Wetland Breaking News: July 2019

                  

IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

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Wetland Breaking News: July 2019

 

 

 




 

Editor's Note


Dear Wetlanders,

Wetland Breaking News: July 2019Summertime in Maine is finally here and there’s no place else I’d rather be. We took our new kayaks on their maiden voyage this weekend along the Tenny River which connects Crystal Lake in the town of Harrison to Panther Pond in the town of Raymond. Crystal Lake and
Panther Pond both allow motorized water vehicles, including ski jets, so neither one is really great for kayaking, but the river, well that’s a slice of heaven. 
Motorized craft are allowed but only at a slow, no wake speed. I was excited to see a lakes association volunteer
checking everyone’s watercraft before entering the lake to ensure there would be no introductions of invasive species like milfoil which are ravaging our beautiful fresh-water lakes and ponds. Next weekend I’m making plans for a real Maine lobster dinner. The lobster export business in Maine has been hit hard by the U.S.-China trade war, so I feel I need to do my civic duty and eat as much lobster as possible this season…

In this edition of Wetland Breaking News, you’ll find news stories about Waters of the U.S. and Clean Water Act Section 401 in Editor’s Choice as these two issues are of high priority to the Association of State Wetland Managers. You’ll find an uplifting story in National News about $78 million in funding for wetland conservation projects and National Wildlife Refuges that was just approved by the Migratory Bird Conservation Commission. You’ll find a story in State News for Alaska with an update on Pebble Mine. And be sure to check out the new National Wetland Plant List just released by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers under Resources & Publications.

I hope you enjoy this issue of Wetland Breaking News, and if you’re looking for something to do this summer, consider coming up to Maine to visit us and enjoy a fabulous lobster dinner!

Best regards,

Marla J. Stelk
Editor
Wetland Breaking News

 

Wetland Breaking News: May 2019

   
                


Editor's ChoiceWetland Breaking News: June 2019


WOTUS debate moves to Senate committee

By Wes Wolfe – The Brunswick News – June 13, 2019
Members of the U.S. Senate Environment and Public Works Committee obliquely debated each other Wednesday morning in a hearing regarding the impacts of the Waters of the United States rule — or Clean Water Rule — on the country’s agricultural operations and environment. The 2015 Obama administration rule is in effect in some states but not in others, as federal court rulings coast-to-coast result in different outcomes. The state of Georgia is party to a lawsuit that currently resides in the federal court in Brunswick. U.S. District Judge Lisa Godbey Wood issued an injunction against enforcement of the regulations a year ago this month — the injunction includes Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Utah, West Virginia and Wisconsin, though Wisconsin withdrew as a plaintiff May 2. Read full story here.

EPA Issues Revised CWA Section 401 Guidance to States

By Duncan M. Greene and Sharon White – The National Law Review – June 10, 2019
On June 7, 2019, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued an updated guidance document (Updated Guidance) that clarifies and provides recommendations to states and tribes concerning their implementation of Section 401 of the Clean Water Act (CWA). The Updated Guidance, issued pursuant to Executive Order 13868, includes procedural and substantive reforms to the Section 401 process to reduce delays and uncertainty among applicants, states, tribes, and federal permitting agencies. The Updated Guidance is the latest in a series of recent executive and judicial developments that have significantly changed the Section 401 landscape, particularly for gas pipelines, hydropower projects, and other energy infrastructure projects. Read full story here.

‘A major punch in the gut’: Midwest rains projected to create near-record dead zone in Gulf

By Sarah Kaplan – The Washington Post – June 10, 2019
As rain deluged the Midwest this spring, commercial fisherman Ryan Bradley knew it was only a matter of time before the disaster reached him. All that water falling on all that fertilizer-enriched farmland would soon wend its way through streams and rivers into Bradley’s fishing grounds in the Gulf of Mexico, off the Mississippi coast. The nutrient excess would cause tiny algae to burst into bloom, then die, sink and decompose on the ocean floor — a process that sucks all the oxygen from the water, turning it toxic. Fish would suffocate or flee, leaving Bradley and his fellow fishermen nothing to harvest. Read full story here.

 
Wetland Breaking News: July 2019

 

Wetland Breaking News: July 2019National News 


Keystone XL pipeline opponents pursue new legal challenge

By Matthew Brown, Associated Press – ABC News – July 1, 2019
Environmentalists asked a federal judge on Monday to cancel approvals issued by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the Keystone XL oil pipeline from Canada, opening another front in the legal fight over a long-delayed energy project that President Donald Trump has tried to push through to completion. Attorneys for the Northern Plains Resource Council, Sierra Club and other groups filed the latest lawsuit against the $8 billion tar sands pipeline in Montana, where they've previously won favorable rulings in related cases. Read full story here.

Tribe seeks to set its own water standards

By Andrew Blok – Spartan Newsroom – June 21, 2019
The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, on the shores of one of the world’s largest freshwater lakes, is petitioning the federal government to hand it control of setting water quality standards. It would become the first tribe in Michigan to receive that right, joining 60 other U.S. tribes already granted that authority. Tribes argue that an increased role in setting water regulation allows them to tailor standards to protect important plants and wildlife. Read full story here.

White House tells agencies they no longer have to weigh a project’s long-term climate impacts

By Juliet Eilperin – The Washington Post – June 21, 2019
The White House proposed Friday that federal agencies no longer have to take a project’s long-term climate impacts into account when assessing how they will affect the environment, reversing a major Obama administration policy. The draft guidance, issued by the White House Council on Environmental Quality, would change the way the U.S. government evaluates activities ranging from coal mining to gas pipelines and oil drilling by limiting the extent to which agencies can calculate their greenhouse gas emissions. In April 2016, CEQ finalized a directive that agencies quantify to what extent they will contribute to climate change, a move that threw approval of those projects into doubt. Read full story here.

Secretary Bernhardt Announces $78 Million in Funding for Wetland Conservation Projects and National Wildlife Refuges

Contact: Vanessa Kauffman – U.S. Department of the Interior – June 19, 2019
The Migratory Bird Conservation Commission, chaired by U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt, approved $78 million in funding for various wetland conservation projects. Of the funds issued, $29.4 million was allocated for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners to conserve or restore more than 205,000 acres of wetland and associated upland habitats for waterfowl, shorebirds and other birds in 22 states throughout the United States. Grants made through the North American Wetlands Conservation Act (NAWCA) come during the 30th anniversary of the Act. The grants will be matched by more than $77 million in partner funds. NAWCA grants ensure waterfowl and other birds are protected throughout their lifecycles. Read full press release here.

Trump EPA finalizes rollback of key Obama climate rule that targeted coal plants

By Juliet Eilperin and Brady Dennis – The Washington Post – June 19, 2019 – Video
Despite a drumbeat of scientific warnings, the Trump administration Wednesday issued a new rule that cuts carbon emissions from power plants by less than half of what experts say is needed to avoid catastrophic global warming. The Affordable Clean Energy rule, issued by the Environmental Protection Agency, represents the Trump administration’s most significant action to unwind federal regulations aimed at addressing climate change. At the EPA on Wednesday, Trump’s top aides, Republican lawmakers and state business leaders celebrated it as proof that the president had delivered for his constituents in coal country. Read full story and view video here.

Former EPA leaders question agency’s direction under Trump

By Dino Grandoni and Brady Dennis – The Washington Post – June 11, 2019 – Video
Past leaders of the Environmental Protection Agency, including officials from both Republican and Democratic administrations, criticized the agency’s shrinking size and ambition in testimony Tuesday on Capitol Hill, saying the agency has moved away from its core duties under President Trump. “I’m deeply concerned that five decades of environmental progress are at risk because of the attitude and approach of the current administration” Christine Todd Whitman, a Republican who led the agency during the George W. Bush administration, told lawmakers Tuesday. “There is no doubt in my mind that under the current administration, the EPA is retreating from its historic mission to protect our environment and the health of the public from environmental hazards,” she added during testimony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee. Read full story and view video here.

White House blocked intelligence agency’s written testimony calling climate change ‘possibly catastrophic’

Wetland Breaking News: July 2019By Juliet Eilperin, Josh Dawsey and Brady Dennis – The
Washington Post – June 8, 2019 – Video
White House officials barred a State Department intelligence agency from submitting written testimony this week to the House Intelligence Committee warning that human-caused climate change is “possibly
catastrophic.” The move came after State officials refused to excise the document’s references to federal scientific findings on climate change. The effort to edit, and ultimately suppress, the prepared
testimony by the State Department’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research comes as the Trump administration is debating how best to challenge the fact that burning fossil fuels is warming the planet
and could pose serious risks unless the world makes deep cuts in greenhouse gas emissions over the next decade. Senior military and intelligence officials have continued to warn that climate change
could undermine the United States’ national security — a position President Trump rejects. Read full story and view video here.

Government argues for halt to youth climate lawsuit, saying there is no constitutional right to a stable climate

By Brady Dennis – The Washington Post – June 4, 2019
A group of young Americans who have spent nearly four years trying to compel the federal government to take action on climate change found themselves back in court Tuesday, arguing that their
unprecedented lawsuit should move forward. And the Trump administration, like the Obama administration before it, was there to argue once again that the lawsuit should be tossed out before it ever goes to trial, both because the plaintiffs do not meet the legal requirements to bring such a suit and because “there is no fundamental constitutional right to a ‘stable climate system.’” The lawsuit, filed in 2015 by 21 young people who argue that the failure of government leaders to combat climate change violates their constitutional right to a clean environment, had been scheduled to go to trial last fall before a district judge in Oregon. Read full story here.

 

Wetland Breaking News: July 2019

 State News Wetland Breaking News: July 2019

AK: EPA says report on Pebble Mine lacks detail, likely underestimates risks to water quality

By Liz Ruskin – Alaska Public Media – July 2, 2019
The Environmental Protection Agency has just released formal comments on the proposed Pebble Mine, and mine opponents will find a lot to cheer about. The EPA’s 100-page comment criticizes the Draft Environmental Impact Statement on the Pebble mine proposal. The EPA says the draft report lacks critical information and likely underestimates the risk the project poses to water quality and aquatic resources. Read full story here.

CA/OR: Lawsuit Seeks Overdue Protection for Rare Salamander in California, Oregon

Contacts: Jeff Miller, George Sexton, Nick Cady, Tom Wheeler – Center for Biological Diversity – July 1, 2019
Conservation groups sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today for failing to respond to a 2018 petition requesting Endangered Species Act protection for the imperiled Siskiyou Mountains salamander. This rare terrestrial salamander lives only in the Klamath-Siskiyou region of southern Oregon and Northern California, primarily in old-growth forests. The species is threatened by U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management plans to increase logging in southern Oregon. Read full press release here.

FL: Profiteering or preservation? Wetlands mitigation law reopens debate about if program works

Jeffrey Schweers – Tallahassee Democrat – June 21, 2019
A law signed by Gov. Ron DeSantis this week to allow developers to dip into local conservation lands when state wetland mitigation banks run dry in their neighborhood has sparked renewed debate about whether the controversial banking program works. The idea behind the wetland banks is that when a developer wants to build on existing wetlands, he can pay to buy wetlands or make improvements to degraded wetlands in the same watershed or region with the goal being zero wetland loss. But environmentalists say the program isn’t working, that the state is losing wetlands at an alarming rate, and the proof of that is the wetland mitigation banks in South Florida are running out of credits. Read full story here.

FL: Florida Keys developer sentenced for illegally filling wetlands following Hurricane Irma

By Katherine Kallergis – The Real Deal – June 12, 2019
A developer in the Florida Keys was sentenced for illegally filling and clearing federally regulated wetlands without a permit in the wake of Hurricane Irma. Bonefish Holdings LLC pleaded guilty and was sentenced to three years of probation and ordered to pay a $50,000 criminal fine and to fully restore the impacted 3.7 acres of wetlands. Bonefish, led by Coral Springs developer Albert Vorstman, estimated the restoration would cost about $189,000, according to a press release from the U.S. Attorney’s office. Read full story here.

KS: Overland Park’s ‘floating wetland’ looks to have potential in fighting algae in South Lake Park

By Leah Wankum; – Shawnee Mission Post – June 19, 2019
After nine months of testing out the floating wetland aimed at reducing toxic algal blooms at South Lake Park, Overland Park city staff brought it in last week to see if it’s working. Turns out, it is working so well that they hope to expand the program in the near future. Ian Fannin-Hughes, a water quality specialist with Overland Park public works, said city staff brought in the floating wetland — a manmade island with native Kansas wetland plants growing on it — to shore on June 14 to observe it, see how well the plants were growing on it and see if any invasive plants or weeds had sprouted. Read full story here.

MD: Maryland estimate for seawalls against rising tides: $27 billion

By Dan Rodricks – The Baltimore Sun – June 28, 2019
A third bridge to get more cars and trucks across the Chesapeake Bay, wider highways to move traffic along the Capital Beltway — those might be the ambitions of Maryland’s road-warrior governor, but they are fanciful luxuries compared to what could be the major infrastructure demand facing the state in the decades ahead: Seawalls to protect thousands of homes, businesses and farmlands, from Ocean City to Baltimore, at a cost of more than $27 billion. And that’s a modest estimate based on moderate sea-level rise, according to a study from a team of engineers and geodata specialists who examined climate-change trends along the U.S. coast. Read full story here.

MD: Species of Carnivorous Plant Found in Maryland

Maryland Department of Natural Resources – June 27, 2019
Botanists from the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and The Nature Conservancy recently confirmed the discovery of a new plant species in Maryland — the dwarf sundew (Drosera brevifolia). Local volunteer botanist Chase Howard discovered and reported the plant growing in open areas with wet, peaty sand in Worcester County. Read full story here.

MA: Cape Communities Receive River & Wetland Restoration Grants

By Brian Merchant – Cape-Cod.com – June 26, 2019
Several local communities will receive state and federal grant funding for river and wetland restoration and climate adaptation projects. More than $2.5 million has been awarded to Falmouth, Wellfleet/Truro, Yarmouth and Plymouth. The projects are now designated as Priority Projects through the Department of Fish and Game’s Division of Ecological Restoration, making them eligible for technical services, including data collection, engineering, design work, permitting, project management and grants. Read full story here.

Wetland Breaking News: July 2019MI: Wetland Wanderings seek to spur citizen scientists

By Jeremy Ervin – The Times Herald – June 13, 2019
Some insects can't thrive in polluted waters, and local organizers are looking to find as many of them as they can. Friends of the St. Clair River is organizing a series of Wetland Wandering events this summer at Wetlands County Park to look for macroinvertebrates. Macroinvertebrates are insects, mollusks and crustaceans that are large enough to be seen without a microscope. "Scientists use the presence or absence of macroinvertebrates to determine water quality," said Amy Meeker-Taylor, Friends of the St. Clair River environmental educator. "We're looking for bugs that don't like pollution." Read full story here.

NY: DEC files appeal in effort to block National Fuel pipeline

By Thomas J. Prohaska – The Buffalo News – June 4, 2019
The State Department of Environmental Conservation is filing an appeal of a federal agency's ruling that it missed a deadline to reject a permit for a natural gas pipeline from Pennsylvania through Western New York. The DEC last week appealed to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in New York City, after the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission refused to give the DEC a second chance to argue its case. Read full story here.

NC: 20 years in the making: Carteret's North River Wetland Preserve is state's largest saltwater marsh restoration

WRAL.com – June 28, 2019
Along the coast of North Carolina, there is a science project targeted at turning back time. The project by the North Carolina Coastal Federation aims to reclaim 6,000 farm acres back into marshland. “Everybody wants to gather a little closer,” said Bree Charron. “We planted more than a million trees." Charron is conducting a tour of media, environmentalists and volunteers through the North River Wetland Preserve in Carteret County - the largest saltwater marsh restoration in North Carolina. The project has been ongoing for nearly 20 years. This summer, the final phase is underway. Read full story here.

OR: GOP lawmakers skipped town to avoid a climate change vote. Then the governor called the police.

By Reis Thebault and Lindsey Bever – The Washington Post – June 21, 2019 – Video
Outside the Oregon State Capitol, small groups of protesters jockeyed for position. There were loggers who opposed the cap-and-trade bill up for a vote that morning. And there were young climate activists who said the legislation was vital to preserving the world they would soon inherit. But there were a few crucial components missing from the political drama unfolding in Salem on Thursday. Namely, the lawmakers. Inside the statehouse, the Senate chambers were conspicuously quiet. As the clerk called roll, a third of the room’s seats were empty. The Republicans, facing down a Democratic supermajority bent on passing bills to combat climate change, resorted to some last-ditch political arithmetic: no senators, no votes. Read full story and view video here.

OR: Oregon House approves ditch-cleaning bill over environmentalist complaints

By Mateusz Perkowski – Capital Press – June 18, 2019
Opposition from multiple environmental groups has failed to stop the Oregon House from approving a bill aimed at simplifying the state’s ditch-cleaning regulations. Farmers could remove up to 3,000 cubic yards of sediment per mile of ditch over five years after notifying state regulators under House Bill 2437, which passed the House 42-17 on June 17. Currently, a state fill-removal permit is necessary to clean more than 50 cubic yards a year from a ditch, which is considered an expensive and time-consuming bureaucratic hurdle for many farmers. Read full story here.

 

Wetland Breaking News: July 2019U.S. Fish & Wildlife National Wetlands Inventory -
Wetlands Data Verification Toolset

An update has been made to the NWI Arc version 10.6 and ArcPro 2.3 compatible QAQC Toolset released in May to remove errors detected in the code. If you have downloaded the toolset since May, please re-download the newest version to avoid these errors.

The Wetlands Data Verification Toolset is a user-friendly tool designed to automate the quality control functions necessary to ensure your data submission meets the federal standard. The tool is intended to be integrated and used at all levels of data collection from data creation, modification, verification and submission. The tool is designed to address specific geospatial errors, digital anomalies and logic checks. The toolset was created using ESRI Model builder and is compatible with ESRI’s Arc Desktop and ArcPro versions.

Wetland Breaking News: July 2019

  Wetland Breaking News: July 2019

 

TX: Lawsuit Seeks Federal Habitat Protection for Two Central Texas Salamanders

Contact: Elise Bennett – Center for Biological Diversity – June 3, 2019
The Center for Biological Diversity today sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for failing to designate critical habitat in central Texas for the Georgetown salamander and Salado salamander. Today’s lawsuit, filed in the District Court for the District of Columbia, notes that Endangered Species Act habitat safeguards are more than five years overdue. The agency’s delay follows a pattern of missed statutory deadlines for these species’ protection. Read full press release here.

UT: A tiny creature threatens Utah’s $1.8 billion Lake Powell pipeline

By Brian Maffly – The Salt Lake Tribune – June 21, 2019
Utah’s push to develop the $1.8 billion Lake Powell pipeline, held up for years by political wrangling, funding feuds, reams of red tape and massive amounts of paperwork, is now being threatened by a tiny creature: the quagga mussel. The nonnative mollusk, infesting Lake Powell since 2013, has been wreaking havoc on boating facilities and Glen Canyon Dam and is the subject of an inconvenient quarantine process to ensure that what happens in Lake Powell stays in Lake Powell. Read full story here.

VT: Some skeptical of 15,000-acre wetland reclassification

By Keith Whitcomb, Jr. – Rutland Herald – June 19, 2019
Those wanting to know more about the implications behind the reclassification of 15,000 acres of wetlands can attend two public hearings next week. The Cornwall and Salisbury conservation commissions plan to petition the state to reclassify the Otter Creek Wetland Complex from Class II wetlands to Class I. The first meeting will be Tuesday in Cornwall from 6:30-7:30 p.m. at the Town Hall. The second will be from 6:30-7:30 p.m. June 27 in Salisbury at Salisbury Congregational Church. The wetlands in question extend from Cornwall to Brandon. The Brandon Select Board has named Selectman Tim Guiles as its liaison to the Steering Committee. Guiles gave an update on the process at the June 10 Brandon Select Board meeting, where some expressed skepticism of the reclassification effort, among them the leader of the Brandon-Leicester-Salisbury-Goshen Insect Control District. Read full story here.

WA: Construction company fined $202,500 and ordered to restore damaged wetlands

Contact: Larry Altose, Rachel McCrea and Joe Burcar – Washington Department of Ecology – July 8, 2019
The Washington Department of Ecology has fined Stetson Heights LLC $202,500 and ordered it to take corrective action after the company caused significant damage to wetlands that flow to streams with runs of salmon and steelhead trout in Port Orchard. Stetson Heights LLC cleared more than 80 steeply sloped acres on Glenwood Road SW in 2018 without protecting the bare ground from stormwater erosion. Stormwater from autumn rains flowed from the cleared land as muddy water. By late fall, up to 4 feet of mud-covered parts of wetlands and streams on – and adjacent to – the project property. Read full story here.

WA: Legal victory holds Canadian company accountable for polluting the upper Columbia River

By Cheryl Ann Bishop – Washington Department of Ecology – June 14, 2019
In a big win for the Colville Tribes and Washington State, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear a landmark environmental case this week. The Supreme Court's denial leaves a September 2018 Ninth Circuit ruling in place, awarding more than $8 million in costs to the Colville Tribes and holding Teck Metals, a Canadian mining company, liable for nearly 10 million tons of toxic wastes that the company discharged into the upper Columbia River. This decision marks a major step forward for recovering upper Columbia River valley cleanup costs and natural resource damages. Read full blog post here.


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Wetland Breaking News: July 2019Wetland Science News


Watershed Moment: “Ephemeral” Streams Debate Could Reshape Ohio Valley Waterways

By Liam Niemeyer – WOUB – July 5, 2019
West Liberty University Professor Zachary Loughman has dedicated his professional life to crustaceans – specifically freshwater crayfish. His team has been all over Appalachia and the Ohio Valley searching streams, wetlands, and marshes to document thousands of crayfish, some of them undiscovered species. His students even named one after him. Yet with each new species Loughman discovers, he worries that the habitats of these unique animals may be at risk in the future. Some crayfish he studies live in wetlands and streams that are considered “ephemeral,” which means they only occasionally have water during events like heavy rainfall. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will decide over the next six months whether to follow through with a Trump administration executive order that would dramatically change federal protections for such streams and wetlands. Read full story here.

In Greenland’s Melting Ice, A Warning on Hard Climate Choices

By Jon Gertner – Yale Environment 360 – June 27, 2019
The heat wave arrived early this spring — a shroud of temperate air, sweeping in during early June, which enveloped the Northern Hemisphere’s biggest ice sheet in a stifling hug. At its peak, nearly 45 percent of Greenland’s frozen surface turned to meltwater, coloring the huge white expanse with sapphire lakes and lapis streams. During the warmest stretch, runoff from the ice sheet amounted to about 2 billion tons, which meant that at the same time Greenland was losing water, the North Atlantic was gaining it. Some areas on the island were 40 degrees Fahrenheit above normal for this time of year. Read full story here.

Growing Water

By Brian Richter – Sustainable Waters – June 24, 2019
In recent posts I’ve highlighted the stellar efforts of many cities in water-scarce regions to reduce their water use as a strategy for avoiding water shortages. But none of these water-smart cities is telling their citizens the whole truth. Truth is, virtually none of these cities is going to enjoy a secure water future unless farmers are willing to conserve a lot of water as well. That’s because most cities share their water sources – rivers, aquifers, lakes – with farmers. And farmers consume the lion’s share of the water: In the Western US, 86% of all consumptive water use goes to irrigated farms. That means that even if Western cities such as Los Angeles, Phoenix, or Denver were able to cut their water consumption in half, it wouldn’t do much to lessen the overall stress on the West’s over-taxed water sources. Read full story here.

Scientists Zero in on Trees as a Surprisingly Large Source of Methane

By Fred Pearce – Yale Environment 360 – June 24, 2019 – Video
There are many mysteries in the Amazon. Until recently, one of the most troubling was the vast methane emissions emerging from the rainforest that were observed by satellites but that nobody could find on the ground. Around 20 million tons was simply unaccounted for. Then Sunitha Pangala, a British post-doc researcher, spent two months traveling the Amazon’s waterways strapping gas-measuring equipment to thousands of trees. She found that trees, especially in the extensive flooded forests, were stimulating methane production in the waterlogged soils and mainlining it into the atmosphere. Read full story here.

Aggressive, non-native wetland plants squelch species richness more than dominant natives do

By Diana Yates, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign – Phys.org – June 19, 2019
Dominant, non-native plants reduce wetland biodiversity and abundance more than native plants do; researchers report in the journal Ecology Letters. Even native plants that dominate wetland landscapes play better with others, the team found. The dominant non-natives are not just choking out many other plants, the researchers report. They also have a broad ecological footprint, taking over wetlands on a regional level, rather than just in individual sites. This negatively affects populations of birds and insects that rely on the native wetlands. Read full story here.

Data Highlight State-by-State Benefits of Federal Natural Disaster Mitigation Grants

By Anne Stauffer, Colin Foard & Errol Spence – PEW – June 17, 2019
Every federal grant dollar spent on natural disaster mitigation projects, such as elevating buildings or retrofitting infrastructure to reduce the impact of future events, saves $6 on average in post disaster recovery costs, according to a 2018 study by the National Institute of Building Sciences (NIBS). But as with all federal spending, the outcomes differ from state to state, with estimated benefits ranging from nearly $7 saved for each $1 spent in Kansas to just over $3 for every $1 invested in California between 1993 and 2016. Read full story here.

 

 The Montana Wildlife and Transportation
Webpage is Now Live!
 

This new webpage is a product of the Montana Wildlife & Transportation Summit (Summit) that was held on Wetland Breaking News: Julyl 2019December 4 and 5, 2018 at Carroll College in Helena, Montana. The Summit was co-convened by the Montana Governor's office, Montana Department of Transportation (MDT), Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP), Western Transportation Institute (WTI), and Montanans for Safe Wildlife Passage (MSWP). While there is more to come with the webpage, there is some great information posted right now, including the Final Summit Report, Summit presentations and other wildlife-related links.

The Summit Final Report highlights the recommendations made at the Summit and also the first commitments made by MDT, FWP and MSWP. The webpage will continue to be updated as work continues on the complex issues involving wildlife and transportation.

Wetland Breaking News: July 2019

  

 

Wetland Breaking News: July 2019Resources and Publications


National Wetland Plant List: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Public Notices 2019 Revisions

By Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard, P.L.L.C. – JD Supra – June 17, 2019
The United States Army Corps of Engineers (“Corps”) published a June 10th Notice to the Federal Register announcing the availability of the final 2019 National Wetland Plant List (“NWPL”). See 84 Fed. Reg. 26824. The Corps developed a 2019 NWPL as part of an interagency effort with the United States Environmental Protection Agency, United States Fish and Wildlife Service and the United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service. The NWPL is used to determine whether the hydrophytic vegetation parameter is met when conducting wetland delineations under the Clean Water Act and Wetland Conservation Provisions of the Food Security Act. Read full story here.

2019 Progress Report of the Parties - Great Lakes

Binational.net – June 13, 2019
Canada and the United States are pleased to release the second Progress Report of the Parties, pursuant to the 2012 Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement (GLWQA). The 2019 Progress Report of the Parties documents the binational and domestic activities and accomplishments of Canada and the United States in implementing the 2012 GLWQA over 2017 to 2019. The Report documents the significant accomplishments achieved through the cooperation of many partners on both sides of the border. These efforts will be discussed at the 2019 Great Lakes Public Forum. Read more and download the report here.

Are Conservation Programs Effective? Evaluating a Collaborative Approach to Improve Water Quality

By Sridhar Vedachalam, Ph.D., Max H. Cassell, Eric A. Heath – Northeast-Midwest Institute – June 2019
The Mississippi River Basin is the largest watershed in the United States, draining approximately 40% of the land area in the lower 48 states. Agriculture is the dominant industry in the Basin, impacting land-use and water quality. Heavy use of fertilizers and manure on agricultural fields has substantially contributed to high levels of nitrogen and phosphorusacross the Basin, resulting in algal blooms, contaminated drinking water, and “dead zones” in open waters.A focus on addressing the problem at the source has led the federal government to invest significantly in conservation programsthrough farmer education, outreach, and cost-sharing of practices that aim to improve soil health and water quality.One such conservation program, the Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP)–implemented by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) –is designed to bring together upstream farmers and downstream stakeholders such as cities, water and wastewater utilities, and other watershed preservation groups. Read report here.


PotpourriWetland Breaking News: July 2019


Klemek column: Two secretive species of wetland birds

By Blane Klemek – DL-Online – July 5, 2019
A few days ago, after a long day at work, I walked down to little Assawa Lake behind my house to say hello. My favorite month of June, nearly gone, replete with splendid greenery, warmth, and heavy with the scent of lush vegetation surrounding this serene and productive basin, provides an ambiance unlike at any other time of the year. As I stood quietly before the lake enjoying the calm water, scenery, and birdlife, I became aware that the springtime cacophony of singing, territorial male red-winged blackbirds was absent already, yet other birds were present everywhere, including the redwings, which were busy feeding hungry mouths in nearby nests scattered throughout cattail beds. Read full story here.

Nature-Based Solutions: The Missing Ingredient in Climate Adaptation?

State of the Planet – Earth Institute June 28, 2019
The upcoming United Nations Climate Action Summit in September 2019 will attempt to bring about transformative change and resounding actions to accelerate climate solutions aligned with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Of the summit’s six action areas, the concept of nature-based solutions has caught the imagination of conservation supporters and development practitioners alike. Read full blog post here.

The Best Way to Explore Water Trails May be By Canoe

Pennsylvania – DCNR – June 26, 2019
Pennsylvania is home to many great hiking trails, but the opportunities for day trips and long-distance treks don’t stop at the water’s edge. Kayaks are an extremely popular way to get around on the water, they can often be seen strapped to the tops of cars heading for the lake or river. However, there’s still plenty of room on the water for its more antiquated counterpart, the canoe. Read full story here.

B.C.'s most endangered amphibians get new lease on life

By Mia Gordon – The Weather Network – June 25, 2019
They may be the most endangered amphibian in British Columbia, but this week more than 1,600 northern leopard frog tadpoles found their way back into the wild with the help of the Vancouver Aquarium. Read full story here.

The U.S. government has studied the longest oil spill in history — 14 years after the leak began

By Darryl Fears – The Washington Post – June 24, 2019
The federal government’s first study of the nearly 15-year-long oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico estimates that up to 108 barrels per day — more than 4,500 gallons — is flowing from a site where an oil company’s platform and wells were destroyed during a hurricane. Monday’s report, by two scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and a Florida State University professor, joined several others in disputing the company’s claim that only one drop of oil per minute is being released from a small area covered in mud, amounting to less than three gallons each day. Read full story here.

How Can We All Help Conserve Nature?

By Marcia C. Muñoz, Mireia Valle, Rachel L. White and Rodolfo Jaffé – Frontiers for Young Minds – June 21, 2019
We often forget how much humans depend on nature. The term that encompasses living organisms and the forces responsible for the physical world, such as the weather, mountains, oceans, and landscapes. Even city-dwellers living in modern skyscrapers need air to breathe, water to drink, and food to eat, all of which are provided by nature. True, you can buy bottled water and ready-to-eat meals in supermarkets, but they were not produced there. Some fruits and vegetables, for example, only grow in tropical countries and cross the globe in refrigerated ship containers, to arrive just ripe to your local supermarket. All drinking water ultimately comes from a natural source, since we still do not have the technology to manufacture large amounts of water in the laboratory [1]. The same applies to the air we breathe, which is purified and oxygenated by plants. So, when we speak about preserving nature, we are really also talking about preserving ourselves. Read full article here.

Mixed Reviews for EPA Move to Speed Energy Permits

By Juliet Eilperin and Brady Dennis – ENR – June 19, 2019
The outlook for new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency guidance aimed at streamlining permit approvals for natural gas pipelines and other energy infrastructure projects is murky, at best, and could lead to more frequent legal skirmishes, some observers say. EPA released guidance on June 7 that would limit the time for states and tribes to evaluate federal energy projects within state lines. Under Section 401 of the Clean Water Act, states and tribes can impose conditions on permit approvals, or even deny permits, if projects could harm water quality. The new guidance is not legally binding, but EPA plans to release a proposed rule by August to codify what the June 7 document spells out. Read full story here.

Habitat Restoration Isn't Just for Professionals

By Barry Nerhus – Scientific American – June 12, 2019
Save the whales. The polar bears. The honeybees. You’ve undoubtedly encountered one or all of these conservation campaigns over the course of your lifetime. You’ll probably encounter many more as our earth’s wildlife continues to hurdle towards mass extinction at an alarming rate. Approximately one eighth of our planet’s plant and animal species are currently at risk. What may seem like a small fraction on its own, actually works out to around one million endangered or vulnerable species when extrapolated. That’s no small figure. Read full blog post here.

RiverSmart helps turn home sweet home into home sweet watershed

By Laura Todd – Bay Journal – June 5, 2019
Standing in a forested wetland, you are surrounded by native sweetbay magnolia (Magnolia virginiana) trees. The sweet, lemony scent of magnolia blooms fills the summer air. You are lucky to bear witness to a rare plant community — the magnolia bog. The National Park Service has determined that only 13 of these wetland areas, rich with clusters of native magnolia trees, remain in the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Four of these 13 exist within the boundaries of Oxon Run Parkway, a 126-acre forest in the District of Columbia that is managed by the National Park Service. Read full article here.
 Wetland Breaking News: July 2019

Ducks Unlimited Canada completes historic Rescue Our Wetlands campaign

Contact: Gregg Powers – Ducks Unlimited – June 1, 2019
Ducks Unlimited, Ducks Unlimited Canada, Ducks Unlimited de Mexico and Wetlands America Trust committed to making DU’s vision of abundant wetlands a reality through our ambitious Rescue Our Wetlands campaign. The $2 billion continental campaign was launched seven years ago and will go down as one of the largest conservation campaigns in history. The money raised is already being put to work conserving, restoring and protecting critical wetland habitat across North America. Ducks Unlimited President Rogers Hoyt announced during DU’s 82nd National Convention in Hawaii that the campaign, which concluded in December 2018, vastly exceeded the $2 billion goal, raising an astonishing $2.34 billion from more than 2 million donors and conserving 2,236,435 acres. Read full press release here.

 
Wetland Breaking News: July 2019

 Calendar of Events


WEBINARS
     
MEETINGS     
TRAINING  

 

Wetland Breaking News: July 2019

Special Events

BIOBLITZ 2019
July 19-20, 2019
Pickerington, OH

Wetland Explorations: Searching for Aquatic Critters and Amazing Plants
July 27, 2019
Pickerington, OH

Watching Monarhs
September 7, 2019
East Bethany, NY

National Estuaries Week
September 14-21, 2019

Voice of the Wetlands Festival
October 11-13, 2019
Houoma, LA

WEBINARS  
     
JULY 2019   
       
July 25, 2019
3:00 p.m. ET 
  U.S. Geological Survey Webinar: Climate Projections and the Stories They Tell  
     
July 31, 2019
3:00 p.m. ET  
  ASWM Members’ Webinar: Modeling Impacts of Climate Change and Land-use Change on Prairie Pothole Wetlands  
     
AUGUST 2019  
       
August 1, 2019
1:00 p.m. ET  
  EBM Tools Network Webinar: Management and evolution give hope to coral reefs facing the effects of climat change  
       
August 5, 2019
3:00 p.m. ET  
  ASWM-NRCS Wetland Training Webinar 7: What are the Choices and Benefits? Matching Objectives to Wetland Programs and Getting Additional Help  
       
August 14, 2019
1:00 p.m. ET  
  American Water Resources Association: Webinar: The Struggle to Define “Waters of the United States”  
       
August 14, 2019
3:00 p.m. ET  
  ASWM Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Mapping Wetland Inundation Dynamics and Wetland Change Using Google Earth Engine   
       
SEPTEMBER 2019  
       
September 10, 2019
2:00 p.m. ET 
  Land Trust Alliance Webinar: Considering Climate Change in Conservation Planning   
     
September 18, 2019
1:00 p.m. ET 
  Center for Watershed Protection Webcast 4: Stormwater Practice Design, Installation and Maintenance  
       
OCTOBER 2019     
       
October 16, 2019
1:00 p.m. ET 
 
  Center for Watershed Protection Webcast 5: Monitoring for Stream Restoration and Green Infrastructure Practices  
       

 

MEETINGS
 
JULY 2019
     
July 24-25, 2019
Cambridge, OH
  Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative (APRI) Conference: Restoring Productive Forest on Mine Lands in Ohio
July 25-31, 2019
Dublin, Ireland
20th INUA Congress: Life on the Edge
   
July 27-31, 2019
Tucson, AZ
  Botanical Society of America: Botany 2019
     
AUGUST 2019   
     
August 3, 2019
Huron, OH
  Ohio Wetlands Association Symposium: Wetlands Mitigating Harmful Algal Blooms
     
August 5-6, 2019
Huntington, PA
  Mid-Atlantic Invasive Plant Council Conference
   
August 11-16, 2019
Louisville, KY
Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting
   
August 18-22, 2019
Atlanta, GA
StormCon
   
August 21-25, 2019
Albuquerque, NM
  Western Field Ornithologist 44th Annual Conference
     
SEPTEMBER 2019
     
September 11-12, 2019
Cleveland, OH
  Great Lakes Area of Concern Conference
   
September 22-25, 2019
hoenix, AZ
  Geological Society of American Annual Meeting
   
September 22-26, 2019
Sacramento, CA
International Conference on Ecology Transportation

   
September 23-29, 2019
New York, NY
  Climate Week 2019
   
September 29-
October 3, 2019

Reno, NV
  American Fisheries Society and the Wildlife Society Annual Meeting
     
OCTOBER 2019  
     

October 8-10, 2019
Pittsburgh, PA

Natural Areas Association: Natural Areas Conference

     
October 9-13, 2019
Fort Collins, CO
  Society of Environmental Journalists Conference
   
October 11-13, 2019
Wilmington, NC
  Diamondback Terrapin Working Group: 8th Symposium on the Ecology, Status, and Conservation of the Diamondback Terrapin
   
October 11-14, 2019
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI
  Sustainability & Development Conference
   
October 15-17, 2019
Atlantic City, NJ
  New Jersey Association for Floodplain Management Conference: One Water: Connecting the Dots of Floodplain Management
   
October 17-19, 2019
Raleigh, NC
  Land Trust Alliance Rally 2019
   
October 21-22, 2019
Oakland, CA
  San Francisco Estuary Partnership: State of teh Estuary Conference

October 27-30, 2019
Spokane, WA

AASHE Conference: Co-Creating a Sustainable Economy

     
NOVEMBER 2019
     
November 1-3, 2019
aizhou, China
  Invasion Ecology Lab, Taizhou University Conference: Current and Emerging Topics in Global Change Ecology of Plants
   
November 3-7, 2019
Mobile, AL
  CERF 2019 25th Biennial Conference: Responsive-Relevant-Ready
   
November 3-7, 2019
Salt Lake City, UT
  American Water Resources Association: Annual Water Resources Conference
   
November 8-10, 2019
University of Arizona
Tucson, AZ
  Society for Ecological Restoration Annual Conference
Abstracts and proposals due by August 30, 2019
   
November 15-17, 2019
Shepherdstown, WV
 

Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Forum: Better Together: Diverse and Innovative Collaborations for the Chesapeake Watershed

     
DECEMBER 2019
     
December 10-14, 2019
Washington, DC
  AGU Fall Meeting: Science Communication: A Sharing Science Room
     
JANUARY 2020
     
January 3-7, 2020
Pacific Grove, CA
  American Society of Naturalists Stand Alone Meeting
     
January 29-30, 2020
Wlminton, DE
  Delaware Wetlands Conference 2020
Call for Abstract begins July 31, 2019
     
FEBRUARY 2020
     
February 18-20, 2020
Elkhart Lake, WI
  Wisconsin Wetlands Association: 25th Annual Wetland Science Conference
Call for Symposium and Workshop Proposals due: September 27, 2019
     
MARCH 2020
     
March 4-5, 2020
Washington, DC
  Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: Great Lakes Day 2020

     
March 23-26, 2020
Austin, TX
  American Water Resources Association Conference: Geospatial Water Technology Conference Complex Systems
     
JUNE 2020
     
June 7-11, 2020
Quebec City, Canada
  Canadian Land Reclamation Association (CLRA), the Society for Ecological Restoration (SER) and the Society of Wetland Scientists (SWS) joint Conference: From Reclaiming to Restoring and Rewilding
     
     

Eagle Hill Institute 2019 Seminars

TRAINING/WORKSHOPS
 
JULY 2019

July 21-27, 2019
Steuben, ME

Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Ericaceae and Heathland Communities of Coastal Maine

   
July 21-27, 2019
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Dragonflies and Damselflies: Field Techniques, Identification, and Natural History
   

July 21-27, 2019
Steuben, ME

Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars:  Drawing and Painting Birds
     
July 22, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Clean Water Rule (2019 Version)
     
July 22-26, 2019
Online
Field Days: July 29-31, 2019
  The Swamp School Course: Accelerated Online Wetland Delineation Training
     
July 22-26, 2019
Walpole, ME
  Center for Wildlife Studies Course: Intro to Mapping Wildlife Habitat in QGIS
     
July 22-August 2, 2019
Missoula, MT 
  Flathead Lake Biological Station Course: Alpine Ecology 
   

July 22-August 2, 2019
Missoula, MT

Flathead Lake Biological Station Course: Stream Ecology
   
July 22-August 2, 2019
Missoula, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station Course: Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Remote Sensing for Freshwater Ecology
   

July 22-August 5, 2019
Online

The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
Other dates offered

July 28-August 2, 2019
Boston University 
Ecological Forecasting 

July 28-August 3, 2019
Steuben, ME

Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Mushroom Identification for the Novice; Focus on Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms

July 28-August 3, 2019
Steuben, ME

Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Leaf and Stem Mining Insects
July 28-August 10, 2019
Bar Harbor, ME  
College of the Atlantic Field Botany: Plants of New England 
   
July 29-August 2, 2019
Shepherdstown, WV
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Course: Restoration Policy, Planning, and Partnering
     
July 30-August 2, 2019
Jackman, ME
  Center for Wildlife Studies Course: Introduction for Ecological Modeling in R
     
AUGUST 2019
     
August 1-2, 2019
Chicago, IL
  Association of Climate Chanage Officers: Climate Fundamental Academy: Central Florida Workshop
     
August 3, 2019
Lake Ariel, PA
  Lacawac Sanctuary Field Station and Environmental Education Center Workshop: Harmful Alga Blooms 
   
August 4-10, 2019
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Microlepidoptera: Collection, Preparation, Dissection, Identification, and Natural History

August 4-10, 2019
Steuben, ME

Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Submersed and Floating Aquatic Plants
   
August 5-8, 2019
Kansas City Area, KS
  Institute of Botanical Training, LLC Course: Wetland Flora Workshop
   
August 5-9, 2019
Savannah, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
August 5-9, 2019
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Managing Ecological Date in R: Introduction to Data Science and the Art of Wrangling for Ecologist
   
August 5-16, 2019
Missoula, MT 
  Flathead Lake Biological Station Course: Ecology of Forests and Grasslands 
   
August 5-16, 2019
Missoula, MT
  Flathead Lake Biological Station Course: Lake Ecology
   
August 5-October 28, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Botanist
     
August 6-9, 2019
Jackman, ME
  Center for Wildlife Studies Course: Generalized Line Models for Ecologist in R
   
August 7-9, 2019
Ann Arbor, MI
  CUAHSI: Open Source Urban Hydrology Sensor Bootcamp

August 9, 2019
Marysville, WA

Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Beginners Plant ID for Wetland Delineation

August 11-17, 2019
Steuben, ME

Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Lichens, Biofilms, and Stone

August 11-17, 2019
Steuben, ME

Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: EPT Taxonomy and Ecology
   
August 12-16, 2019
Moss Landing, CA
  5-Day General CRAM Training

   
August 12-16, 2019
South Lake Tahoe, CA
  5-Day General CRAM Training
   
August 12-16, 2019
Shepherdstown, WV
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Course: Habitat Conservation Planning for Endangered Species
   
August 12-16, 2019
Online
Field Days
August 21-22, 2019
  The Swamp School Blended Online and Field Wetland Delineation Workshop
   
August 12-September 6, 2019
Online
 

The Swamp School Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment
Other dates offered

August 13-14, 2019
Atlanta, GA

Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Hydrophytic Vegetation (Piedmont)

August 13-16, 2019
Hays, KS

Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Wetlands and Wetland Delineators

August 18-24, 2019
Steuben, ME

Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Mushroom Microscopy: An Exploration of the Intricate Microscopic World of Mushrooms

August 18-24, 2019
Steuben, ME

Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Taxonomy and Biology of Ferns and Lycophytes

August 18-24, 2019
Steuben, ME

Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Introduction to Bird Banding, Research, and Monitoring for Songbirds and Raptors
   
August 19-22, 2019
Aliquippa, PA
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
     
August 19-September 13, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Developing Wetland Water Budget 2019
Other dates offered
   
August 20-21, 2019
Marquette, MI
  Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Northern Michigan Wetland Plant Identification
   
August 20-21, 2019
Niles, MI
  Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Wetlands Grass Identification
   
August 26-29, 2019
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Grasses, Sedges and Rushes
     
August 28, 2019
Freeport, ME
  Cumberland County Soil & Water Conservation District: Wetland Identification and Protection Workshop
     
September 2019
     
September 4, 2019
Georgetown, ME
  Maine Association of Wetland Scientist: 2019 Soils and Natural Resouroces Workshop
     
September 4, 2019
Hatley, WI
  Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Hands-on Aquatic Plan ID Workshop
   
September 5-6, 2019
Hilliard, OH
  Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Ohio Rapid Assessment Method (ORAM) for Wetlands
September 6-8, 2019
Steuben, ME
Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Asteraceae: Fall Botanizing and Botanical Surveys
   
September 9-November 29, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
September 10-12, 2019
Avondale, PA
CUAHSI Workshop: DIY Water Monitoring Data Portals, and Watershed Modeling
September 16-17, 2019
St. Michaels, MD
Environmental Concern Course: Evaluating Hydric Soils in the Field
   
September 16-20, 2019
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Essentials of Spatial Ecology: GIS Analysis with R, QGIS and Google Earth Engine
   
September 16-October 11, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessment
   
September 17-18, 2019
Toms River, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Vegetation Identification for Wetland Delineation: South
September 17-19, 2019
Pocono Mountains, PA
The Swamp School Workshop: Wetland Plant ID 
   
September 19, 2019
Tuckerton, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants
   
September 23-25, 2019
New Brunswick NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
     
September 23-25, 2019
New Brunswick NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Soils and Site Evaluation for Septic Disposal Systems and Stormwater BMPs
   
September 23-26, 2019
Hilliard, OH
  Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Wetland Delinetation
   
September 23-27, 2019
Trout Lake Station
Boulder Junction, WI
  North Temperate Lakes LTER and the Universtiy of Wisconsin-Madion's Trout Lake State: Aquatic Sensors Workshop
     
September 25, 2019
Spokane, WA
  Washington Department of Ecology Course: Using the Credit-Debit Method for Estimating Mitigation Needs
   
September 25-26, 2019
Niles, MI 
Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Advanced Wetland Delineation
   
September 27-29, 2019
Steuben, ME
Eagle Hill Natural History Science Fall Workshop: Fall Maine Mushrooms
   
September 30
-October 4, 2019

St. Michaels, MD
Environmental Concern Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
     
October 2019
     
October 1, 2019
Vernon, WA
  Washington Department of Ecology Course: Using Field Indicators for Hydric Soils 
     
October 2-4, 2019
Hillsborough, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Wetland Construction: Principles, Planning and Design
   
October 7-11, 2019
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Basic Wetland Delineation 
October 7-November 1, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2019
Other dates offered
   
October 11-13, 2019
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Natural History Science Fall Workshop: Bryophytes: Mosses and Liverworts
   
October 14-18, 2019
Shepherdstown, WV
  Stream Mechanics Workshop: Stream Functions Pyramid
   
October 14-November 8, 2019
Onlinle
  The Swamp School Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment
Other dates offered
   
October 15, 2019
Boulder, CO 
CUAHSI Workshop: The Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System 
   
October 21-24, 2019
Pittsburgh, PA
  The Swamp School Workshop: Principles of Wetland Design
   
October 22-25, 2019
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Methodology for Delineating Wetlands
   
October 23, 2019
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Introduction to Wetland Identification
   
October 25-27, 2019
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Natural History Science Fall Workshop: Crustose and Foliose Lichens
     
NOVEMBER 2019   
     
November 7-8 2019
Somerset, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Lake Management
   
November 11-13, 2019
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Winter Woody Plant ID
   
November 11-January 31, 2019 
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design
Other dates offered
   
November 14-15, 2019
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
   
November 18-19, 2019
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands, and Hydrology (Piedmont)
   
November 25-
December 23, 2019

Online
  The Swamp School Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment
     
   DECEMBER 2019
     
December 2-5, 2019
Atlanta, GA 
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
   
December 2-29, 2019 Online 
  The Swamp School Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2019
   
December 16-27, 2019
Online 
  The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
 
     

 

 

 

INDEX

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • WOTUS debate moves to Senate committee
  • EPA Issues Revised CWA Section 401 Guidance to States
  • ‘A major punch in the gut’: Midwest rains projected to create near-record dead zone in Gulf

NATIONAL NEWS

  • Keystone XL pipeline opponents pursue new legal challenge
  • Tribe seeks to set its own water standards
  • White House tells agencies they no longer have to weigh a project’s long-term climate impacts
  • Trump EPA finalizes rollback of key Obama climate rule that targeted coal plants
  • Former EPA leaders question agency’s direction under Trump
  • White House blocked intelligence agency’s written testimony calling climate change ‘possibly catastrophic’
  • Government argues for halt to youth climate lawsuit, saying here is no constitutional right to a stable climate

STATE NEWS

  • AK: EPA says report on Pebble Mine lacks detail, likely underestimates risks to water quality
  • CA/OR: Lawsuit Seeks Overdue Protection for Rare Salamander in California, Oregon
  • FL: Profiteering or preservation? Wetlands mitigation law reopens debate about if program works
  • FL: Florida Keys developer sentenced for illegally filling wetlands following Hurricane Irma
  • KS: Overland Park’s ‘floating wetland’ looks to have potential in fighting algae in South Lake Park
  • MD: Maryland estimate for seawalls against rising tides: $27 billion
  • MD: Species of Carnivorous Plant Found in Maryland
  • MA: Cape Communities Receive River & Wetland Restoration Grants
  • MI: Wetland Wanderings seek to spur citizen scientists
  • NY: DEC files appeal in effort to block National Fuel pipeliner
  • NC: 20 years in the making: Carteret's North River Wetland Preserve is state's largest saltwater marsh restoration
  • OR: GOP lawmakers skipped town to avoid a climate change vote. Then the governor called the police.
  • OR: Oregon House approves ditch-cleaning bill over environmentalist complaints
  • TX: Lawsuit Seeks Federal Habitat Protection for Two Central Texas Salamanders
  • UT: A tiny creature threatens Utah’s $1.8 billion Lake Powell pipeline
  • VT: Some skeptical of 15,000-acre wetland reclassification
  • WA: Construction company fined $202,500 and ordered to restore damaged wetlands
  • WA: Legal victory holds Canadian company accountable for polluting the upper Columbia River
 

Wetland Breaking News: July 2019


INDEX


Editor's Choice

National News

State News

Wetland Science News

Resources & Publications

Potpouri

Calendar of Events

WETLAND SCIENCE NEWS

  • Watershed Moment: “Ephemeral” Streams Debate Could Reshape Ohio Valley Waterways
  • In Greenland’s Melting Ice, A Warning on Hard Climate Choices
  • Growing Water
  • Scientists Zero in on Trees as a Surprisingly Large Source of Methane
  • Aggressive, non-native wetland plants squelch species richness more than dominant natives do
  • Data Highlight State-by-State Benefits of Federal Natural Disaster Mitigation Grants

RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONS

  • National Wetland Plant List: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Public Notices 2019 Revisions
  • 2019 Progress Report of the Parties - Great Lakes
  • Are Conservation Programs Effective? Evaluating a Collaborative Approach to Improve Water Quality

POTOURRI

  • Klemek column: Two secretive species of wetland birds
  • Nature-Based Solutions: The Missing Ingredient in Climate Adaptation?
  • The Best Way to Explore Water Trails May be By Canoe
  • B.C.'s most endangered amphibians get new lease on life
  • The U.S. government has studied the longest oil spill in history — 14 years after the leak began
  • How Can We All Help Conserve Nature?
  • Mixed Reviews for EPA Move to Speed Energy Permits
  • Habitat Restoration Isn't Just for Professionals
  • RiverSmart helps turn home sweet home into home sweet watershed
  • Ducks Unlimited Canada completes historic Rescue Our Wetlands campaign

Wetland Breaking News: July 2019

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Webinars

June 2019

  • Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Mapping Thirty Years of Wetland Surface Water Dynamics Using Landsat Satellite Imagery: Implications for Climate Change and Species Management
  • American Trails Webinar: Designing Near Wetlands, Streams, Forests, and Other Environmental Resources
  • ASWM - EPA Region 10 Tribal Wetland Training Webinar: Balancing Tribal Economic Development, Sustainable Cultural Uses and Wetland/Aquatic Resource Protection and Restoration
  • Compensatory Mitigation Webinar 7: An Ecological Framework for Compensatory Mitigation: Anticipating the Unexpected

July 2019

  • EBM Tools Network Webinar: A Toolkit for Managing Cultural Resources in Marine Protected Areas
  • American Water Resources Association Webinar: Catchment Carbon Offsets Trial
  • U.S. Geological Survey Webinar: Climate Projections and the Stories They Tell

September 2019

  • Land Trust Alliance Webinar: Considering Climate Change in Conservation Planning
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webcast 4: Stormwater Practice Design, Installation and Maintenance

October 2019

  • Center for Watershed Protection Webcast 5: Monitoring for Stream Restoration and Green Infrastructure Practices

 

MEETINGSWetland Breaking News: July 2019

June 2019

  • Joint Conference of the Society for the Study of Evolution, the Society of Systematic Biologists, and the American Society of Naturalist: Evolution Conference
  • 12th North American Forest Ecology Workshop: Forests on the Edge: Forest Ecology in Rapidly Changing Conditions

July 2019

  • Society for Conservation GIS Annual Conference
  • Appalachian Regional Reforestation Initiative (ARRI) Conference: Restoring Productive Forest on Mine Lands in Ohio
  • 20th INUA Congress: Life on the Edge
  • Botanical Society of America: Botany 2019

August 2019

  • Ohio Wetlands Association Symposium: Wetlands Mitigating Harmful Algal Blooms
  • Mid-Atlantic Invasive Plant Council Conference
  • Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting 
  • StormCon
  • Western Field Ornithologist 44th Annual Conference

September 2019

  • Great Lakes Area of Concern Conference
  • Geological Society of America Annual Meeting
  • International Conference on Ecology & Transportation
  • Climate Week 2019
  • American Fisheries Society and the Wildlife Society Annual Meeting

October 2019

  • Natural Areas Association: Natural Areas Conference
  • Diamondback Terrapin Working Group: 8th Symposium on the Ecology, Status, and Conservation of the Diamondback Terrapin
  • Sustainability & Development Conference
  • New Jersey Association for Floodplain Management Conference: One Water: Connecting the Dots of Floodplain Management
  • Land Trust Alliance Rally 2019
  • San Francisco Estuary Partnership: State of the Estuary Conference
  • AASHE Conference: Co-Creating a Sustainable Economy

November 2019

  • Invasion Ecology Lab, Taizhou University Conference: Current and Emerging Topics in Global Change Ecology of Plants
  • CERF 2019 25th Biennial Conference: Responsive-Relevant-Ready
  • American Water Resources Association: Annual Water Resources Conference
  • Society for Ecological Restoration Annual Conference
  • Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Forum: Better Together: Diverse and Innovative Collaborations for the Chesapeake Watershed

December 2019Wetland Breaking News: July 2019

  • AGU Fall Meeting: Science Communication: A Sharing Science Room

February 2020

  • Wisconsin Wetlands Association: 25th Annual Wetland Science Conference

March 2020

  • Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: Great Lakes Day 2020

 

Training/Workshops

June 2019

  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Sedges and Rushes: Identification and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Insect and Spider Biology “Through the Lens”
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Advanced Hydric Soils Online with Field Practicum 
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Identifying Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
  • Shoals Marine Laboratory Course: Climate Change and the Gulf of Maine
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station Course: Conservation Ecology
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station Course: Environmental Sensors: Designing, Building and Deploying in the Field
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station Course: Field Ecology
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station Course: Seminars in Ecology and Resource Management
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Planning Hydrology, Vegetation, and Soils for Constructed Wetlands
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Beginners Plant ID for Wetland Delineation
  • Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences: Coral Reef Ecology: Reef Response to Environmental Change

July 2019

  • W. K. Kellogg Biological Station Course: Wetland Ecology and Management
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2019
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Survey of Grasses: Their Structure, Identification, and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Marine Benthic Invertebrates
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Graphite Illustration: Mastering 3-Dimentionality and Composition
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station Course: Landscape Ecology
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station Course: Aquatic Microbial Ecology
  • Rocky Mountain Field Course: Earth Corps Field Studies
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Monitoring Techniques
  • Isle Royale & Keweenaw Association: Keweenaw Plant I.D. Workshop
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Advanced Hydric Soils Online with Field Practicum  
  • QUBES Workshop: Evolution of Data in the Classroom: From Data to Data Science
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Wetland Identification, Delineation, and Ecology
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminar: Taxonomy and Natural History of Northeastern Caddisflies (Trichoptera)
  • Department of Forest and Rangeland Stewardship, Colorado State University Course: Western Ranch Management and Ecosystem Stewardship
  • Shoals Marine Laboratory Course: Integrated Ecosystem Research and Management
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Course: Wetland Plant Identification
  • The Swamp School Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment
  • Institute for Wetland & Environmental Education & Research: Plant ID Course: Basic Wetland Delineator Training
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Wetland Delineators
  • Institute of Botanical Training, LLC Course: Wetland Flora Workshop
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Ericaceae and Heathland Communities of Coastal Maine
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Dragonflies and Damselflies: Field Techniques, Identification, and Natural History
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Drawing and Painting Birds
  • Center for Wildlife Studies Course: Intro to Mapping Wildlife Habitat in QGIS
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station Course: Alpine Ecology
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station Course: Stream Ecology
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station Course: Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Remote Sensing for Freshwater Ecology
  • The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
  • Ecological Forecasting
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Mushroom Identification for the Novice; Focus on Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Leaf and Stem Mining Insects
  • College of the Atlantic Field Botany: Plants of New England
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Course: Restoration Policy, Planning, and Partnering
  • Center for Wildlife Studies Course: Introduction to Ecological Modeling in R

August 2019

  • Lacawac Sanctuary Field Station and Environmental Education Center Workshop: Harmful Algal Blooms
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Microlepidoptera: Collection, Preparation, Dissection, Identification, and Natural History
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Submersed and Floating Aquatic Plants
  • Institute of Botanical Training, LLC Course: Wetland Flora Workshop
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Managing Ecological Data in R: Introduction to Data Science and the Art of Wrangling for Ecologists
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station Course: Ecology of Forests and Grasslands
  • Flathead Lake Biological Station Course: Lake Ecology
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Botanist
  • Center for Wildlife Studies Course: Generalized Linear Models for Ecologist
  • CUAHSI: Open Source Urban Hydrology Sensor Bootcamp
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Beginners Plant ID for Wetland Delineation
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Lichens, Biofilms, and Stone
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: EPT Taxonomy and Ecology
  • 5-Day General CRAM Training
  • 5-Day General CRAM Training
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Course: Habitat Conservation Planning for Endangered Species 
  • The Swamp School Blended Online and Field Wetland Delineation Workshop 
  • The Swamp School Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training: Hydrophytic Vegetation (Piedmont)
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Plant Identification for Wetlands and Wetland Delineators
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Mushroom Microscopy: An Exploration of the Intricate Microscopic World of Mushrooms
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Taxonomy and Biology of Ferns and Lycophytes
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Field Seminars: Introduction to Bird Banding, Research, and Monitoring for Songbirds and Raptors
  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training 
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2019
  • Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Northern Michigan Wetland Plant Identification
  • Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Wetlands Grass Identification
  • Environmental Concern Course: Grasses. Sedges and Rushes

September 2019

  • Maine Association of Wetland Scientist: 2019 Soils and Natural Resources Workshop
  • Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Ohio Rapid Assessment Method (ORAM) for Wetlands
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Fall Workshop: Asteraceae: Fall Botanizing and Botanical Surveys
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
  • CUAHSI Workshop: DIY Water Monitoring Data Portals, and Watershed Modeling
  • Environmental Concern Course: Evaluating Hydric Soils in the Field 
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Essentials of Spatial Ecology: GIS Analysis with R, QGIS and Google Earth Engine
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Conducting Effective Ecological Risk Assessments 
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Vegetation Identification for Wetland Delineation: South
  • The Swamp School: Wetland Plant ID Workshop 
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants 
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Identification of Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Soils and Site Evaluation for Septic Disposal Systems and Stormwater BMPs
  • Midwest Biodiversity Institute Course: Wetland Delineation
  • North Temperate Lakes LTER and the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Trout Lake State: Aquatic Sensors Workshop
  • Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Advanced Wetland Delineation
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Fall Workshop: Fall Maine Mushrooms
  • Environmental Concern Course: Basic Wetland Delineation

October 2019

  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Wetland Construction: Principles, Planning and Design
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2019
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Fall Workshop: Bryophytes: Mosses and Liverworts
  • Stream Mechanics Workshop: Stream Functions Pyramid
  • The Swamp School Course: Basic Botany for Wetland Assessment
  • CUAHSI Workshop: The Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System 
  • The Swamp School Workshop: Principles of Wetland Design
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Methodology for Delineating Wetlands
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Introduction to Wetland Identification
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Fall Workshop: Crustose and Foliose Lichens

November 2019

  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Lake Management
  • Environmental Concern Course: Winter Woody Plant ID
  • The Swamp School Online Workshop: Principles of Wetland Design
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands, and Hydrology (Piedmont)
  • The Swamp School Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment

December 2019

  • The Swamp School Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2019
  • The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals

  
Wetland Breaking News: July 2019

Wetland Breaking News: July 2019

 

Wetland Breaking News:May 2019