WBN October 2018

                

IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

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Thank you for your continued interest.

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WBN October 2018

 

WBN - Editor's NoteEditor's Note


Dear Wetlanders,

This month has been a busy one for wetlands. As most of you know by now, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released its pre-publication version of the proposed rule on Dec. 11th that would dramatically redefine what constitutes as a “water of the U.S.” The proposed definition would result in a significant decline in federal jurisdiction and protection for many wetlands nationwide. Similarly, in Michigan, a proposed bill under consideration would roll back state wetland protections and would increase the minimum size of a regulated wetland from five to ten acres. You can find both of these stories in my Editor’s Choice section this month.

Interestingly, this all comes on the heels of the passing of former President George H.W. Bush who established the national goal of “no net loss” of wetlands. President Bush was an avid fisherman and understood the value of wetlands for wildlife, recreation and more. The Bushes were regular visitors to Maine at their summer retreat on Walker’s Point in Kennebunkport. Regardless of political affiliation, they were highly respected in our neck of the woods. According to an article in our Editor’s Choice section, he had “a pro-environmental record while serving in Congress” proving that protecting the environment and conserving wetlands is a non-partisan issue. Or at least it should be.

Also, in Editor’s Choice you’ll find a story about how the State of Washington won an important legal battle supporting its use of Section 401 to deny a permit for a proposed coal port in Tacoma that would have had significant adverse environmental impacts from the construction and operation of the proposed terminal. Of course, there are many, many more stories in all the sections of this edition of Wetland Breaking News that we think you’ll find of interest, so we hope you’ll peruse them all.

But perhaps most importantly, all of us at ASWM wish you, your family and friends a most wonderful holiday season full of good food and cheer. If you’re not a member of ASWM yet, we hope you’ll consider joining us in 2019. Membership comes with many great benefits. We also hope you’ll consider a charitable end-of-year contribution to ASWM to help support the work we do to provide information and resources to all of you (like Wetland Breaking News), regardless of your membership status. To join us or make a donation, just click here.

Season’s Greetings!

Marla J. Stelk
Editor
Wetland Breaking News

 
   
              


Editor's ChoiceWBN: October 2018

 

Port That Could Send Wyoming Coal to Asia Hits Another Roadblock

By Heather Richards – Start Tribune – December 12, 2018
Wyoming’s dream of getting Powder River Basin coal to Asia drifted farther away Tuesday when the company proposing a coal port in Washington state lost an important legal battle against the coastal state. Washington has effectively blocked the proposed coal port by denying a water quality permit necessary for the project to move forward. Lighthouse Resources, parent company of the Millennium Bulk Terminals, sued the state and Gov. Jay Inslee over the permit. The railroad BNSF, noting the importance of the port to help its coal-reliant rail business survive in a declining market, also sued. Judge Robert Bryan of the U.S. District Court in Tacoma knocked down the companies’ argument that the state had preempted federal laws in denying the water permit. Read full story here.

Trump EPA Proposes Major Rollback of Federal Water Protections

By Nathan Rott – NPR – December 11, 2018
Vast amounts of wetlands and thousands of miles of U.S. waterways would no longer be federally protected by the Clean Water Act under a new proposal by the Trump administration. The proposal, announced Tuesday at the Environmental Protection Agency, would change the EPA's definition of "waters of the United States," or WOTUS, limiting the types of waterways that fall under federal protection to major waterways, their tributaries, adjacent wetlands and a few other categories. The change aims to "provide states and landowners the certainty they need to manage their natural resources and grow local economies," said the EPA's acting administrator, Andrew Wheeler. Read full story here.

How George H.W. Bush (Eventually) Rescued U.S. Wetlands

By Ariel Wittenberg – E&E News – December 3, 2018
On the presidential campaign trail in 1988, then-Vice President George H.W. Bush made a remarkable promise: His administration would set a national goal of "no net loss of wetlands." Bush's pledge came on Labor Day weekend, just after he'd cast a line into Lake Erie and before a sweeping speech on environmental policy that detailed how the nation was losing wetlands at a rate of a half-million acres per year. "Much of the loss comes from inevitable pressure for development, and many of our wetlands are on private property, but I believe we must act," Bush said. "We must bring the private and public sectors together at the local and state levels to find a way to conserve wetlands." It was an exciting promise for EPA officials who were working to fully implement the 1972 Clean Water Act. Read full story here.

Bill Would Roll Back Wetlands Protections

By Catherine Shaffer – Michigan Radio – November 26, 2018
A proposed bill under consideration by a Michigan Senate committee would roll back protections for Michigan's wetlands. The bill would increase the minimum size of a regulated wetland from five to ten acres. As well, it modifies the definition of regulated streams and regulated lakes in the state of Michigan. Todd Losee is president of the Michigan Wetlands Association. He says according to his calculations, the bill would eliminate protections for about fifty percent of currently regulated wetlands. Read full story here.

WBN: October 2018: Members' Webinars

 

National News 


As Hunting Declines, Efforts Grow to Broaden the Funding Base for Wildlife Conservation

By Lincoln Larson – The Conversation – December 14, 2018
Hunting is a seasonal ritual for more than 11 million Americans in fall and winter. For those whose quarry includes ducks, geese or other waterfowl, one essential item is a Federal Duck Stamp – one of the most innovative and influential conservation initiatives in U.S. history. Duck stamps represent a “user pay, user benefit” approach to funding conservation that is unique to North America, with hunters as the centerpiece. But this model works only if people hunt, and the number of hunters in the United States has significantly declined in recent decades. Read full story here.

40 Million Americans Depend on the Colorado River. It’s Drying Up.

By Eric Holthaus – Grist – December 13, 2018
Prompted by years of drought and mismanagement, a series of urgent multi-state meetings are currently underway in Las Vegas to renegotiate the use of the Colorado River. Seven states and the federal government are close to a deal, with a powerful group of farmers in Arizona being the lone holdouts. The stakes are almost impossibly high: The Colorado River provides water to 1-in-8 Americans and irrigates 15 percent of the country’s agricultural products. The nearly 40 million people who depend on it live in cities from Los Angeles to Denver. The river supports native nations and industry across the vast desert Southwest — including 90 percent of U.S.-grown winter vegetables. Simply put: The region could not exist in its current form without it. Read full story here.

EPA Launches Smart Sectors Program in New England to Achieve Better Environmental Outcomes

Contact: David Deegan – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – December 12, 2018
Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 1 office announced the launch of Smart Sectors New England, a partnership initiative between the Agency and regulated sectors that is focused on achieving better environmental outcomes. Based on the national Smart Sectors program, this approach provides a significant opportunity for EPA to consider more forward-thinking ways to protect the environment in collaboration and dialogue with key sectors of the economy in the states of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont. Read full news release here.

New Governors Plan Aggressive Climate Steps

By Reid Wilson – The Hill – December 9, 2018
New and recently reelected Democratic governors plan a series of aggressive steps to address climate change and bolster renewable energy industries in their states. The new climate plans come amid federal and international reports that show significant and immediate threats to the environment and the global economy as carbon emissions rise and temperatures spike faster than anticipated. At the same time, President Trump has said he will pull the United States out of the Paris climate accords, rolled back several anti-pollution regulations imposed by the Obama administration and pledged to revitalize the struggling American coal industry. Read full story here.

Coping with Threats from Hurricanes, Wildfires, and Rising Sea Levels

Contact: Melanie Preve – EurekAlert – December 3, 2018
As sea levels continue to rise and more severe storms, like Hurricanes Maria and Michael, threaten coastline communities, local leaders need to assess the hazards and vulnerabilities of their locale. Risk assessment and risk mitigation practices can be beneficial in creating adaptation plans and making mitigation decisions for coastal communities. As scientists ponder the possibility of category six hurricanes, previous disaster prevention plans are no longer adequate for current threats from severe weather. Read full news release here.

Climate Change Will Be Costly, Especially for At-Risk Communities

Michigan Radio – December 3, 2018
On Black Friday, the federal government released its National Climate Assessment. Compiled by 13 federal agencies, the landmark report spells out the consequences we’re already seeing — and that we’ll continue to see worsen over time — as a result of climate change. Maria Carmen Lemos is one of the authors of the Midwest chapter of this assessment. She’s also the associate dean of the University of Michigan’s School for Environment and Sustainability and co-directs the Great Lakes Integrated Sciences and Assessments Center. Climate change will have wide-reaching impacts on public health, the economy, agriculture, and more. The damage caused by a changing climate, though, is projected to hit certain communities harder than others. Lemos says cities, rural and coastal communities, Native American and indigenous tribes, and the poor will be the most severely impacted. Read or listen to full story here.

Wetlands Hold the Key to Cutting Emissions

By Evelyn S. Gonzalex – PHYS.org – November 29, 2018
A team of scientists has identified more ways to mitigate climate change. Restoring coastal wetlands, rewetting drained soils, preventing erosion and reconnecting wetlands to exchange with saltwater can reduce more greenhouse gas emissions if done together, according to their report. "Coastal management activities like watershed alterations and oil and gas extraction have resulted in large sources of greenhouse gas emissions," said Tiffany Troxler, co-author of the report and director of science in the Sea Level Solutions Center at Florida International University. "Coastal wetland restoration is a win-win solution for both mitigating greenhouse gas emissions and protecting coastal economies." Read full story here.

EPA Chief: Trump Administration May Intervene in Next Climate Study

By Alex Guillen – Politico – November 28, 2018
Acting EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler on Wednesday accused the Obama administration of tilting last week’s federal climate change report to focus on the worst-case outcomes — and indicated that the Trump administration could seek to shape the next big study of the issue. “Going forward, I think we need to take a look at the modeling that’s used for the next assessment,” Wheeler said at an event hosted by The Washington Post. Read full story here.

After a Long Boom, an Uncertain Future for Big Dam Projects

By Jacques Leslie – YaleEnvironment360 – November 27, 2018
The last few years have been turbulent for the global dam industry. In July, flooding caused a dam under construction in Laos to collapse, releasing an inland tsunami that drowned hundreds of people — estimates of the number killed start at 200 and go up by multiples of that. The torrent devastated the homes and farmland of about 6,600 people, most of who now live in tents. Read full story here.

A Legal Battle in the Coachella Valley Could Transform How California—and the Nation—Uses Water

By Sophie Yeo – Pacific Standard – November 26, 2018
In a legal battle between a Californian tribe and the state's water agencies, experts are seeing a turning point in the history of United States water rights, potentially affecting how water is controlled across the entire country. In November of last year, the Supreme Court declined to hear a case that the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians, concerned about the effects of climate change and the quality of the water in the aquifer, brought against the Coachella Valley Water District and the Desert Water Agency. This Supreme Court decision left standing a Ninth Circuit ruling, which established—for the first time—the principle that tribes have priority over their reservations' groundwater. Read full article here.

Five Big Ways the United States Will Need to Adapt to Climate Change

By Brad Plumer – The New York Times – November 26, 2018
The federal government’s sweeping new National Climate Assessment is more than just a dire warning about current and future global warming effects across the United States. It’s also the most detailed guide yet to all the ways the country will have to adapt. Even if the nations of the world get their act together and slash fossil-fuel emissions rapidly, the United States will need to spend many billions of dollars to harden coastlines, rebuild sewer systems and overhaul farming practices to protect against floods, wildfires and heat waves that are already causing havoc nationwide. And the more that emissions rise, the more difficult and costly that task gets. Read full story here.

Flood Insurance Rebuilds Home with Public Money Repeatedly

By Emery P. Dalesio – AP News – November 26, 2018
Floodwaters rose about 15 inches (40 centimeters) into Danielle Rees’ home in September when Hurricane Florence drenched this tidewater city on the Pamlico River and overwhelmed a local creek and marshland. The first floor was a sopping mess of gritty, swampy water in three bedrooms, a bathroom and a laundry. “It’s part of living close to the river, and Washington is really low land,” said Rees, a graphic designer who grew up in the city. But she anticipates her $2,000-a-year policy through the taxpayer-subsidized National Flood Insurance Program will help her rebuild the home about a quarter-mile from the river, just as it did in 2011 after Hurricane Irene — and as it did, under previous ownership, after floods in 1996, 1998 and 1999, according to her property history provided by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The program has done something similar, over and over, for others. Read full story here.

Climate Change Puts U.S. Economy and Lives at Risk, and Costs are Rising, Federal Agencies Warn

By Bob Berwyn – InsideClimate News – November 23, 2018
The U.S. government's climate scientists issued a blunt warning on Friday,
writing that global warming is a growing threat to human life, property
and ecosystems across the country, and that the economic damage—
from worsening heat waves, extreme weather, sea level rise, droughts
and wildfires—will spiral in the coming decades. The country can reduce
those costs if the U.S. and the rest of the world cut their greenhouse gas
emissions, particularly the burning of fossil fuels. Read full story here.

Climate May Force Millions to Move and the U.S. Isn’t Ready, Report
Says

By Christopher Flavelle – Bloomberg – November 23, 2018
Global warming may push millions of Americans away from the coast, and the U.S. isn’t prepared for the consequences of such a mass migration, scientists from across the federal government warned on Friday. “Sea level rise might reshape the U.S. population distribution,” the scientists wrote in a sweeping report on climate change. “The potential need for millions of people and billions of dollars of coastal infrastructure to be relocated in the future creates challenging legal, financial, and equity issues that have not yet been addressed.” Read full story here.

Trump Announces Wheeler as EPA Nominee

By Gregory Wallace – CNN – November 16, 2018
President Donald Trump announced Friday he plans to nominate the acting chief of the Environmental Protection Agency, Andrew Wheeler, to permanently lead the agency. Trump announced the move during a Medal of Freedom ceremony at the White House, where he introduced Wheeler along with other top administration officials in attendance. "Acting administrator -- who, I will tell you, is going to be made permanent," Trump said. "He's done a fantastic job. And I want to congratulate him. EPA, Andrew Wheeler." Wheeler took over the agency after Trump's first EPA administrator, former Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, resigned in July under a cloud of scandal. Read full story here.

Texas A&M Study: Enormous Growth by Cities to Pose Huge Problems

By Keith Randall – Texas A&M Today – November 13, 2018
The rapid expansion of cities has accelerated in recent decades, so much so that a city the size of London could be created every seven weeks by 2050 if current trends continue, according to a study co-led by a Texas A&M University professor. Burak Güneralp, assistant professor of geography, and colleagues have had their work published as a report by The Nature Conservancy. The study shows that urban growth presents extreme challenges to biodiversity and ecosystem services due to the ongoing loss and fragmentation of habitats from the expansion of cities. Read full story here.

Sustainable Irrigation Could Feed Extra 2.8 Billion People

By Kate Ravilious – Our Environment – November 12, 2018
Today many regions rely on ever more sophisticated irrigation systems, using pumps and water sensors to grow crops on otherwise unworkable land as efficiently as possible. But not every part of the world benefits from modern irrigation and lack of freshwater is often the major limiting factor in crop production. Now a study reveals that global irrigation levels could sustainably increase by nearly 50%, boosting crop yields and feeding an additional 2.8 billion people. Read full story here.

Water Resources Foundation Releases Report on Incentivizing Green Infrastructure

By Maren Taylor – Sustainable Sites Initiative – November 12, 2018
Green infrastructure (GI) elements, such as green roofs, rain gardens and permeable pavement are widely used in municipalities across the country to address climate impacts, prevent damage and pollution caused by stormwater runoff, and enhance community resilience. GI strategies can also help conserve energy and address social equity. By wisely deploying green infrastructure, communities can realize dividends across the triple bottom line: economy, equity and environment. Read full story here.

 

 

 State News WBN:  October 2018: Visit ASWM


AK: Fight Brews as Interior Eyes Drilling in Wetlands

By Margaret Kriz Hobson – E&E News – December 11, 2018
The Interior Department tomorrow is due to auction off the last available oil and gas leases at the eastern edge of the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska, a 22.1-million-acre block of federal property on Alaska's North Slope. Most of the leases up for sale are located in the neighborhood of ConocoPhillips, Alaska's celebrated Willow oil discovery, which is estimated to hold between 400 million and 750 million barrels of recoverable oil. Read full story here.

CA: Fire & Water

By Nate Seltenrich – Berkeley Engineer – November 14, 2018 – Video
The verdant meadows of Illilouette Creek drain directly into the southeastern corner of bustling Yosemite Valley via 370-foot Illilouette Falls. Springtime wildflower displays draw crowds from the popular lookout at Glacier Point, a short hike away. The Illilouette Creek Basin also happens to be surrounded by a bowl of pure Yosemite granite, meaning its 40,000 acres are actually quite isolated in one important way: fire. When a blaze ignites by lightning, it’s not likely to escape. Typically, firefighters don’t even bother. Read full story and view video here.

CA: Watersheds Are Important to All of Us

By Andrea Mayer – Cadillac News – November 20, 2018
“Watersheds Our Water, Our Home” was this year’s theme for the National Association of Conservation Districts (NACD) poster contest for students in kindergarten to 12th grade. Each year an environmental or conservation issue of concern is highlighted. Teachers and students are provided with educational material related to the topic and students are given the opportunity to enter the themed poster contest. Missaukee Conservation District sponsors our county contest and manages the statewide contest on behalf of the Cnservation District Employees of Michigan. Read full story here.

ME: Why Some Maine Coastal Communities Are Up in Arms About Aquaculture

By Mary Pols – Portland Press Herald – December 9, 2018
From oyster farms to cultivated seaweed and farm-raised salmon, aquaculture is often described as essential to the economic future of Maine’s fisheries in the face of a changing ecosystem. Warming waters from climate change are pushing lobster farther Down East and have shut down the shrimp fishery, and threats such as ocean acidification and invasive green crabs are harming Maine’s natural fisheries. But opposition to several proposed projects suggests the hardest part of getting into aquaculture might be getting past the neighbors. Read full story here.

ME: Regulators Close Maine’s Shrimp Fishery for Next 3 Years

By David Sharp – AP News – November 16, 2018
Regulators voted Friday to close the Gulf of Maine winter shrimp season for another three years, raising fears that the fishery decimated by rising water temperatures may never bounce back. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission has been taking a year-to-year approach to determining whether to allow a winter season, but the panel decided to shut it down for 2019, 2020 and 2021 after receiving a dismal report on the depleted fishery. The fishery has been shut down since in 2013 in Maine, New Hampshire and Massachusetts. Read full story here.

MI: Environmentalist, Business leader React to Proposal Scaling Back Wetlands Protections

Michigan Radio – November 30, 2018
A bill sponsored by State Senator Tom Casperson would remove protections from some Michigan’s wetlands, inland lakes, and streams. In a recent letter, Ducks Unlimited, Michigan United Conservation Clubs, Michigan Trout Unlimited, and the National Wildlife Federation outlined their opposition to the proposed legislation. Stateside's Lester Graham talked to a business leader who supports the bill, as well as an environmentalist who opposes it. Charles Owens is the state director of the National Federation of Independent Businesses in Michigan, and he supports the Casperson bill. He says the current definition of a wetland is far too broad. Read full story here.

MN: Rather Than Install Runoff System, Minnesota Farmers’ Excess Water is Part of Wetlands Habitat

Star Tribune – December 9, 2018
Here in west-central Minnesota, farming changed forever in 1906 when Stevens County’s best and brightest allowed Moose Island Lake to be drained, creating, along with an untold number of newly tillable acres, County Ditch No. 1. “That was very controversial at the time, and it still is a thorn in the side of the county commissioners because it’s always someone complaining about land getting too much water or not getting drained enough,” Ward Voorhees, a federal soil scientist, said a while back, as quoted in the Stevens County Times newspaper. “This event really changed farming forever throughout the county.” Read full story here.

MN: Requiem for Our Wetlands? What’s at Risk in NE Minnesota

By Judy Helgen – Minn Post – November 30, 2018
Thousands of acres of wetlands in northeastern Minnesota are in danger, and only the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers can save them. These two agencies must rule on federally required permits related to water quality and wetlands. What’s at risk? Up to 7,694 acres of wetlands located in a region that supports the highest quality, diverse wetlands in Minnesota. 960 acres will be directly destroyed by PolyMet (in itself a huge loss), an additional 6,700 could be harmed indirectly by mining activities. Read full story here.

NH: State Holds Hearings on Final Draft of New Wetlands Code

By Annie Ropeik – NPR – December 3, 2018
The state begins public hearings Monday on the final draft of a major update to its wetland’s rules. The regulations lay out when developers need a permit to work around sensitive wetlands – whether to build a dock, a bridge or a logging road – and set parameters for those developments. The state hasn't rewritten this code since 1991, and they've been working on these new regulations since 2014 – including a series of public hearings on an early draft this year. Read full story here.

NC: Atlantic Coast Pipeline Constructions Halts as Court Reviews 4 Endangered Species

By John Murawski – The News & Observer – December 10, 2018
Construction on the Atlantic Coast Pipeline could be delayed for months after a federal court in Richmond ordered the 600-mile interstate natural gas project to stop all work on Friday. The U.S. Court of Appeals suspended the federal permits from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which in September had cleared the way for pipeline construction in sensitive habitats. The habitats are home to four endangered species: a bee, a bat, a mussel and a crustacean. Read full story here.

NC: Why Coastal Carolina May Never Recover from its Intensifying Hurricanes

By Nsikan Akpan – PBS WMHT – December 6, 2018 – Videos
Floods leave too much behind. That’s how Sherry Henderson described life in Pollocksville about 40 days after Hurricane Florence. The storm flooded half of this North Carolina town, which sits on the banks of the Trent River, about 50 miles from the coast. For days, floodwaters stewed in the Henderson’s two-story home, where the family had lived for 26 years. Florence wiped out the family’s kitchen, den and master bedroom, and lifted the garage off its foundation. More than a month after the storm, mounds of mattresses, couches, framed pictures still lined the Hendersons’ street, along with a few pianos. Unlike a wildfire, which burns everything, a flood ruins and spoils. Read full story and view video here.

OH: Another Blow in the Fight to Save Lake Erie

By James Proffitt – Great lakes Now – November 29, 2018
Ohio Gov. John Kasich’s effort to protect the future of Lake Erie from harmful algal blooms was dealt a serious blow this month when the Ohio Soil and Water Conservation Commission (OSWCC) declined to move forward in designating eight watersheds in northwest Ohio as “distressed.” The executive order, which Kasich signed in July, was intended to offer policymakers tools to more closely regulate farmers’ use of fertilizers, considered a primary source of food which feeds the lake’s harmful algal blooms. Read full story here.

OH: Updated Green Infrastructure Toolkit Serves as a Regional Resource

Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission – November 26, 2018
Central Ohio communities know that environmentally sustainable storm water infrastructure – or green storm water infrastructure (GSI) – not only serves to improve the region’s streams and rivers, but is a long-term approach that can protect the safety and health of residents while saving taxpayer dollars. Now communities have even greater access to green storm water infrastructure information through the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission’s (MORPC’s) updated Green Infrastructure Toolkit. Read full story here.

PR: UNH Researches Find Unexpected Impact of Hurricanes on Puerto Rico’s Watershed

University of New Hampshire – December 10, 2018
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found unprecedentedly high levels of nitrate, an essential plant nutrient, in streams and watersheds of Puerto Rico for a year after two consecutive major hurricanes in 2017. This high amount of nitrate may have important climate change implications that could harm forest recovery and threaten ecosystems along Puerto Rico’s coastline by escalating algal blooms and dead zones. Read full story here.

SC: Protecting Water at its Source

By Andrew Moore – Greenville Journal – November 20, 2018
As other parts of the country struggle to find adequate supplies of clean water, Greenville has abundant, and comparatively clean, water resources. The city’s tap water routinely meets state and federal regulations, and it has even been named the “best tasting” water in the country and South Carolina. So how does the city have such high-quality drinking water? It begins with safeguarding the 30,000 acres of forested watersheds that surround the North Saluda and Table Rock reservoirs, which have provided millions of gallons of drinking water to Greenville residents since the 1930s. Read full story here.

VA: NSF Renews Three-Decade Coastal Research Program with $6.7 Million Grant

By Fariss Samarrai – University of Virginia Today – November 29, 2018
For the sixth straight time – and for what will be 36 years running – the University of Virginia’s Long-Term Ecological Research Project on Virginia’s Eastern Shore has received significant funding from its primary sponsor, the National Science Foundation. The six-year renewal grant, approved earlier this month, is for $6.72 million. UVA’s Long-Term Ecological Research Project is part of a nationwide network of NSF-funded sites that study long-term environmental change across a broad range of ecosystem types. UVA’s project, centered on the Nature Conservancy’s Virginia Coast Reserve, focuses on shallow coasts – the connected system of barrier islands, marshes and bays, and the diverse life forms that inhabit those areas. These ecosystems are the first line of defense against sea-level rise and storms and protect coastal communities. Read full story here.

WI: Wild Rice Gets Boost in Green Bay

By Kara Headley – Great Lakes Echo – November 30, 2018
Wisconsin volunteers once again planted wild rice in Green Bay-area wetlands to protect the native plant from invasive species. The group spread 2,000 pounds of wild rice recently over 40 acres of water along the east shore, the lower bay and the west shore. “Wild rice is a very important wetland plant,” said Amy Carrozzino-Lyon, Green Bay Restoration project coordinator. “It provides a nursery for fish and waterfowl, benefits the diversity of plants, and promotes the historical wetlands.” Read full story here.

 

 

WBN: October 2018: Wetland ScienceWetland Sciece News

 

Declining Snowpack Over Western US Mapped at a Finer Scale

By Mari N. Jensen – The University of Arizona – December 12, 2018
Researchers have now mapped exactly where in the Western U.S. snow mass has declined since 1982. A University of Arizona-led research team mapped the changes in snow mass from 1982 to 2016 onto a grid of squares 2.5-miles on a side over the entire contiguous U.S. A person could practically find the trend for their neighborhood, said first author Xubin Zeng, a UA professor of hydrology and atmospheric sciences. Grid size for previous studies was about 40 miles on a side, he said. "This is the first time anyone has assessed the trend over the U.S. at the 2.5-mile by 2.5-mile pixel level over the 35-year period from 1982 to 2016," Zeng said. "The annual maximum snow mass over the Western U.S. is decreasing." In the Eastern U.S., the researchers found very little decrease in snow mass. Read full story here.

Winds of Climate Change Will Affect Migratory Birds

Cornell Chronicle – December 10, 2018
Under future climate scenarios, changing winds may make it harder for North American birds to migrate south in the autumn but easier for them to come north in the spring. Researchers from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology came to this conclusion using data from 143 weather radar stations to estimate the altitude, density and direction birds took during spring and autumn migrations over several years. They also extracted wind data from 28 climate-change projections in the most recent report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Their findings were published Dec. 9 in Global Change Biology. Read full story here.

Freshwater is Getting Saltier, Threatening People and Wildlife

By Tim Vermimmen – Scientific American – December 6, 2018
Salts that de-ice roads, parking lots and sidewalks keep people safe in winter. But new research shows they are contributing to a sharp and widely rising problem across the U.S. At least a third of the rivers and streams in the country have gotten saltier in the past 25 years. And by 2100, more than half of them may contain at least 50 percent more salt than they used to. Increasing salinity will not just affect freshwater plants and animals but human lives as well—notably, by affecting drinking water. Read full article here.

NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson Tests Drones Use for Shoreline Mapping

By, Lt. j.g. Matt Sharr and Lt. Charles Wisotzkey – NOAA Office of Coast Survey – December 4, 2018
NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey and the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) recently conducted operational tests of small unmanned aerial systems — or drones — on board NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson in support of survey operations conducted along the south coast of Puerto Rico. The tests show the potential of imagery from low-cost off-the-shelf drones to meet NOAA survey specifications for near-shore and shoreline feature mapping. This could replace traditional shoreline verification and mapping techniques used by NOAA hydrographic survey field units. Potential benefits of using drones for shoreline mapping include: improved data collection efficiency compared to data collection from small skiffs; more accurate feature investigation than traditional techniques; and, most importantly, removal of personnel from potentially dangerous situations (i.e. survey in close proximity to features being mapped). Read full story here.

Warming Waters Could Make Sharks “Right-Handed”—And Deadlier

By Gemma Conroy – Scientific American – December 3, 2018
Rising ocean temperatures and acidification are known to be altering the way fish grow and reproduce—and now research shows these climate change side-effects may also change how fish think and act. A recent study has found Port Jackson sharks become “right-handed” when incubated at the kind of temperatures projected to prevail by the end of this century, if climate change continues at its current pace. Some scientists think such shifts could lead to behavioral changes that tip marine ecosystems out of balance. Read full article here.

Climate Change is Shrinking Winter Snowpack, Which Harms Northeast Forests Year-Round

By Andrew Reinmann and Pamela Templer – The Conversation – December 3, 2018
Climate change often conjures up images of heat, drought and hurricanes. But according to the latest U.S. National Climate Assessment, released on Nov. 23, 2018, winters have warmed three times faster than summers in the Northeast in recent years. These changes are also producing significant effects. Historically, over 50 percent of the northern hemisphere has had snow cover in winter. Now warmer temperatures are reducing the depth and duration of winter snow cover. Many people assume that winter is a dormant time for organisms in cold climates, but decades of research now show that winter climate conditions – particularly snowpack – are important regulators of the health of forest ecosystems and organisms that live in them. Read full story here.

Uneven Rates of Sea Level Rise Tied to Climate Change

PHYS.org – December 3, 2018
The pattern of uneven sea level rise over the last quarter century has been driven in part by human-caused climate change, not just natural variability, according to a new study. The findings suggest that regions of the world where seas have risen at higher than average rates—including the Eastern Seaboard of the United States and the Gulf of Mexico—can expect the trend to continue as the climate warms. Read full story here.

Major Natural Carbon Sink May Soon Become Carbon Source

PHYS.org – November 19, 2018
Until humans can find a way to geoengineer ourselves out of the climate disaster we've created, we must rely on natural carbon sinks, such as oceans and forests, to suck carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. These ecosystems are deteriorating at the hand of climate change, and once destroyed they may not only stop absorbing carbon from the atmosphere but start emitting it. Read full story here.

Warning for Seafood Lovers: Climate Change Could Crash These Important Fisheries

By Bob Berwyn – InsideClimate News – November 29, 2018
In the chilly waters off Iceland and Norway, the world's largest populations of Atlantic cod have kept fishing fleets thriving for centuries. They feature in Viking legends and grace today's Icelandic coins.
They're also facing a rising climate threat that could crash these critical fisheries. As greenhouse gas pollution increases, it will create a double whammy for Atlantic and polar cod populations, with warming and more acidic water projected to undercut their reproduction and alter their habitat dramatically, new research shows. Read full story here.

Public Land Drilling Contributes a Quarter of All Greenhouses Gas Emissions in US: Reports

By Miranda Green – The Hill – November 26, 2018
Drilling on public lands contributes nearly a quarter of all greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S., according to a new Trump administration report. The first-of-its-kind U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) report, released late Friday, found that emissions from fossil fuels produced on federal lands and offshore areas represent an average of 24 percent of all national emissions of carbon, a major contributor to air pollution and climate change. Read full story here.

Half of the World’s Annual Precipitation Falls in Just 12 Days

EOS – November 15, 2018
Currently, half of the world’s measured precipitation that falls in a year, falls in just 12 days, according to a new analysis of data collected at weather stations across the globe. In a new study in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, climate models project this lopsided distribution of rain and snow is likely to become even more skewed by century’s end, with half of annual precipitation falling in 11 days. Read full story here.

 

 

 

Resources and Publications

 

First Comprehensive List of Non-Native Species Established in Three Major Regions in the United States

By Annie Simpson and Meghan C. Eyler – U.S. Geological Survey – November 2018
Invasive species are a subset of non-native (or alien) species, and knowing what species are non-native to a region is a first step to managing invasive species. People have been compiling non-native and invasive species lists ever since these species started causing harm, yet national non-native species lists are neither universal, nor common. Non-native species lists serve diverse purposes: watch lists for preventing invasions, inventory and monitoring lists for research and modeling, regulatory lists for species control, and nonregulatory lists for raising awareness. This diversity of purpose and the lists’ variation in geographic scope make compiling comprehensive lists of established (or naturalized) species for large regions difficult. However, listing what species are non-native in an area helps measure Essential Biodiversity Variables for invasive species monitoring and mount an effective response to established non-native species. In total, 1,166 authoritative sources were reviewed to compile the first comprehensive non-native species list for three large regions of the United States: Alaska, Hawaii, and the conterminous United States (lower 48 States). The list contains 11,344 unique names: 598 taxa for Alaska, 5,848 taxa for Hawaii, and 6,675 taxa for the conterminous United States. The list is available to the public from U.S. Geological Survey ScienceBase, and the intent, though not a guarantee, is to update the list as non-native species become established in, or are eliminated from, the United States. The list has been used to annotate non-native species occurrence records in the U.S. Geological Survey all-taxa mapping application, Biodiversity Information Serving Our Nation (BISON). Read full report here.

Wetland Restoration for Climate Change Resilience

Ramsar – October 2018
As the climate continues to change, our ability to adapt will depend on our ability to put in place a range of responses. Key among these are the wise use of wetlands and the restoration of degraded wetlands. Harnessing the natural capacity of wetlands to buffer communities against the adverse effects of climate change can increase climate resilience. This Briefing Note highlights key information from recent reports on wetlands and climate change mitigation and adaptation. It includes assessments of carbon uptake and storage, which find that the continuing loss and degradation of wetlands has resulted in significant losses of their stored carbon to the atmosphere. Read full briefing note here.

Innovative Finance for Resilient Coasts and Communities

By Andrew Deutz, Jan Kellett and Tenke Zoltani – UNDP – November 15, 2018
Coastal zones are critical to life and livelihoods, people and planet. They are conduits to trade, to communications, they provide resources and livelihoods, they are often centers of economic growth. Critical coastal ecosystems underpin a number of key economic sectors, including tourism, fisheries, mineral extraction, oil and construction. The ocean-economy, covering broad categories of employment and ecosystem services is estimated at between USD 3-6 trillion a year. And these areas are, of course, centers of population; already, half of the world’s population lives within 60 kilometers of a coast, and more than 600 million people (10% of the world’s population) live in coastal areas that are less than 10 meters above sea level. Read full report here.

Using high-frequency soil oxygen sensors to predict greenhouse gas emissions from wetlands

By Ashley R. Smyth, Terrance D. Loecke, Trenton E. Franz, and Amy J. Burgin – ScienceDirect – October 30, 2018
Understanding the mechanisms that lead to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions requires knowledge of short-term fluctuations in drivers of fluxes. To better understand how variation and lags in abiotic conditions affect soil GHG fluxes, we coupled weekly methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) flux measurements with time-series soil sensor data for oxygen (O2), moisture and temperature. Including time-series data improved models for soil CH4 and N2O fluxes compared to models which did not contain time series data. Fluctuations in soil O2 drove CH4 fluxes, where rapid changes in redox conditions led to high fluxes. N2O fluxes occurred when soils were warm and dry. Soil O2 was the best predictor and thus sensor for understanding CH4 fluxes, whereas soil moisture best predicted N2O fluxes. Combining data from multiple sensors improved models for both gases, underscoring the relative importance of interactions among drivers. Overall, our top models explained 15% and 30% of the variance in N2O and CH4 fluxes, respectively. Fluxes predicted using linear interpolation between measured fluxes were lower than time-series model predictions for both N2O and CH4 fluxes. This suggests linear interpolation may fail to capture “hot moments” or episodic events which lead to high fluxes. Long-term, continuous data from sensors, which accounts for short-term variation in abiotic drivers, may improve our ability to predict the timing and intensity of GHG emissions from wetland soils. Read full article here.

Engaging the Private Sector in Green Infrastructure Development and Financing: a Pathway
Toward Building Urban Climate Resilience

U.S. Agency for International Development – October 2018
In 2016, 55 percent of the world’s population lived in urban areas (WEF 2016) and cities accounted for 80 percent of global GDP (World Bank 2018a). In virtually every country, cities serve as governmental, financial and education hubs, and in many cases, peri-urban areas serve as industrial hubs. Cities are typically a country’s transport and shipping hub, serving as the location for the primary international airport and shipping port, the crossroads of ground transportation, and the main entry and exit point for tourists, raw materials and manufactured goods. In addition to the functions and services provided by cities for the countries in which they are located, cities provide or facilitate a myriad of services for their residents, including housing, employment, access to potable water, electricity, natural gas and sewerage, sanitation, stormwater management, public and mass transit, schools and libraries, health services and hospitals, safety and fire protection, and cultural and recreational attractions. Read full report here.

 

 


PotpourriWBN: October 2018: Potpourri

 

You, Too, Are in Denial of Climate Change

By David Wallace Wells – Intelligencer – December 14, 2018
You, too, are in denial. We all are, nearly every single one of us as individuals, even those of us who are following the bad news that suggests “the climate change problem is starting to look too big to solve”; every nation, almost none of them meeting their climate commitments, and most (not just the United States) publicly downplaying the threat; and even many of the alliances and organizations, like the IPCC, endeavoring to solve the crisis. At the moment, negotiations at the organization’s COP24 conference, meant to formalize the commitments made in the Paris accords two years ago, are “a huge mess,” perhaps poised to collapse. Last month, scientists warned that we had only about 12 years to cut global emissions in half and that doing so would require a worldwide mobilization on the scale of that for World War II. Read full article here.

Coastal Warning: An Unwelcome Messenger on the Risks of Rising Seas

By Gilbert M. Gaul – YaleEnvironment 360 – December 6, 2018
For six decades, Orrin Pilkey has written, taught, and preached about the beauty of barrier islands and the extraordinary risk of building in coastal floodplains. In more than 40 books, 250 scientific papers and journal articles, and countless opinion pieces, Pilkey has fashioned a vision of coasts as dynamic, living landscapes, with their own personalities, quirks and flaws, “not unlike people,” he says. Read full story here.

Exploring the Ecosystem of the U.S.- Mexico Border

By Margaret Wilder – Scientific American – December 6, 2018
The wetlands are springing back to life in the Colorado River delta located mostly in Mexico just at the border with the United States. The endangered Yuma clapper rail croaks a funny song in the tall reeds that rise up out of the unexpected marshes in the Ciénega de Santa Clara. The snowy egret, vermilion flycatcher and Gila woodpecker are surging back in the Laguna Grande wetlands and the endangered yellow-billed cuckoo is found anew at this key stopover on the Pacific migratory bird flyway. Lured by water and habitat fix-ups through binational restoration efforts, bobcats and beavers are making a comeback, too. Read full blog post here.

Looking to Nature: Mobilizing Constructed Wetlands for Resource Recovery

By Paxia Ksatryo and Tamara Avellán – SDG – November 29, 20218
With 80% of wastewater being released untreated into the environment and 892 million people still practicing open defecation, our communities and environment are at risk. Thus, it is no surprise that clean water and sanitation are prioritized in the UN SDGs. Committed to safeguarding a sustainable future, the SDGs aim to address global challenges by 2030. Linked to social and economic development, wastewater management is a vital component in achieving SDG 6, most notably in developing countries (Target 6A). Read full story here.

Plastic is Now Part of the Planet’s Fabric—a Scientist and Archaeologist Discuss What Happens Next

By Sharon George and Matt Edgeworth – The Conversation – November 27, 20218 – Videos
Plastics are ingrained in our everyday lives. Since 1950, it’s estimated that we have produced billions of tons of plastic, and most of this is not recycled. Plastics have spread around the world through oceans, rivers and the air to every part of the planet. In rivers and oceans, plastic moves vast distances and is now found right through the water column of the oceans, from the surface to the deepest trenches. We don’t yet know how long this material will prevail in these environments, but it will certainly be longer than the lifespan of the person who used it. And it’s accumulating. Read full article and to view videos here.

Climate Change is Changing the Politics of Climate Change

By David Doniger – NRDC – November 26, 2018
A pessimist could be forgiven for thinking the treadmill of climate denial and inaction is endless. For at least 50 years, senior oil company executives have known that burning their product was destabilizing our climate. President Lyndon Johnson called on Congress in 1965 to pass legislation to curb carbon dioxide pollution, and Congress enacted that law—the Clean Air Act—in 1970. Daniel Patrick Moynihan warned Richard Nixon, and every subsequent president has had his Jeremiah to sound the alarm. We made steps forward under Clinton and Obama only to suffer sharp reversals under the second Bush and—sharpest of all—Trump. But even at this late hour, I tend toward hope that this cycle is about to change. Why? Because in 1965, 1995, and even 2015, climate change seemed still off in the future, theoretical, something our worst politicians could deny altogether, and our best ones could leave for later. No longer. Climate change is here and now. And palpably getting worse. That is rapidly changing how Americans think about it. Read full blog post here.

Ending Harmful Fisheries Subsidies Could Reverse Decline in Fish Stocks

By Isabel Jarrett – The PEW Charitable Trust – November 19, 2018
Healthy fisheries are critical to a healthy ocean, but today many fish stocks are in decline due to a number of threats, including overfishing. One approach to curb overfishing is to reduce harmful fishing subsidies—payments from governments to the industry to keep boats on the water even when doing so doesn’t make economic or fisheries management sense. Although not all subsidies are harmful, World Trade Organization (WTO) member countries now have a small window of opportunity to do something about those that are, by agreeing to binding WTO rules. Read full story here.

Impact of Blue-Green Infrastructure Investment Pathways on
Dynamic Evolution of Natural Capital

University of Nottingham – November 15, 20218
Natural capital and ecosystem services concepts are a popular way of describing the multiple benefits we get from the natural environment. The publication of the Millennium Assessment in 2005 has, along with national publications such as the UK National Ecosystem Assessment (2011), raised the profile of these concepts. Read full blog post here.

 

 

 Calendar of Events


WEBINARS
     
MEETINGS     
TRAINING  

 

 

WBN: October 2018

Special Events

World Wetlands Day
February 2, 2019

Central Coast Watershed Wetlands Tour
The Wetlands Conservancy
Newport, OR

Shiver in the River
February 23, 2019
Richmond, VA

Wings Over the Rockies Festival
May 6-12, 2019

Bay Day Festival
May 18, 2019
Kemah, TX

 

 

WEBINARS  
             
JANUARY 2019  
             
January 8, 2019
2:00 p.m. ET
        Environmental Law Institute Webinar: Stream Compensatory Mitigation – Credit/Debit Determination  
             
January 9, 2019
2:00 p.m. ET
        Associaton of State Wetland Managers Compensatory Mitigation Webinar: An Ecological Framework for Reviewing Compensatory Mitigation Plans: Plan Review (Part 4 of 4)
 
             
January 9, 2019
2:00 p.m. ET 
        Michigan State University, Department of Forestry Webinar: FCWG Learning Exchange Series: Forest Carbon Offsets: A Viable Opportunity for US Landowners?   
             
January 10, 2019
3:00 p.m. ET
        American Planning Association Webinar: Climate Change Policy and Implementation Strategies in Oregon  
             
January 16, 2019
3:00 p.m. ET
        ASWM-NRCS Wetland Training Webinar 5: Dealing with Reality: How to Work with Wetlands in Altered Landscapes   
             
January 24, 2019
12:00 p.m. ET
        Antioch University Webinar: Built Environment – Resilient Water Features
 
             
FEBRUARY 2019  
             

February 1, 2019
2:00 p.m. ET

 
        Environmental Law Institute Webinar: Stream Compensatory Mitigation -- Monitoring and Performance Standards  

 

   
MEETINGS
 
JANUARY 2019 
     
January 6-9, 2019
San Diego, CA
  International Soils Meeting: Soils Across Latitudes

     

January 7-10, 2019
Washington, DC

  National Council for Science and the Environment: 2019 Annual Conference: Sustainable Infrastructure & Resilience
     
January 10-12, 2019 
Miami, FL
  Sixth Evolutionary Demography Society Annual Meeting
     
January 11, 2019 
Thatcher, AZ
  Upper Gila Watershed Forum 
     

January 14-15, 2019
Chico, CA

  2019 Northern California Botanists Symposium: Research and Conservation of Northern California’s Vegetation Communities 
     
January 27-30, 2019 
Cape May, NJ
  2019 Delaware Estuary Science & Environmental Summit: Estuary 2029: Saving our System Through Collaboration
     

January 31-February 2, 2019
New Haven, CT

  Yale Chapter of the International Society of Tropical Foresters: Examining Tropical Changes: Resilience in the Context of Disturbance and Transgression
     
FEBRUARY 2019 
     
February 5-7, 2019
Phoenix, AZ
  Tamarisk Coalition and the Desert Botanical Garden: Riparian Restoration Conference
     
February 5-7, 2019
Osage Beach, MO
  Missouri Natural Resources Conference

     
February 5-7, 2019
Stevenson, WA
  River Restoration Northwest: Stream Restoration Symposium

     

February 7-10, 2019
Towson, MD

  2019 MAEOE Conference: Full Steam Ahead: Expanding the potential of Environmental Education 
     
February 11-15, 2019
Anchorage, AK
  Alaska Forum on the Environment

     
February 19-21, 2018
Madison, WI
  Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Wetland Science Conference

     
February 21-24, 2019
Oracle, AZ
  University of Arizona Conference: Crafting the Long Tomorrow: New Conversations & Productive Catalysts Across Science and Humanities Boundaries as the Global Emergency Worsens
     
February 23-
March 2, 2019 
San Juan, Puerto Rico
  Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography: Planet Water: Challenges and Successes 
     
February 27-28, 2018
Toronto, Canada
  International Conference on Water Management Modeling
     

February 27-March 1, 2019
Bend, OR

  Oregon Chapter of the Wildlife Society Annual Meeting: Ecology and Policy in a Changing Environment 
     
MARCH 2019
     
March 2, 2019
Worcester, MA 
  Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commissions Annual Environmental Conference
     
March 11-22, 2019
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology
     
March 13-15, 2019
Ann Arbor, MI
  Michigan Stormwater Floodplain Association Conference
     
March 13-17, 2019
Raleigh, NC 
  CitSci 2019: Growing Our Family Tree 
     
March 20-22, 2019
Baltimore, MD 
  Climate Leadership Conference
     
March 25-29, 2019
Denver, CO
  5th Life Discovery – Doing Science Biology Education Conference: : Microbiomes to Ecosystems: Evolution and Biodiversity across Scale, Space, and Time
     

March 22, 2019
Berlin, CT

  Soil & Water Conservation Society Southern New England Chapter: 2019 Annual Winter Conference 
     
March 25-29, 2019
Denver, CO
  National Water Quality Monitoring Council: 11th Annual National Monitoring Conference
     
   APRIL 2019
     
April 4-6, 2019
Ashland, OH
  Ohio Wetlands Association Vernal Poolooza
     

April 12-14, 2019
Pella, IA

  2019 Society of Ecological Restoration Midwest-Great Lakes Meeting
     
April 22-25, 2019
Coral Springs, FL
  Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration: Science Advancing Everglades Resilience and Sustainability
     
April 23-25, 2019
Madison, WI
  National Adaptation Forum
     
April 29-May 2, 2019
Charleston, SC
  Center for Watershed Protection: 2019 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference 
     
MAY 2019   
     
May 2, 2019
Washington, DC
  Environmental Law Institute Conference: Clean Water Act: Law and Regulation 2019 
     

May 2-3, 2019
Saratoga Springs, NY

  Land Trust Alliance: New York Land Conservation Conference
     
May 20-22, 2019
Baltimore, MD 
  Choose Clean Water Coalition: 10th Annual Choose Clean Water Conference 
Proposals due by January 11, 2019 
     
May 6-10, 2019
Minneapolis, MN
  National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Connecting Policy, Practice, Business, Science & People
     
May 7, 2019
Washington, DC
  Environmental Law Institute 30th Annual National Wetlands Awards 2019 
     
May 19-23, 2019
Baltimore, MD
  2018 NAEP Conference: The Environmental Landscape in an Age of Infrastructure Modernization
     
May 19-24, 2019
Cleveland, OH
  Association of State Floodplain Managers 42nd Annual Meeting: Managing Floods Where the Mountains Meet the Desert 
     
May 28-31, 2019
Baltimore, MD
  Society of Wetland Scientists 2019 Annual Meeting: The Role of Wetlands in Meeting Global Environmental Challenges: Linking Wetland Science, Policy , and Society
     
May 29-June 2, 2019
Waikoloa, HI
  Ducks Unlimited National Convention
     
   JUNE 2019
     
June 4-6, 20, 2019
Bologna, Italy
  2nd International Conference on Community Ecology 
     
June 10-14, 2019
Brockport, NY 
  The College at Brockport, State University of new York: 62nd Annual Conference on Great Lakes Research: Large Lakes Research: Connecting People and Ideas 
     

June 13-14, 2019
Providence, Fl

  Land Trust Alliance: Seventh Symposium on Advanced Legal Topics in Land Conservation 
     
June 16-19, 2018
Sparks, NV
  2019 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: Improving Water Infrastructure Through Resilient Adaptation
     
June 17-20, 2019
Louisville, KY
  National Hydrologic Warming Council Conference
     
June 21-24, 2019
Cleveland, OH
  River Network: River Rally
     

June 23-27, 2019
Flagstaff, AZ

  12th North American Forest Ecology Workshop: Forests on the Edge: Forest Ecology in Rapidly Changing Conditions
     
JULY 2019
     

July 1-5, 2019
Milano, Italy

  International Association for Landscape Ecology's World Congress: Nature and society facing the Anthropocene: challenges and perspectives for Landscape Ecology
     
AUGUST 2019   
     
August 11-16, 2019
Louisville, KY
  Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting
     
OCTOBER 2019  
     

October 8-10, 2019
Pittsburgh, PA

 

Natural Areas Association: Natural Areas Conference
Proposals due by April 15, 2019

   

TRAINING/WORKSHOPS
 
DECEMBER 2018
     
     

December 27, 2018-
January 16, 2019
Xpu-Ha Beach, Mexico

  Caribbean Ecosystem Field Studies Course 
     
December 28, 2018-January 16, 2019 
Costa Rica
  Organization for Tropical Studies and the University of Costa Course:  Field Ecology: Skills for Science and Beyond
     
JANUARY 2019
     
January 4-5, 2019
Saukville, WI
  University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Workshop: Ecology and Physiology of Plants in Winter
     

January 7, 2019
Online

  The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Delineation Training 2019 
January 9-April 26, 2019
Online
  Montana State University Online Course: Wetland & Riparian Ecology & Management
     

January 9-May 3, 2019
Auburn, AL

  School of Forestry & Wildlife Sciences, Auburn University Course: Restoration Ecology
     
January 10-21, 2019
Kananaskis Valley
Alberta, Canada 
  University of Saskatchewan Centre for Hydrology / CWRA / Canadian Society for Hydrological Sciences Kananaskis Short Course: Principles of Hydrology  
     
January 13-18, 2019
Oracle, AZ
  CUAHSI Master Class: Advanced Techniques in Watershed Science 
     
January 14-17, 2019
Sacramento, CA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
     

January 15-16, 2019
Padilla Bay Reserve
Mt. Vernon, WA

  Washington State Department of Ecology: Coastal Training Program Course: Grass, Sedge, and Rush Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
     
January 22-May 9, 2019
Online
  University of Missouri Online Course: Topics in Natural Resources (Urban biodiversity, conservation, planning)
     

January 30, 2019
Tacoma, WA

  Washington State Department of Ecology: Coastal Training Program Course:  How to Administer Development Permits in Western Washington’s Shorelines   
     
FEBRUARY 2019
     

February 4-April 29, 2019
Online

 

The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2019

February 6, 2019
Lacey, WA

  Washington State Department of Ecology: Coastal Training Program Course:  Lower Your Risk: Taking the Mystery out of Cultural Resource Management
     

February 7-8, 2019
Washington, DC

  American Law institute Continuing Legal Education Course: Environmental Law 2019
     

February 13, 2019
Padilla Bay Reserve
Mt. Vernon, WA

  Washington State Department of Ecology: Coastal Training Program Course:  How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
     

February 20, 2019
Padilla Bay Reserve
Mt. Vernon, WA

  Washington State Department of Ecology: Coastal Training Program Course:  Tree and Shrub Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats
     
MARCH 2019
     
March 18, 2019
Online 
  The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2019
     

March 18-22, 2019
Shepherdstown, WV

 
 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Stream Habitat Measurement Techniques

 
APRIL 2019   
     
April 1-5, 2019
Shepherdstown, WV
  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Course: Wetland Assessment, Restoration and Management 
     

April 8-10, 2019
Knoxville, TN

  CUAHSI Workshop: The Role of Runoff and Erosion on Soil Carbon Stocks: From Soilscapes to Landscapes 
     
MAY 2019
     

May 13-24, 20 19
Flagstaff, AZ

  Northern Arizona University Training Course: New Advances in Land Carbon Cycle Modeling 
     

May 21, 2019
Boulder, CO

  CUAHSI Short Course: The Science and Practice of Operational Ensemble Hydrological Prediction
     

May 29-31, 2019
Golden, CO

  CUAHSI Short Course: Integrated Simulation of Watershed Systems using Parflow 
     
JULY 2019
     

July 28-August 2, 2019
Boston University

  Ecological Forecasting
     
July 28-August 10, 2019
Bar Harbor, ME 
  College of the Atlantic Field Botany: Plants of New England
     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 INDEX 

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • NFWF, NOAA Announce $28.9 Million in Grants for the 2018 National Coastal Resilience Fund
  • Voters Just Elected Seven More Scientists to Congress
  • Climate Change and the Elections: Five Takeaways
  • Trump Signs the Water Infrastructure Act

NATIONAL NEWS

  • Exclusive: At U.N. Climate Talks, Trump Team Plans Sideshow on Coal
  • Fishermen Sue Oil Companies Over Rising Ocean Temperatures
  • New Resources Support Tribes in Preparing for Climate Change
  • Ocean at the Door: New Homes and the Rising Sea
  • USGS: Florence Set at Least 28 Flood Records in Carolinas
  • USACE Announces Lake Erie Wetland Restoration
  • Every President Since JFK Was Warned About Climate Change
  • Dam Problems, Win-Win Solutions
  • Facing Climate Change, States and Cities Seek to Borrow Billions
  • Can Citizen Lawsuits Force Governments to Act on Climate Change?
  • Oil and Gas Leasing Delayed in Sage Grouse Habitat
  • Recent Hurricanes Underscore Critical Need for Better Flood-Ready Infrastructure Standards
  • A Great Lakes Pipeline Dispute Points to a Broader Energy Dilemma
  • Watershed Groups Have a Positive Impact on Local Water Quality, Study Finds

STATE NEWS

  • AK: The Trump Administration Just Approved a Plan to Drill for Oil in Alaska’s Federal Waters. It’s a Major First
  • CA: U.S. Judge Bans Trump Administration from OKing Fracking Off California Coast 
  • CA: New Hope for Southern California’s Besieged Wetland
  • CO: When in Drought: States Take on Urgent Negotiations to Avoid Colorado River Crisis
  • CT: Connecticut's Marshes: Past, Present, and Uncertain Future
  • FL: Why Won’t Red Tide Go Away? After Hurricane Michael, Toxic Algae Has Again Spread
 

INDEX


Editor's Choice


National News


State News


Wetland Science News


Resources & Publications


Potpouri


Calendar

  • FL: Before and After: Coastal Change Caused by Hurricane Michael
  • ME: Consider the Lobster Tariffs
  • ME: Why is the Gulf of Maine Warming Faster Than 99% of the Ocean?
  • MD: Maryland Receives Funds for Shoreline, Wetland Protection
  • MS: Seeking Water from Above: Low-Level Helicopter to Fly Above Mississippi Alluvial Plain
  • MS: Vital Barrier Islands are Becoming Increasingly Vulnerable
  • NY: 3 Major Changes Will Transform Landscape of Staten Island’s West Shore
  • NC: Grant to Support Harbor Shoreline Work
  • OH: Ohio’s Watershed Moment: How to Fix Lake Erie Algae
  • PR: Puerto Rico Considers 100% Renewable Energy, But Natural Gas May Come First
  • UT: At its End, Utahns Worry About Bear River’s Future
  • VA: Report Details the Cost of Recycling Coal Ash in Virginia
  • WV: DEP Awards Stream Partner Grants
  • WV: WVU Researchers to Profile Wetlands to Set Water Standards
  • WY: Group Effort to Preserve Wyoming’s Wetlands, Water Resources

WETLAND SCIENCE NEWS

  • Part of the Answer to Climate Change may be America’s Trees and Dirt, Scientists Say
  • New Study Reveals Natural Solutions Can Reduce Global Warming
  • Carbon Goes with the Flow
  • Shrinking Groundwater
  • Streamside Forests Store Tons of Carbon
  • Conservation Areas Help Birdlife Adapt to Climate Change
  • Estimating the Vulnerability of Ocean Planning and Blue Economy to Climate Change
  • Water-Harvesting and Arid-Adapted Agrobiodiversity
  • How Much Danger Are We in When Chemicals Are Spilled in Local Rivers?
  • Climate Change: ‘Wetlands Vital to Protect Cities’
  • Dredging and Wetlands Creation—an Environmental Success Story
  • Climate Change Prompts a Rethink of Everglades Management
  • Greenland’s Ice Sheets Hold Clues to Global Sea-Level Rise
  • Salty Water Causes Some Freshwater Harmful Algae to Release Toxins
  • The Missing Turtles of the Anthropocene

RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONS

  • Cross-Ecosystem Carbon Flows Connecting Ecosystems Worldwide
  • Multiple Forest Attributes Underpin the Supply of Multiple Ecosystem Services
  • Ecosystem-Based Adaptation: A Handbook for EbA in Mountain, Dryland, and Coastal Ecosystems

POTOURRI

  • Improved Water Quality Starts at Home
  • As Courts Halt Keystone XL, Public Voices Opposition
  • How to Accelerate the Use of Natural Infrastructure to Aid Climate Change Adaptation
  • IPCC Report and the Missing Dialogue in US Environmentalism
  • Alaska Case Could be Landmark in Water Rights Disputes
  • The Love and Lore of Lake Erie’s Wetlands
  • Most Underestimate Minorities’ Environmental Concerns—Even Minorities
  • How the Farm Bureau’s Climate Agenda is Failing its Farmers
  • How Can We Reduce Losses from Coastal Storms? Monitor the Health of Our Coasts.
  • How Monitoring Local Water Supplies Can Build Community

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Webinars

November

  • Society for Ecological Restoration Webinar: Spatial Ecology for Assessment of Landscape-level Conservation and Restoration
  • Association of State Wetland Managers: Members Wetland Webinar: Planning Wetland Restoration at the Watershed Level
  • National Water Quality Monitoring Council Webinar: Harmful Algal Bloom Detection
  • The Swamp School Webinar: Hydric Soil Indicators – 2018 Updates

December

  • Association of State Floodplain Managers Webinar: Disaster Responsibilities Before, During and After a Flood
  • NOAA/USFWS Webinar: The Little Rapids Restoration Project Webinar: A 25 year partnership to Improve Habitat in the St. Mary’s River Area of Concern
  • ASWM-NRCS Wetland Training Webinar 4: Wetlands Ecology for Planners – Examples of Variation Across the United States
  • Environmental Law Institute Webinar: Stream Compensatory Mitigation – The Watershed Approach
  • Association of State Wetland Managers: Members Wetland Webinar: Using a Living Shorelines Prioritization Tool for Wetland Improvements

January

  • Compensatory Mitigation Webinar: An Ecological Framework for Reviewing Compensatory Mitigation Plans: Plan Review (Part 4 of 4)
  • ASWM-NRCS Wetland Training Webinar 5: Dealing with Reality: How to Work with Wetlands in Altered Landscapes
  • Antioch University Webinar: Built Environment – Resilient Water Features

February

  • Environmental Law Institute Webinar: Stream Compensatory Mitigation -- Monitoring and Performance Standards

MEETINGS

November

  • American Water Works Association, Florida Section: 2018 Fall Conference: Planning the Future of Water
  • World Summit on Climate Change & Global Warming
  • 2018 ACES Conference: A Community on Ecosystem Services
  • National Aquarium Lecture Series: Science into Action
  • Patuxent River Conference: Climate Change & The Patuxent River: Local Implications of Global Issues
  • Maryland Water Monitoring Council Annual Conference: Science, Stewardship, and Citizen Involvement – Working Together for Clean Water

December

  • 2018 ACES Conference: A Community on Ecosystem Services
  • National Aquarium Lecture Series: Science into Action
  • Patuxent River Conference: Climate Change & The Patuxent River: Local Implications of Global Issues
  • Maryland Water Monitoring Council Annual Conference: Science, Stewardship, and Citizen Involvement – Working Together for Clean Water
  • Actions for Wildlife in a Changing Climate
  • Restore America’s Estuaries Conference: 9th National Summit on Coastal and Estuarine Restoration and Management
  • Midwestern States Environmental Consultants Association Conference: Environmental Liabilities, Risk Assessment, and Remediation
  • AGU Fall Meeting
  • North Central Region Water Network: North Central Region One Water Action Forum

January 2019

  • International Soils Meeting: Soils Across Latitudes
  • National Council for Science and the Environment: 2019 Annual Conference: Sustainable Infrastructure & Resilience
  • Sixth Evolutionary Demography Society Annual Meeting
  • Upper Gila Watershed Forum
  • 2019 Northern California Botanists Symposium: Research and Conservation of Northern California’s Vegetation Communities
  • 2019 Delaware Estuary Science & Environmental Summit: Estuary 2029: Saving our System Through Collaboration
  • Yale Chapter of the International Society of Tropical Foresters: Examining Tropical Changes: Resilience in the Context of Disturbance and Transgression

February 2019

  • Tamarisk Coalition and the Desert Botanical Garden: Riparian Restoration Conference
  • Missouri Natural Resources Conference
  • River Restoration Northwest: Stream Restoration Symposium
  • Alaska Forum on the Environment
  • Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Wetland Science Conference
  • University of Arizona Conference: Crafting the Long Tomorrow: New Conversations & Productive Catalysts Across Science and Humanities Boundaries as the Global Emergency Worsens
  • International Conference on Water Management Modeling

 March 2019

  • Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commission Annual Environmental Conference
  • Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation Course: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology
  • Michigan Stormwater Floodplain Association Conference
  • CitSci 2019: Growing Our Family Tree
  • Climate Leadership Conference
  • 5th Life Discovery – Doing Science Biology Education Conference: Microbiomes to Ecosystems: Evolution and Biodiversity across Scale, Space, and Time
  • Soil & Water Conservation Society Southern New England Chapter: 2019 Annual Winter Conference
  • National Water Quality Monitoring Council: 11th Annual National Monitoring Conference

April 2019

  • Ohio Wetlands Association Vernal Poolooza
  • Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration: Science Advancing Everglades Resilience and Sustainability
  • National Adaptation Forum
  • Center for Watershed Protection: 2019 National Watershed & Stormwater Conference

May 2019

  • Environmental Law Institute Conference: Clean Water Act: Law and Regulation 2019
  • Land Trust Alliance: New York Land Conservation Conference
  • Choose Clean Water Coalition: 10th Annual Choose Clean Water Conference
  • National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Connecting Policy, Practice, Business, Science & People
  • Environmental Law Institute 30th Annual National Wetlands Awards 2019
  • 2018 NAEP Conference: The Environmental Landscape in an Age of Infrastructure Modernization
  • Association of State Floodplain Managers 42nd Annual Meeting: Managing Floods Where the Mountains Meet the Desert
  • Society of Wetland Scientists 2019 Annual Meeting: The Role of Wetlands in Meeting Global Environmental Challenges: Linking Wetland Science, Policy, and Society
  • Ducks Unlimited National Convention

June 2019

  • 2nd International Conference on Community Ecology
  • The College at Brockport, State University of New York: 62nd Annual Conference on Great Lakes Research: Large Lakes Research: Connecting People and Ideas
  • Land Trust Alliance: Seventh Symposium on Advanced Legal Topics in Land Conservation
  • 2019 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: Improving Water Infrastructure Through Resilient Adaptation
  • National Hydrologic Warning Council Conference
  • River Network: River Rally

August 2019

  • Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting 

 

Training/Workshops

November

  • The Swamp School Online Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment
  • Urban Riparian and Stream Restoration Training

December

  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018
  • Portland State University Course: River Restoration Project Management
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Real Dirt on Dirt: A Workshop on Soil & Health
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training
  • D & D West Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement – Eastern Mountains/Piedmont)
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Education Course: Identification of Wetland Plants in Winter
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
  • The Swamp School Workshop: Wetland Water Budget
  • Caribbean Ecosystem Field Studies Course
  • Organization for Tropical Studies and the University of Costa Course: Field Ecology: Skills for Science and Beyond

January 2019

  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018
  • Portland State University Course: River Restoration Project Management
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Real Dirt on Dirt: A Workshop on Soil & Health
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training
  • D & D West Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement – Eastern Mountains/Piedmont)
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Education Course: Identification of Wetland Plants in Winter
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
  • The Swamp School Workshop: Wetland Water Budget
  • Caribbean Ecosystem Field Studies Course
  • Organization for Tropical Studies and the University of Costa Course: Field Ecology: Skills for Science and Beyond

February 2019

  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2019
  • Washington State Department of Ecology: Coastal Training Program Course: Lower Your Risk: Taking the Mystery out of Cultural Resource Management
  • American Law institute Continuing Legal Education Course: Environmental Law 2019
  • Washington State Department of Ecology: Coastal Training Program Course: How to Explain Science, Share Data, and Build Trust: Presentation Skills for Scientists and Public Officials
  • Washington State Department of Ecology: Coastal Training Program Course: Tree and Shrub Identification for Western WA Puget Lowland Habitats

March 2019

  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2019

July 2019

  • College of the Atlantic Field Botany: Plants of New England