June 6-10, 2016 in Charleston, SC.          
                   
October 11-12, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species.
         
                   
NOVEMBER 2016
                   
November 2-4, 2016
Raleigh, North Carolina
      North Carolina State University Stream Restoration Program course: Natural Channel Design Principles          
                   
November 14-15, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology (Piedmont. Coastal Plain: April 4-5, 2016 in Charleston, SC.          
                   
DECEMBER 2016
                   

December 5-8, 2016
Santa Fe, New Mexico

      The Wetland Training Institute, Inc. course: Federal Wetland / Waters Regulatory Policy, This course will also on April 26-29, 2016 in Dallas, TX.          
                   
December 12-13, 2016
Atlanta, Georgia
      Duncan & Duncan Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement (Eastern Mountains/Piedmont). Atlantic & Gulf Coastal Plain: February 24-25, 2016, Charleston, SC.          
                   
SPECIAL EVENTS 2015
                   

May 6-15, 2016
Northwest Ohio

      Biggest Week in American Birding          
                   
May 7, 2016
Southern, Illinois
      Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Cache River Nature Fest          
                   

May 21, 2016
Global

      World Fish Migration Foundation: World Fish Migration Day: Connecting Fish, Rivers and People          
                   
June 8-12, 2016
Jamestown, North Dakota
      Potholes & Prairie Birding Festival          
                   

October 18-23, 2016

Northeast North Carolina
      Wings over Water Festival          
                   

For more wetland events, meetings, conferences, and courses nationwide, visit the ASWM calendar.

         
           

Wetland Breaking News - March 2016


INDEX

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • Reshaping the Chesapeake Bay, one living shoreline at a time
  • USDA invests $25 million in watersheds to improve water quality
  • 2015 National Environmental Scorecard Reveals Most Anti-Environmental Congress in History
  • Court to hear case against Obama's water rule
  • Fixing the Greater Florida Everglades-Once and For All
  • Research points to unprofitable land use
  • A Controversial EPA Rule Is Pitting Small Farmers Against Big Agribusiness
  • Wetland Mapping Consortium (WMC) Workshop Webinars – March 30, 2016

NATIONAL NEWS

  • Military checks for water contamination at 664 sites
  • Obama: US, Canada 'fully united in combating climate change'
  • USDA Commits $20 Million to Innovative Conservation Projects
  • New Investment Model for Green Infrastructure to Help Protect Chesapeake Bay
  • Service Distributes $1.1 Billion to State Wildlife Agencies to Support Conservation, Outdoor Recreation, and Job Creation
  • Alarm over lead found in drinking water at US schools
  • Supreme Court shoots down challenge to cleanup plan
  • Monarch Butterfly Migration Rebounds, Easing Some Fears
  • These experts say Congress is ‘legislating scientific facts’ — and wrong ones, too
  • Republican candidates' calls to scrap EPA met with skepticism by experts
  • House Republicans seek to open up national forests to mining and logging
  • Canada and U.S. to reduce phosphorus 40% to improve Lake Erie water
  • National Wildlife Federation to Sue Pipeline Safety Administration to Protect Communities, Wildlife from Oil Spill in the Great Lakes
  • EPA Releases Drinking Water Mapping Application to Protect Source Waters
  • Updated Policy Re-affirms Federal-State Collaboration on Implementing the ESA
  • New web site aims to help public track Bay restoration
    Maryland takes Virginia to court over coal ash plan on the Potomac
  • U.S. House passes controversial bill on NSF research
  • John A. Rapanos, who vowed 'Fight to the death' against EPA, dies at 80
  • A Look at Obama's Final Budget Proposal

STATE NEWS

  • AK: Court upholds federal plan to protect vast polar bear habitat in Alaska
  • CA: Pits of drilling waste threaten water, air safety, report charges
  • CA: The disappearing wetlands in California’s Central Valley
  • CA: OC launches wetland project to improve water quality and wildlife habitats
  • FL: FPL nuclear plant canals leaking into Biscayne Bay, study confirms
  • FL: Florida drops bill to open fracking in the Everglades after public outcry
  • FL: Florida shores yellow, brown and black all over
  • FL: Record 6,250 manatees spotted in Florida
  • IA: Conservation study: Millions spent, but no lasting gains
  • KS: EPA and Franklin County, Kan., Reach Settlement on Clean Water Act Violations
  • LA: Louisiana black bear to be removed from endangered species list
  • MD: Waterkeepers: Removal of waterways from federal pollution rules may violate Clean Water Act
  • MD: Squabbles threaten future of Chesapeake’s oyster restoration
  • MD: On the Bay: Waterway permit process changed
  • MI: Flint to stop sending water bills until credits applied
  • MI: EPA chief: Protective film building up in Flint pipes
  • MI: EPA Again Postpones Enbridge Fine for 2010 Kalamazoo River Spill
  • MN: Report warns of contaminated central Minnesota groundwater
  • NV: Walker River Paiutes to develop tribal water quality standards
  • NJ: Lead Fear Forces Water Ban in 30 New Jersey School Buildings
  • NJ: Toxic Passaic River to Get $1.38 Billion Cleanup Over 10 Years
  • NM: State cautions snowmelt may stir up mine spill debris
  • NY: This New York storm barrier could have slowed down Sandy. But European settlers ate it.
  • NY: State pollution investigation of Hoosick Falls widens
  • NY: Debate Lingers Over Massive Clean-up of Hudson River
  • NC: Outcry Prompts Dominion to Make Coal Ash Wastewater Cleaner
  • NC: DEQ cites Duke for leaky coal ash ponds
  • NC: Critics: Shoreline Permits Need Reform
  • OH: Injections of wastewater rise in Ohio despite lull in fracking
  • OH: Public pans Army Corps of Engineers' plan to dump toxic river sediment into Lake Erie
  • OK: Oklahoma Puts Limits on Oil and Gas Wells to Fight Quakes
  • OR: Oregon lawmakers approve hemp, wetland, drought, wildfire bills
  • PA: Pennsylvania families win $4.2 million damages in fracking lawsuit
  • TX: Bill would allow North Texas reservoir to bypass federal regulators
  • UT: Will the Great Salt Lake be reduced to dust?
  • VA: Virginia allows Dominion to exceed toxic limits for James River dumping
  • WA: Drugs found in Puget Sound salmon from tainted wastewater
  • WA: Palouse farmers honored for commitment to clean water
  • WV: West Virginia receives $1 million to fund water quality project

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • A 'smeary' Lake Erie sees progress, setbacks
  • Increasing levels of flame retardants in smallmouth bass threaten Lake Erie fish consumers
  • Could a new plastic-eating bacteria help combat this pollution scourge?
  • Soviet collapse might explain mysterious trend in global methane emissions
  • Regenerating degraded dirt
  • Scientists turn to bowhead whales for clues to algal biotoxin in the Arctic
  • Road salt putting human, aquatic lives on a collision course
  • Supreme Court backs EPA this time, refuses to block controls on toxic mercury
  • Trees vital to improving stream quality, study finds
  • BP oil spill damage 'dramatically diminished', scientists say
  • Harnessing the Power of the Mississippi for Restoration
  • Study suggests salt marshes could persist despite rising sea levels
  • US lawmakers expand probe of climate study
  • Glyphosate persistence raises questions
  • We Can Save Individual Species – But Can We Save Entire Ecosystems?
  • Study says climate change pushes fish toward poles, threatening food source for poor
  • Seas are now rising faster than they have in 2,800 years, scientists say
  • De-Extinction, a risky ecological experiment
  • How different are wild salmon from farm salmon? A lot, DNA shows
  • The Fate of Sediment When Freshwater Meets Saltwater
  • Experts call on feds to re-evaluate the world’s most heavily used herbicide
  • Scientists look at role of wetlands in battle against climate change
  • Obama says confident in legal footing after Supreme Court carbon decision
  • Algal Bloom May Be Linked To Alzheimer's, Researchers Say
  • Climate Data Now Key to Disaster Preparedness, First Responders Say

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • Protecting and Restoring Riparian Areas
  • Model Riparian Protection Ordinance
  • Progress and Challenges of Testing the Effectiveness of Stream Restoration in the Pacific Northwest Using Intensively Monitored Watersheds
  • The Stream-Catchment (StreamCat) Dataset: A Database of Watershed Metrics for the Conterminous United States

POTPOURRI

  • MDC (Michigan Design Council) Launches First Annual Michigan Design Prize – A Water Based Challenge
  • The miracle of Kolkata's wetlands – and one man's struggle to save them
  • Amazonian tribe in Peru takes hostages after oil spill
  • The Marine Corps is planning a $50-million effort to help save desert tortoises. But will it work?
  • Federal authorities reject plan for development with 2,200 homes near Grand Canyon
  • How protecting the environment changes human nature
  • WTO swats down India's massive solar initiative
  • Economists keep saying we should put a price on nature. Now they've finally done it

WEBINARS, MEETINGS, TRAINING

Webinars

  • The Swamp School webinar: Principles of the Rosgen Stream Classification System
  • Using Flood Risk Products Virtual Brown Bag Webinar: "Using Depth Grid Data"
  • Great Lakes Sea Grant Network Crude Move Webinar Series: Understanding Hazards, Risk and Security
  • AWRA webinar: Proactive Flood and Drought Management Volume II: Case Studies from Around the US
  • AWRA webinar: Use - and Abuse - of Science in Water Resource Policy and Management
  • Great Lakes Sea Grant Network webinar: Spill Response Requirements and Regional Capacity: Regulations and Resources

Meetings

  • Michigan State University: Protecting Your Shoreline: A Workshop for Inland Lakefront Property Owners
  • 2016 Midwest Ecology and Evolution Conference
  • National Flood Determination Association 2016 Conference
  • 26th Annual International Conference on Soil, Water, Energy, and Air
  • 14th Annual Climate Prediction Application Science Workshop (CPASW)
  • Society for Applied Anthropology 76th Annual Meeting
  • 17th Annual Ecological Integration Symposium: Ecological Perspectives in Sustainability
  • US-IALE 2016 Annual Meeting: Landscape Change
  • Center for Climate Preparedness and Community Resilience: Local Solutions: Eastern Regional Climate Preparedness Conference
  • Community, Culture, and Conservation: Sustaining Landscapes and Livelihoods
  • Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Ecological Society of America: 2016 annual meeting
  • Coyote Howl Conference
  • The National Association of Environmental Professionals (NAEP) 41st Annual Conference
  • Center for Watershed Protection: 2016 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference
  • Governors' South Atlantic Alliance: South Atlantic Living Shorelines Summit
  • 21st Annual Godwit Days Spring Migration Bird Festival
  • 2016 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference
  • Alice Ferguson Foundation’s Annual Potomac River Watershed Cleanup
  • European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016
  • Ecosystem Restoration (NCER): Ecosystem Restoration in Action
  • 27th Annual Nonpoint Source Pollution Conference
  • Levin College of Urban Affairs: Water Resilient Cities Conference: Climate Change, Infrastructure, Economies, and Governance in the Great Lakes Basin
  • Balcones Canyonlands National Wildlife Refuge: Balcones Songbird Festival
  • Tenth Annual Nelson Institute: Earth Day Conference
  • 2016 AWRA Spring Specialty Conference
  • Michigan Inland Lakes Partnership: 2016 Michigan Inland Lakes Convention: A Formula for Successful Lake Protection and Management
  • 10th National Monitoring Conference
  • 4th International Symposium on: Ocean in a High-CO2 World
  • 2016 Ohio Stormwater Conference
  • Stanford Chapter of the Society for Conservation Biology: 17th Bay Area Conservation Biology Symposium
  • International Society for Ecological Modelling Global Conference 2016
  • Data Flow: Grand Challenges in Water Systems Modeling, Data Management, and Integration
  • 2016 National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference
  • 4th International Climate Change Adaptation Conference: Adaptation Futures
  • New York State Floodplain and Stormwater Managers Association:16th Annual Meeting
  • Society of Wetland Scientist European Chapter: 11th annual meeting on Wetland - Science and Society knowledge transfer, conservation conflicts and restoration management
  • Canadian Water Network's Blue Cities 2016: Water Resiliency for The New Normal
  • 2016 National Parks BioBlitz
  • River Network: River Rally
  • Running on Empty: Increasing Demands on Freshwater Resources in the Fae of a Changing Climate
  • ScienceFilm 7-day immersion workshop: Introduction to Science Film Making
  • World Fisheries Congress
  • 23rd IAHR International Symposium on Ice
  • Protecting wetland ecosystem services. Promoting stronger economies
  • Lake Michigan Coastal Awareness Month: Celebrate the Coast: Fresh, Water, Fun!
  • Resource Institute: Southwest Stream Restoration Conference
  • 79th Annual Ducks Unlimited National Convention
  • Science Communication: Confronting the challenges of public participation in environmental, planning and health decision-making
  • ASLO 2016 Summer Meeting
  • Great Lakes Solutions: Integrating Across Disciplines & Scales
  • CWEA (Chesapeake Water Environmental Association) Stormwater Seminar: Beyond Nutrients: Case Studies and Tools for Addressing TMDLs
  • US Water Alliance: One Water Summit 2016
  • Coastal Zone Canada Association: Coastal Zone Canada Conference
  • 12th International Congress: Biology of Fish
  • American Water Works Association: Annual Conference & Exposition: Uniting the World of Water
  • 13th International Coral Reef Symposium: Bridging Science to Policy
  • ASFPM's 40th Annual National Conference: "Great Lakes - Grand Partners"
  • Fish Passage 2016 International Conference: River Connectivity Best Practices and Innovations
  • Inaugural International Conference on Natural and Constructed Wetlands: Interactions between Scientists and Engineers
  • 41st Annual Natural Hazards Research and Applications Workshop
  • 2016 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: GIS and Water Resources
  • River Flow 2016 Eighth International Conference: Fluvial Hydraulics
  • From Cemetery Prairies to National Tallgrass Prairies
  • 3rd North America Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB): Communicating Science for Conservation Action
  • Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum
  • University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences: Mangrove & Macrobenthos Meeting
  • Resource Institute's Rocky Mountain Stream Restoration Conference
  • 2nd Student Workshop on Ecology and Optics of Coastal Zones
  • 2016 Gordon Research Conference: Unifying Ecology Across Scales: Linking the Levels from Physiological to Ecosystem Ecology
  • 4th International Marine Conservation Congress (IMCC4): Making Marine Science Matter
  • Wetland Restoration Workshop
  • 2016 Ecological Society of America's (ESA) annual meeting
  • American Society of Civil Engineers: GEO Sustainability & Geoenvironment
  • American Fisheries Society 146th Annual Meeting: Fisheries Conservation and Management: Making Connections and Building Partnerships
  • StormCon: Designing the Future of Stormwater
  • NC State University EcoStream - Stream Ecology and Restoration Conference
  • 22nd National Nonpoint Source (NPS) Monitoring Workshop
  • 2016 World Water Week
  • IUCN World Conservation Congress: Planet at the crossroads
  • 3rd International Conference “Water resources and wetlands”
  • 10th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference
  • Water: Events, Trends, Analysis
  • 4th Northern Rockies Invasive Plants Council Conference
  • Natural Areas Association 2016 Natural Areas Conference
  • Association of Climate Change Officers: Climate Strategies Forum - West Coast
  • Student Conference on Conservation Science – New York (SCCS-NY)
  • Land Trust Alliance Rally 2016 National Land Conservation Conference
  • American Water Works Association: Water Infrastructure Conference & Exposition
  • North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) Symposium: Science to Stewardship: Balancing Economic Growth and Lake Sustainability
  • American Water Works Association: Water Quality Technology Conference® & Exposition
  • 2016 AWRA Annual Water Resources Conference
  • 8th National Summit: Our Coasts, Our Future, Our Choice and 25th Biennial Meeting of The Coastal Society

Training

  • Coastal Training Program course: Environmental Negotiations (Eastern WA)
  • Urban Watersheds Research Institute course: LID and BMP Selection, Design & Economics
  • Endangered Species Act Overview
  • Using the Revised Washington State Wetland Rating System (2014) in Western Washington
  • Wetland and Endangered Species Training Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology (Coastal Plain)
  • Everglades Wetland Research Park course: Creation and Restoration of Wetlands
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Botanist
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Workshop: Principles of Wetland Design
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Phase 1 Environmental Site Assessment
  • FIRM Map Revisions – Technical/Administrative Aspect
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. will hold a course on Federal Wetland / Waters Regulatory Policy
  • Streambank Assessment and Restoration
  • North Carolina State University Stream Restoration Program course: Stream Morphology Assessment
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • Hydrophytic Vegetation (Coastal Plain)
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
  • 8th annual 2-week Wildlife Field Course
  • The Swamp School Online Program: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments
  • Tribal Water Law and Policy
  • Environmental Law Institute course: Clean Water Act 2016: Law and Regulation (ELI/ALI CLE Course of Study)
  • Better Birding: Field Skills For Advancing Birdwatchers
  • Wetland Restoration and Training LLC: Wetland Design and Restoration Techniques
  • Conservation Science and Leadership Course
  • Wetland Restoration and Training LLC: Wetland Assessment and Monitoring
  • Forester University Fluvial Geomorphology Part 3 of the Surface Water Master Class Series
  • Bayesian Workshop for Ecologists and Wildlife Biologists
  • Arctic Alaska Environmental Change
  • University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Aquatic & Terrestrial Invasive Species Management
  • University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Fundamentals of Stream Channel
  • Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Runoff Predictions in Ungauged Basins (PUB)
  • The Swamp School Online Workshop: Principles of Wetland Design
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • University at Buffalo's Summer Workshop Series in Ecosystem Restoration: Watershed Management Planning, Assessment, & Monitoring
  • Creative Writing: Finding Your Native Voice
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station Course: Field Ecology
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator
  • Freshwater Algae Identification Intensive Summer Workshop
  • Species Identification and Assessment of Northeastern Freshwater Fish Assemblages
  • Plate Tectonics of the Appalachians: A Traveling Geology Course, Maine to Quebec
  • Moths and Butterflies Identification, Specimen Preparation, and Taxonomy
  • CERES of the Ecole Normale Supérieure: Summer School on Modelling Environmental Resilience
  • Seashore Subjects in Pen & Ink and Color Pencil
  • Dragonflies and Damselflies Field Techniques and Identification
  • Mosses, Liverworts and Sphagnums
  • Sedges and Rushes Identification and Ecology
  • Crustose Lichen Identification
  • Native Bees as Pollinators Diversity, Ecology, Conservation, and Habitat Enhancement
  • Ecology of Algal Blooms
  • The Swamp School Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training
  • Planning Hydrology, Vegetation, and Soils for Constructed Wetlands
  • Introduction to Beetles Diversity, Identification, and Natural History in Maine and Around the World
  • Wetland Identification, Delineation, and Associated Ecology
  • Restoration of Stream Processes - Field Applications
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station Course: Lake Ecology
  • Mushroom Identification for New Mycophiles: Foraging for Edible and Medicinal Mushroom
  • The Rocky Coast: Ecology, Botany, and Pattern: Northern Forest Atlas Course:No Keys or Lectures, Lots of Diagrams & Problems
  • Wetland Restoration Workshop
  • Slime Molds: Miniature Marvels of Nature
  • The EPT Taxa (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera): Taxonomy and Stream Biomonitoring
  • Hydrophytic Vegetation (Piedmont)
  • Assimilating Long-Term Data into Ecosystem Models
  • Coastal and Inland Forests of Maine: Identification and Ecology of Trees and Shrubs
  • Taxonomy and Biology of Ferns and Lycophytes
  • Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Polypores and Other Wood-inhabiting Fungi
  • Field Methods for Studying Avian Migration
  • Introduction to Coastal Maine Birds: Identification, Taxonomy, Ecology
  • Marine Benthic Macroinvertebrates, Communities, and Habitats
  • Exploring Medicinal Plants of Maine (and beyond)
  • Field Ornithology: Shorebirds & Seabirds of Downeast Maine
  • Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
  • Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Riparian Habitat Restoration in the Arid Southwest
  • Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Spatial Ecology, Geospatial Analysis and Remote Sensing for Conservation
  • Endangered Species Act Overview
  • Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
  • Natural Channel Design Principles
  • Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology (Piedmont)
  • Federal Wetland / Waters Regulatory Policy
  • Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement (Eastern Mountains/Piedmont)

SPECIAL EVENTSWetland Breaking News - March 2016

  • Biggest Week in American Birding
  • Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge: Cache River Nature Fest
  • World Fish Migration Foundation: World Fish Migration Day: Connecting Fish, Rivers and People
  • Potholes & Prairie Birding Festival
  • Wings over Water Festival


Wetland Breaking News - December 2015

Wetland Breaking News - March 2016


The Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News (WBN)
is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to Wetland Breaking News - March 2016wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those working in water resources and related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published for over fifteen years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.

The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to .

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled and Edited by Marla Stelk, Editor; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors. Executive Director: Jeanne Christie. Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399 Fax: 207-892-3089

All photos by Jeanne Christie, ASWM


 

 

 

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