IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

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All photos by
Jeanne Christie, ASWM

   



Dear Wetlanders,

May is American Wetlands Month and ASWM has been celebrating by posting fun stuff on its Facebook page Monday-Friday throughout the month. Fun little tidbits include trivia quizzes, interesting and strange facts about wetlands, wetland photos, videos, webinars and great ideas for ways you can celebrate American Wetlands month at work and at home. On Wednesdays, we are inviting folks to submit photos of their favorite wetland on our Facebook page for a chance to win our Wetland Wednesday Photo Contest (please click on photo contest link to read the rules of engagement). To join the fun, tune in daily to the ASWM Facebook page here!

ASWM is also hosting an American Wetlands Month webinar, in collaboration with Wetland Link International – Americas, on “Attracting Local People into Wetland Sites” on Tuesday, May 30, 2017 at 3:00pm EDT. At many wetland sites, staff and volunteers work hard to engage local people, providing communications and publicity materials, trying to make them relevant to a wide range of local stakeholders. However, many of us still struggle to bring local people into our wetlands. This webinar looks at how we can learn from each other about the best way to make wetlands relevant to people in your local area. For more information and to register, click here.

And finally, ASWM is also celebrating American Wetlands Month by attending the Environmental Law Institute’s Wetlands Awards ceremony on Thursday, May 18th from 6:00pm – 8:00pm at the U.S. Botanic Garden in Washington, D.C. We are very excited to share the news that ASWM member and former Board Chair, Collis Adams, Administrator of the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NH DES) Wetlands Bureau, will be accepting the award for State, Tribal, and Local Program Development. ASWM’s Brenda Zollitsch will be at the awards to celebrate with Collis. There are also many other events happening around the country, and ASWM has compiled a small list on our website. The Society of Wetland Scientists has provided a list on their website as well. And if you read through this issue of Wetland Breaking News you’ll find stories about events in Michigan and South Carolina.

There are many other news stories to celebrate this month. In National News you’ll find a story about how the U.S. EPA’s Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (WIFIA) program will be providing $1 billion in credit to finance over $2 billion in water infrastructure improvements. Wouldn’t it be great if some of this money went to fund natural infrastructure projects? Also in National News, you can read a couple of stories about the 2017 omnibus spending bill that passed without huge cuts to research and avoided huge cuts to water programs. This is great news!

So to all of you, our fellow Wetlanders, ASWM wishes you a wonderful American Wetlands Month and thanks you for all your tireless (and sometimes thankless) work to protect our nation’s greatest resource (okay so we’re a little biased…), wetlands.

Happy American Wetlands Month!


Marla J. Stelk, Editor,
Wetland Breaking News

   
             
             

Water Rule Rewrite: EPA Wants Governors' Input on Rewriting Waters of US Rule

DTN/The Progressive Farmer – May 10, 2017
In an attempt to rewrite the definition of waters of the United States, two federal agencies are asking for input from governors in all 50 states and five territories, according to a news release from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday. One of the issues new EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt stressed in the congressional hearings leading up to his confirmation was a need to restore what he called "cooperative federalism," where the states and federal agencies work together on developing regulations. For full story, click here.

Mississippi River cities: Feds should take climate change seriously

Elizabeth Dunbar – MPR News – May 9, 2017
St. Paul Mayor Chris Coleman has witnessed five Mississippi River floods in his city in just the past decade. In 2016, historic floods hit parts of the Mississippi in Missouri and Arkansas in January. They hit Baton Rouge, La. in August. Arkansas saw devastating floods again last week. Damages from several of those recent Mississippi River floods have surpassed $1 billion. The flooding has also made shipping up and down the river less reliable, Coleman said Tuesday. "One year we have a drought and you can't get into a port, the next year we have flooding and you can't navigate on the Mississippi River," he said. "Those have a dramatic impact." For full story, click here.

What Trump's executive orders in his first 100 days were actually about

By Rebecca Harrington and Skye Gould – Business Insider – May 5, 2017
Though he used to criticize President Barack Obama for overusing his power when he was in office, President Donald Trump issued nearly as many executive orders in his first 100 days as Obama used to average in a year. Many Trump supporters defend the president's use of power by saying he was simply getting rid of Obama's egregious actions. While nearly all of Trump's presidential actions have reversed Obama's policies, very few of them actually canceled orders his predecessor signed. For full story, click here.

Stephen Hawking now says humanity has only about 100 years to escape Earth

By Peter Holley – Chicago Tribune – May 5, 2017 – Video
In November, Stephen Hawking and his bulging computer brain gave humanity what we thought was an intimidating deadline for finding a new planet to call home: 1,000 years. Ten centuries is a blip in the grand arc of the universe, but in human terms it was the apocalyptic equivalent of getting a few weeks' notice before our collective landlord (Mother Earth) kicks us to the curb. For full story and to view video, click here.

What happened when an industry-friendly EPA leader in the '80s went too far

By Scott Tong – Marketplace – May 02, 2017
Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency in the Trump administration, has drawn fire for being too close to the industry he regulates by reversing a planned ban on a pesticide and rolling back rules of power plant pollution. But this isn’t the first time the EPA pendulum has swung this far. The last time it happened, in the dawn of the Reagan administration, the efforts crashed and burned. For full story, click here.


 

EPA asked the public which regulations to gut — and got an earful about leaving them alone

By Brady Dennis – The Washington Post – May 16, 2017 – Video
Last month, the Environmental Protection Agency put out a call for comments about what regulations are in need of repeal, replacement or modification. The effort stemmed from an executive order issued by President Trump earlier this year instructing agencies to reexamine regulations that “eliminate jobs, or inhibit job creation” and/or “impose costs that exceed benefits.” More than 55,100 responses rolled in by the time the comment period closed on Monday — but they were full of Americans sharing their experiences of growing up with dirty air and water, and with pleas for the agency not to undo safeguards that could return the country to more a more polluted era. For full story and to view video, click here.

EPA science advisers resign 'in protest'

By John Siciliano – Washington Examiner – May 12, 2017 – Video
Two scientists resigned from a key Environmental Protection Agency science advisory board on Friday in an act of protest against a decision this week removing the board's co-chairmen, according to a resignation letter sent by one of the scientists. For full story and to view video, click here. 

Dakota Access pipeline has first leak before it's fully operational

By Sam Levni – The Guardian – May 10, 2017
The Dakota Access pipeline has suffered its first leak, outraging indigenous groups who have long warned that the project poses a threat to the environment. The $3.8bn oil pipeline, which sparked international protests last year and is not yet fully operational, spilled 84 gallons of crude oil at a South Dakota pump station, according to government regulators. Although state officials said the April 6 leak was contained and quickly cleaned, critics of the project said the spill, which occurred as the pipeline is in the final stages of preparing to transport oil, raises fresh concerns about the potential hazards to waterways and Native American sites. For full story, click here.

NRDC Sues EPA for Failing to Respond to Freedom of Information Act Requests

Contact: Nick Conger – NRDC – May 11, 2017
The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) filed a lawsuit today asking a federal court to order the release of records addressing whether Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt is adhering to ethical obligations, and whether he is favoring industry stakeholders. For full story, click here.

Tillerson, in Alaska, Gives No Hint on Paris Climate Accord

By Henry Fountain – The New York Times – May 11, 2017
Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson said on Thursday that the United States would “continue to be vigilant” in protecting the Arctic, a region that is undergoing rapid change linked to global warming. But he gave no signal as to whether his government would remain in the Paris climate accord, the international agreement that would go furthest in ensuring that protection. For full story, click here.

Bid to revoke Obama methane rule fails in surprise U.S. Senate vote

By Valerie Volcovici – Reuters – May 10, 2017
The U.S. Senate on Wednesday rejected a resolution to revoke an Obama-era rule to limit methane emissions from oil and gas production on federal lands, dealing a blow to President Donald Trump's efforts to free the drilling industry from what he sees as excessive environmental regulation. The Congressional Review Act resolution received just 49 votes after Republican leaders scrambled for weeks to secure the 51 needed to pass it. The resolution would have revoked the rule and prevented similar regulations from being introduced. For full story, click here.

Bay report card shows slight improvement in bay and local waterways

By Rachael Pacella – Capital Gazette – May 8, 2017 – Video
Anne Arundel County waterways are still more unhealthy than the Chesapeake Bay in general, according to an environmental report card released Monday morning, but both the region and the bay as a whole are showing signs of improvement. In its annual report on bay health, the Integration & Application Network, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, gave the bay as a whole a "C" grade. That's the same grade the bay received last year on the Chesapeake Bay Report Card, but researchers say there was a slight improvement in ecosystem health this year. For full story, click here.

As US, EU step back, climate talks could signal geopolitical shift

By Douglas Fischer – The Daily Climate – May 8, 2017
An obscure negotiating session of the UN climate talks is suddenly in the spotlight – but for all the wrong reasons. The United Nations opens its interim talks here in Bonn on Monday, a two-week negotiating session that traditionally sets the agenda for the larger fall meetings. But as with so many political issues this year, the climate is anything but quiet: President Trump is mulling an exit from commitments Barack Obama inked in Paris in 2015, Europe stands poised to abandon its leadership role in emissions reduction, and delegates are watching to see if China, India or another country steps to the front and assumes the mantle of climate leadership. For full story, click here.

Tired of conflicts and lost heritage, indigenous leaders seek a bigger voice and role in the climate talks.

By Douglas Fischer – The Daily Climate – May 11, 2017
Addressing climate change has always involved far more than simply trimming emissions or promoting renewable energy. Deep questions about justice run through these United Nations negotiations underway here in Bonn. And few run deeper than what role the world's indigenous peoples need to play at these talks. "Bigger than the climate crisis are the shocks to the social systems of indigenous people," said Cándido Mezúa Salazar, an Embera leader from Panama who represents indigenous and other traditional forest peoples from the Yucatan to Panama's Darien Forest. "Governments are making decisions for people without consulting the people, even the people living in the forest." For full story, click here.

U.S. had 2nd wettest, 11th warmest April on record

NOAA – May 8, 2017
“April showers bring May flowers,” or so the saying goes. Perhaps a more appropriate description this year might be, “Heavy April showers bring record flooding.” All that rain helped shrink the drought footprint for the contiguous U.S. to the lowest level since the nationwide Drought Monitor program began in 2000. It also caused loss of life and extensive property destruction in many communities. For full story, click here.

Water Infrastructure Investment Gets Boost from EPA

WaterWorld – May 3, 2017
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (WIFIA) program received 43 letters of interest from prospective borrowers for projects to update our nation's water infrastructure. EPA's WIFIA program will provide $1 billion in credit to finance over $2 billion in water infrastructure investments. EPA received letters from entities seeking loans for the program from all over the country, demonstrating the high demand from businesses seeking to invest in the economy and local communities. For full story, click here.

Want Healthier Soil? Link it to Crop Insurance

By Elizabeth Grossman – Civil Eats – May 2, 2017
Most farmers know that the health of their soil is important, but they don’t all prioritize it over, say, maximizing what they grow each year. Now, some scientists are looking into ways to ensure that more farmers—especially those producing commodity crops in the middle of the country—start taking soil seriously. he world’s biggest crop insurance program, the U.S. Federal Crop Insurance Program (FCIP) provides coverage to help farmers recover from “severe weather and bad years of production.” But recently, a pair of Cornell University scientists looked at what might happen if crop insurance were also tied to soil quality—that is, if insurance companies began considering soil data when determining rates. For full story, click here.

EPA asks what rules to cut, gets earful about dirty water

By Michael Biesecker – Associated Press – KTBS – May 2, 2017
The Trump administration got an earful Tuesday from people who say federal rules limiting air and water pollution aren't tough enough, even as it was seeking suggestions about what environmental regulations it should gut. The Environmental Protection Agency held a three-hour "virtual listening session" on Tuesday to collect public comments by phone about which clean water regulations should be targeted for repeal, replacement or modification. The call was part of the agency's response to President Donald Trump's order to get rid of regulations that are burdensome to business and industry. For full story, click here 

23 Environmental Rules Rolled Back in Trump’s First 100 Days

By Nadia Popovich and Tatiana Schlossberg – The New York Times – May 2, 2017
President Trump, with help from his administration and Republicans in Congress, has reversed course on nearly two dozen environmental rules, regulations and other Obama-era policies during his first 100 days in office. Citing federal overreach and burdensome regulations, Mr. Trump has prioritized domestic fossil fuel interests and undone measures aimed at protecting the environment and limiting global warming. For full story, click here.

EPA removes climate change information from website

By Rene Marsh – CNN – April 29, 2017 – Video
The EPA removed most climate change information from its website Friday, saying in a press release that language on the website is being updated to "reflect the approach of new leadership." EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt has expressed doubt about the reasons for climate change, saying in a CNBC interview in March that he was skeptical of the role carbon dioxide plays. For full story and to view video, click here.

East coast braces for fresh climate fight as Trump eyes more offshore drilling

By Oliver Milman – The Guardian – April 28, 2017
Communities along the east coast are steeling themselves for a fresh round of angst and protest over offshore drilling, with Donald Trump set to throw open vast swaths of the Atlantic seaboard to oil and gas companies. On Friday, the president signed an executive order that asks the interior department to review offshore areas potentially rich in fossil fuels that were put out of reach of drilling by Barack Obama’s administration. For full story, click here.

National Park Service considering wetland projects at local parks

By Samantha Hogan – The Frederick News - Post – April 27, 2017
The National Park Service is gathering public comment on a plan to restore wetlands at four local national parks. The plan lays out projects to protect wetlands, waterways and stream habitats at Catoctin Mountain Park, Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park, Harpers Ferry National Historical Park and Monocacy National Battlefield. An environmental assessment identified 42 potential sites for controlling invasive species control, planting native plants, enhancing riparian buffers, increasing fish passages and restoring natural hydrology. In total, the National Park Service identified approximately 50 acres of wetlands and 20,000 linear feet of streams for restoration. For full story, click here.

States Move to Roll Back Environmental Rules in Trump’s Wake

By Ari Natter – Bloomberg – May 5, 2017 – Video
Emboldened by the environmental rollbacks of President Donald Trump, state legislatures are following suit, taking aim at items as varied as solar incentives, chemical spill protections and, even, anti-pipeline protesters. The legislation in states from Florida to Wisconsin comes as the Environmental Protection Agency under Trump argues that it can curtail federal regulations, leaving it up to states to decide how to protect against pollution. Shifting the burden to state capitals allows industry lobbyists to divide and conquer their foes, pitting one state’s deregulation against another’s. For full story and to view video, click here. 

Secretary Zinke Announces Boost to Wetland, Waterfowl Conservation, Access to Public Lands Through Conservation Grants, Federal Duck Stamp Funds

Contact: Vanessa Kauffman – U.S. Department of Interior – April 26, 2017
The Migratory Bird Conservation Commission, chaired by U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke, today approved $17.8 million in grants for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners to conserve or restore more than 108,000 acres of wetland and associated upland habitats for waterfowl, shorebirds and other birds in 14 states throughout the United States. Representing Secretary Zinke at the meeting was Acting Deputy Secretary of the Interior James Cason. The grants, made through the North American Wetlands Conservation Act (NAWCA), will be matched by nearly $40 million in partner funds. NAWCA grants ensure waterfowl and other birds are protected throughout their lifecycles. For full story, click here.

2017 Federal Budget Passed Without Huge Cuts to Research

By Julia Marsh – Ecological Society of America – May 11, 2017
Congress passed a relatively clean Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 omnibus spending bill that keeps the federal government operating through Sept. 30, 2017. For the past seven months, agencies have been operating under a continuing budget resolution that froze spending at FY 2016 levels and stalled new programs. President Trump’s release of his FY 2018 “Skinny Budget” in March that drastically cut federal spending caused considerable anxiety about potential FY 2017 funding cuts for science. Fears proved to be for naught as a bipartisan, bicameral Congress rejected severe cuts to the federal budget. For full story, click here. 

Dakota Pipeline Is Ready for Oil, Without Spill Response Plan for Standing Rock

By Phil McKenna – InsideClimate News – May 10, 2017
Oil is set to flow through the controversial Dakota Access pipeline, but there is still no oil spill response plan in place for the section of pipe that crosses the Missouri River just upstream from the Standing Rock reservation. The company won't be required to have emergency response cleanup equipment stored near the river crossing for another year, either. The lack of rigorous safety measures for the crude oil pipeline is raising concerns from lawyers and pipeline consultants for the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, whose protests and legal fight against the Dakota Access pipeline became a flashpoint for environmental justice and indigenous rights last year. For full story, click here.

Congress Budget Deal Protects Water Programs

By Brett Walton – Circle of Blue – May 10, 2017
The Trump administration’s talk of slashing environmental programs in fiscal year 2018 did not translate into big cuts in a 2017 spending agreement negotiated by Congress. President Trump signed a budget deal on May 5 that keeps the government operating through September 30. Notably, the agreement does not include huge cuts to water and environment programs — elimination of rural water grants, for instance, or a one-third cut to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — that the president targeted in his 2018 budget proposal. For full story, click here. 

EPA dismisses half of its scientific advisers on key board, citing ‘clean break’ with Obama administration

By Juliet Eilperin and Brady Dennis – The Washington Post – May 8, 2017 – Video
Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt has chosen to replace half of the members on one of its key scientific review boards, the first step in a broader effort by Republicans to change the way the agency evaluates the scientific basis for its regulations. The move could significantly change the makeup of the 18-member Board of Scientific Counselors, which advises EPA’s key scientific arm on whether the research it does has sufficient rigor and integrity. For full story, click here.

Early skirmishes on Trump policies prefigure long legal war

By Amanda Reilly – E&E News – April 27, 2017
The Trump administration's legal maneuverings and attempts to begin unraveling regulations during its first 100 days have set the stage for what are likely to be prolonged, fierce battles in environmental law over the next four years. The administration has mostly tried to get its bearing in a host of environmental legal disputes pending in various federal courts. Early skirmishes with environmentalists have centered on its requests to halt litigation as it figures out what to do with Obama-era policies. For full story, click here.

Trump orders review of national monuments, vows to ‘end these abuses and return control to the people’

By Juliet Eilperin – The Washington Post – April 26, 2017 – Video
President Trump signed an executive order Wednesday instructing Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to review any national monument created since Jan. 1, 1996, that spans at least 100,000 acres in a move he said would “end another egregious use of government power.” Referring to the 1906 law that empowers a president to take unilateral action to protect cultural, historic or natural resources on federal land that is under threat, Trump declared, “The Antiquities Act does not give the federal government unlimited power to lock up millions of acres of land and water, and it’s time that we ended this abusive practice.” For full story and to view video, click here.

Trump EPA plots path to Scalia-inspired regulation

By Ariel Wittenberg – E&E News – April 20, 2017
The Trump administration laid out its vision yesterday for lining up federal Clean Water Act oversight with the views expressed by the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. Meeting with state and local officials in Washington, U.S. EPA used a slideshow to outline plans for rolling back and replacing the Obama administration's Clean Water Rule — also known as Waters of the U.S., or WOTUS — that aims to clarify what waterways and wetlands get automatic federal protection. For full story, click here.

 
 


AK: Trump EPA reverses Obama block on controversial copper mine

By Alex Guillén – Politico – May 12, 2017
The Trump administration has agreed to stop standing in the way of a proposed mine in Alaska that has inspired a long-running, multimillion-dollar legal and lobbying battle in Washington — in yet another reversal of former President Barack Obama's environmental policies. In a settlement announced Friday, the EPA agreed to drop its efforts to preemptively block the planned Pebble Mine. The proposed gold, copper and molybdenum mine inspired a pitched battle from opponents including native tribes, environmental groups and commercial fishermen, who feared its pollution, would devastate the world’s largest wild salmon fishery. For full story, click here.

CA: In Napa Valley, Vineyards and Conservationists Battle for the Hills

By Alastair Bland – Yale Environment 360 – May 11, 2017
Kellie Anderson stands in the understory of a century-old forest in eastern Napa County, about 70 miles north of San Francisco. To her left is a creek gully, a rush of the water audible through the thick riparian brush. The large trees here provide a home for deer, mountain lions, and endangered spotted owls, while the stream supports the last remnants of the Napa River watershed’s nearly extinct steelhead trout. “They want to take all of this out,” says Anderson, who sits on the steering committee of a local environmental organization, Save Rural Angwin, named for a community in the renowned wine country of the Napa Valley. She is studying a project-planning map of the area as she waves her free arm toward the wooded upward slope. “It looks like this will be the edge of a block of vines,” she says. For full story, click here.

CA: Oroville Dam: What state’s forensics team has found in first analysis

By Ryan Sabalow and Dale Kasler – The Sacramento Bee – May 10, 2017 – Video
In a report released Wednesday, engineers assigned to investigate the February failure of Oroville Dam’s main spillway cited a variety of flaws in the 3,000-foot-long structure, including variations in the thickness of the concrete slabs, poor drainage beneath the spillway, improperly filled cracks and signs of inadequate maintenance. The forensics team, consisting of six outside consultants, also said the spillway may have split because of an increase in water releases just prior to the Feb. 7 incident. For full story, click here.

CA: Cosumnes River Provides Model for Floodplain Restoration in California

By Michelaina Johnson – Water Deeply – April 19, 2017
With California's surface drought over, the state can prioritize investing in groundwater recharge and floodplain restoration to help fight one of its biggest lingering problems: groundwater overdraft. As it does so, the relatively unknown Cosumnes River watershed has emerged as a model. For full story, click here.

CT: CT fires its first shots in battle with Trump over environment

By Jan Ellen Spiegel – CT Mirror – April 20, 2017
Connecticut is ready for battle. But no guns, no grenades, no things that go boom here. Just a platoon of lawyers armed with the Clean Air and Water acts and a lot of guidance from the U.S. Supreme Court. The goal is just that – clean air and water – but also vigilance in combating climate change in the face of Trump administration actions to roll back, alter or even eliminate existing environmental regulations and programs. For full story, click here.

FL: Oil exploration in Big Cypress wins approval

By David Fleshler – Sun Sentinel – May 6, 2017
A Texas company won approval Friday to explore for oil at Big Cypress National Preserve, after the National Park Service concluded the work would have no significant environmental impact. Environmentalists immediately denounced the decision, saying it will cause lasting damage to some of the last extensive wildlife habitat left in South Florida. For full story, click here.

FL: Florida's building boom threatens wildlife-rich lagoon

By Jason Dearen and Mike Schneider – Associated Press – Lancaster Online – May 4, 2017
The most biologically diverse waterway in America is seriously ill. The Indian River Lagoon is repeatedly being choked with oxygen-robbing algae, its surface increasingly dotted with thousands of dead fish, manatees, birds and other creatures. The culprits: farm runoff and a huge influx of people that has sent lawn fertilizer and other pollutants into the lagoon, which runs 156 miles along Florida's Atlantic Coast, almost to Palm Beach, and includes the Cape Canaveral area. "It's the death by a thousand cuts," said Bob Knight, an environmental scientist with the Howard T. Odum Florida Springs Institute who has studied Florida's waters for 40 years. For full story, click here.

FL: Gentrification fears grow as high ground becomes hot property

Erika Bolstad – E&E News – ClimateWire – May 1, 2017
One of the first sea-level rise maps Broadway Harewood saw was a few years back, when climate activists gathered in his neighborhood to talk about how global warming would affect people in less-affluent South Florida communities. Harewood had a realization, one that he illustrates with his hands. One hand represents the city of Miami Beach. The opposite hand, moving like the incoming tide, demonstrates how the seas will eventually rise, potentially bringing the coastline of South Florida closer to Miami's historically black neighborhoods — properties like his investments in Liberty City that sit on comparatively higher ground. "Oh, Miami Beach is going under, the sea level is coming up," Harewood said. "So now the rich people have to find a place to live. My property is 15 feet above sea level, theirs is what? Three under? For full story, click here.

IL: Emanuel Recoups Climate Change Info Deleted From EPA Website

NBC Chicago – May 6, 2017
Mayor Rahm Emanuel is accusing President Donald Trump of trying to erase what Al Gore has called the “inconvenient truth” about climate change, and is doing his part to recoup that information. Emanuel has created a new city website titled, “Climate Change is Real,” the Chicago Sun-Times is reporting. It resurrects information about decades of research on the impact of climate change that, the mayor claims was “unceremoniously removed” from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s own Climate Change website on April 29. For full story, click here.

IL: Wetland Mitigation Sites Sought By IDOT

The Gazette-Democrat – April 25, 2017
The Illinois Department of Transportation, IDOT, is seeking to purchase land from willing sellers for wetland mitigation in Hamilton, White, Saline, Gallatin, Hardin, Pope, Johnson and Massac counties, as well as the eastern portion of Jefferson, Williamson and Union counties. For full story, click here.

IA: The Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture Faces a Shut-Down

By Lisa Held – Civil Eats – May 5, 2017
You may never have heard of the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture, but if you’re eating sustainable food, the odds are good it has something to do with its work. Named after the iconic conservationist, Aldo Leopold, the Center has been conducting and funding research that helped define today’s working definition of sustainable agriculture for the last 30 years. But the Iowa State University (ISU)-based Center’s reign—covering not only soil and water quality, but also developing regional, rural food systems and increasing profits for farmers—may soon come to an end. For full story, click here.

KY: Lawsuit Challenges Kentucky’s Weakened Coal Ash Regulations

By Erica Peterson – WFPL News – May 3, 2017
A Kentucky environmental attorney has filed a lawsuit challenging the commonwealth’s controversial new coal ash regulations. The standards are set to go into effect on Friday. The lawsuit was filed Wednesday in Franklin Circuit Court by Tom FitzGerald of the Kentucky Resources Council on behalf of Trimble County landowner Kelley Leach. Leach lives next door to Louisville Gas & Electric’s Trimble County Power Plant — a plant for which regulators recently approved a permit to expand the facility’s coal ash landfill. Coal ash is a byproduct of burning coal for electricity; it’s typically stored in ponds or landfills and if it’s not managed correctly, has caused environmental contamination and safety concerns. For full story, click here.

LA: Governor declares La. coast in state of emergency

By Garrett Ohlmeyer – Daily Comet – April 20, 2017
Gov. John Bel Edwards declared the Louisiana coast in a state of emergency Wednesday to give national attention to coastal land loss. The letter, sent to President Donald Trump and members of Congress, aims to highlight the severity of the issue and further expedite priority restoration projects to a higher level of urgency. The state of emergency extends to May 17. For full story, click here.

LA: 'Wetland Watchers Celebration' introduces new crop of students to outdoors

By Barry Guillot – Nola-The Times-Picayume – April 9, 2017
St. Charles Parish Wetland Watchers Park is a popular place on the weekends. Hundreds of people visit the lakeshore park to crab, fish, kayak, picnic, or just relax. Recently, in the middle of a week, over 1,800 people gathered for a different reason…to introduce a whole new group of students to the Wetland Watchers Program and to celebrate another busy year of the group’s activities. For full blog post, click here.

ME: Pesticide-friendly bill from LePage mirrors model by secretive national group

By Colin Woodard – Portland Press Herald – May 9, 2017
Gov. Paul LePage’s bill to take away municipal government’s ability to enact local pesticide ordinances closely mirrors a model bill written and promoted by a secretive national group that helps large national corporations ghost-write laws for sympathetic state legislators. The governor’s bill – which a legislative panel will take up again next week – would prohibit Maine municipalities from restricting a wide range of chemicals used for everything from treating lawns to killing household pests and invasive moths. It has the support of local pest control and lawn care companies, but is opposed by environmental groups, the Maine Municipal Association and towns that have adopted ordinances to protect vulnerable local resources such as lobster. For full story, click here. 

ME: New Report Documents Damage to Maine if Proposed EPA Budget Cuts are Approved

Natural Resources Council of Maine – April 20, 2017
The Trump Administration has proposed deep cuts to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) programs that reduce pollution in Maine, save the lives of Maine people, and strengthen our communities and economy. According to a comprehensive new report by the Natural Resources Council of Maine, the Administration’s unprecedented proposed cuts to EPA would cause widespread harm to efforts to protect clean air and clean water, achieve economic redevelopment at shuttered paper mills, and protect Maine people from toxic hazards. To read more and to download report, click here.

MD: Maryland prosecution of environmental crimes at 20-year low

By Scott Dance – The Baltimore Sun – May 10, 2017 – Video
Maryland is prosecuting its fewest environmental crimes in at least two decades as Gov. Larry Hogan fulfills promises to ease regulatory burdens on businesses. The work force dedicated to enforcing laws and regulations that protect air quality and the Chesapeake Bay has been shrinking since the second term of former Gov. Martin O'Malley, a Democrat. The trend prompted Democrats in the General Assembly to force the Republican administration to spend $400,000 to hire more environmental inspectors in the coming fiscal year. For full story and to view video, click here.

MA: Environmentalists worry GE's move to Mass. could taint Housatonic cleanup plan

By Larry Parnass – The Berkshire Eagle – May 8, 2017
As General Electric plants its corporate flag in South Boston, in a project it says embodies a "global commitment to the environment," activists question the company's commitment to that goal in Berkshire County. "How more ironic can you get?" asked Barbara Cianfarini, of Pittsfield, a co-founder of Citizens for PCB Removal. Though remarks at Monday's ceremonial groundbreaking focused on bright outlooks for innovation and job growth, people pushing to address GE's legacy of Housatonic River pollution speak of darker possibilities. By taking up residence in Boston as a Massachusetts company, some warn, GE may be positioning itself to gain an upper hand in regulatory skirmishes over its duty to remove PCB sediment and soil from the Housatonic River. For full story, click here.

MA: Mass. Water Resources Authority Will Continue Water Quality Monitoring of Massachusetts Bay

WaterWorld – May 3, 2017
The Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) has chosen Battelle, the world's largest independent research and development organization, to continue water quality monitoring to assess potential impacts associated with the discharge of municipal wastewater effluent into Massachusetts Bay. Battelle has been conducting the water quality monitoring of the Bay for MWRA since 1990. The MWRA Harbor and Outfall Monitoring Program is a long-term project that monitors the effects of discharging treated sewage effluent into Massachusetts Bay. The project began in 1989 when MWRA began planning for an upgraded wastewater treatment system to mitigate the ecological and water quality impacts of discharging sewage into Boston Harbor. For full story, click here.

MA: Lesson on Vernal Pools Begins By Making One

By Andrea F. Carter – The Falmouth Enterprise – April 25, 2017
Lawrence School students wearing hard hats were on-site Monday, April 24, to help construct a vernal pool wetland at the school. The pool will be a living laboratory, home to invertebrates and amphibians. Vernal pools are shallow bodies of water with their own cycle, filling up with the autumn and early winter rains and drying up by the end of summer. At only two feet or less deep, they are not a welcome habitat for fish, which are predators of the species that thrive in the pools. When students arrived in the morning, an excavator lay waiting to begin the day’s work on the grassy area along the driveway in front of the school above Weeks Pond. Digging started later in the morning. For full story, click here. 

MI: May offers good opportunities to visit Michigan wetlands

Detroit Free Press – Associated Press – May 7, 2017
State officials are encouraging visits to some of Michigan's premier wetland areas during May, which federal agencies designate as American Wetlands Month. The state Department of Natural Resources manages seven "wetland wonders," which are areas that offer especially good waterfowl habitat and hunting opportunities. For full story, click here.

MI: Waterfowl Hunters Paying for Michigan’s Wetland Management and Restoration

By Amy Miller – WDET – May 4, 2017
The month of May is celebrated as American Wetlands Month. A report released recently looks at the health and management of seven of Michigan’s most important wetland areas. The Seven Wetland Wonders report includes Southeast Michigan’s 3,000-acre Saint Clair Flats on Harsens Island and the 4,000-acre Pointe Mouillee State Game Area in Monroe County. For full story, click here.

MN: Minnesota beekeepers win a round against EPA on insecticide approval

By Josephine Marcoty – StarTribune – May 11, 2017
A Minnesota beekeeper has won a round against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in a protracted lawsuit over a class of insecticides implicated in the decline of honeybees and other wild insects. A federal judge in California ruled this week that, in doing a regular review of the pesticides, the EPA failed to consider the potential impact of neonicotinoids on insects on the federal Endangered Species list, as required by law. For full story, click here.

MT: Montana dam, passage to save fish lacks funding

By Matt Volz - Associated Press – San Francisco Chronicle – May 2, 2017
A federal agency targeted by President Donald Trump for budget cuts next year has only about half the money needed to build a new Yellowstone River dam and a bypass channel meant to save an endangered fish, but it plans to begin construction anyway. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers inked a $36 million contract in 2015 with Ames Construction of Burnsville, Minnesota, to build the concrete dam and a channel in Montana for about 125 wild pallid sturgeon to swim to their spawning grounds that are now blocked by an existing rock dam. For full story, click here.

NY: Huge Victory: Natural Gas Storage Plan Halted at Seneca Lake

By Dandra Steingraber – EcoWatch – May 11, 2017
The news broke Wednesday in the most banal of venues: the biweekly environmental compliance report submitted by Arlington Storage Company to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). Deep in the third paragraph of section B, this wholly owned subsidiary of the Houston-based gas storage and transportation giant, Crestwood Midstream, announced that it was walking away from its FERC-approved plan to increase its storage of methane (natural gas) in unlined, abandoned salt caverns along the shoreline of Seneca Lake. For full story, click here.

NY: ‘Dead Rivers, Closed Beaches’: A Water Crisis on Long Island

By Lisa W. Foderaro – The New York Times – May 8, 2017
The Great South Bay, flanked by Fire Island and the South Shore of Long Island, once produced half the shellfish consumed in the United States, and supported 6,000 jobs in the early 1970s. Since then, the health of the bay has declined. Housing development meant more septic tanks depositing more nitrogen in the ground. The nitrogen flowed to rivers and the Great South Bay, leading to algae blooms. It depleted salt marshes that serve as fish habitat and suppressed oxygen levels. One result is that the shellfish industry has all but collapsed. The annual harvest of hard clams, for example, has fallen more than 90 percent since 1980. For full story, click here.

NY: DIPRA Adds Support to Gov. Cuomo’s New York State Water Infrastructure Bill

WaterWorld – May 1, 2017
The Ductile Iron Pipe Research Association (DIPRA) applauds New York Governor Andrew Cuomo for his commitment to restoring the quality of the state's water infrastructure following the signing of the Clean Water Infrastructure Improvement Act. For full story, click here.

NY: Yorktown Town Board Rejects Changes to Wetland Ordinance

By Sam Barron – Yorktown Daily Voice – April 30, 2017
After a three-hour hearing with more than 30 speakers, the Town of Yorktown decided to table any changes to its wetland ordinance at its April 18 meeting. Supervisor Michael Grace said the town will go back to the drawing board on the Freshwater Wetlands Protection Ordinance. The ordinance would've increased the minimum size for wetlands from 1,000 square feet to 4,356 square feet. Aside from the speakers, the hearing drew more than 100 protestors opposing the ordinance. Supervisor Michael Grace defended the proposed ordinance, saying it would be stronger than the current law. For full story, click here.

NC: N.C. said it still needs $929 million in aid for Hurricane Matthew. It got $6.1 million.

By Angela Fritz – The Washington Post – May 11, 2017 – Video
The rain is done, and the flood is long over. The rest of the country moved on months ago, but North Carolina is still feeling the effects of Hurricane Matthew. Hundreds of families remain displaced, and critical infrastructure sits damaged. Its unmet need is enormous, the governor says, and they aren’t getting the money. In a soon-to-be-announced disaster relief allocation from the federal government, Gov. Roy Cooper expects to get just 0.7 percent of what he and North Carolina lawmakers in Congress say the state still needs to get back on its feet. For full story and to view video, click here.

NC: NC GOP Protects Factory Farms’ Right to Pollute

By Christina Cooke – Civil Eats – May 9, 2017
Elsie Herring has been fighting for decades against the industrial hog farm that moved in beside her family’s Eastern North Carolina property in 1986 and began spraying the fecal material of 2,000-plus hogs onto the field that ends eight feet outside her kitchen window. But last Friday, when the state’s newly elected Democratic Governor Roy Cooper vetoed a bill that would protect the hog industry from lawsuits like one she and about 500 others have filed against a subsidiary of Smithfield Foods, she breathed a sigh of relief—at least for the moment. For full story, click here.

ND: EPA signs off on North Dakota regulation of CO2 wells

By Blake Nicholson – The Modesto Bee – May 9, 2017
The Trump administration is proposing to make North Dakota the first state with the power to regulate underground wells used for long-term storage of waste carbon dioxide captured from industrial sources such as coal-fired power plants. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt on Tuesday signed off on the proposal that had languished under the Obama administration. A final decision will come after a 60-day public comment period that will follow a Federal Register posting. North Dakota, which has a large coal industry, would be the first state to get such authority, according to the EPA. For full story, click here.

OH: Dakota Pipeline Builder Under Fire for Ohio Spill: 8 Violations in 7 Weeks

By Zahra Hirji – InsideClimate News – May 12, 2017
Energy Transfer Partners, the company behind the controversial Dakota Access oil pipeline, is under fire from federal and state regulators after triggering a massive spill, and seven other violations, during the first seven weeks of construction of a major gas pipeline in Ohio. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on Wednesday sent a letter to the Rover pipeline operator ordering it to not start construction on any new locations, as well as to stop construction at the site of the major wetlands spill and to hire an independent contractor to dig into what went wrong there. For full story, click here. 

OH: Ohio lawmakers add budget provision that could open state parks to fracking

By Kim Palmer – Reuters – May 3, 2017
Ohio legislators took a step toward allowing fracking in state parks, adding a provision in a pending budget that would strip the governor of the ability to control the issuing of licenses for the oil and gas drilling practice that has raised environmental concerns. The provision, added on Tuesday by the Republican-controlled House, would allow the state legislature instead of the governor to control appointments to the Oil and Gas Commission responsible for issuing drilling licenses for state lands. For full story, click here.

PA: Hellbender proposed as official state amphibian

By Mike Parker – The Sentinel – May 11, 2017– Video
Chances are, you’ve never heard of the Eastern Hellbender. If you’ve actually seen one, you’re in rare company. Now, a group familiar with the reclusive giant of the amphibian world is making a case to name the hellbender as Pennsylvania’s official state amphibian. “It’s North America’s largest salamander. It can reach lengths of up to 29 inches, so approaching three feet long,” said Anna Pauletta, a senior at Cumberland Valley High School. “They live under flat rocks in cold, fast moving streams, which we have a lot of in Pennsylvania.” For full story and to view video, click here.

PA: Study: Cover crops on farm fields in Pennsylvania combat global warming

By Ad Crable – Lancaster Online – May 11, 2017
The majority of Lancaster County farmers have long cloaked their fields in winter with a green cover crop to guard against soil erosion and reduce the need for fertilizers. A 2013 study found that 75 percent of farm fields in Lancaster County have cover crops in winter. But a new study of farm fields in central Pennsylvania and Spain shows the farming practice also lessens the effects of climate change. For full story, click here.

SC: A ‘Wetland Treasure’ is closer than you think: Take a tour

The State – May 6, 2017
Wetlands play an important role in both the ecology and economy of South Carolina. These hardworking ecosystems serve as sanctuaries for people and wildlife, provide natural flood control and filter runoff, which helps keep our rivers, lakes and drinking water clean. For full story, click here.

TX: Nearly 400 migratory birds die from striking Texas skyscraper

Reuters – May 6, 2017
Nearly 400 migratory birds of brilliant plumage were killed when they smashed into an office tower in Texas while flying in a storm, officials said on Friday. Office workers arrived at the tallest skyscraper in downtown Galveston on Thursday morning and found the birds with feathers of blue, green, yellow and other hues dead on the ground, said Josh Henderson, animal services supervisor for Galveston police. The birds were coming from Central and South America and arrived in the coastal city of Galveston, likely fatigued from their flight over the Gulf of Mexico. The birds migrate to several areas across North America during the warmer months of the year. For full story, click here.

TX: House panel debates state parks funding

By Cassandra Pollock – The Texas Tribune – May 4, 2017
After a push to increase funding for state parks failed in 2015, a House panel revisited the issue on Thursday, with some lawmakers and advocates hopeful a similar proposal to boost funding for parks — and guarantee future funding — passes this time. The House Appropriations Committee took public comment on House Bill 78 by state Rep. Ryan Guillen, D-Rio Grande City. The legislation would ensure that almost all of revenue generated by the state’s “sporting goods sales tax” would go to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department to fund the operation and maintenance of all 103 state parks and historical sites in Texas. For full story, click here.

UT: Levels of Toxic Mercury in the Great Salt Lake Again

By Liesl Nielsen – KSL.com – May 4, 2017
High levels of toxic mercury in the Great Salt Lake are on the rise again after nearly disappearing in years prior. In 2010, scientists detected high levels of the toxic element, known as methylmercury, in the deep waters of the Great Salt Lake, according to University of Utah geology and geophysics professor William Johnson. The waterfowl in the area also showed exceptionally high levels of the toxin, causing authorities to issue a rare advisory that warned residents to limit their consumption of ducks harvested near the lake. By 2015, however, 90 percent of the mercury was gone. Now, it’s back on an upward trajectory. For full story, click here.

UT: Utah land swaps could foil a Trump bid to strip protection

By Jennifer Yachnin E– &E News – May 2, 2017
If the latest partisan battle over the fate of national monuments feels a bit like déjà vu, there's a good reason for that. A Democratic commander-in-chief used the Antiquities Act to protect a large swath of land, and a new Republican administration called for a review of recently designated monuments. Congress raised the specter of curtailing the 1906 law that allows presidents to declare such sites, and a legal battle royal loomed. That was two decades ago. But President Trump's executive order last week mandating a review of dozens of sites created by his predecessors doesn't just raise a series of striking parallels. In at least one case, it actually is the same monument back on the chopping block: Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, which includes 1.87 million acres of southern Utah desert. For full story, click here.

VT: Vernon Wetland to Receive More Protection

By Harmony Birch - Brattleboro Reformer – VT Digest – May 8, 2017
The Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation may reclassify Black Gum Swamp to better protect its unique wildlife. The DEC has a three-tier classification system for all wetlands. Currently Black Gum Swamp is a Class II wetland but will soon be upgraded to a Class I. The classification system was started in 1990. Up until last year there were only three Class I wetlands in Vermont, now there are six. For full story, click here.

VA: How 'draining the swamp' backfired spectacularly in Va.

Kavya Balaraman – E&E News – Climatewire – May 12, 2017
Chris Lowie has been keeping a watchful eye on the pitch-black waters of the Great Dismal Swamp for more than a year. The swamp, a 112,000-acre tangle of lush vegetation and dark soil with a name out of a fairy tale and a history that dates back to George Washington, has seen better times. After centuries of being drained and logged, the swamp, straddling the Virginia-North Carolina border, has transformed from a moist wetland to a dry mass of peaty soil that's constantly emitting carbon and frequently sparking wildfires. But Lowie, the manager of the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, thinks he's figured out a way to bring it back to normal: by controlling its water flow. For full story, click here.

VA: Protecting Natural Resources: 40 Years of the Virginia Environmental Endowment

By Sandy Hausman – WVTF Radio – May 11, 2017
The Virginia Environmental Endowment announced, this week that this year it would give more than a quarter of a million dollars to 14 groups statewide. 2017 marks the 40th anniversary of the VEE; the first organization of its kind in the nation. Sandy Hausman reports on how it got started, and what it has done to protect and improve this state’s natural resources. For full story, click here.

VA: Lynchburg aims to improve water quality through stream restoration project

By Sherese Gore – The News & Advance – May 8, 2017
What currently resembles a construction wasteland near Greenwood Drive is targeted for transformation into an aquatic wetland, a project designed to help the city improve water quality and meet its stormwater management requirements. Lynchburg lies within the Chesapeake Bay watershed. As such, all tributaries in the city drain into the James River and ultimately the bay. To help reduce pollutants into that body of water, the dual Greenwood Drive pond and Blackwater Creek Tributary stream restoration project is one of many the city is undertaking to improve water quality. For full story, click here.

VA: Dominion reconsidering coal ash storage plans in VA

By Whitney Pipkin – Bay Journal – May 8, 2017
Earlier this year, it seemed inevitable that Dominion Virginia Power would be permanently storing coal ash underground at a power station near the Potomac River. The site is the first of four along Chesapeake Bay tributaries where the utility is looking to entomb the accumulated residue from decades of burning coal for power. What happens at Possum Point near Quantico could set a precedent for how ash is handled elsewhere in the state. But before state environmental regulators could issue the first permit to allow long-term storage, separate actions by the Virginia governor and a federal judge this spring have sent the company back to the drawing board for a more thorough consideration of alternatives. For full article, click here.

WA: Washington AG Pledges To Defend National Monuments

By Courtney Flatt – OPB – May 11, 2017
Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson is pledging to defend the state’s national monuments. Ferguson sent a letter to U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke defending the Hanford Reach National Monument, which is up for review under an executive order. Ferguson asserts that President Trump and Zinke don’t have the legal authority to revoke national monuments. The review could wind up shrinking, modifying or eliminating some monuments altogether. For full story, click here.

WA: Invasive green crabs found off Olympic Peninsula

By the Associated Press – The Seattle Times – April 29, 2017
Officials in Washington State say an invasion of the European green crabs that could disrupt the Puget Sound ecosystem is continuing. Biologists with Washington Sea Grant tell the Kitsap Sun that 16 of the crabs have been caught this spring at one location on Dungeness Spit near Sequim on the Olympic Peninsula. The group coordinates volunteers who place crab traps to locate populations of the green crabs and then additional traps to thin their populations if any are found. For full story, click here.

WA: Conservationists guardedly optimistic about funding to restore forests, coasts and flood-prone areas

By Adiel Kaplan – InvestigateWest – April 20, 2017
Bipartisan. Unanimous. Two words not heard often in contemporary politics describe a pair of bills passed by a divided Washington Legislature to revitalize forests in the face of climate change and megafires that have killed firefighters and cost the state many millions of dollars. Now comes the real test: Will the Legislature provide the money needed to carry out these plans? For full story, click here

WI: In low-key rollout, DNR begins giving water to those with tainted wells

Journal Sentinel – May 9, 2017 – Video
With livestock-contamination of drinking water a growing concern in Wisconsin, the Department of Natural Resources has quietly started efforts to provide temporary water supplies to people with tainted wells. The DNR posted an update on its website in April that said it would provide temporary emergency drinking water when tests show that a water supply is contaminated and is likely due to groundwater contaminated by manure, a person on the property contracts a water-borne illness or there is a sudden change in color or odor of well water. For full story and to view video, click here.

WI: Burnham Canal cleanup in Milwaukee will transform channel to wetland

By Don Behm – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel – April 25, 2017
A historic navigation channel in Milwaukee's Menomonee Valley unused since the 1980s will be returned to a wetland as part of a two-leg remediation relay to begin this year. Miller Compressing Co. will run the first leg: a $2.3 million environmental cleanup of the west end of the Burnham Canal, officials said. For full article, click here.

 

 


The big melt: Glacier National Park is losing its glaciers

By Steve Almasy and Mayra Cuevas – CNN – May 10, 2017
The 37 glaciers remaining at Glacier National Park are vanishing. In the past half century, some of the ice formations in Montana have lost 85% of their size, and the average shrinkage is 39%, a study released by the U.S. Geological Survey and Portland State University says. One day, they will be gone, the study's lead scientist said Wednesday. For full story, click here.

The Injustice of Atlantic City’s Floods

By John Upton – Climate Central – May 10, 2017 – Video
A driver plowed a sedan forcefully up Arizona Avenue, which had flooded to knee height during a winter storm as high tide approached. The wake from the passing Honda buffeted low brick fences lining the tidy homes of working-class residents of this failing casino city, pushing floodwaters into Eileen DeDomenicis’s living room. For full story, click here. 

How much milkweed to save monarch? Only 1.8 billion new stems, study finds

By Ron Meador – MinnPost – May 10, 2017
All over Minnesota and beyond, citizens and clubs and the occasional municipality are planting milkweed in hopes of helping the monarch butterfly reverse its ongoing population crash. Still, the losses continue. This gorgeous, iconic creature’s numbers have declined by probably 80 percent in the last decade, and it may face 50-50 odds of disappearing from the Midwestern landscape in the next two. For full story, click here.

New lobster fishing rules on the way amid warming waters

By Patrick Whittle – Boston.com – May 9, 2017
New restrictions are coming to southern New England’s lobster fishery in an attempt to save the area’s population of the crustaceans, which has dwindled as waters have warmed. An arm of the interstate Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission voted on Tuesday to pursue new management measures to try to slow the decline of lobsters in the area. Management tools will include changes to legal harvesting size, reductions to the number of traps and seasonal closures to fishing areas. For full story, click here.

Earth could break through a major climate threshold in the next 15 years, scientists warn

By Chelsea Harvey – The Washington Post – May 9, 2017
Global temperatures could exceed 1.5 degrees Celsius above their preindustrial levels within the next 15 years, according to a new scientific study, crossing the first threshold under the Paris climate agreement and placing the world at a potentially dangerous level of climate change. The report comes as climate agreement participants are watching the United States — where the Trump administration is debating whether to withdraw from the Paris accord — and as scientists with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change are working on a special report about the 1.5-degree goal (equivalent to 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) and the consequences of overshooting it. For full story, click here. 

Protected species in Gulf of Mexico could take decades to recover from Deepwater Horizon oil spill

By Mike Gaworecki – Mongabay – May 8, 2017
Research released last month suggested that the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster and oil spill caused $17.2 billion in damages to the Gulf of Mexico’s natural resources — and a slew of other recent studies provide even more detail on just how severe those impacts were for many of the protected marine mammal and sea turtle species found in the Gulf. What started as a blowout at an ultra-deepwater well operated by British oil major BP on April 20, 2010 led to an explosion on the Deepwater Horizon offshore drilling rig and ultimately the largest offshore oil spill in United States history. The well would not be successfully capped for another 87 days, by which time approximately 3.19 million barrels (or 134 million gallons) of oil had spewed into the Gulf of Mexico. That oil contaminated more than 112,000 square kilometers (over 43,200 square miles) of surface waters and fouled 2,100 kilometers (a little over 1,300 miles) of shoreline in five states. For full story, click here.

Global warming kills gut bacteria in lizards

University of Exeter – May 8, 2017
Climate change could threaten reptiles by reducing the number of bacteria living in their guts, new research suggests. Scientists from the University of Exeter and the University of Toulouse found that warming of 2-3°C caused a 34% loss of microorganism diversity in the guts of common lizards (also known as viviparous lizards). In the experiments, lizards were put in temperature-controlled enclosures and samples of their gut bacteria were tested to identify which bacteria were present. The diversity of bacteria was lower for lizards living in warmed conditions, and the researchers found this had an impact on their survival chances. For full story, click here.

Study refutes findings behind challenge to Sierra Nevada forest restoration

By Brett Israel – Berkeley News – May 8, 2017
A study led by ecologists at UC Berkeley has found significant flaws in the research used to challenge the U.S. Forest Service plan to restore Sierra Nevada forests to less dense, and less fire-prone, environments. Until recently, the consensus among forest ecologists was that before European settlers arrived in the Sierra, the forests were mostly open conifer forests dominated by big trees and low-to-moderately severe fires every eight to 12 years. The Forest Service recently released a plan to restore the range’s forests back to this state following decades of fire suppression and timber harvesting regulations, which have created dense, fire-prone forests. For full story, click here.

Scottish badgers highlight the complexity of species responses to environmental change

Uppsala Universitet – May 8, 2017
In a new study researchers have found that although warmer weather should benefit badger populations, the predicted human population increase in the Scottish highlands is likely to disturb badgers and counteract that effect. These results emphasize the importance of interactive effects and context-dependent responses when planning conservation management under human-induced rapid environmental change. For full press release, click here.

Humpbacks are washing up on the Atlantic Coast, but why?

By Jacqueline L. Urgo – Philly.com – May 8, 2017
Humpback whales — no longer considered an endangered species — have recovered from near extinction over the last 40 years, with a current population that numbers as many as 80,000 worldwide. But scientists are baffled about certain humpback behaviors over the last 16 months around the globe, including a spike in dead humpbacks washing up on beaches from Maine to North Carolina. For full story, click here.

‘We all knew this was coming’: Alaska’s thawing soils are now pouring carbon dioxide into the air

By Chris Mooney – The Washington, Post – May 8, 2017
Even as the Trump administration weighs withdrawing the United States from the Paris climate agreement, a new scientific paper has documented growing fluxes of greenhouse gases streaming into the air from the Alaskan tundra, a long-feared occurrence that could worsen climate change. The new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests that frozen northern soils — often called permafrost — are unleashing an increasing amount of carbon dioxide into the air as they thaw in summer or subsequently fail to refreeze as they once did, particularly in late fall and early winter. For full story, click here.

It's time to make soil great again

By David Montgomery – GreenBiz – May 6, 2017
Most of us don’t think much about soil, let alone its health. It’s time to recommend some skin care for Mother Nature. Restoring soil fertility is one of humanity’s best options for making progress on three daunting challenges: Feeding everyone, weathering climate change and conserving biodiversity. For full story, click here.

What’s the Average Methane Isotope Signature in Arctic Wetlands?

By Terri Cook – EOS – May 4, 2017
Although methane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas, the relative contributions of its various sources to the global budget are still poorly constrained. In wetlands, different metabolic and transport processes, as well as the variety and extent of vegetation, affect the rate at which methane is emitted as well as its isotopic composition. Although these processes are known to produce varied isotopic signatures on local scales, it is uncertain whether wetland emissions that reach the broader atmosphere have a more coherent signature. For full story, click here.

Human noise in US parks threatens wildlife

By Sarah McQuate – Nature – May 4, 20 17
Tourists who visit national parks and other protected areas in the United States hope to gain a respite from the sights and sounds of their everyday lives. But evading human soundscapes isn’t easy. Many protected areas are surprisingly noisy, a new study finds, and that can interfere with more than just the peace and quiet visitors seek. Noise generated by humans — including that from development activities, traffic and the extraction of natural resources — threaten the survival of plant and animal species across the country1, researchers report on 4 May in Science. “I was frankly shocked to learn how noisy humans have made some of the most remote places on the continent,” says Charlie Zender, an atmospheric physicist at the University of California, Irvine, who was not involved in the research. For full story, click here.

Mangroves optimized: How to make coastal habitats sequester even more carbon

By Brandon Keim – Anthropocene Magazine – May 3, 2017
Of all the carbon buried in the floors of Earth’s oceans, most of it is found in the narrow strip of tidal marshes, seagrass beds, and mangroves along their edge. Known as blue carbon ecosystems, these vegetated coastal habitats “occupy only 0.2% of the ocean surface, yet contribute 50% of the total amount of carbon buried in marine sediments,” write researchers, led by Deakin University ecologist Peter Macreadie, in the journal Frontiers in Ecology in the Environment. Meter for meter, they’re some of the most effective carbon storage systems we have. But could people make them even more effective? For full article, click here.

Sea level rise is on the rise

By Sarah DeWeerdt – Anthropocene Magazine – May 2, 2017
Global sea level is rising faster now than it was in the 1990s, according to a mammoth analysis of 26 different data sets, published last month in Geophysical Research Letters. The study uses a ‘sea level budget’ approach, which places the mass of the oceans in the context of the entire hydrological cycle. The amount of water on Earth is constant, so the sum of changes in all forms of water—chiefly oceans, glaciers, the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, terrestrial liquid water such as lakes and rivers, atmospheric water vapor, and snowpack—should be zero. For full article, click here.

WCS STUDY: Some – But Not All – Corals Adapting to Warming Climate

Media Contact: Stephen Sautner and John Delaney – WCS Newsroom – May 2, 2017
A new WCS study reveals evidence that some corals are adapting to warming ocean waters – potentially good news in the face of recent reports of global coral die offs due to extreme warm temperatures in 2016. The study appears in the latest issue of Marine Ecology Progress Series. The study looked at responses to extreme temperature exposures in the same reefs over time, and found less coral bleaching in 11 of the 21 coral species studied. WCS Senior Conservation Zoologist, Tim McClanahan, who has been studying coral responses to climate change since the extreme temperatures of the1998 El Nino, authored the study. For full news release, click here.  

Plants can hear water. Could noise pollution interfere?

By Brandon Keim – Anthropocene– April 26, 2017
There’s a transformation underway in how people think about plants: not just as inanimate biological objects, but as capable of perceptions and actions that resemble the intelligent behaviors of animals. Studies have described plants communicating with each other, using light and scent to see and hear, even appearing to remember weather patterns or being eaten. The latest addition to this blooming area of literature: plants can detect the sound of water and use it to guide the growth of their roots. For full article, click here. 

A better way to predict the environmental impacts of agricultural production

Phys.org – April 21, 2017
Consumer goods companies often rely on life-cycle assessments (LCA) to figure out the potential consequences of how they design products and source ingredients. This kind of assessment, while sophisticated, often lacks detail about how the products affect natural resources such as land, water and biodiversity. A team of researchers from Stanford University and the University of Minnesota, in a partnership called the Natural Capital Project, along with researchers from Unilever's Safety and Environmental Assurance Centre, developed a new kind of assessment to integrate these impacts in a more detailed way. They call it Land Use Change Improved Life Cycle Assessment, or LUCI-LCA. It's designed to help researchers or companies more accurately predict impacts of new designs and sourcing. For full story, click here. 

Biologist tracks climate change drivers from as far back as medieval era

By Devin Henry – The Hill – April 19, 2017
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on Wednesday said it would begin a review of an Obama administration rule limiting methane emissions at oil and gas drilling sites. EPA’s action — the first step in the lengthy process of undoing the methane rule — was a component of the energy executive order President Trump signed in March. It comes after oil and gas industry objections to Obama’s methane regulations, which drillers said were duplicative, harmful to companies and unnecessary, given industry-driven efforts to reduce methane emissions on its own. For full story, click here.

Non-native weatherfish are discovered in Roxana Marsh in northwest Indiana

By Abigail Bobrow – Sea Grant – April 17, 2017
Weatherfish, known in scientific circles as Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, were spotted in the recently restored Indiana wetland, Roxana Marsh, by researchers from the University of Notre Dame. PhD candidate Katherine O’Reilly, who led the team that confirmed the weatherfish finding, was at the marsh in 2015 for an IISG-funded project evaluating how coastal wetlands around Lake Michigan support the nearshore lake food webs. “The main goal of the project is to figure out how fish moving between these habitats might be moving energy,” O’Reilly said. “You might have fish moving out to the nearshore and becoming prey for larger sport fish. That moves food, energy, and nutrients from these highly productive coastal wetland systems to the less productive lake habitat.” For full story, click here.

Can Seaweed Farming Play a Role in Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation?

Carlos M. Duarte, Jiaping Wu, Xi Xiao, Annette Bruhn, and Dorte Krause-Jensen – Frontiers – April 12, 2017
Seaweed aquaculture, the fastest-growing component of global food production, offers a slate of opportunities to mitigate, and adapt to climate change. Seaweed farms release carbon that may be buried in sediments or exported to the deep sea, therefore acting as a CO2 sink. The crop can also be used, in total or in part, for biofuel production, with a potential CO2 mitigation capacity, in terms of avoided emissions from fossil fuels, of about 1,500 tons CO2 km−2 year−1. Seaweed aquaculture can also help reduce the emissions from agriculture, by improving soil quality substituting synthetic fertilizer and when included in cattle feed, lowering methane emissions from cattle. Seaweed aquaculture contributes to climate change adaptation by damping wave energy and protecting shorelines, and by elevating pH and supplying oxygen to the waters, thereby locally reducing the effects of ocean acidification and de-oxygenation. The scope to expand seaweed aquaculture is, however, limited by the availability of suitable areas and competition for suitable areas with other uses, engineering systems capable of coping with rough conditions offshore, and increasing market demand for seaweed products, among other factors. Despite these limitations, seaweed farming practices can be optimized to maximize climate benefits, which may, if economically compensated, improve the income of seaweed farmers. For full article, click here.

 

 

 

Developing Wetland Restoration Priorities for Climate Risk Reduction and Resilience in the MARCO Region

By James McElfish, Rebecca Kihslinger and Jessye Waxman – Environmental Law Institute – December 2016
Working with New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia — the five members of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean (MARCO) — the Environmental Law Institute prepared a detailed assessment of methods to identify, conserve, and restore wetlands for protection of communities and ecosystems in the face of rapid climate change. To read more and download this report, click here.

Stream Mitigation: Science, Policy, and Practice

Environmental Law Institute, Stream Mechanics, The Nature Conservancy – 2016
ELI, Stream Mechanics, and The Nature Conservancy (TNC) have partnered to provide a wide-ranging view of the state of stream compensatory mitigation. This report examines how stream compensatory mitigation has evolved in policy and practice and was based on a series of white papers, which can be found on the State of Stream Compensatory Mitigation page. To read more and download this report, click here.

Floodplain Buyouts: An Action Guide for Local Governments on How to Maximize Community Benefits, Habitat Connectivity, and Resilience

Environmental Law Institute, University of North Carolina Institute for the Environment – April 2017
This Action Guide is designed to help local governments across the country leverage hazard mitigation buyouts to protect, restore, and connect habitats in local communities. Greatly informed by the information gathered through in-depth case studies and conversations with key players in local buyout programs, the Guide highlights management approaches that will be useful and practicable for the local officials and managers who have the ability to target their acquisitions in ways that improve habitat connectivity and resilience while also reducing flood hazards. To read more and to download this guide, click here.

Reaching Higher Ground: Tools for Communities Displaced by Climate Change

By Maxine Burkett, Robert R.M. Verchick, and David Flores – Center for Progressive Reform – May 2017
Politicians may be able to get away with ignoring climate change for a time, but the millions of people whose lives are being reshaped right now by the creeping realities of sea-level rise, more frequent and more violent storms, and other impacts do not have that luxury. Some will need to move, and often entire communities will be uprooted as a result. Indeed, in the United States, such relocations are already under way. To read more and download the report, Reaching Higher Ground: Avenues to Secure and Manage New Land for Communities Displaced by Climate Change, click here.

Report: Private Capital for Working Lands Conservation

By Leigh Whelpton and Andrea Ferri – Conservation Finance Network – April 4, 2017
The purpose of this new report from Conservation Finance Network is to showcase how environ¬mental markets do not emerge in a fully functional state but are built incrementally. It also shows how public, private and philanthropic groups each have unique roles to play in con¬tributing to this market development over time. To read more and to download the report, Private Capital for Working Lands Conservation, click here.


 

 

 

Big Pharma’s Pollution is Creating Deadly Superbugs While the World Looks the Other Way

The Bureau of Investigative Journalism – May 6, 2017
Industrial pollution from Indian pharmaceutical companies making medicines for nearly all the world’s major drug companies is fueling the creation of deadly superbugs, suggests new research. Global health authorities have no regulations in place to stop this from happening. For full story, click here.

Effort to clean up ocean plastic to begin in 12 months, years ahead of schedule

ABC News – May 11, 2017 – Video
A Dutch foundation dedicated to removing plastic pollution from the world’s oceans announced a new system design today that will allow them to begin an ambitious cleanup plan in the next 12 months, two years ahead of schedule. The Ocean Cleanup said today its new system features an anchor that does not attach to the ocean seabed, instead floating with the ocean currents. The anchor is deep enough to keep the system moving slower than the plastic that floats on the ocean's surface. The system can then catch plastic inside its barrier. For full story and to view video, click here.

What broke the Safe Drinking Water Act?

By Anne Snider – Politico – May 10, 2017
It was 1997 when Californians began to worry in earnest about a chemical called perchlorate. For decades, the ingredient in rocket fuel had been seeping from missile factories and testing sites into groundwater across the state and, thanks to a new testing method, it was suddenly clear it had reached hundreds of drinking water wells. Soon, researchers discovered that the toxic chemical had reached Lake Mead, the picturesque reservoir that supplies water to 25 million people in the American Southwest and irrigates the fields that grow the lion’s share of the nation’s winter produce. For full story, click here.

How a Professional Climate Change Denier Discovered the Lies and Decided to Fight for Science

By Sharon Lerner – The Intercept – April 28, 2017
The hardest part of reversing the warming of the planet may be convincing climate change skeptics of the need to do so. Although scientists who study the issue overwhelming agree that the earth is undergoing rapid and profound climate changes due to the burning of fossil fuels, a minority of the public remains stubbornly resistant to that fact. With temperatures rising and ice caps melting — and that small minority in control of both Congress and the White House — there seems no project more urgent than persuading climate deniers to reconsider their views. For full story, click here.

We would need 1.7 Earths to make our consumption sustainable

By Denise Lu – The Washington Post – May 4, 2017
President Trump has acted on his campaign promises to reverse Obama’s environmental policies and proposed a budget that would significantly slash the Environmental Protection Agency’s funding in an effort to take federal responsibility out of environmental regulations. More recently, White House officials have met to discuss whether the United States should leave the Paris climate agreement. For full story, click here. 

Life on the Keystone XL route: where opponents fear the ‘black snake’

The Guardian – May 2, 2017 – Videos
Our people call it the black snake because it is evil,” says Tressa Welch, as thunder clouds steamroll the blue sky over the plains of Wolf Point. “And like snakes they come out of nowhere; they slither and strike unknown.” She faces southwards where, a couple of miles away, forks of lightning crack over the Missouri river. The 2m acre Fort Peck Indian reservation straddles this winding water source, providing sustenance for the almost 7,000 Assiniboine and Sioux tribe members here and thousands of others throughout north-east Montana. It is the river that Welch and other Native American activists on the reserve say the Keystone XL oil pipeline – or the “black snake” – will corrupt. For full story and to view videos, click here.

 As a non-political scientist I don't march – until now

By Ilissa Ocko – EDF – April 25, 2017
Because I’m a scientist, politically-motivated public demonstrations are far outside of my comfort zone and actually against my nature. I left academia to pursue scientific research that informs climate-related decision-making, but working for a science-based organization that’s committed to scientific integrity remains a requirement of mine. I have a strong desire to remain apolitical and a commitment to follow the data where it takes me, regardless of the outcome. For full blog post, click here.

A Hands-On Education in River Restoration

Walton Family Foundation Blog – April 24, 2017
Sarah Henry, a teacher at the Paradox Valley Charter School in the small town of Bedrock, Colorado, knows how important the health of the nearby Dolores River is to the local community. The Dolores, a 240-mile-long tributary of the Colorado River, supplies water to irrigate agricultural crops, support ranching operations and is a destination for fly fishers, rafters, campers and hikers. It’s also under siege by invasive tamarisk trees, a thirsty species that spreads along the riverbank, sucking up precious water and choking off access to the river for recreation. For full blog post, click here.

Why Rust Belt States Are Tackling Methane When Trump Won't

By Dan Grossman – Forbes – March 23, 2017
Nobody raises an eyebrow when California takes steps to rein in air pollution – but what’s going on when conservative-leaning rust belt states such as Ohio and Pennsylvania are doing the same? At a time when the Trump administration and Congress seek to scale back federal rules targeting methane emissions from energy production, a growing number of states that swung in favor of Trump in 2016 are heading in the opposite direction. For full story, click here.

 

 

 

WEBINARS

   

MEETINGS

 

TRAINING

 

SPECIAL EVENTS

 
WEBINARS
       
MAY 2017
       
May 18, 2017
1:00 p.m. EDT
  The Swamp School: Wetland Plant Identification Webinar: Sedges, Grasses and Rushes of the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic  
       
May 18, 2017
3:00 p.m. EDT
  Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance (NFFA) Webinar: The Naturally Resilient Communities Project: Siting Guide and Case Studies for the Mainstreaming of Natural Infrastructure to Address Coastal and Riverine Flooding  
       
May 23, 2017
2:00 p.m. EDT
  EPA’s Water Infrastructure and Resiliency Finance Center is hosting a stormwater finance webinar series in collaboration with the Water Environment Federation. Washington DC’s Stormwater Retention Credit Program Webinar  
       
May 30, 2017
TBD
  EPA Webinar: Water Systems Partnerships  
       
May 30, 2017
3:00 p.m. EDT
  Association of State Wetland Managers Hot Topics Webinar: Successfully Attracting Local People into Wetland Sites  
       
MORE MAY WEBINARS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
JUNE 2017
       
June 1 and 8, 2017
2:00 p.m. EDT
  Forester University Live Webinar: Stream Restoration Basics & Techniques  
       
June 3, 2017
2:00 p.m. EDT
  Webinar: Improving Soil Health on Urban Farms   
       
June 14, 2017
1:00 p.m. EDT
  Creating an 'American Nile': Policy, Engineering, and Recreation in the Colorado River Basin & Abroad
 
       
June 21, 2017
1:00 p.m. EDT
  Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Making Urban Tress Count  
       
June 21, 2017
2:00 p.m. EDT
  Network or Landscape Conservation Webinar: Scaling Up: Conservation, Wetland, and NPS Banking  
       
MORE JUNE WEBINARS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
MEETINGS
 
MAY 2017
       
May 20-25, 2017
Makuhari Messe
Chiba, Japan
  Japan Geoscience Union-American Geophysical Union (JpGU-AGU) Joint Meeting  
       
May 21-25, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  Environmental & Water Resources Institute of ASCE: World Environmental & Water Resources Congress  
       
May 23-24, 2017
Stockholm, Sweden
  Stockholm Environment Institute Workshop: Emerging Complexity of Climate Adaptation Governance in a Globalizing World
 
       
May 29-June 2, 2017
Cancun, Mexico
  International Water Resources Association: World Water Congresses: Bridging Science and Policy  
       
May 31–June 1, 2017
Champaign, IL
  The Illinois Sustainable Technology Center (ISTC), a division of the Prairie Research Institute at the University of Illinois, and Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant: Emerging Contaminants in the Aquatic Environment Conference
 
       
May 31-June 2, 2017
Detroit, MI
  Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Green Infrastructure Conference: Integrated Stormwater Management from Duluth to Quebec  
       
May 31-June 3, 2017
Browns Summit, NC
  4th Symposium on Urbanization and Stream Ecology: Making urban stream rehabilitation a co-evolutionary process  
       
MORE MAY MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
JUNE 2017
       
June 1-2, 2017
Seattle, WA
  Law Seminars International Fourth Annual Conference: Tribal Water in the Pacific Northwest   
       
June 4-9, 2017
Raleigh, NC
  Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting: Designing Our Freshwater Futures
 
       
June 5-8, 2017
Olympic Valley, CA
  National Hydrologic Warning Council 2017 Conference  
       
June 5-8, 2017
San Juan, Puerto Rico
  Society of Wetland Scientists’ 2017 Annual Meeting: Celebrating Wetland Diversity Across the Landscape: Mountains to Mangroves
 
       
June 8, 2017
Reisterstown, MD
  2017 Maryland Land Conservation Conference  
       
June 11-14, 2017
Philadelphia PA
  American Water Works Association Annual Conference & Exposition: Uniting The World Of Water  
       
June 12-14, 2017
Binghamton, NY
  New York State Floodplain and Stormwater Managers Association 017 An2nual Meeting   
       
June 12-16, 2017
Boulder, CO
  Computational & Information Systems Lab: 4th Annual Graduate Workshop on Environmental Data Analytics  
       
June 13-15, 2017
Colorado State University
Fort Collins, CO
  2017 UCOWR/NIWR Conference: Water in a Changing Environment  
       
June 14-16, 2017
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative: 2017 Annual Meeting  
       
June 15-16, 2017
San Antonio, TX
  Land Trust Alliance: Sixth Symposium on Advanced Legal Topics in Land Conservation  
       
June 16-18, 2017
Hangzhou, China
  3rd Conference on Soil and Water Conservation & Ecological Restoration  
       
June 18-21, 2017
Duluth, MN
  9th International Charr Symposium
 
       
June 19-21, 2017
Oregon State University
Corvallis, Oregon
  International Conference: Engineering and Ecohydraulics for Fish Passage  
       
June 19-22, 2017
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
  University of Alberta: 11th North American Forest Ecology Workshop  
       
June 20-22, 2017
Kamloops, BC
  Thompson Rivers University (TRU) and the Invasive Species Council of BC (ISCBC): Invasive Species Research Conference - Turning Science into Action at TRU  
       
June 22, 2017
Traverse City, MI
  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District Forum: Corps’ Regulatory Program  
       
June 23-27, 2017
Portland, OR
  American Society of Naturalists, the Society for the Study of Evolution, and the Society of Systematic Biologists: Evolution 2017  
       
June 25-28, 2017
Tysons, VA
  2017 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: Climate Change Solutions: Collaborative Science, Policy and Planning for Sustainable Water Management
 
       
June 27-29, 2017
New Orleans LA
  US Water Alliance: One Water Summit 2017  
       
MORE JUNE MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
JULY 2017
       
July 9-13, 2017
Worcester, MA
 

North American Echinoderm Conference

 
 
       
July 10-14, 2017
New York, NY
  World Climate Research Program: Regional Sea Level Changes and Coastal Impacts Conference  
       
July 11, 2017
Davis, CA
  Sharing Technical and Scientific Knowledge About Extreme Precipitation  
       
July 18-19, 2017
Santa Fe, NM
  Law Seminars International 2017 Santa Fe Advanced Natural Resource Damages Conference  
       
July 21-24, 2017
Franklin County, OH
  National Association of Counties: 2017 Annual Conference
 
       
July 23-27, 2017
Long Beach, CA
  Hosted by International Water Association: 11th IWA International Conference on Water Reclamation and Reuse   
       
July 25-27, 2017
University of Alabama
Tuscaloosa, A
  CUAHSI 2017 Conference: Hydroinformatics: Swimming in Data without Drowning in the Deluge  
       
July 25-27, 2017
Duluth, MN
  Michigan Technological University workshop: Science and Management of Ash Forests after Emerald Ash Borer
 
       
MORE JULY MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
AUGUST 2017
       
August 1- 2, 2017
Juniata College
Huntingdon, PA
  Mid-Atlantic Invasive Plant Council: Invasion Biology: Paths to Conservation and Restoration Success   
       
August 6-11, 2017
Portland, OR
  2017 ESA Annual Meeting: Linking biodiversity, material cycling and ecosystem services in a changing world
 
       
August 8–11, 2017
Puerto Iguazú,
Misiones, Argentina
  Ornithological Congress of the Americas  
       
August 14-17, 2017
Iselin, NJ
  Association of State Floodplain Managers: The National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop
 
       
August 20-23, 2017
Bergen, Norway
  3rd International Workshop on Trait-based Approaches to Ocean Life  
       
August 20-23, 2017
Tampla, FL
  American Fisheries Society 147th Annual Meeting: Fisheries Ecosystems: Uplands to Oceans  
       
August 21-25, 2017
Beijing, China
  12th International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL 2017 Beijing): Ecology and Civilization in a Changing World
 
       
August 22-26, 2017
Big Sky, MT
  7th International Symposium: Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control (WETPOL)  
       
August 24-26, 2017
Corum, Montpellier, France
  Biodiversity and Ecosystem Scenarios Network (ScenNet): Scenarios and Models of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Support of Decision Making  
       
August 27-September 1, 2017
Stockholm, Sweden
  SIWI World Water Week: Water and Waste: Reduce and Reuse’  
       
MORE AUGUST MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
SEPTEMBER 2017
       
September 5-7, 2017
University of Leeds, UK
  7th International Conference on Flood Management (ICFM7)  
       
September 5-8, 2017
Long Beach, CA
  Floodplain Management Association Annual Conference: Creating Partnerships through Integration: Water, Environment, People  
       
September 16-17, 2017
Toonton, Candad
  Sixth International Conference: Climate Change Adaptation 2017 (CCA 2017). Abstracts due by April 30, 2017.  
       
September 20-22, 2017
Baltimore, MD
  Rhode Island Resource Institute: 8th Mid-Atlantic Stream Restoration Conference  
       
September 23-27, 2017
Albuquerque, NM
  Wildlife Society 24th Annual Conference  
       
September 28-29, 2017
Budapest, Hungary
  1st International Conference on Community Ecology (ComEc)  
       
MORE SEPTEMBER MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
OCTOBER 2017
       
October 10-12, 2017
Collins, CO
  Natural Areas Association: Natural Areas Conference

 
       
October 11-13, 2017
American Museum of Natural History
New York, NY
  Center for Biodiversity and Conservation and its partners: 2017 Student Conference on Conservation Science  
       
October 12-13, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  2017 Mid-Atlantic Water Resources Conference: Water Research: Building Knowledge and Innovative Solutions  
       
October 14, 2017
Westerville, OH
  Ohio Wetlands Association Science Summit: Working Wetlands for Water Quality  
       
October 17-19, 2017
University of California, Davis
  California Department of Water Resources, Urban Streams Restoration Program, Riparian Habitat Joint Venture: 2017 Riparian Summit - Confluence to Influence  
       
October 19-21, 2017
University of Oklahoma
  4th Life Discovery – Doing Science Biology Education Conference  
       
October 19-21, 2017
Rome, Italy
  4th World Conference on Climate Change: Today's Progress and Tomorrow's Climate Challenges  
       
October 24-26, 2017
Atlantic City, NJ
  2017 NJAFM Annual Conference  
       
October 25-27, 2017
Boyne Falls, MI
  Michigan Aquatic Restoration Conference  
       
October 26-28, 2017
Denver, CO
  Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2017 National Land Conservation Conference  
       
MORE OCTOBER MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
NOVEMBER 2017
       
November 5-9, 2017
Portland, OR
  2017 AWRA Annual Conference  
       
November 5-9, 2017
Providence, RI
  Coastal Estuarine Research Federation (CERF) Conference: Coastal Science at the Inflection Point: Celebrating Successes & Learning from Challenges   
       
November 6-9, 2017
Green Bay, WI
  International Association for Great Lakes Research: State of Lake Michigan Conference  
       
November 8-9, 2017
Manhattan, KS
  Kansas Water Office Governor's Conference: Future of Water in Kansas  
       
MORE NOVEMBER MEETINGS CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
TRAINING
       
MAY 2017
       
May 21-27, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Crustose Lichens of the Acadian Forest  
       
May 21-27, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Undergraduate Field Studies: Marine Intertidal Community Ecology  
       
May 22-23, 2017
Omaha/Lincoln, NE
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum – 2017  
       
May 22-23, 2017
State College, PA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Advanced Hydric Soils – 2017  
       
May 22-24, 2017
San Luis National Wildlife Refuge
Los Basos, CA
  Wetland Management and Educational Services, Inc. Workshop: Waterfowl Ecology & Management (short course); $525/person  
       
May 22-25, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Climate Change Vulnerability Assessments  
       
May 22-26, 2017
Moss Point, MS
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Advanced Plant ID: Grasses, Sedges, Rushes and Composites  
       
May 22-26, 2017
Charleston, SC
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Basic Wetland Delineation. The course will also be held on October 2 - 6, 2017 in Atlanta, GA.  
       
May 22-27, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Grasses (Poaceae) of the Southern Appalachians  
       
May 23, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Principle of Green Chemistry  
       
May 23-24, 2017
McClellan, CA
  Floodplain Management Association: Stormwater BMPs Workshop  
       
May 23-26, 2017
Hays, KS 
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Graminoid Identification for Wetlands and Wetland Delineators   
       
May 23-26, 2017
Gray Summit, MO
  Institute of Botanical Training: Wetland Flora Workshop  
       
May 24-25, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Chemicals and Product Stewardship  
       
May 25, 2017
Tacoma, WA
  Washington Department of Ecology: Coastal Training Program Course: Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration  
       
May 25-26, 2017
Lake Ariel, PA
  Lacawac Sanctuary and Biological Field Station Workshop: Ecological Functional Genomics  
       
May 28-June 3, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Microlepidoptera: Collection, Preparation, Dissection, Identification, and Natural History  
       
May 28-June 3, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Drawing and Painting Birds in Watercolor and Colored Pencil  
       
May 28-June 3, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: A-B-C's of Birding: Introduction to Coastal Maine Bird Identification  
       
May 29-June 3, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Biology & Identification of Ferns  
       
May 29-June 16, 2017
Chauvin, LA
  Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium's (LUMCON) Summer Course: Coastal Biogeochemistry  
       
May 30-June 2, 2017
Little Rock, AR
  Institute of Botanical Training: Wetland Flora Workshop  
       
MORE MAY TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
JUNE 2017
       
June 1-2, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Urban Planning and Design Studio  
       
June 1-2, 2017
Denver, CO
  Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Stormwater Detention System Design  
       
June 2, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Understanding the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta: An Overview of Delta Governance and Regulation  
       
June 4-10, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Undergraduate Field Studies: Introduction to Bryophytes and Lichens  
       
June 4-10, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Undergraduate Field Studies – Natural History of Freshwater Fishes  
       
June 5-10, 2017
Poolesville, MD
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation with Emphasis on Soils and Hydrology  
       
June 5-10, 2017
Houghton, MI
  Isle Royale National Park: Plant I.D. Workshop  
       
June 5-17, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Flora of the Blue Ridge  
       
June 7, 2017
Padilla Bay Reserve
Mt. Vernon, WA
  Washington Department of Ecology: Coastal Training Program Course: How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
 
       
June 7, 2017
Online
  UC Davis Extension Online Course: NEPA Case Law and Policy Update  
       
June 7-9, 2017
San Diego, CA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Coastal Southern California  
       
June 8, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Endangered Species Regulation and Protection  
       
June 9, 2017
Sacramento, CA 
  UC Davis Extension Course: Sustainability Through Native American Stewardship  
       
June 9, 2017
Sacramento, CA 
  UC Davis Extension Course: Understanding the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta: An Overview of Delta Governance and Regulation  
       
June 11-17, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Mosses: Structure, Ecology, and Identification  
       
June 11-17, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Systematics, Biology, and Ecology of Important Lotic and Lentic Aquatic Insects: Mayflies, Stoneflies, Caddisflies, Odonata, and Coleoptera, and Identification  
       
June 12-13, 2017
Denver, CO
  EUCI Course: Endangered Species Act, Wetlands, Stormwater & Floodplain Regulatory Compliance for Energy and Utilities  
       
June 12-24, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: General Ecology  
       
June 13-16, 2017
Indianapolis, IN
  Institute of Botanical Training: Wetlands and Weeds Workshop
 
       
June 14-16, 2017
St. Louis University
St. Louis, MO
  National Science Foundation and Saint Louis University: GIS Applications in Aquatic Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Workshop  
       
June 18-24, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Bogs and Fens: Maine Peatlands  
       
June 18-24, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Exploring Medicinal Plants of Maine (and Beyond)  
       
June 19, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: WOW! The Wonders of Wetlands  
       
June 19-23, 2017
Willows, CA
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Wetland Assessment, Restoration and Management. This course will also be held on August 21-25, 2017 in Alexandria Bay NY.  
       
June 19-23, 2017
Indianapolis, IN
  Institute of Botanical Training: Plants of the Upper Midwest
 
       
June 19-23, 2017
Bellingham, WA
  Pacific Ecological Consultants, LLC, Western Washington University Course: Wetland Identification & Delineation
 
       
June 20-21, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Wetlands: Science and Regulatory Management  
       
June 20-23, 2017
State College, PA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Planning Hydrology, Vegetation, and Soils for Constructed Wetlands  
       
June 21, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Land Use and Environmental Planning in the Era of Climate Change  
       
June 21-22, 2017
Williamsport, PA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
June 22-23, 2017
Denver, CO
  Urban Watersheds Research Institute Class: Watershed Modeling Using CUHP-SWMM  
       
June 23, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetland Plant ID: Know ‘Em and Grow ‘Em  
       
June 25-July 1, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Liverworts and Liverwort Ecology  
       
June 25-July 1, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Moths and Butterflies: Identification, Specimen Preparation, and Taxonomy  
       
June 26-27. 2017
Anchorage, AK
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum – 2017
 
       
June 26-30, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Endangered Species Recovery Planning and Implementation  
       
June 26-30, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  Conservation Leadership Network Training Course: Mitigation Banking & In-Lieu Fee Program Interagency Review Teams  
       
June 26-July 7, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Conservation Ecology  
       
June 26-July 8, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Conservation Biology in the Field  
       
June 26-July 20, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Field Ecology  
       
June 26-July 21, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Seminars in Ecology and Resource Management  
       
June 28, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Development Agreements, Public-Private Partnerships and Redevelopment 2.0  
       
June 28-29, 2017
Anchorage, AK
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Advanced Hydric Soils – 2017  
       
MORE JUNE TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
JULY 2017
       
July 2-8, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Lichens and Lichen Ecology  
       
July 2-8, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Sedges and Rushes: Identification and Ecology  
       
July 2-8, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Dragonflies and Damselflies: Field Techniques and Identification  
       
July 6-19, 2017
Socorro, NM
  New Mexico Tech: Summer Field Hydrology Course  
       
July 9-15, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Native Bees as Pollinators: Diversity, Ecology, Conservation, and Habitat Enhancement  
       
July 9-15, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Finding Words in Nature: Creative Writing for Aspiring Authors ... Study Retreat  
       
July 9-15, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Nature Journaling: Black and White Illustration Techniques  
       
July 10-13, 2017
Pittsburgh, PA
  The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design  
       
July 10-14, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Workshop: Gardening with Native Plants in Highlands  
       
July 10-21, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Landscape Ecology  
       
July 10-21, 2017
Santa Barbara, CA
  National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis Training: Open Science for Synthesis: Gulf Research Program  
       
July 11, 2017
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Endangered Species Act Overview  
       
July 12, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Special Status Amphibians and Reptiles of Northern California   
       
July 12-13, 2017
Laramine, WY
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
July 12-14, 2017
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Problematic Delineation Seminar  
       
July 13, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Wetlands Regulation and Mitigation  
       
July 15, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: An Introduction to Living Shorelines
 
       
July 16-22, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Boletes and Other Fungi of New England  
       
July 16-22, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Survey of Grasses: Their Structure, Identification, and Ecology  
       
July 17-18, 2017
Denver, CO
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Advanced Hydric Soils – 2017  
       
July 17-21, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Restoration Policy, Planning, and Partnering  
       
July 17-21, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Wetland Plant Identification  
       
July 17-29, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Introduction to Southern Appalachian Fungi  
       
July 18-20, 2017
Raleigh, NC
  North Carolina University Stream Restoration Program River Course: 302 HEC-RAS for Stream Restoration  
       
July 23-28, 2017
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI
  Course: Making Meaning through Modeling: Problem solving in Biology  
       
July 23-29, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Wetlands Identification, Delineation, and Ecology  
       
July 23-29, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Spiders: Identification, Biology, and Ecology  
       
July 23-29, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Lichens, Biofilms, and Stone  
       
July 24-August 4, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Stream Ecology  
       
July 24-August 4, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Alpine Ecology  
       
July 24-August 5, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Forest Ecosystems of the Southern Appalachians  
       
July 25-27, 2017
Copper Harbor, MI
  Isle Royale & Keweenaw Parks Association: Keweenaw Plant I.D. Workshop  
       
July 25-28, 2017
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Wetland Delineators  
       
July 27, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: BMP Options for Stormwater Runoff  
       
July 30-August 5, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Mushroom Identification for New Mycophiles: Foraging for Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms  
       
July 30-August 5, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Art and Science of Photographing Insects and their Kin  
       
July 31-August 4, 2017
Loga, UT


  Utah State University, S.J. & Jessie E. Quinney College of Natural Resources Course: Sediment Transport in Stream Assessment and Design  
       
July 31-August 12, 201
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Southern Appalachian Mayflies, Stoneflies, & Caddisflies  
       
MORE JULY TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
AUGUST 2017
       
August 1-2, 2017
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Advanced Hydric Soils – 2017  
       
August 2-3, 2017
Davis, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: GIS for Watershed Analysis: Intermediate  
       
August 6-12, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Submersed and Floating Aquatic Plants  
       
August 6-12, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Independent Studies: Interesting and Challenging Saxicolous Lichens of North America  
       
August 7-8, 2017
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Hydrophytic Vegetation (Coastal Plain or Piedmont)  
       
August 7-11, 2017
Sagehen Field Station near
Lake Tahoe, CA
  UC Berkeley Course: Geomorphic & Ecological Fundamentals of River & Stream Restoration  
       
August 7-11, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  The Conservation Fund: Conservation Banking Training Course  
       
August 7-11, 2017
Shepherdstown, WV
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Conservation Biology of Freshwater Mussels  
       
August 7-12, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Course: Wetland Plant Communities  
       
August 7-18, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Ecology of Forests and Grasslands  
       
August 7-18, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Drone Remote Sensing of Freshwater Ecosystems
 
       
August 7-18, 2017
Polson, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Course: Lake Ecology  
       
August 8, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Overview of Environmental Statistics  
       
August 9-11, 2017
Davis, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Using GIS to Manage, Analyze and Promote Sustainability  
       
August 13-19, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Field Botany and Plant Ecology of the Eastern Maine Coast  
       
August 14-17, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Grasses, Sedges and Rushes  
       
August 14-18, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Workshop: Mushrooms of the Carolinas  
       
August 14-20, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Tidal Marsh Restoration: A Traveling Course from Rhode Island to Maine  
       
August 15-18, 2017
Hays, KS
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Wetlands and Wetland Delineators  
       
August 17, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Planning and Mitigation on Tribal Lands  
       
August 20-26, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Identification, Biology, and Natural History of Ferns and Lycophytes  
       
August 20-26, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Banding/research Techniques for Studying Songbirds and Raptors  
       
August 21-22, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Evaluating Hydric Soils in the Field  
       
August 21-25, 2017
Alexandria Bay, NY
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Wetland Assessment, Restoration and Management  
       
August 24-25, 2017
Denver, CO
  Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Floodplain Delineation using 2D HEC RAS Model  
       
August 25, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Vested Rights, Vesting Maps and Development Agreements  
       
August 27-September 2, 2017
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Better Birding: Passerines and Seabirds for Advancing Birders  
       
August 28-29, 2017
Arlington, WA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
MORE AUGUST TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
SEPTEMBER 2017
       
September 6-7, 2017
Duck Creek Conservation Area
Puxico, MO
  Wetland Management and Educational Services, Inc. Workshop: Moist-soil Management for Biologists and Managers  
       
September 7-8, 2017
Whitefish, MT
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
June 9, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Understanding the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta: An Overview of Delta Governance and Regulation   
       
September 11-15, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
September 12-13, 2017
Charleston, SC
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes  
       
September 13-14, 2017
McNary National Wildlife Refuge
Burbank, WA
  Wetland Management and Educational Services, Inc. Workshop: Moist-Soil Management for Maintenance Staff
 
       
September 14-15, 2017
San Diego, CA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Riparian Habitat Restoration for the Arid Southwest  
       
September 18-19, 2017
Covington, LA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
September 14-15, 2017
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species  
       
September 19-20, 2017
Arlington, VA
  Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Wetlands: Science and Regulatory Management  
       
September 20-21, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Habitat Site Restoration  
       
September 21-22, 2017
Poolesville, MD
  Wwetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum - 2017  
       
September 28, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Exploring Wetland Wildlife  
       
MORE SEPTEMBER TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
OCTOBER 2017
       
October 2-5, 2017
Hilliard, OH
  MBI (Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Wetland Delineation  
       
October 2-6, 2017
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Basic Wetland Delineation  
       
October 9-13, 2017
Barcelona, Spain
  Transmitting Science, the Institut Catalá de Paleontologia Miquel, Crusafont and the Centre de Restauració i Interpretació Paleontològica Course: Comparative Approaches in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Science    
       
October 14-17, 2017
Iselin, NJ
  National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop  
       
October 18, 2017
Sacramento, CA
  UC Davis Extension Course: Planning Tools to Create Healthy Communities  
       
October 18-19, 2017
Richmond, VA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
October 18-19, 2017
Highlands, NC
  Highlands Biological Station Workshop: Tree Identification  
       
October 26, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Building Stream Buffers  
       
October 26-27, 2017
Denver, CO
  Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Stormwater Green Drainage Design Using EPA SWMM-LID  
       
MORE OCTOBER TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
NOVEMBER 2017
       
November 2-3, 2017
Charleston, SC
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum  
       
November 6-9, 2017
Columbus, OH
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: ACOE Wetland Delineation, Waters of the US and Regional Supplement Training  
       
November 7-9, 2017
Gainseville, FL
  CUAHSI and the University of Florida 3-day Training Workshop: Using In-Situ Water Quality Sensors - Lagrangian and Eulerian Applications  
       
November 8, 2017
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetland Pollinators  
       
November 13-14, 2017
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands, and Hydrology (Coastal Plain or Piedmont)  
       
MORE NOVEMBER TRAINING CAN BE FOUND ON THE ASWM CALENDAR
       
SPECIAL EVENTS
       
May   American Wetlands Month  
       
May 19, 2017   Endangered Species Day  
       
June 24, 2017
Rapids, MI
  2017 Grand River Water Festival  
       
September 12-16, 2017
Bloomfield Hills, NI
  Rouge River Water Festival  
       
September 23, 2017
Cape May, NJ
  Fall Migration Festival  
       
October 13-15, 2017
Houma, LA
  2017 Voice of Wetlands Festival  
       
For more wetland events, meetings, conferences, and courses nationwide, visit the ASWM calendar.
       

       
INDEX      


EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • Water Rule Rewrite: EPA Wants Governors' Input on Rewriting Waters of US Rule
  • Mississippi River cities: Feds should take climate change seriously
  • What Trump's executive orders in his first 100 days were actually about
  • Stephen Hawking now says humanity has only about 100 years to escape Earth
  • What happened when an industry-friendly EPA leader in the '80s went too far

NATIONAL NEWS

  • EPA science advisers resign 'in protest'
  • Dakota Access pipeline has first leak before it's fully operational
  • NRDC Sues EPA for Failing to Respond to Freedom of Information Act Requests
  • Tillerson, in Alaska, Gives No Hint on Paris Climate Accord
  • Bid to revoke Obama methane rule fails in surprise U.S. Senate vote
  • Bay report card shows slight improvement in bay and local waterways
  • As US, EU step back, climate talks could signal geopolitical shift
  • Tired of conflicts and lost heritage, indigenous leaders seek a bigger voice and role in the climate talks.
  • U.S. had 2nd wettest, 11th warmest April on record
  • Water Infrastructure Investment Gets Boost from EPA
  • Want Healthier Soil? Link it to Crop Insurance
  • EPA asks what rules to cut, gets earful about dirty water
  • 23 Environmental Rules Rolled Back in Trump’s First 100 Days
  • EPA removes climate change information from website
  • East coast braces for fresh climate fight as Trump eyes more offshore drilling
  • National Park Service considering wetland projects at local parks
  • States Move to Roll Back Environmental Rules in Trump’s Wake
  • Secretary Zinke Announces Boost to Wetland, Waterfowl Conservation, Access to Public Lands
  • Through Conservation Grants, Federal Duck Stamp Funds
  • 2017 Federal Budget Passed Without Huge Cuts to Research
  • Dakota Pipeline Is Ready for Oil, Without Spill Response Plan for Standing Rock
  • Congress Budget Deal Protects Water Programs
  • EPA dismisses half of its scientific advisers on key board, citing ‘clean break’ with Obama administration
  • Early skirmishes on Trump policies prefigure long legal war
  • Trump orders review of national monuments, vows to ‘end these abuses and return control to the people’
  • Trump EPA plots path to Scalia-inspired regulation

STATE NEWS

  • AK: Trump EPA reverses Obama block on controversial copper mine
  • CA: In Napa Valley, Vineyards and Conservationists Battle for the Hills
  • CA: Oroville Dam: What state’s forensics team has found in first analysis
  • CA: Cosumnes River Provides Model for Floodplain Restoration in California
  • CT: CT fires its first shots in battle with Trump over environment
  • FL: Oil exploration in Big Cypress wins approval
  • FL: Florida's building boom threatens wildlife-rich lagoon
  • FL: Gentrification fears grow as high ground becomes hot property
  • IL: Emanuel Recoups Climate Change Info Deleted From EPA Website
  • IL: Wetland Mitigation Sites Sought By IDOT
  • IA: The Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture Faces a Shut-Down
  • KY: Lawsuit Challenges Kentucky’s Weakened Coal Ash Regulations
  • LA: Governor declares La. coast in state of emergency
  • LA: 'Wetland Watchers Celebration' introduces new crop of students to outdoors
  • ME: Pesticide-friendly bill from LePage mirrors model by secretive national group
  • ME: New Report Documents Damage to Maine if Proposed EPA Budget Cuts are Approved
  • MD: Maryland prosecution of environmental crimes at 20-year low
  • MA: Environmentalists worry GE's move to Mass. could taint Housatonic cleanup plan
    MA: Mass. Water Resources Authority Will Continue Water Quality Monitoring of Massachusetts Bay
  • MA: Lesson on Vernal Pools Begins By Making One
  • MI: May offers good opportunities to visit Michigan wetlands
  • MI: Waterfowl Hunters Paying for Michigan’s Wetland Management and Restoration
  • MN: Minnesota beekeepers win a round against EPA on insecticide approval
  • MT: Montana dam, passage to save fish lacks funding
  • NY: Huge Victory: Natural Gas Storage Plan Halted at Seneca Lake
  • NY: ‘Dead Rivers, Closed Beaches’: A Water Crisis on Long Island
  • NY: DIPRA Adds Support to Gov. Cuomo’s New York State Water Infrastructure Bill
  • NY: Yorktown Town Board Rejects Changes to Wetland Ordinance
  • NC: N.C. said it still needs $929 million in aid for Hurricane Matthew. It got $6.1 million.
  • NC: NC GOP Protects Factory Farms’ Right to Pollute
  • ND: EPA signs off on North Dakota regulation of CO2 wells
  • OH: Dakota Pipeline Builder Under Fire for Ohio Spill: 8 Violations in 7 Weeks
  • OH: Ohio lawmakers add budget provision that could open state parks to fracking
  • PA: Hellbender proposed as official state amphibian
  • PA: Study: Cover crops on farm fields in Pennsylvania combat global warming
  • SC: A ‘Wetland Treasure’ is closer than you think: Take a tour
  • TX: Nearly 400 migratory birds die from striking Texas skyscraper
  • TX: House panel debates state parks funding
  • UT: Levels of Toxic Mercury in the Great Salt Lake Again
  • UT: Utah land swaps could foil a Trump bid to strip protection
  • VT: Vernon Wetland to Receive More Protection
  • VA: How 'draining the swamp' backfired spectacularly in Va.
  • VA: Protecting Natural Resources: 40 Years of the Virginia Environmental Endowment
  • VA: Lynchburg aims to improve water quality through stream restoration project
  • VA: Dominion reconsidering coal ash storage plans in VA
  • WA: Washington AG Pledges To Defend National Monuments
  • WA: Invasive green crabs found off Olympic Peninsula
  • WA: Conservationists guardedly optimistic about funding to restore forests, coasts and flood-prone areas
  • WI: In low-key rollout, DNR begins giving water to those with tainted wells
  • WI: Burnham Canal cleanup in Milwaukee will transform channel to wetland

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • The big melt: Glacier National Park is losing its glaciers
  • The Injustice of Atlantic City’s Floods
  • How much milkweed to save monarch? Only 1.8 billion new stems, study finds
  • New lobster fishing rules on the way amid warming waters
  • Earth could break through a major climate threshold in the next 15 years, scientists warn
  • Protected species in Gulf of Mexico could take decades to recover from Deepwater Horizon oil spill
  • Global warming kills gut bacteria in lizards
  • Study refutes findings behind challenge to Sierra Nevada forest restoration
  • Scottish badgers highlight the complexity of species responses to environmental change
  • Humpbacks are washing up on the Atlantic Coast, but why?
  • ‘We all knew this was coming’: Alaska’s thawing soils are now pouring carbon dioxide into the air
  • It's time to make soil great again
  • What’s the Average Methane Isotope Signature in Arctic Wetlands?
  • Human noise in US parks threatens wildlife
  • Mangroves optimized: How to make coastal habitats sequester even more carbon
  • Sea level rise is on the rise
  • WCS STUDY: Some – But Not All – Corals Adapting to Warming Climate
  • Plants can hear water. Could noise pollution interfere?
  • A better way to predict the environmental impacts of agricultural production
  • Biologist tracks climate change drivers from as far back as medieval era
  • Non-native weatherfish are discovered in Roxana Marsh in northwest Indiana
    Can Seaweed Farming Play a Role in Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation?

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • Developing Wetland Restoration Priorities for Climate Risk Reduction and Resilience in the MARCO Region
  • Stream Mitigation: Science, Policy, and Practice
  • Floodplain Buyouts: An Action Guide for Local Governments on How to Maximize Community Benefits, Habitat Connectivity, and Resilience
  • Reaching Higher Ground: Tools for Communities Displaced by Climate Change
  • Report: Private Capital for Working Lands Conservation

POTPOURRI

  • Big Pharma’s Pollution is Creating Deadly Superbugs While the World Looks the Other Way
  • Effort to clean up ocean plastic to begin in 12 months, years ahead of schedule
  • What broke the Safe Drinking Water Act?
  • How a Professional Climate Change Denier Discovered the Lies and Decided to Fight for Science
  • We would need 1.7 Earths to make our consumption sustainable
  • Life on the Keystone XL route: where opponents fear the ‘black snake’
  • As a non-political scientist I don't march – until now
  • A Hands-On Education in River Restoration
  • Why Rust Belt States Are Tackling Methane When Trump Won't

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

WEBINARS, MEETINGS, TRAINING

Webinars

  • The Swamp School: Wetland Plant Identification Webinar: Sedges, Grasses and Rushes of the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic
  • NFFA Webinar: The Naturally Resilient Communities Project: Siting Guide and Case Studies for the Mainstreaming of Natural Infrastructure to Address Coastal and Riverine Flooding
  • EPA Webinar: Washington DC’s Stormwater Retention Credit Program Webinar
  • EPA Webinar: Water Systems Partnerships
  • Association of State Wetland Mangers Hot Topics Webinar: Successfully Attracting Local People into Wetland Sites
  • Forester University Live Webinar: Stream Restoration Basics & Techniques
  • Webinar: Improving Soil Health on Urban Farms 
  • Creating an 'American Nile': Policy, Engineering, and Recreation in the Colorado River Basin & Abroad
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webinar: Making Urban Tress Count
  • Network or Landscape Conservation Webinar: Scaling Up: Conservation, Wetland, and NPS Banking

Meetings

  • Japan Geoscience Union-American Geophysical Union (JpGU-AGU) Joint Meeting
  • World Environmental & Water Resources Congress
  • Stockholm Environment Institute Workshop: Emerging Complexity of Climate Adaptation Governance in a Globalizing World
  • International Water Resources Association: World Water Congresses: Bridging Science and Policy
  • The Illinois Sustainable Technology Center: Emerging Contaminants in the Aquatic Environment Conference
  • Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Green Infrastructure Conference: Integrated Stormwater Management from Duluth to Quebec
  • 4th Symposium on Urbanization and Stream Ecology: Making urban stream rehabilitation a co-evolutionary process
  • Law Seminars International Fourth Annual Conference: Tribal Water in the Pacific Northwest
  • Society for Freshwater Science Annual Meeting: Designing Our Freshwater Futures
  • National Hydrologic Warning Council 2017 Conference
  • Society of Wetland Scientists’ 2017 Annual Meeting: Celebrating Wetland Diversity Across the Landscape: Mountains to Mangroves
  • 2017 Maryland Land Conservation Conference
  • American Water Works Association Annual Conference & Exposition: Uniting The World Of Water
  • New York State Floodplain and Stormwater Managers Association 2017 Annual Meeting
  • Computational & Information Systems Lab: 4th Annual Graduate Workshop on Environmental Data Analytics
  • 2017 UCOWR/NIWR Conference: Water in a Changing Environment
  • Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative: 2017 Annual Meeting
  • Land Trust Alliance: Sixth Symposium on Advanced Legal Topics in Land Conservation
  • 3rd Conference on Soil and Water Conservation & Ecological Restoration
  • 9th International Charr Symposium
  • International Conference: Engineering and Ecohydraulics for Fish Passage
  • University of Alberta: 11th North American Forest Ecology Workshop
  • Invasive Species Research Conference - Turning Science into Action at TRU
  • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Detroit District Forum: Corps’ Regulatory Program
  • American Society of Naturalists, the Society for the Study of Evolution, and the Society of Systematic Biologists: Evolution 2017
  • 2017 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: Climate Change Solutions: Collaborative Science, Policy and Planning for Sustainable Water Management
  • US Water Alliance: One Water Summit 2017
  • North American Echinoderm Conference
  • World Climate Research Program: Regional Sea Level Changes and Coastal Impacts Conference
  • Sharing Technical and Scientific Knowledge About Extreme Precipitation
  • Law Seminars International 2017 Santa Fe Advanced Natural Resource Damages Conference
  • National Association of Counties: 2017 Annual Conference
  • CUAHSI 2017 Conference: Hydroinformatics: Swimming in Data without Drowning in the Deluge
  • Michigan Technological University workshop: Science and Management of Ash Forests after Emerald Ash Borer
  • Mid-Atlantic Invasive Plant Council: Invasion Biology: Paths to Conservation and Restoration Success
  • 2017 ESA Annual Meeting: Linking biodiversity, material cycling and ecosystem services in a changing world
  • Ornithological Congress of the Americas
  • Association of State Floodplain Managers: The National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop
  • 3rd International Workshop on Trait-based Approaches to Ocean Life
  • American Fisheries Society 147th Annual Meeting: Fisheries Ecosystems: Uplands to Oceans
  • 12th International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL 2017 Beijing): Ecology and Civilization in a Changing World
  • 7th International Symposium for Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control (WETPOL)
  • Biodiversity and Ecosystem Scenarios Network (ScenNet): Scenarios and Models of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Support of Decision Making
  • SIWI World Water Week: Water and Waste: Reduce and Reuse’
  • 7th International Conference on Flood Management (ICFM7)
  • Floodplain Management Association Annual Conference: Creating Partnerships through Integration: Water, Environment, People
  • Sixth International Conference: Climate Change Adaptation 2017 (CCA 2017)
  • Rhode Island Resource Institute: 8th Mid-Atlantic Stream Restoration Conference
  • Wildlife Society 24th Annual Conference
  • 1st International Conference on Community Ecology (ComEc)
  • Natural Areas Association: Natural Areas Conference
  • Center for Biodiversity and Conservation and its partners: 2017 Student Conference on Conservation Science
  • 2017 Mid-Atlantic Water Resources Conference: Water Research: Building Knowledge and Innovative Solutions
  • Ohio Wetlands Association Science Summit: Working Wetlands for Water Quality
  • California Department of Water Resources, Urban Streams Restoration Program, Riparian Habitat Joint Venture: 2017 Riparian Summit - Confluence to Influence
  • 4th Life Discovery – Doing Science Biology Education Conference
  • 4th World Conference on Climate Change: Today's Progress and Tomorrow's Climate Challenges
  • 2017 NJAFM Annual Conference
  • Michigan Aquatic Restoration Conference
  • Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2017 National Land Conservation Conference
  • 2017 AWRA Annual Conference
  • Coastal Estuarine Research Federation (CERF) Conference: Coastal Science at the Inflection Point: Celebrating Successes & Learning from Challenges
  • International Association for Great Lakes Research: State of Lake Michigan Conference
  • Kansas Water Office Governor's Conference: Future of Water in Kansas

Training

  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Crustose Lichens of the Acadian Forest
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Undergraduate Field Studies: Marine Intertidal Community Ecology
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum – 2017
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Advanced Hydric Soils – 2017
  • Wetland Management and Educational Services, Inc. Workshop: Waterfowl Ecology & Management
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Climate Change Vulnerability Assessments
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Advanced Plant ID: Grasses, Sedges, Rushes and Composites
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Grasses (Poaceae) of the Southern Appalachians
  • Floodplain Management Association: Stormwater BMPs Workshop
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Graminoid Identification for Wetlands and Wetland Delineators
  • Institute of Botanical Training: Wetland Flora Workshop
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Chemicals and Product Stewardship
  • Institute of Botanical Training: Wetland Flora Workshop
  • Washington Department of Ecology: Coastal Training Program Course: Puget Sound Coastal Processes, Shoreline Modifications, and Beach Restoration
  • Lacawac Sanctuary and Biological Field Station Workshop: Ecological Functional Genomics
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Microlepidoptera: Collection, Preparation, Dissection, Identification, and Natural History
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Drawing and Painting Birds in Watercolor and Colored Pencil
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: A-B-C's of Birding: Introduction to Coastal Maine Bird Identification
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Biology & Identification of Ferns
  • Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium's (LUMCON) Summer Course: Coastal Biogeochemistry
  • Institute of Botanical Training: Wetland Flora Workshop
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Urban Planning and Design Studio
  • Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Stormwater Detention System Design
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Understanding the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta: An Overview of Delta Governance and Regulation
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Undergraduate Field Studies: Introduction to Bryophytes and Lichens
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Undergraduate Field Studies – Natural History of Freshwater Fishes
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Wetland Delineation with Emphasis on Soils and Hydrology
  • Isle Royale National Park: Plant I.D. workshop
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Flora of the Blue Ridge
  • Washington Department of Ecology: Coastal Training Program Course: How to Determine the Ordinary High Water Mark
  • UC Davis Extension Online Course: NEPA Case Law and Policy Update
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Coastal Southern California
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Endangered Species Regulation and Protection
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Sustainability Through Native American Stewardship
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Understanding the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta: An Overview of Delta Governance and Regulation
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Mosses: Structure, Ecology, and Identification
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Systematics, Biology, and Ecology of Important Lotic and Lentic Aquatic Insects: Mayflies, Stoneflies, Caddisflies, Odonata, and Coleoptera, and Identification
  • EUCI Course: Endangered Species Act, Wetlands, Stormwater & Floodplain Regulatory Compliance for Energy and Utilities
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: General Ecology
  • Institute of Botanical Training: Wetlands and Weeds Workshop
  • National Science Foundation and Saint Louis University: GIS Applications in Aquatic Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Workshop
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Bogs and Fens: Maine Peatlands
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Exploring Medicinal Plants of Maine (and Beyond)
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: WOW! The Wonders of Wetlands
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Wetland Assessment, Restoration and Management
  • Institute of Botanical Training: Plants of the Upper Midwest
  • Pacific Ecological Consultants, LLC, Western Washington University Course: Wetland Identification & Delineation
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Wetlands: Science and Regulatory Management
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Planning Hydrology, Vegetation, and Soils for Constructed Wetlands
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Land Use and Environmental Planning in the Era of Climate Change
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Urban Watersheds Research Institute Class: Watershed Modeling Using CUHP-SWMM
    Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetland Plant ID: Know ‘Em and Grow ‘Em
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Liverworts and Liverwort Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Moths and Butterflies: Identification, Specimen Preparation, and Taxonomy
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum – 2017
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Endangered Species Recovery Planning and Implementation
  • Conservation Leadership Network Training Course: Mitigation Banking & In-Lieu Fee Program Interagency Review Teams
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Conservation Ecology
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Conservation Biology in the Field
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Field Ecology
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Seminars in Ecology and Resource Management
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Development Agreements, Public-Private Partnerships and Redevelopment 2.0
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Advanced Hydric Soils – 2017
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Lichens and Lichen Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Sedges and Rushes: Identification and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Dragonflies and Damselflies: Field Techniques and Identification
  • New Mexico Tech: Summer Field Hydrology Course
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Native Bees as Pollinators: Diversity, Ecology, Conservation, and Habitat Enhancement
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Finding Words in Nature: Creative Writing for Aspiring Authors ... Study Retreat
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Nature Journaling: Black and White Illustration Techniques
  • The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • Highlands Biological Station Workshop: Gardening with Native Plants in Highlands
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Landscape Ecology
  • National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis Training: Open Science for Synthesis: Gulf Research Program
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Endangered Species Act Overview
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Special Status Amphibians and Reptiles of Northern California
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Problematic Delineation Seminar
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Wetlands Regulation and Mitigation
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: An Introduction to Living Shorelines
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Boletes and Other Fungi of New England
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Survey of Grasses: Their Structure, Identification, and Ecology
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Advanced Hydric Soils – 2017
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Restoration Policy, Planning, and Partnering
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Wetland Plant Identification
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Introduction to Southern Appalachian Fungi
  • North Carolina University Stream Restoration Program River Course: 302 HEC-RAS for Stream Restoration
  • Course: Making Meaning through Modeling: Problem solving in Biology
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Wetlands Identification, Delineation, and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Spiders: Identification, Biology, and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Lichens, Biofilms, and Stone
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Stream Ecology
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Alpine Ecology
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Forest Ecosystems of the Southern Appalachians
  • Isle Royale & Keweenaw Parks Association: Keweenaw Plant I.D. Workshop
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Wetland Delineators
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: BMP Options for Stormwater Runoff
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Mushroom Identification for New Mycophiles: Foraging for Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Art and Science of Photographing Insects and their Kin
  • Utah State University, S.J. & Jessie E. Quinney College of Natural Resources Course: Sediment Transport in Stream Assessment and Design
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Southern Appalachian Mayflies, Stoneflies, & Caddisflies
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Advanced Hydric Soils – 2017
  • UC Davis Extension Course: GIS for Watershed Analysis: Intermediate
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Submersed and Floating Aquatic Plants
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Independent Studies: Interesting and Challenging Saxicolous Lichens of North America
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Hydrophytic Vegetation (Coastal Plain or Piedmont)
  • UC Berkeley Course: Geomorphic & Ecological Fundamentals of River & Stream Restoration
  • The Conservation Fund: Conservation Banking Training Course
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Conservation Biology of Freshwater Mussels
  • Highlands Biological Station Course: Wetland Plant Communities
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Ecology of Forests and Grasslands
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana Course: Drone Remote Sensing of Freshwater Ecosystems
  • University of Montana’s Flathead Lake Biological Station Course: Lake Ecology
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Overview of Environmental Statistics
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Using GIS to Manage, Analyze and Promote Sustainability
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Field Botany and Plant Ecology of the Eastern Maine Coast
  • Environmental Concern Course: Grasses, Sedges and Rushes
  • Highlands Biological Station Workshop: Mushrooms of the Carolinas
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Tidal Marsh Restoration: A Traveling Course from Rhode Island to Maine
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Wetlands and Wetland Delineators
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Planning and Mitigation on Tribal Lands
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Identification, Biology, and Natural History of Ferns and Lycophytes
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Banding/research Techniques for Studying Songbirds and Raptors
  • Environmental Concern Course: Evaluating Hydric Soils in the Field
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Wetland Assessment, Restoration and Management
  • Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Floodplain Delineation using 2D HEC RAS Model
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Vested Rights, Vesting Maps and Development Agreements
  • Eagle Hill Institute Seminar: Better Birding: Passerines and Seabirds for Advancing Birders
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum – WA
  • Wetland Management and Educational Services, Inc. Workshop: Moist-soil Management for Biologists and Managers
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum - MT
  • Environmental Concern Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
  • Wetland Management and Educational Services, Inc. Workshop: Moist-Soil Management for Maintenance Staff
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Riparian Habitat Restoration for the Arid Southwest
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
    Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Wetlands: Science and Regulatory Management
  • Northwest Environmental Training Center Course: Habitat Site Restoration
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum – 2017 – MD
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Exploring Wetland Wildlife
  • MBI (Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Wetland Delineation
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Course: Comparative Approaches in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Science
  • National Flood Mitigation & FloodProofing Workshop
  • UC Davis Extension Course: Planning Tools to Create Healthy Communities
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc.: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum – VA
  • Highlands Biological Station Workshop: Tree Identification
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Building Stream Buffers
  • Urban Watersheds Research Institute Workshop: Stormwater Green Drainage Design Using EPA SWMM-LID
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Basic: Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum – SC
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.: ACOE Wetland Delineation, Waters of the US and
  • Regional Supplement Training
  • CUAHSI and the University of Florida 3-day Training Workshop: Using In-Situ Water Quality Sensors - Lagrangian and Eulerian Applications
  • Environmental Concern Workshop: Wetland Pollinators
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands, and Hydrology (Coastal Plain or Piedmont)

SPECIAL EVENTS

  • American Wetlands Month
  • Endangered Species Day
  • 2017 Grand River Water Festival
  • Rouge River Water Festival
  • Fall Migration Festival
  • 2017 Voice of Wetlands Festival
       
Wetland Breaking News - December 2015
 

Wetland Breaking News - March 2016

The Association of State Wetland Managers' Wetland Breaking News (WBN) is a monthly e-newsletter. Wetland Breaking News is an edited compilation of wetland-related stories and announcements submitted by readers and gleaned from listservs, press releases and news sources from throughout the United States. WBN chronicles the legislative, national and state news relevant to wetland science and policy, wetland regulations and legal analysis of Supreme court cases from the past month; it also links to new publications and resources available to wetland professionals as well as events and training opportunities for those working in water resources and related fields. Wetland Breaking News has been published Wetland Breaking News - January 2017for over fifteen years and ASWM has been a think-tank and source for wetland science and policy news and discussion for over 30 years.The items presented in Wetland Breaking News do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor or of the Association of State Wetland Managers. Send your news items, comments, corrections, or suggestions to .

"WETLAND BREAKING NEWS" Compiled and Edited by Marla Stelk, Editor; Laura Burchill and Sharon Weaver, Assistant Editors. Executive Director: Jeanne Christie. Association of State Wetland Managers, 32 Tandberg Trail, Ste. 2A, Windham, ME 04062. Telephone: 207-892-3399 Fax: 207-894-7992
 All photos by Jeanne Christie, ASWM
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