2014 NFFA RECORDED WEBINARS
[2017 - 2016 - 2015, 2013, 2012, 2011]

 

Conference Call

Monday, December 8 – 3:00 p.m. ET

 



The Impact of Wetland Drainage on the Hydrology of a Northern Prairie Watershed

Monday, November 17 – 3:00 p.m. EST      


Dr. John Pomeroy, Centre for Hydrology, University of Saskatchewan

Introduction Marla Stelk, ASWM

Presenter – Dr. John Pomeroy, Centre for Hydrology, University of Saskatchewan 

PowerPoint presentations available here.

Abstract:  The Prairie Hydrological Model simulates blowing snow redistribution, snowmelt, infiltration to frozen soils and the fill and spill of networks of prairie wetlands.  The model was used to simulate the hydrology of Smith Creek, Saskatchewan, Canada with various wetland extent scenarios.  This model simulation exercise shows that prairie wetland drainage can increase annual and peak daily flows substantially, and that notable increases to estimates of the annual volume and peak daily flow of the flood of record have derived from wetland drainage to date and will proceed with further wetland drainage.

Dr. John Pomeroy is the Canada Research Chair in Water Resources and Climate Change (Tier 1), Professor of Geography and Director of the Centre for Hydrology at the University of Saskatchewan, an Honorary Professor of the Centre for Glaciology, Aberystwyth University, Wales and Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou and an Institute Professor of the Biogeoscience Institute of the University of Calgary. He was recently elected a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union. He leads the Canadian Rockies Hydrological Observatory study and the Process Theme of the Changing Cold Regions Network and was recently President of the International Commission for Snow and Ice Hydrology, Chair of the IAHS Decade on Prediction in Ungauged Basins, Principal Investigator for the IP3 Cold Regions Hydrology Network, Co-Principal Investigator for the Drought Research Initiative and President of the Canadian Geophysical Union. Dr. Pomeroy has authored over 250 research articles and several books.  His current research interests are on the impact of land use and climate change on hydrology, snow processes, mountain, prairie and northern hydrology, and modelling including floods and droughts.
 

           
Part 1: Part 1: Introduction: 
Marla Stelk, ASWM
Presenter: Dr. John Pomeroy,
Centre for Hydrology, University
of Saskatchewan 
     Part 2: Dr. John Pomeroy,
Centre for Hydrology, University
of Saskatchewan 
       
   
Part 3: Dr. John Pomeroy,
Centre for Hydrology, University
of Saskatchewan 
    Part 4: Questions/Discussion
       

 

Conference Call

Monday, October 6 – 3:00 p.m. EDT

 



Webinar: ASCE report on how to address our systemic flood problems

Monday, September 8 – 3:00 p.m. EDT     

David Fowler, Senior Project Manager, Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District

Introduction – Marla Stelk, ASWM

Presenter – David Fowler, Senior Project Manager, Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District

PowerPoint presentations available here.

Abstract: Six years ago, in the wake of Hurricane Katrina’s devastating impacts on the US Gulf Coast , the Mississippi Floods of 2011, Hurricane Irene, and Super Storm Sandy the American Society of Civil Engineers(ASCE) issued a call for action urging the nation to address the growing challenge of increasing flood losses in the US and the threat to the safety of the population that lies in the potential paths of such events.  Similar reports have been issued by both governmental and non-governmental organizations since Katrina and they echoed the ASCE call. 

Over the last two years, an ASCE committee examined our national response to this call for action and was charged with writing a final report and make recommendations for approval by the ASCE board.  This committee visited many communities, and reached out to government and nongovernmental organizations across the country, hosted a national flood risk summit and carefully examined lessons learned in post Katrina floods to include superstorm Sandy.  It was clear to the committee that while some progress has been made, in general, the flood challenge continues to receive scant attention and much remains to be accomplished to safeguard the wellbeing of people and property at risk.  If the devastating impacts of Super-Storm Sandy and the losses sustained in floods and hurricanes since Katrina were to be used as the measures of progress, the nation has failed to heed the call. 

Ignoring the challenge will not cause it to go away. America is a compassionate nation, and we will respond to citizens in crisis.  How we act now is the difference between proactively minimizing the impacts of potentially life changing events – building resilience, versus reactively recovering from catastrophic events and failing to heed the lessons we have learned.  A failure to act today will have enormous future consequences.  The call for action must once again be sounded! 

David Fowler, MS, CFM is a Senior Project Manager with the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District in Wisconsin.  He worked as a Fisheries Biologist with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources for two years before moving to Milwaukee.  He has been with the Sewerage District for 33 years.  He has managed over a dozen capital flood management and stream restoration projects ranging in cost from $128 million to $500,000.  For the last five years he has managed the District’s watercourse maintenance program that includes over 23 miles of concrete lined channels and 13 miles of bio engineered channels.  Dave is a Certified Floodplain Manger (CFM) in the state of Wisconsin and is a tireless advocate for the protection of Wisconsin’s water resources. He has a Master of Science degree in Stream Ecology. 

Dave is a member of the Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM) and was active in the formation of the Wisconsin Association for Floodplain, Stormwater and Coastal Management (WAFSCM) in 2001.  In 2006 Dave received the WAFSCM Chapter Service Award for his work promoting sustainable floodplain management in Wisconsin.  And in 2005 Dave was awarded the River Networks, “National River Hero Award” for his work on Milwaukee’s Rivers.  Dave served on the board of directors for the Association of State Floodplain Managers as the Region V Director and currently serves as the Watershed POD Facilitator for ASFPM and the Liaison for the Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance.   He is also currently serving as a flood management advisor for the Earth Economics Non-Profit Consulting Group.  

           
Part 1: Introduction: 
Marla Stelk, ASWM
Presenter: David Fowler,
Senior Project Manager, 
Milwaukee Metropolitan
Sewerage District
  Part 2: David Fowler, 
Senior Project Manager, 
Milwaukee Metropolitan 
Sewerage District
  Part 3: David Fowler, 
Senior Project Manager, 
Milwaukee Metropolitan 
Sewerage District
         
     
Part 4: Questions/Discussion   Part 5: Questions/Discussion    


 

Conference Call

Monday, August 11 – 3:00 p.m. EDT



 
Preventing Flood Disasters from Becoming Disastrous

Monday, July 14 – 3:00 p.m. EDT     


Brian Varrella, Chair, Colorado Association of Stormwater and Floodplains

Introduction – Marla Stelk, ASWM

Presenter – Brian Varrella, Chair, Colorado Association of Stormwater and Floodplain Managers

PowerPoint presentations available here.

Abstract: Colorado experienced epic flooding in September 2013.  The floods affected a region of more than 1,500 square miles, much of it in the pristine watersheds at the foot of the Rocky Mountains.  It took only 4 days for a quarter of Colorado to be declared a Disaster Area; a declaration that arrived, for some, before the rains even dissipated.   The environmental, economic and social devastation from this regional flood event will take years to recover, and as Colorado learns new lessons from old best practices, new policies, new standards, and new philosophic approaches to asset management are being developed. 

The 1-hour webinar prepared by the Colorado Association of Stormwater and Floodplain Managers (CASFM.org) will explore the depth and breadth of the Colorado 2013 Disaster experience.  Join the Chair of CASFM as he explores the fallacy of freeboard, the benefits of resource buffers, and the hindsight lessons learned from a $3 billion natural disaster.


Brian Varrella
is the Chair of the Colorado Association of Stormwater and Floodplain Managers (CASFM.org) and the Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM) Region 8 Director.  He is a licensed professional engineer and certified floodplain manager living and working in Fort Collins, Colorado.  His current job titles include Floodplain Manager, Fire Recovery Specialist, and Emergency Manager for the City of Fort Collins. 

Brian has worked in 19 states in his career and his experience is equally balanced between private consulting experience and public sector service.  He considers himself fortunate to be part of ASFPM’s mission to promote policies and activities that recognize and expand natural and beneficial functions of floodplain and riparian areas.  Brian spends his free time flyfishing the streams and rivers of Colorado’s summer season, and skiing frozen rivers of next the next season’s runoff in the winter.  You can find Brian on LinkedIn.

 

        ;  
Part 1: Introduction:
Marla Stelk, ASWM
Presenter: Brian Varrella,
Chair, Colorado Association of
Stormwater and Floodplain
Managers
  Part 2: Brian Varrella, Chair,
Colorado Association of
Stormwater and Floodplain
Managers
      Part 3: Brian Varrella, Chair,
Colorado Association of
Stormwater and Floodplain
Managers
         
         
Part 4: Questions/Discussion   Part 5: Questions/Discussion    
         

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Natural Floodplain Functions Alliance Meeting

Wednesday, June 4 – 4:00-5:30 p.m. PDT 

AFPM Conference Seattle Washington

Washington State Convention Center, Room 306

June’s conference call was replaced with the opportunity for members to meet face-to-face at the Association of State Floodplain Managers’ Annual National Conference in Seattle, Washington.

 

Restoration of the Mississippi Delta in a Post-BP Oil Spill Environment

Monday, May 12 – 3:00 p.m. EST 

Introduction – Marla Stelk, ASWM

Presenters – Estelle Robichaux, Restoration Project Analyst, Mississippi River Delta Restoration Team and Whit Remer, Senior Policy Analyst & Attorney, Mississippi River Delta Restoration Team

PowerPoint presentations available here.

Abstract: Restoration of coastal Louisiana – particularly of the Mississippi River Delta and its estuaries – has been an issue of local and scientific concern for decades. Louisiana’s coastal wetlands are a first line of defense for coastal and ecological communities, mitigating risk from hurricanes and other disasters. The region garnered national attention after the devastation wreaked by Hurricane Katrina and the Gulf oil disaster, which highlighted longstanding issues of wetland loss and degradation in the area.

When the BP oil spill trial, settlements and assessments are completed, billions of dollars will be directed to the Gulf Coast for restoration. With this promise of initial funding for the large-scale restoration program set out by Louisiana’s Coastal Master Plan (CMP), there is hope that the vital Mississippi River Delta landscape will soon be on the road to Estelle Robichaux, Restoration Project Analyst, Mississippi River Delta Restoration Teamrecovery. NFFA members will gain insights into the development of the CMP, including the science of sediment diversions to build and sustain wetlands, and sources of funding for restoration implementation.

Estelle Robichaux advocates for and provides evidence to support internal and external science-based decision-making, relating to Mississippi River Delta restoration efforts. She monitors the progress and development of science and restoration initiatives that were established in the wake of the BP oil disaster.

Estelle is a broadly trained scientist with a passion for wetlands conservation and restoration. She received her B.A. in Economics and French from Wellesley College and her M.S. in Interdisciplinary Ecology with a concentration in Wetland Science from the University of Florida. She has a background in both the natural and social sciences as well as extensive experience in formal and informal science education. Her field and research background is also wide-ranging, spanning wetlands, marine and wildlife, from Costa Rica to South Africa to South Caicos. Prior to graduate school, Estelle worked with the Louisiana State University AgCenter on their 4-H Marsh Maneuvers program and the Florida Fish & Wildlife Research Institute.

White Remer, Senior Policy Analyst & Attorney, Mississippi River Delta RestorationWhit Remer works to advance EDF’s Mississippi River Delta Restoration project’s federal policy goals. His key responsibilities include monitoring and responding to congressional developments, securing adequate funding for restoration efforts, and preparing research to help increase the public’s and decision makers’ awareness of coastal Louisiana restoration efforts. Whit serves as EDF’s lead for the Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA), which is currently being conducted in the Gulf Coast region following the oil spill.

Recently, Whit worked with EDF’s policy team to successfully pass the RESTORE Act, a bill that will send billions of dollars to the Gulf Coast for environmental and economic restoration after the 2010 oil spill. Whit provided policy support that helped advance the RESTORE Act through complex and technical legislative processes. He received his B.S. in Geography and Political Science from Florida State University, his Master’s in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of New Orleans and his J.D. from Loyola University New Orleans College of Law.

 

             
         
Part 1: Introduction:
Marla, Stelk, ASWM
Presenter: Estelle Robichaux,
Restoration Project Analyst 
    Part 2: Presenter: Estelle
Robichaux, Restoration
Project Analyst 
    Part 3: Presenter: Whit
Remer, Senior Policy
Analyst & Attorney 
             
         
Part 4: Whit Remer, Senior
Policy Analyst & Attorney and
Estelle Robichaux, Restoration
Project Analyst
    Part 5: Discussion      
             

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  



Conference Call

Monday, April14 – 3:00 p.m. EST


Beyond the 100-year floodplain: Experiences in European floodplains under the Flood Directive

Monday, March 10 – 3:00 p.m. EST  

Introduction Marla Stelk, ASWM

Presenters – G. Mathias Kondolf, Professor of Environmental Planning, University of California, Berkeley and Anna Serra-Llobet, Visiting Scholar Institute of Urban and Regional Development, University of California, Berkeley

PowerPoint presentations available here.

Abstract: While the US was ahead of Europe as a whole in floodplain mapping through the 20th century, EU member states have arguably pulled ahead of the US in some significant ways since adoption of the EU Flood Directive in 2007.  Among the Directive’s many components, its flood mapping requirements include not only a ‘moderate’ flood (typically Q100), but also larger, infrequent floods, and the ‘natural’ floodplain area that would be flooded in the absence of levees and other structures.  Due to Brussels at the end of 2013, as these maps become available they provide examples of alternative approaches to floodplain mapping and risk communication.

G. Mathias Kondolf, Professor of Environmental Planning, University of California, Berkeley G. Mathias (Matt) Kondolf is a fluvial geomorphologist and environmental planner, specializing in environmental river management and restoration. He is Professor of Environmental Planning at the University of California, Berkeley, where he teaches courses in hydrology, river restoration, and environmental science.  Formerly Clarke Scholar at the Institute for Water Resources, member of the Environmental Advisory Board to the Chief of the US Army Corps of Engineers, and member of  the Calfed Ecosystem Restoration Program Science Board from 1999-2005, Dr. Kondolf has served as an expert witness before the California Legislature, US Congress, and the International Court of Justice in the Hague.  His book Tools in Fluvial Geomorphology is a reference work in the field (2nd edition due late 2014).

Anna Serra-Llobet, Visiting Scholar Institute of Urban and Regional Development, University of California, Berkeley

 

Anna Serra-Llobet is an environmental scientist whose research concerns to flood risk management policies.  She completed her PhD in Environmental Sciences at the Autonomous University of Barcelona, analyzing the influence of the 1982 Tous Dam failure on subsequent national flood policy in Spain.  She then worked at the Directorate General for the Environment at the European Commission (EU) in Brussels, focusing on the hydrometeorological risks (floods and droughts) and vulnerability assessment in Europe. Currently she is a visiting scholar at the University of California at Berkeley, conducting post-doctoral research on flood management strategies in the US and the EU.

 

       

Part 1: Introduction: Marla
Stelk, ASWM
Presenters: Anna Serra-Llobet,
Visiting Scholar Institute of
Urban and Regional
Development, University of
California, Berkeley and
G. Mathias Kondolf, Professor
of Environmental Planning,
University of California, Berkeley

      Part 2: Anna Serra-Llobet,
Visiting Scholar Institute of
Urban and Regional
Development, University of
California, Berkeley
         
     
Part 3: Anna Serra-Llobet,
Visiting Scholar Institute of
Urban and Regional
Development, University of
California, Berkeley
      Part 4: Questions/Answers
         

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conference Call

Monday, February 10 – 3:00 p.m. EST




This NFFA webinar included two presentations which focused on FLDPLN Model Applications.

Monday, January 13 – 3:00 p.m. EST  

Introduction – Jeanne Christie, ASWM

Part 1: New Developments in River Valley Floodplain Mapping: A Survey of FLDPLN Model Applications – Jude Kastens, Kansas Applied Remote Sensing Program, Kansas Biological Survey

PowerPoint presentations available here.

Jude Kastens, Kansas Applied Remote Sensing Program, Kansas Biological SurveyAbstract: Researchers at the Kansas Biological Survey (KBS) developed a topographic floodplain model (FLDPLN) that has been used to map floodplains for many rivers and stream networks using simple hydrologic flow principles. The stage-dependent inundation library output from FLDPLN can be used for flood extent and depth estimation and hydrologic connectivity indexing. Model outputs have applications for river valley morphology assessment, ecological modeling, and flood disaster response mitigation and damage assessment, and can also facilitate traditional hydraulic studies. We will highlight KBS research on floodplain wetlands and riparian areas and real examples of flood extent estimation, in addition to other applications.

Part 2: TWIP and FLDPLN Applications for Watershed Restoration Activities Jeff Neel, Kansas Alliance for Wetlands and Streams

PowerPoint presentations available here.

Abstract: TWIP and FLDPLN products have excellent potential applications for watershed restoration assessment, design, planning, and implementation activities. TWIP identifies potential and actual wetland locations Jeff Neel, Kansas Alliance for Wetlands and Streamsbased on the underlying topography and hydrology. FLDPLN creates stage-dependent floodplain extent libraries useful for examining recurrent connective relationships between floodwaters and floodplain features such as wetlands and riparian areas. Together, these tools may be used to identify opportunities to increase watershed flood storage and infiltration, modulate peak runoff and stream flows, restore stream channels and their floodplain connections, and better understand the state of stream evolutionary processes throughout a watershed.

 

 

   
Part 1a: Introduction:
Jeanne Christie, ASWM;
Presenter: Jude Kastens,
Kansas Applied Remote
Sensing Program, Kansas
Biological Survey
  Part 1b: Jude Kastens,
Kansas Applied Remote
Sensing Program, Kansas
Biological Survey
  Part 1c: Jude Kastens,
Kansas Applied Remote
Sensing Program,Kansas
Biological Survey; Questions
         
        
Part 2a: Presenter: Jeff Neel,
Kansas Alliance for Wetlands
and Streams
  Part 2b: Jeff Neel, Kansas
Alliance for Wetlands and
Streams
  Part 2c: Jeff Neel, Kansas
Alliance for Wetlands and
Streams; Questions

 

Jude Kastens is an assistant research professor working for the Kansas Biological Survey (KBS) at the University of Kansas. He holds a PhD in mathematics from KU. Since 1999, Jude has worked for the Kansas Applied Remote Sensing (KARS) Program at KBS, where the focus of his work involves using remote sensing and other GIS data primarily for agricultural applications and for applications in flood and floodplain mapping and modeling. His responsibilities extend to ecological modeling and assessment, land cover mapping and change detection, database development and management, programming and software development, and whatever else crosses his path.

Jeff Neel is the Executive Director of the Kansas Alliance for Wetlands and Streams (KAWS) since September 2013. He received an M.S. in Environmental Science from Ohio State University in 1999. In 2002, Jeff began working for Research and Extension at Kansas State University on watershed modeling, GIS, remote sensing, and stream geomorphological applications useful for assessing non-point source pollution problems and evaluating BMP implementation strategies aimed at watershed health and restoration.  Jeff started his own consulting company, Blue Earth, in 2007, and began partnering with KAWS and many others to develop watershed assessment methods, TWIP, riparian forest assessment methods, and floodplain connectivity tools using GIS and remote sensing. 


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Past Webinars: [2017 - 2016 - 2015 - 2013 2012 - 2011]

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