Wetland Breaking News: November 2019

                  

IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

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 Wetland Breaking News: November2019

 

 




 

Editor's Note

Dear Wetlanders,

Well the frost and snow certainly hit the State of Maine with a whallop last week as well as much of the Midwest. Here in southern Maine we didn’t really get as much of the snow as we did ice and freezing temperatures in the teens and twenties. All I can say is, no matter how early or late in the season this weather hits us, it never gets any easier.

There are several interesting stories in the news from the past month to share with you, including a potential reinterpretation of Section 6 of the Coastal Barrier Resources Act that would allow sand mining in protected coastal refuges for the purpose of beach renourishment – see Editor’s Choice. Also, in Editor’s Choice is a great story highlighting the incredible work our partners at the National Wetlands Inventory do to help us identify and track wetlands across the Nation.

You’ll find a few articles on issues related to the Clean Water Act, including the Maui case and Waters of the U.S., in the Editor’s Choice, National News and State News sections. And for those of you who have been following the Conowingo Dam court case, you’ll be pleased to read about the $200 million settlement with the State of Maryland to clean up Susquehanna River under State News.

Wetland Breaking News will be getting a new identify and face lift starting in January 2020. We’ll still be reporting out on news stories related to the practice of wetland science, policy and management but after more than twenty years we felt it was worthy of a dust off. So, stay tuned for our new improved monthly news digest!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Marla J. Stelk
Editor
Wetland Breaking News

 

Wetland Breaking News: May 2019

   
                


Editor's ChoiceWetland Breaking News: November 2019


Trump Administration Makes It Easier to Dredge Protected Areas to Restore Beaches

By Christopher Flavelle – The New York Times – November 7, 2019
The Trump administration changed a 25-year-old policy to make it easier for coastal communities to take sand from protected ecosystems to improve their beaches. The shift makes it cheaper for some of the wealthiest communities in the country to replenish their beachfronts, which are increasingly under threat from more frequent and intense storms, rising seas and other effects of climate change. Critics say that comes at the expense of vulnerable coastal ecosystems. Read full story here.

Meet the feds who track changes in the nation's wetlands

Ariel Wittenberg – E&E News – November 7, 2019
When Megan Lang flies on airplanes with her children, she says she has to "fight them" for the window seat. Chief scientist at the Fish and Wildlife Service's National Wetlands Inventory, Lang leads a team working to track wetlands changes across the country. With a report due to Congress in 2022, she spends most of her days staring at satellite and other images finding and documenting wetlands. Her interest in what they look like from the air doesn't dissipate when she's off the clock. "When you fly to Florida, they usually fly along the coast, and I love seeing the Delmarva bays; I want to see them!" she said of elliptical-shaped depressions common in coastal Delaware and Maryland. "They are so beautiful. I just find the shapes so amazing, and to see them interspersed with the geometric features and man-made landscape, I just love that." With a Status and Trends report due in three years, Lang's team has been working since 2018 to review 5,048 control plots, each 4 square miles, randomly scattered across the country. NWI has been watching many of the plots — some containing wetlands, some not — since the program's inception, coming back to them roughly once a decade to see if there are any changes to aquatic resources. Read full story here.

Justices wrestle with reach of Clean Water Act

By John Kruzel – The Hill – November 6, 2019
The Supreme Court on Wednesday appeared divided over how to deal with polluted waters that flow indirectly into rivers and oceans that are regulated by the federal government as the justices heard oral arguments in a major case over the Clean Water Act. At issue in the case is whether Maui County in Hawaii violated the Clean Water Act by injecting wastewater underground that then seeped into the Pacific Ocean. Read full story here.

Economic analysis could undermine Trump rule repeal

Ariel Wittenberg – E&E News – October 30, 2019
When the Trump administration finalized its repeal of the Obama-era Clean Water Rule last month, it also quietly updated an economic analysis of the repeal's costs and benefits. The 195-page final analysis is nearly 10 times longer than the one that accompanied the Trump administration's initial proposal in 2017 to repeal the rule and estimates different costs and benefits of repealing the regulation, which clarified which wetlands and waterways are protected by the Clean Water Act. The updated analysis — which the public did not have the chance to comment on — could leave the repeal vulnerable to legal challenges, experts say. Read full story here

EPA delays advisers' review of 'secret science' rules

By Miranda Green and Rebecca Beitsch – The Hill – November 18, 2019
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has repeatedly rescheduled and delayed a meeting of an advisory board slated to review a controversial proposal that would block the agency from considering studies that don’t make their underlying data public. The rule in question is titled “Strengthening Transparency in Regulatory Science,” but it is known as the secret science rule. Former EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt and other Republicans have railed against “secret science” that they say is used to support regulations even when the data underlying the science is not released. Critics of the rule say scientists sometimes do not have the legal right to make their data public, and that the new rule could endanger public safety by putting up barriers to the use of valid scientific evidence. Read full story here.  

 

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Wetland Breaking News: November 2019

 

Wetland Breaking News: November 2019National News 


Former Obama EPA chief named CEO of green group

By Justine Coleman – The Hill – November 5, 2019 – Video
A former Obama administration Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) chief has been named president and CEO of the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC). The NRDC announced Gina McCarthy as their new leader over Twitter. She is set to start in January at the beginning of the organization’s 50-year anniversary, according to the group's press release. Read full blog post and view video here.

Keystone Pipeline leaks 383,000 gallons of oil in second big spill in two years

By Hannah Knowles – The Washington Post – November 1, 2019
Approximately 383,000 gallons of crude oil have spilled into a North Dakota wetland this week in the latest leak from the Keystone Pipeline, further fueling long-standing opposition to plans for the pipeline network’s extension. With about half an Olympic swimming pool’s worth of oil covering roughly half an acre, the leak is among the largest in the state, said Karl Rockeman, who directs the North Dakota Department of Environmental Quality’s division of water quality. But the spill does not appear to pose an immediate threat to public health, he added, as people do not live nearby and the wetland is not a source of drinking water. Read full story here.

WOTUS lawsuits start long, muddy legal battle

Pamela King – E&E News – October 24, 2019
Get ready for a surge of lawsuits over the Trump administration's decision to walk back Obama-era protections for wetlands and streams. Opponents to the administration's take on which water bodies are considered "waters of the United States" under the Clean Water Act already launched at least two challenges this week, kicking off the next round of courtroom action. The cases add a new dimension to what could soon be a complicated legal quagmire over the Obama administration's WOTUS rule and the Trump administration's efforts to both erase and replace the regulation. Read full story here.

EPA and Army Repeal Clean Water Rule and Move Forward with Plan to Redefine Waters Subject to Federal Regulation under Clean Water Act

The National Law Review – October 24, 2019
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) published a rule on October 23, 2019, repealing the Clean Water Rule promulgated by the Obama administration in 2015. The rule, which goes into effect on December 23, 2019, puts the pre-2015 regulations governing areas subject to federal jurisdiction under the Clean Water Act back into place nationwide. Environmental groups and state attorneys general have vowed to challenge the repeal in court. Read full story here.

NFWF Announces Nearly $13 Million in Grants from the Chesapeake Bay Stewardship Fund

The Southern Maryland Chronicle – October 11, 2019
The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today announced nearly $13 million in grants to support the restoration and conservation of the Chesapeake Bay watershed in six U.S. states and the District of Columbia. The 47 grants will generate more than $20 million in matching contributions for a total conservation Wetland Breaking News: November 2019impact of nearly $32 million. Eighteen projects in Maryland will leverage matching funds of $8,269,710 for a total of $12,750,381 to support water quality improvements. Read full story here.

Trump Administration issues orders to combat ‘bureaucratic abuse’ by ‘rogue agencies’

By Jared Serbu Federal – News Network – October 9, 2019
President Donald Trump signed a pair of executive orders Wednesday that the White House said were meant to curtail what it views as “abuses” of American citizens by federal agencies. The orders deal with what the administration said is a federal bureaucracy that is “running roughshod” over individuals’ and companies’ legal and constitutional rights: they demand that agencies
increase transparency in their regulatory and enforcement processes and reduce what the White House said is an overreliance on informal rulemaking. Read full story here.

Supreme Court will hear Atlantic Coast Pipeline case

By Whitney Pipkin – Bay Journal – October 8, 2019
The U.S. Supreme Court said Friday that it plans to revisit a lower court’s ruling that, among others, forced Virginia’s largest electric utility to halt construction on a $7.5 billion natural gas pipeline in the southwest corner of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The project’s backer, Dominion Energy, petitioned the court to consider the case after the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals in late 2018 vacated a permit from the U.S. Forest Service. The permit would have allowed pipeline construction to cross the Appalachian Trail and 21 miles of national forest lands. It is one of seven federal permits related to the project vacated by the courts, resulting in a construction stoppage dating to late 2018. Read full article here.

 

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 State News Wetland Breaking News: November 2019


CA: Solano wetlands restoration project benefits salmon and smelt

PR Newswire – October 7, 2019
Local, state, federal, and private industry leaders will gather on October 15th to celebrate the completion of a unique tidal wetland restoration project in the Delta. The project, known as Tule Red Restoration Project, is a joint effort by the State and Federal Contractors Water Agency (SFCWA), Westervelt Ecological Services (WES) and the Department of Water Resources (DWR). The celebration will mark the final step in the restoration process-the breaching of a levee to return brackish tidal water to over 400 acres habitat for the sake of dwindling native fish populations including Delta smelt, longfin smelt, Chinook salmon and the food web that supports them. Read full news release here.

DE: $25 Million Wetland Project in Delaware Breaks Ground

By Cristina Tuser – Storm Water Solutions (SWS) – October 25, 2019
Delaware has started construction on its South Wilmington Wetlands Project, which aims to reduce flooding and restore degraded wetlands. Delaware officials have begun the construction of the $25 million South Wilmington Wetlands Park project, reported 1st State Update. According to Mayor Purzycki’s press release, the purpose of the wetland park project is to create a storm water management facility that will reduce flooding in Southbridge. The project also has the goal to restore 14 acres of degraded wetland to a freshwater tidal wetland habitat in South Wilmington. The most prominent design feature of the project is a pathway through the heart of the park. Read full story here.

HI: Maui Mayor Won’t Settle Clean Water Act Case at Supreme Court

By Ellen M. Gilmer – Bloomberg Environment – October 21, 2019
A local dispute that could derail an environmental case at the Supreme Court is no closer to resolution just weeks before oral arguments. Maui Mayor Michael Victorino on Oct. 18 confirmed he doesn’t intend to follow through on a legal settlement that local lawmakers recently approved for County of Maui v. Hawai’i Wildlife Fund, a major case focused on the scope of the Clean Water Act. Read full story here.

LA: Coastal authority wants to use Maurepas Swamp diversion as mitigation for West Shore Lake Pontchartrain levee

By Mark Schleifstein – Nola – October 21, 2019
The state Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority has asked the Army Corps of Engineers to use its proposed $200 million Maurepas Swamp freshwater diversion project as the required environmental mitigation for a $760 million levee project under construction in St. John the Baptist Parish. If the Corps agrees, at least part of the diversion's cost could be counted against the state’s 35 percent share of the cost of the new levee, called the West Shore Lake Pontchartrain project. The diversion, designed to benefit nearly 45,000 acres, or nearly 70 square miles, of cypress-tupelo freshwater swamp on the edges of Lake Maurepas, will cost far more than Louisiana needs to spend on mitigation to offset the effects of building the levee across wetlands in St. John Parish, so only a small part of its total cost could be used as an offset. Read full story here.

ME: Jared Golden concerned about ‘lack of transparency’ in federal permitting of CMP corridor

By Christopher Burns – Bangor Daily News – October 16, 2019
U.S. Rep. Jared Golden is concerned about what he calls a “lack of transparency” in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ review and permitting process for Central Maine Power’s controversial 145-mile transmission corridor through western Maine. Golden, a Democrat representing Maine’s 2nd Congressional District, in his Oct. 16 letter to Col. William Conde, the commander for the New England District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, called on the agency to make public its response to an April letter from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that faulted the corps for not producing “organized and transparent information” about a permit required under the Clean Water Act. Read full story here.

MD: National Aquarium Secures $11 Million for Floating Wetlands Project

By Kevin Lynch – SouthBMore.com – November 7, 2019
Yesterday, the National Aquarium announced it has secured $11 million in funding for its floating wetland projects. The project, which will be located between Piers 3 and 4 adjacent to the aquarium’s Inner Harbor facility, features wetlands and a pier system. It is designed to create a habitat for native species, gradually improve the harbor’s water quality, and reconnect people with nature on the waterfront. Read full story here.

MD: In settlement with Maryland, Conowingo Dam owner Exelon to invest $200 million to clean up Susquehanna River

By Scott Dance – The Baltimore Sun – October 29, 2019
Conowingo Dam owner Exelon Corp. and the state of Maryland have reached a settlement under which the Chicago-based energy company will invest $200 million to clean up the Susquehanna River, and, by extension, the Chesapeake Bay. That includes $41 million to reduce the amount of trash and debris passing through the dam toward the bay, $47 million for projects to increase populations of grasses and oysters and $500,000 to study how to deal with sediment built up behind the dam. The company and Gov. Larry Hogan’s administration had been at odds over Exelon’s management of the flow through the dam after record rainfall across the Mid-Atlantic in 2018 sent a surge of debris downstream into the bay. Read full story here.

MI: 75% of Lake St. Clair wetlands are gone. Management helps make up the difference for birds

By Jeremy Ervin – Port Huron Times Herald – October 10, 2019
A group of birds lifted off from the water between rows of corn, pushing upward into the sky Wednesday evening. Not far away, hunters waited at the St. Clair Flats Wildlife Area to get a look at the hunting grounds they'll frequent this fall. The Michigan Department of Natural Resources held an open house on Wednesday for hunters to tour the St. Clair Flats State Wildlife Area as waterfowl hunting season moves forward. The area is about 3,300 acres and managed to optimize waterfowl hunting, DNR Wildlife Technician John Darling said. It also serves as a haven for migrating birds. About 75% of Lake St. Clair wetlands have been lost to development, Darling said. Read full story here.

NV: Nevada receives more than $500,000 to advance wetland science, research

By Jeff Munson – Carson Now – October 15, 2019
Wetlands are the link between land and water, where the flow of water, the cycling of nutrients, and the energy of the sun meet to create highly productive ecosystems with unique plant and animal life. In broad terms, wetlands refer to all wet areas that provide ecosystem services and habitat for plants, wildlife, and aquatic species, including wet meadows, seeps and springs, playas, and riparian areas. Often referred to as the “kidneys” of a watershed, wetlands are renowned for their ability to remove toxic substances, excess nutrients, and harmful pollutants from the water. Understanding the vital importance of wetlands to Nevada’s ecological, economic, and social health, the Nevada Division of Natural Heritage, within the Nevada Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, is excited to advance its Wetland Program by leveraging a $516,771 grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Read full story here.

NM: Creating wetlands in Ruidoso for lasting ecological benefits

Ruidoso News – October 31, 2019 – Video
A new wetlands enhancement project below Grindstone Reservoir dam not only will offset lost wetland areas in the village, it also will be one of the last requirements by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers connected to installation of a liner on the dam to prevent leakage. “I’m super excited about this project," said Eric Boyda, Ruidoso water rights and water conservation specialist. “I know it is an obligation from the Army Corps, but I think it is these types of projects we should be doing anyway, even if they are not an obligation.” Boyda explained Thursday that restoration projects provide important eco-system services. Read full story and view video here.

NY: In Staten Island, NYC’s first ‘mitigation bank’ restores 54 acres of wetlands

By Carol Splvack – Curbed – October 8, 2019
The city is wrapping up a 54-acre wetlands restoration on Staten Island’s west shore after years of dredging debris from Saw Mill Creek. Located in Bloomfield, the creek served as an illegal dumping ground for decades. Tires, hunks of concrete, and abandoned boats and cars became common sights in the blighted marshland along Saw Mill Creek. To change that, in 2017 the NYC Economic Development Cooperation (NYCEDC) and the Parks Department partnered on the Saw Mill Creek Pilot Wetland Mitigation Bank, which allows developers to buy credits in order to offset the environmental mitigation they are required to complete at other nearby construction projects. Read full story here.

ND: North Dakota lawmakers call for change to wetland regulations

DakotaFarmers – October 18, 2019
At a recent landowner roundtable in Hope, N.D., lawmakers urged U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt to help advance regulatory relief for farmers and ranchers impacted by wetlands easements under the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D., chairman of the Senate Agriculture Appropriations Committee and a member of the Energy and Natural Resources Committee, and Sen Kevin Cramer, R-N.D., said key problems include FWS’ perpetual easements, the cost of the appeals process and setback requirements. Read full story here.

PA: Work begins to create wetland at Lewisburg's Eichhorn school

By Eric Scicchitano – The Daily Item – October 18, 2019
Site work began this week to restore a native wetland habitat outside Donald H. Eichhorn Middle School in Lewisburg. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service this week used heavy equipment to move dirt to build the depression wetlands, with plantings of native flowers and shrubs set for next spring, according to Shanon L. Burkland Stamm, watershed and program specialist, Union County Conservation District. Earth-moving was to wrap up Friday. “The purpose is to re-establish a native wetland habitat that will filter stormwater runoff and provide a hands-on educational site for students,” Stamm said. Read full story here.

SD: Wetlands, cropland coexist: New demonstration farm shows ways to make it work

By Janelle Atyeo – Kenosha News – November 8, 2019
Wetlands can be a beneficial part of a farming operation, and a group of conservation organizations are out to prove it with a new demonstration farm in South Dakota. Just south of Huron, 310 acres of crop land is being managed in ways that improve wildlife habitat, soil health, and ultimately, farm income. It’s a place where conservation groups hope to show that while wetlands can be a headache to farm around, they can be an asset in other ways, like when it comes to grazing. Read full story here.

VA: Waynesboro marks transformation of Mulberry Run Wetlands

Augusta Free Press – October 25, 2019
After three years, a manmade haven for both wildlife and the community is thriving at Waynesboro’s Mulberry Run Wetlands. The project was created to prevent polluted runoff from entering the South River and Chesapeake Bay. Its success comes ahead of Virginia’s General Assembly session, in which state legislators will determine future investment in similar projects across Virginia supported by the Stormwater Local Assistance Fund. Read full story here.

WA: New EPA regulations could allow for more polluted waters, and tribes and state officials are worried

By Hannah Weinberger – Crosscut – October 7, 2019
Lydia Sigo, a geoduck diver and Suquamish Museum historian, has harvested seafood from central Puget Sound with her family since her youth on the Suquamish reservation — for business, sustenance and religion. As a Suquamish tribal member with Duwamish heritage, it’s her treaty right to catch and co-manage fish and shellfish in these waters with state and federal authorities. These days, she thinks those treaty rights ⁠aren’t being fully respected. The Suquamish depend on some waterways often exposed to pollutants, which means the afflicted seafood they rely on to survive has the potential to be vehicles for toxic chemicals. Read full story here.

Wisconsin Assembly passes wetland credits bill

Associate Press – November 7, 2019
Wetland Breaking News: November 2019The state Assembly has sent to Gov. Tony Evers a bill that would require developers to purchase wetland mitigation credits within the watershed they’re changing. The Department of Natural Resources requires creation or preservation of other wetlands as a condition of an individual permit allowing dredging or filling wetlands. Builders can satisfy those conditions by purchasing credits from a mitigation bank located anywhere in Wisconsin. Banks are a stash of credits generated by other developers who created or preserved wetlands. Read full story here.

WI: When Big Storms Inundate Wisconsin, How Could Wetlands 'Slow the Flow'?

By Will Cushman – WisContext – October 7, 2019
When record-setting rains in July 2016 sent murky, sediment-laden floodwaters rushing into Chequamegon Bay, residents of Ashland and other bayside communities on Lake Superior's south shore were provided with a stark visual reminder of just how much the region's streams and rivers impact the world's largest body of freshwater. What may have been less clear — yet was critical for understanding how the flood unfolded — was the connection between those rivers conveying the muddy water and the wetlands that help feed them. Read full story here.


Wetland Breaking News: November2019

 

Wetland Breaking News: November 2019Wetland Science News


More than 11,000 scientists from around the world declare a ‘climate emergency’

By Andrew Freedman – The Washington Post – November 5, 2019 – Video
A new report by 11,258 scientists in 153 countries from a broad range of disciplines warns that the planet “clearly and unequivocally faces a climate emergency,” and provides six broad policy goals that must be met to address it. The analysis is a stark departure from recent scientific assessments of global warming, such as those of the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, in that it does not couch its conclusions in the language of uncertainties, and it does prescribe policies. Read full story and view video here.

Preserved pollen tells the history of floodplains

Contact: Susan V. Fisk – American Society of Agronomy – October 30, 2019
Many of us think about pollen only when allergy season is upon us. However, for soil scientists like Matthew Ricker, pollen can be an invaluable tool. By tracking fossil pollen in soil, scientists can look back in time to better understand past land use and climate dynamics. For example, when European settlers cleared forests in the eastern United States and planted crops, the pollen profile in soil changed. Ragweed and grass pollen became more common. Tree pollen became rarer.
But, the study of fossil pollen has been restricted to relatively few sites, usually those near lakes or bogs. In a new study, Ricker and colleagues report that fossil pollen can be a viable tool in floodplain soils. Read full news release here.

Why Rising Acidification Poses a Special Peril for Warming Arctic Waters

By Cheryl Katz – YaleEnvironment360 – October 24, 2019
From the deck of a Norwegian research ship, the ravages of climate change in the Arctic are readily apparent. In the Fram Strait, the ocean passageway between Norway’s Arctic islands and the east coast of Greenland, seas that should be ice-covered in early September shimmer in the sunlight. Glaciers that muscled across mountains a decade ago are now in rapid retreat, leaving behind walls of glacial till. Rivers of meltwater gush off the Greenland Ice Sheet. But some of the biggest changes taking place in these polar seas are invisible. Under disappearing ice cover, these waters are rapidly growing more acidic as decades of soaking up humanity’s carbon emissions take their toll on ocean chemistry. Read full story here.

Ghost of Land Use Past

By Dante LaPenta – University of Delaware – October 22, 2019 – Video
All over the eastern part of the United States, thousands of small dams span streams and rivers, harkening back to colonial times. Originally constructed for energy and milling operations by settlers or companies, most of the milldams no longer serve their original purpose. Now, many of these inactive dams are being removed by government and private agencies — driven by a need or hope of increasing public safety, reducing liability and improving aquatic habitats. However, less attention is being paid to how removing the dams could impact water quality, which is precisely what University of Delaware Professor Shreeram Inamdar is investigating. Read full story and view video here.

A Flash Drought Dries the Southeast

Earth Observatory – October 22, 2019
When you hear the word “drought”, lack of rain probably comes to mind. But it is not only lack of rain that has put farmers in the U.S. Southeast in the grips of a damaging drought this fall. Bouts of unusually warm temperatures, lots of sun, low humidity, and windy conditions can also come together to dry out soil surprisingly quickly, explained Christopher Hain, a scientist at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in northern Alabama. So quickly, in fact, meteorologists have coined a term—flash drought—to describe these fast-moving events. Read full story here.

Replacing Coal with Gas or Renewables Saves Billions of Gallons of Water

Contact: Tim Lucas – Nicholas School of the Environment – October 21, 2019
The ongoing transition from coal to natural gas and renewables in the U.S. electricity sector is dramatically reducing the industry’s water use, a new Duke University study finds. “While most attention has been focused on the climate and air quality benefits of switching from coal, this new study shows that the transition to natural gas – and even more so, to renewable energy sources – has resulted in saving billions of gallons of water,” said Avner Vengosh, professor of geochemistry and water quality at Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment. These savings in both water consumption and water withdrawal have come despite the intensification of water use associated with fracking and shale gas production, the new study shows. Read full story here.

To aid cleanup efforts, study looks at how toxic PFAS move through soil

Wetland Breaking News: November 2019By Timothy B. Wheeler –Bay Journal – October 17, 2019
Brian Shedd has been spending time this year in a musty old brick building on Baltimore’s waterfront, where he’s hoping to unlock the secrets of a troublesome family of toxic chemicals contaminating water supplies across the United States. Shedd, a geologist with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Baltimore District, set up a laboratory in the 19th century structure, which once served as a guardhouse and ordnance storehouse on the grounds of Fort McHenry, the historic harbor fortress that played a starring role in the War of 1812. There, in a small compound just outside the walls of the national historic monument, the Corps’ Baltimore District docks a small fleet of vessels used to survey shipping channels and clean up floating debris, among other tasks. For Shedd, it offered a great location for studying per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances, known as PFAS. That’s because it was built long before the 1950s, when the chemicals began being manufactured for use in a host of consumer and industrial products. Thus, the site was relatively free of the contamination that has since increasingly turned up in many places — including drinking water, foods and people’s bodies. Read full article here.

Slime on river rocks is a forensics tool for environmental scientists

Washington State Department of Ecology – October 15, 2019 – Video
We’ve all been there. You’re having a nice day playing in the water at your local lake or river, and all of the sudden you slip on a slimy rock! That slick, brownish goop squelches between your toes, and next thing you know, you’re falling backwards into the water. While most of us may not appreciate the slime that grows on river rocks, Dr. William Hobbs and his colleagues have found this slime useful for investigating the sources of toxic chemicals in the water. This rock slime, known as biofilm, helps scientists measure where toxic chemicals are the most concentrated along a river. Their recently published paper in the journal Environmental Science and Technology shares more of the slimy details. Read full blog post and view video here.

VIMS earns grant to improve coastal resilience by studying dunes

By David Malmquist – VIMS – October 10, 2019
A team co-led by Associate Professor Christopher Hein of William & Mary’s Virginia Institute of Marine Science has won a 3-year, $687,850 federal grant to study how natural and constructed dunes respond when impacted by coastal storms and rising seas. Their goal is to provide resource managers with knowledge and tools to help make the U.S. coastline more resilient. Read full story here.

As Sea Levels Rise, So Do Ghost Forests

By Gabriella Demczuk – The New York Times – October 8, 2019
Up and down the mid-Atlantic coast, sea levels are rising rapidly, creating stands of dead trees — often bleached, sometimes blackened — known as ghost forests. The water is gaining as much as 5 millimeters per year in some places, well above the global average of 3.1 millimeters, driven by profound environmental shifts that include climate change. Increasingly powerful storms, a consequence of a warming world, push seawater inland. More intense dry spells reduce freshwater flowing outward. Adding to the peril, in some places the land is naturally sinking. All of this allows seawater to claim new territory, killing trees from the roots up. Read full article here.

UNH Researchers Find Northern Forests Have Lost Crucial Cold, Snowy Conditions

Environmental News Network – October 3, 2019
As the popular saying goes, “winter is coming,” but is it? Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found clear signs of a decline in frost days, snow covered days and other indicators of winter that could have lasting impacts on ecosystems, water supplies, the economy, tourism and human health. “Winter conditions are changing more rapidly than any other season and it could have serious implications,” said Alexandra Contosta, research assistant professor at UNH’s Earth Systems Research Center. “Whether precipitation falls as snow or rain makes a big difference, whether you’re talking about a forest stream, a snowshoe hare or even a skier.” Read full story here.

Study: As Climate Changes, So Will Maple Syrup Production

By Charlotte Albright and Amy Olson – Dartmouth News – October 2, 2019
Maple trees are turning color, leaves are dropping, and soon the sap will go dormant until late February or March, when the sugaring season traditionally starts. But over the coming decades, climate change is likely to alter the timing of that cycle, and producers should brace themselves for the impact of rising temperatures on their industry, according to a Dartmouth study of six sugar maple stands from Virginia to Quebec. In some locations, "as the climate gets warmer, the sugar maple tapping season will shrink and get closer to a December date," says co-author David Lutz, a research assistant professor of environmental studies. Read full story here.

Awards & Grants

$5000 Grant Supporting Natural History Symposia
The Western North American Naturalist is a quarterly journal committed to publishing excellent, peer-reviewed research focused on the biological natural history of western North America. They will award one $5,000 grant to facilitate a natural history symposium within the scope of the Western North American Naturalist journal.

Deadline to apply is November 30, 2019. More information is available here.

DOE Funding Opportunity in Environmental System Science
The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER) hereby announces its interest in receiving applications for research in Environmental Systems Science (ESS), including Terrestrial Ecosystem Science (TES) and Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR).

Deadline for Pre-applications is December 5, 2019. More information is available here.

2020 Wetland Foundation Travel Grants
The Wetland Foundation is soliciting applications for 2020 travel grants. For more information, visit The Wetland Foundation website.

Application deadline is December 18, 2019.

EPA Announces Requests for Applications for the 2020 Environmental Education Grants Program
As authorized by the National Environmental Education Act of 1990, EPA is pleased to announce the availability of up to $3 million in funding for locally-focused environmental education projects under the 2020 Environmental Education Grant Program. EPA will award three to four grants in each of the agency’s 10 regions. Groups interested must submit their application by Jan. 6, 2020, to be considered. The Requests for Application (RFA) is posted here.

Applications must be submitted by January 6, 2020, electronically through Grants.gov by following the instructions in the RFA. The full list of solicitation notices is available at Grants.gov and here at the EPA website.

Request for Proposals, City of Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks Funded Research Program
The Open Space and Mountain Parks Department (OSMP) of the City of Boulder has funding available through its funded research program for scientific inquiry on OSMP lands. Preference is given to original proposals that address priority research topics identified by the department. However, all proposals will be considered based on their merits. For research that crosses the boundaries of OSMP and our neighbors (Boulder County Parks and Open Space and Jefferson County Open Space), we will also consider interagency grant proposals for joint funding.

The maximum award amount for OSMP proposals is $10,000.

Proposal deadline is January 10, 2019. Full details are available here.

Ecological Society of America (ESA) Awards
The American Society of Naturalists, the Society for the Study of Evolution, and the Society of Systematic Biologists announce the call for nominations for the 1st annual ASN/SSE/SSB Inclusiveness, Diversity, Equity, and Access (IDEA) Award. The IDEA Award will be given to a person at any career stage who has strengthened the ecology and evolutionary biology community by promoting inclusiveness and diversity in our fields. The award can also be presented to a group. The recipient will receive a plaque at the annual meeting of ASN/SSB/SSE and a $1000 honorarium. Nominations should be submitted by January 15, 2020.

 

 

Wetland Breaking News: November 2019Resources and Publications


New California Coastal Hazard Resilience Planning Resource

NOAA, USGS, the California Coastal Commission, the California Governor's Office of Emergency Service and Office of Planning and Research, the California Ocean Protection Council, the California State Coastal Conservancy, and FEMA have produced a new reference guide "Coastal Hazard Resilience Planning in California." While designed for California, the concepts are applicable to communities in other states. Explore the reference guide here.

New Online Tool Designed to Optimize Conservation Efforts in the Mississippi River Basin

A new “Floodplain Prioritization Tool” (FP Tool) has been released, which is designed to identify critical opportunities for floodplain conservation and restoration in the Mississippi River Basin. Working with data developed by The Nature Conservancy and provided by several partners, the FP Tool is designed to help identify places where these actions would have the greatest impact on the overall health of this iconic river system. The interactive, web-based tool is hoped to help decision-makers—like federal, state and local governments, county planners, land trusts, and businesses—identify priorities and assess tradeoffs related to nutrient removal, wildlife habitat, flooding and other goals. Learn more at FPTool.org.

 Wetland Breaking News: November 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PotpourriWetland Breaking News: November 2019


Citizen scientists make big impact on big data

Michigan State University – October 30, 2019
Collecting large amounts of data for long-term and large-scale research projects can be a burdensome task, but research from Michigan State University shows that citizen science programs can help fill the data gap. Using a database with lake water quality samples from over 87 sources, including state and federal agencies, tribes, universities and citizen science programs, researchers found that over 50% of the data were provided by citizen science programs. A citizen scientist is typically a volunteer or non-science professional who has undergone some level of training that allows them to contribute his or her time, effort and resources toward scientific research and data collection on a variety of subjects such as species presence, weather, water quality and environmental pollution. In this study, researchers looked at lake water quality data collected by citizen science programs. Read full story here.

Sea-level rise: Adapt or retreat | Opinion

By Valsin A. Marmillion – Sun Sentinel – October 29, 2019
Today’s news is full of gloom and doom tied to sea-level rise projections. The magnitude of the issue is hard to digest for many who have homes in coastal America. When I resided in Coral Ridge, it was an oddity to see water on the streets, an occurrence that has now become all too commonplace. According to flood inundation maps released by Climate Central and the real estate website, Zillow, close to $1 trillion in real estate will be lost if seas rise six feet. Ft. Lauderdale figures substantially in these calculations. The enormity of the challenge is breathtaking. Read full opinion here.

ECOVIEWS: Bad boys of the frog world

By Whit Gibbons – Tuscaloose News – October 27, 2019
In the United States, the largest frog is the American bullfrog. The largest one in the tree frog family is the Cuban tree frog. In some situations, both qualify as bad boys of the frog world because they have shown up where they do not belong. Cuban tree frogs are native to Cuba, the Bahamas and the Cayman Islands. Elsewhere they can be an invasive species of the worst kind, competing with and cannibalizing other frogs. The maximum size for U.S. tree frogs is less than 3 inches long, whereas the largest Cuban tree frogs are over 5 inches. They can readily overpower the smaller native tree frogs. Cuban tree frogs have also been documented to eat lizards and small snakes. Read full opinion here.

Wilderness areas could reduce extinction risks by more than half

By Brandon Keim – Anthropocene Magazine – October 23, 2019
The idea of wilderness doesn’t have the cachet it once did. Academics have deconstructed its sometimes shaky intellectual foundations; conservationists have lamented, rightly, that romanticizing places without humans can lead to neglect for the nature around us. Yet for all its philosophical troubles, wilderness—big, contiguous places with minimal Homo sapiens footprints—is still enormously important. Read full article here.

Bay Foundation Forced to Leave Disappearing Island

Chesapeake Bay Magazine – October 15, 2019
It’s the end of an era for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF). After more than 40 years, student groups will no longer be able to stay overnight on a truly remote island in the middle of the Bay to learn about the environment. CBF has announced it will close its residential environmental education center on Tangier Sound’s Great Fox Island for safety reasons at the conclusion of the fall field trip season. That’s because there just isn’t much left of the island. Read full article here.

$15.5M to 4 groups for Gulf of Mexico research

Associated Press – October 2, 2019
Four teams of scientists are getting a total of $15.6 million from BP oil spill fines to study fish, other sea life and birds in the Gulf of Mexico, federal officials said Wednesday. The largest grant is $6 million for a team led by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. That group will combine habitat and water quality information with three reef fish surveys into a comprehensive database to improve stock assessments. Among other things, they plan to look at year-to-year trends from 1992 to 2024. Read full story here.

EPA on 'forever chemicals': Let them drink polluted water

By Scott Faber – The Hill – October 1, 2019
Standing before a room mostly filled with industry lobbyists last week, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler sent a clear message to the hundreds of American communities with drinking water contaminated with the highly toxic fluorinated chemicals known as PFAS: Let them drink polluted water. Read full story here.

Wetland Breaking News: November 2019

 

Wetland Breaking News: November 2019

 

 Calendar of Events


WEBINARS
     
MEETINGS     
TRAINING  

 

Wetland Breaking News: November 2019


Special Events

World Wetlands Day
February 2, 2020

Orlando Wetlands Park Festival
Christmas, FL
February 15, 2020

Great Lakes Day
March 4-5, 2020
Washington, DC

Wings Over Water Birding Festival
March 20 – 22, 2020
Blaine, WA



Wetland Breaking News: November 2019

 

WEBINARS  
       
NOVEMBER 2019  
       
November 21, 2019
1:00 p.m. ET 
  Swamp School Webinar: Systematic Wetland Soil Identification  
       
November 21, 2019
3:00 p.m. ET 
 
  U.S. Geological Survey Webinar: Using Decision Tools to Design the Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge  
       
November 25, 2019
12:30 p.m. ET 
 
  Association of Climate Change Officers Webinar: Climate-101 (Web): Understanding Climate Science & the Latest Projections  
       
DECEMBER 2019  
       
December 3, 2019
1:00 p.m. ET 
 
  EBM Tools Network Webinar: Improving your impact: Guidelines for doing science that influences policy and management  
       
December 3, 2019
3:00 p.m. ET 
 
  Association of State Wetland Managers Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: NWI Data in Support of Conservation Efforts and Habitat Modeling  
       
December 5, 2019
1:00 p.m. ET 
  Soak Up the Rain New England Webinar Series: Working Together: Collaborative Stormwater Management in Central Massachusetts  
       
December 10, 2019
12:00 p.m. ET
  Ecological Landscape Alliance Webinar: The Wet and Wild World of Constructed Wetlands  
       
December 10, 2019
1:00 p.m. ET
  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Webcast: Integrating Water Quality and Natural Hazard Mitigation Planning  
       
December 11, 2019
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of State Wetland Managers Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Becoming a Ramsar-designated Internationally Important Body of Water: Understanding the Opportunities Created and Lessons Learned from the Niagara River Corridor’s Recent Designation  
       
JANUARY 2020  
       
January 15, 2020
12:30 p.m. ET 
 
  Ecological Landscape Alliance Webinar: Reconnecting Water, Soils, and Vegetation: Green Infrastructure in the Urban Environment  
       
January 29, 2020
3:00 p.m. ET 
 
  Association of State Wetland Managers Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: In Lieu Fee Mitigation for Impacts to Aquatic Resources: Current Program Instruments and Implementation Practices in the United States  
       
FEBRUARY 2019  
       

February 10, 2020
12:00 p.m. ET 
 

  Ecological Landscape Alliance Webinar: Conservation, Education, and Community Building through Prairie Restoration  
       
February 26, 2020
3:00 p.m. ET 
 
  Association of State Wetland Managers Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: The Future of Restoration of Wetlands from Constructed Impoundments  

 

MEETINGS
     
DECEMBER 2019
     
December 4, 2019
Washington, DC
  Montgomery Parks and Casey Trees Eight Annual Conference: Trees Matter: Green Cities Summit
     
December 5, 2019
Moraga, CA
  Contra Costa Creek & Watershed Symposium: A Culture of Conservation
December 10-14, 2019
Washington, DC
  AGU Fall Meeting: Science Communication: A Sharing Science Room
     
December 12-13, 2019
Indianapolis, IN
  Midwestern States Environmental Consultants Association: Conference on Environmental Liabilities, Risk Assessment, and Remediation
     
JANUARY 2020
     
January 3-7, 2020
Pacific Grove, CA
  American Society of Naturalists Stand Alone Meeting
     
January 6-9, 2020
Washington, DC
  National Council for Science and the Environment Conference: Science and Environmental Decision-Making
     
January 29, 2020
UC Davis Campus
Davis, CA
  UC Davis Coastal and Marine Sciences Institute Environmental DNA Symposium: How to Achieve a True Consensus for Best Environmental Data Practices

     
January 29-30, 2020
Wlminton, DE
  Delaware Wetlands Conference 2020

     
FEBRUARY 2020
     
February 6-9, 2020
University of Georgia Athens, GA
  Integrative Conservation Conference (ICC) Conference
     
February 16-21, 2020
San Diego, CA
  Ocean Sciences Meeting 

     
February 18-20, 2020
Elkhart Lake, WI
  Wisconsin Wetlands Association: 25th Annual Wetland Science Conference: A Clear Vision for Wetlands
Abstracts due by November 15, 2019
     
MARCH 2020
     
March 4-5, 2020
Washington, DC
  Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: Great Lakes Day 2020

     
March 18-20, 2020
Chattanooga, TN
  Land Trust Alliance: 2020 Southeast Land Conservation Confernce
     
March 23-26, 2020
Austin, TX
  American Water Resources Association Conference: Geospatial Water Technology Conference Complex Systems
     
APRIL 2020
     
April 19-22, 2020
Richmond, VA
  NatureServe: Biodiversity Without Boundaries 2020

     
April 27-29, 2020
Baton Rouge, LA
  University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences: 13th International Symposium on Biogeochemistry of Wetlands
     
April 28-29, 2020
Clayton, NY
  2020 New York State Wetlands Forum Conference
     
April 28-30, 2020
Novi Michigan
  Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy: Great Lakes Water Infrastructure Conference 
 
MAY 20202
     
May 4-8, 2020
Boise, ID
  National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Investing in the Environment
     
May 7-8, 2020
Saratoga Springs, NY
  Land Trust Alliance: New York Land Conservation Conference: Building Resilient and Inclusive Communities

   
May 12-15, 2020
Richmond, VA
  River Management Training Symposium: Mountain Creeks to Metro Canals
   
May 27-30, 2020
Orlando, FL
  Ducks Unlimited 83rd annual National Convention
 
JUNE 2020
     
June 7-11, 2020
Fort Worth, TX
  Association of State Floodplain Managers: 2020 Annual Conference: Resiliency Where the West Begins
     
June 7-11, 2020
Quebec City, Canada
  Canadian Land Reclamation Association (CLRA), the Society for Ecological Restoration (SER) and the Society of Wetland Scientists (SWS) joint Conference: From Reclaiming to Restoring and Rewilding
     
June 21-25, 2020
Queenland, Australia
  EcoSummit 2020: Building a Sustainable and Desirable Future: Adapting to Changing Land and Sea-Scape

     
June 21-26, 2020
Waterville Valley, NH
  Gordon Research Conference: Biological Responses to Winter Climate Change
     
June 22-25, 2020
Stanford University
Stanford, CA
  CMWR 2020 Biennial Conference: Data, Models, Data-driven Models, and Their Use in Decision-Making. Abstracts due by November 30, 2019.
     
June 22-26, 2020
Sydney, Australia
  International Statistical Ecology Conference. Abstracts due by December 2, 2019.
     
JULY 2020
     
July 5-10, 2020
Bremen, Germany
  14th International Coral Reef Symposium

     
July 13-14, 2020
Manchester, NH
  Gordon Research Seminar: Genomic Changes Behind Adaptation and Ecosystem Functions

     
July 26-31, 2020
Denver, CO
  North American Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB 2020): Crossing Boundaries: Innovative Approaches to Conservation
     
AUGUST 2020
     
August 2-7, 2020
Salt Lake City, UT
 

Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting: Harnessing the Ecological Data Revolution. Proposals due by November 21, 2019 (5:00pm Eastern)

SEPTEMBER 2020
     
September 27-
October 1, 2020

Louisville, KY
  Wildlife Society’s Annual Conference
 
OCTOBER 2020
     
October 4-8, 2020
Providence, RI 
  202 Summit: The National Coastal and Estuarine Summit 

 

TRAINING/WORKSHOPS
 
NOVEMBER 2019   
     
November 25-
December 23, 2019

Online
  Swamp School Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment
     
   DECEMBER 2019
     
December 2-5, 2019
Atlanta, GA 
  Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
     
December 2-13, 2019
Online
  Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Botanist/Winter Edition 2019
     
December 2-13, 2019
Online
  Swamp School Online Course: Stream Restoration Part 2 – Stream Site Assessment Techniques
   
December 2-27, 2019 Online 
  Swamp School Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2019
     
December 4-5, 2019 Vernon, WA   Padilla Bay Adaptation Planning for Coastal Communities
     
December 9, 2019-
March 2, 2020
Online
  Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
     
December 11-12, 2019 Portage, WI   Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Problematic Delineation Seminar
     
December 16-17, 2019 
Baskin Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Identification of Wetland Plans in Winter
   
December 16-27, 2019
Online 
  Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
 
     
January 2020 
     
January 6, 2019
Online
  Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Skills Mastery Program
     
January 6, 2019
Online (2-14 weeks)
  Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design
     
January 13-16, 2019
Raleigh, NC
  Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
     
January 15-17, 2019
Annapolis, MD
  National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC): Graduate Leaders in Socio-Environmental (S-E) Synthesis Workshop.
     
February 2020
     
February 3, 2020
Onlinle
 
  Swamp School Online Course: Functional Mitigation Design for Dam Removals
     
February 10-21, 2020
Annapolis, MD
  National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC): People, Land, & Ecosystems: Leveraging NEON for Socio-Environmental Synthesis
     
February 10-21, 2020
Onlinle
 
  Swamp School Course: Stream Restoration Part 3 – Stream Ecology
     
MARCH 2020
     
March 2, 2020
Online
  Swamp School Online Workshop: Living Shoreline Design
     
March 9-20, 2020
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Consrvation Course: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology
     
MAY 2020
     
May 19-June 9, 2020
Wrangell, AK
  Tatoosh School Course: Community Ecology
   JUNE 2020 
     
June 1, 2020
Online (3-16 weeks)
  Swamp School Online Workshop: Stream Restoration Part 4 – Stream Design
June 1-11, 2020
Annapolis, MD
 
  National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center’s (SESYNC) Education Program Course: Bayesian Modeling for Socio-Environmental Data

 

 Wetland Breaking News: November 2019

 

INDEX

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • Trump Administration Makes It Easier to Dredge Protected Areas to Restore Beaches
  • Meet the feds who track changes in the nation's wetlands
  • Justices wrestle with reach of Clean Water Act
  • Economic analysis could undermine Trump rule repeal
  • EPA delays advisers' review of 'secret science' rules

NATIONAL NEWS

  • Former Obama EPA chief named CEO of green group
  • Keystone Pipeline leaks 383,000 gallons of oil in second big spill in two years
  • WOTUS lawsuits start long, muddy legal battle
  • EPA and Army Repeal Clean Water Rule and Move Forward with Plan to Redefine Waters Subject to Federal Regulation under Clean Water Act
  • NFWF Announces Nearly $13 Million in Grants from the Chesapeake Bay Stewardship Fund
  • Trump Administration issues orders to combat ‘bureaucratic abuse’ by ‘rogue agencies’
  • Supreme Court will hear Atlantic Coast Pipeline case

STATE NEWS

  • CA: Solano wetlands restoration project benefits salmon and smelt
  • DE: $25 Million Wetland Project in Delaware Breaks Ground
  • HI: Maui Mayor Won’t Settle Clean Water Act Case at Supreme Court
  • LA: Coastal authority wants to use Maurepas Swamp diversion as mitigation for West Shore Lake Pontchartrain levee
  • ME: Jared Golden concerned about ‘lack of transparency’ in federal permitting of CMP corridor
  • MD: National Aquarium Secures $11 Million for Floating Wetlands Project
  • MD: In settlement with Maryland, Conowingo Dam owner Exelon to invest $200 million to clean up Susquehanna RiverIMI: 75% of Lake St. Clair wetlands are gone. Management helps make up the difference for birds
  • NV: Nevada receives more than $500,000 to advance wetland science, research
  • NM: Creating wetlands in Ruidoso for lasting ecological benefits
  • NY: In Staten Island, NYC’s first ‘mitigation bank’ restores 54 acres of wetlands
  • ND: North Dakota lawmakers call for change to wetland regulations
  • PA: Work begins to create wetland at Lewisburg's Eichhorn school
  • SD: Wetlands, cropland coexist: New demonstration farm shows ways to make it work
  • VA: Waynesboro marks transformation of Mulberry Run Wetlands
  • WA: New EPA regulations could allow for more polluted waters, and tribes and state officials are worried
  • WI: Wisconsin Assembly passes wetland credits bill
  • WI: When Big Storms Inundate Wisconsin, How Could Wetlands 'Slow the Flow'?
 

Wetland Breaking News: November 2019


INDEX


Editor's Choice

National News

State News

Wetland Science News

Resources & Publications

Potpouri

Calendar of Events

WETLAND SCIENCE NEWS

  • More than 11,000 scientists from around the world declare a ‘climate emergency’
  • Preserved pollen tells the history of floodplains
  • Why Rising Acidification Poses a Special Peril for Warming Arctic Waters
  • Ghost of Land Use Past
  • A Flash Drought Dries the Southeast
  • Replacing Coal with Gas or Renewables Saves Billions of Gallons of Water
  • To aid cleanup efforts, study looks at how toxic PFAS move through soil
  • Slime on river rocks is a forensics tool for environmental scientists
  • VIMS earns grant to improve coastal resilience by studying dunes
  • As Sea Levels Rise, So Do Ghost Forests
  • UNH Researchers Find Northern Forests Have Lost Crucial Cold, Snowy Conditions.
  • Study: As Climate Changes, So Will Maple Syrup Production

RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONS

  • New California Coastal Hazard Resilience Planning Resource
  • New Online Tool Designed to Optimize Conservation Efforts in the Mississippi River Basin

POTOURRI 

  • Citizen scientists make big impact on big data
  • Sea-level rise: Adapt or retreat | Opinion
  • ECOVIEWS: Bad boys of the frog world
  • Wilderness areas could reduce extinction risks by more than half
  • Bay Foundation Forced to Leave Disappearing Island
  • New Giant Salamander Species Is the World’s Largest Amphibian
  • $15.5M to 4 groups for Gulf of Mexico research
  • EPA on 'forever chemicals': Let them drink polluted water

Wetland Breaking News: November 2019

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Webinars

November 2019

  • Swamp School Webinar: Systematic Wetland Soil Identification
  • U.S. Geological Survey Webinar: Using Decision Tools to Design the Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge
  • Association of Climate Change Officers Webinar: Climate-101 (Web): Understanding Climate Science & the Latest Projections

Wetland Breaking News: November 2019December 2019

  • EBM Tools Network Webinar: Improving your impact: Guidelines for doing science that influences policy and management
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: NWI Data in Support of Conservation Efforts and Habitat Modeling
  • Soak Up the Rain New England Webinar Series: Working Together: Collaborative Stormwater Management in Central Massachusetts
  • Ecological Landscape Alliance Webinar: The Wet and Wild World of Constructed Wetlands
  • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Webcast: Integrating Water Quality and Natural Hazard Mitigation Planning
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Becoming a Ramsar-designated Internationally Important Body of Water: Understanding the Opportunities Created and Lessons Learned from the Niagara River Corridor’s Recent Designation

January 2020

  • Ecological Landscape Alliance Webinar: Reconnecting Water, Soils, and Vegetation: Green Infrastructure in the Urban Environment
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: In Lieu Fee Mitigation for Impacts to Aquatic Resources: Current Program Instruments and Implementation Practices in the United States

February 2020

  • Ecological Landscape Alliance Webinar: Conservation, Education, and Community Building through Prairie Restoration
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: The Future of Restoration of Wetlands from Constructed Impoundments 

MEETINGS

December 2019

  • Montgomery Parks and Casey Trees Eight Annual Conference: Trees Matter: Green Cities Summit
  • Contra Costa Creek & Watershed Symposium: A Culture of Conservation
  • AGU Fall Meeting: Science Communication: A Sharing Science Room
  • Midwestern States Environmental Consultants Association: Conference on Environmental Liabilities, Risk Assessment, and Remediation

January 2020

  • American Society of Naturalists Stand Alone Meeting
  • National Council for Science and the Environment Conference: Science and Environmental Decision-Making
  • UC Davis Coastal and Marine Sciences Institute Environmental DNA Symposium: How to Achieve a True Consensus for Best Environmental Data Practices
  • Delaware Wetlands Conference 2020

February 2020

  • Integrative Conservation Conference (ICC) Conference
  • Ocean Sciences Meeting
  • Wisconsin Wetlands Association: 25th Annual Wetland Science Conference

March 2020

  • Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: Great Lakes Day 2020
  • Land Trust Alliance: 2020 Southeast Land Conservation Conference
  • American Water Resources Association Conference: Geospatial Water Technology Conference: Complex Systems

April 2020

  • NatureServe: Biodiversity Without Boundaries 2020
  • University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences: 13th International Symposium on Biogeochemistry of Wetlands
  • 2020 New York State Wetlands Forum Conference
  • Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy: Great Lakes Water Infrastructure Conference

May 2020

  • National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Investing in the Environment
  • Land Trust Alliance: New York Land Conservation Conference: Building Resilient and Inclusive Communities
  • River Management Society Symposium: Mountain Creeks to Metro Canals
  • Ducks Unlimited 83rd Annual National Convention

June 2020

  • Association of State Floodplain Managers: 2020 Annual Conference: Resiliency Where the West Begins
  • Canadian Land Reclamation Association (CLRA), the Society for Ecological Restoration (SER) and the Society of Wetland Scientists (SWS) joint Conference: From Reclaiming to Restoring and Rewilding
  • EcoSummit 2020: Building a Sustainable and Desirable Future: Adapting to Changing Land and Sea-Scape
  • Gordon Research Conference: Biological Responses to Winter Climate Change
  • CMWR 2020 Biennial Conference: Data, Models, Data-driven Models, and Their Use in Decision-Making
  • International Statistical Ecology Conference

July 2020

  • 14th International Coral Reef Symposium
  • Gordon Research Seminar: Genomic Changes Behind Adaptation and Ecosystem Functions
  • North American Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB 2020): Crossing Boundaries: Innovative Approaches to Conservation

August 2020

  • Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting: Harnessing the ecological data revolution

September 2020

  • Wildlife Society’s Annual Conference
  • 202 Summit: The National Coastal and Estuarine Summit

 

Training/Workshops

November 2019

  • The Swamp School Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment

December 2019

  • The Swamp School Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Botanist/Winter Edition 2019
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Stream Restoration Part 2 – Stream Site Assessment Techniques
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2019
  • Padilla Bay Adaptation Planning for Coastal Communities
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Problematic Delineation Seminar
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Eduation Course: Identification of Wetland Plants in Winter
  • The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals

January 2020

  • Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Skills Mastery Program
  • Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC): Graduate Leaders in Socio-Environmental (S-E) Synthesis Workshop

February 2020

  • Swamp School Online Course: Functional Mitigation Design for Dam Removals
  • National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC): People, Land, & Ecosystems: Leveraging NEON for Socio-Environmental Synthesis
  • Swamp School Online Course: Stream Restoration Part 3 – Stream Ecology

March 2020

  • Swamp School Online Workshop: Living Shoreline Design
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology

May 2020

  • Tatoosh School Course: Community Ecology

June 2020

  • Swamp School Online Workshop: Stream Restoration Part 4 – Stream Design
  • National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center’s (SESYNC) Education Program Course: Bayesian Modeling for Socio-Environmental Data

   
Wetland Breaking News: November 2019

 Wetland Breaking News: November 2019

 

Wetland Breaking News:May 2019