Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

                  

IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

To view past issues of Wetland Breaking News on our website, please click here.

Visit ASWM online to read weekly news updates between issues.

Please send comments and news stories to .

Thank you for your continued interest.


PRINT THIS ISSUE

Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

 

 

 




 

Editor's Note


Dear Wetlanders,Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

The foliage in Maine is superb this week. I was very excited to get out on Dundee Pond near my home for some fall kayaking and water-side leaf peeping – I was not disappointed! It was a great way to refresh my senses and revitalize my passion for protecting our amazing wetlands and aquatic resources. I hope you all have a chance to do the same.

This past month has seen the release of the U.S. EPA’s Step 1 Rule, repealing the Obama-era 2015 Clean Water Rule. You can find a story on that development in Editor’s Choice. To date it has not been published in the Federal Register, but as you can read in an article we are sharing in Potpourri it is likely that once it is published, it will be heavily litigated.

I was excited to attend the Michigan Wetlands Association meeting on Sept. 8th where presentations and discussions were focused on PFAS in wetlands. It’s a topic ASWM is very interested in engaging in, and we were pleasantly surprised to find an article about a PFAS munching microbe found in New Jersey’s wetlands – see Editor’s Choice.

And in State News, you’ll find a story about several awards given to four individuals and three organizations in New Hampshire by the EPA New England office, including a “lifetime achievement” award for Collis Adams, ASWM’s former Chair of the Board of Directors. Congratulations to Collis!!

Best regards,

Marla J. Stelk
Editor
Wetland Breaking News

 

Wetland Breaking News: May 2019

   
                


Editor's ChoiceWetland Breaking News: October 2019


Microbe from New Jersey wetlands chomps PFAS

American Chemical Society – September 18, 2019
Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are building up in the environment, and scientists are becoming concerned. These substances, ubiquitous as water-repellent or nonstick additives in many consumer products, are persistent and have been accumulating in organisms throughout the food chain over many years. Now, researchers reporting in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology have identified bacteria from a New Jersey wetland that, surprisingly, can break carbon-fluorine bonds and degrade PFAS. Read full press release here.

Nearly 30% of birds in U.S., Canada have vanished since 1970

By Gustave Axelson – Cornell Chronicle – September 19, 2019 – Video
If you were alive in 1970, more than 1 in 4 birds in the U.S. and Canada have disappeared within your lifetime. According to research published Sept. 19 by the journal Science, the total breeding bird population in the continental U.S. and Canada has dropped by 29 percent since that year. Read full story and view video here.

Trump administration drops Obama-era water protection rule

By John Flesher – RealClear Politics – September 13, 2019
The Trump administration on Thursday revoked an Obama-era regulation that shielded many U.S. wetlands and streams from pollution but was opposed by developers and farmers who said it hurt economic development and infringed on property rights. Environmental groups criticized the administration’s action, the latest in a series of moves to roll back environmental protections put into place under President Barack Obama. Read full story here.

BLM move would split apart key public lands team

By Rebecca Beitsch – The Hill – October 14, 2019 – Video
The team that assesses the environmental impacts of major projects on the nation’s public lands will be split up and spread across seven states, according to new internal documents breaking down the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) plans to relocate most of its Washington-based employees out west. The documents reviewed by The Hill provide insight into how BLM plans to split up teams, spreading people who currently work together to offices across different states. Read full story here.  

  Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

 

Wetland Breaking News: October 2019National News 


Americans Love Public Lands and Species Conservation but How Do We Pay for Them?

By John Goodell – Mountain Journal – September 26, 2019
Buried within the distracting melee of our current news cycle, an obscure piece of legislation is poised to modernize fish and wildlife conservation funding for the first time since the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt. The legislation in question is the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act, and its successful passage in the current Congressional session will require the support of all those that value fish and wildlife conservation, hunting and fishing, birdwatching, outdoor recreation and more. In many ways it will require a leap of faith at a time when trust and belief in government solutions is at an all-time low. Read full article here.

The Trump administration weakened Endangered Species Act rules — 17 state attorneys general have sued over it

By Darryl Fears – The Washington Post – September 25, 2019
Attorneys general in 17 states on Wednesday made good on a promise to sue the Trump administration over rule changes that substantially weakened how Endangered Species Act protections are considered and enforced. The attorneys general vowed to challenge the administration in mid-August when the Interior and Commerce departments announced new rules that would allow officials to decrease the amount of habitat threatened and endangered animals require to survive and remove tools used by scientists to predict future harm to species as a result of climate change. Read full story here.

Committee Approves Slate of Legislation to Maintain Labor Standards, Fund Water Projects Across the Country, Improve Disaster Preparedness, and More

House Committee on Transportation – September 19, 2019
Today, the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure approved a slate of bipartisan measures by voice vote, including the Fair and Open Skies Act, the Protect and Restore America’s Estuaries Act, the Resilience Revolving Loan Fund Act, legislation to amend the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, and more. Read full news release here.

Secretary Bernhardt Announces Over $100 Million in Public-Private Funding for Wetland Conservation Projects

Contact: Vanessa Kauffman – U.S. Department of Interior – September 16, 2019
The Migratory Bird Conservation Commission, chaired by U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt, approved $28 million in funding for various wetland conservation projects. Marking its 30th anniversary since enactment, the 2019 North American Wetlands Conservation Act (NAWCA) grants will be used to ensure waterfowl and other birds are protected throughout their life cycles. Of the funds issued, $23.9 million was allocated for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners to conserve or restore more than 150,000 acres of wetland and associated upland habitats for waterfowl, shorebirds and other birds in 20 states throughout the United States. These grants will be matched by more than $72 million in partner funds. Read full press release here.

Feds finalize plan to open Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling

By Anna M. Phillips – Los Angeles Times – September 12, 2019
The Trump administration announced Thursday its final plan to open Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling, giving the petroleum industry access to the pristine wildland for the first time. The plan would allow oil leasing on 1.56 million acres of the 19-million-acre refuge. The proposal — which would open the entire coastal plain to the energy industry — was seen as the most extreme of three options considered by the Interior Department. Read full story here.

 Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

 

Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

 State News Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

AR: Natural growth back in wetland

By Stacy Ryburn – Arkansas Democrat Gazette – September 16, 2019
The Wilson Springs wetland preserve in Fayetteville is officially on its way back to health. The 121-acre preserve, the largest in Northwest Arkansas, is home to a plethora of vegetation and wildlife. Rare species such as the Arkansas darter fish and Henslow sparrow share the space with deer, bobcats, coyotes, owls and ducks. Spring-fed streams converge to form Clabber Creek. Native flora have re-sprouted and replaced non-native plants and trees like privet and honeysuckle that stifled the area’s natural beauty and deprived the streams and undergrowth of sunlight. The transformation took seven years. Read full story here.

CA: California farm region faces furry new threat: swamp rodents

By Samantha Maldonado and Tery Chea – Yahoo Finance News – Associated Press – September 26, 2019 – Video
One of the most recent threats to California's environment has webbed feet, white whiskers, shaggy fur and orange buck teeth that could be mistaken for carrots. "Boy, they're an ugly-looking thing," said David Passadori, an almond and walnut grower in central California. "And the way they multiply — jeez." The swamp rodents, called nutria, are setting off alarms in California. They weigh about 20 pounds (9 kilograms) each and eat the equivalent of about a fourth of their weight each day by burrowing into riverbanks and chomping into plants that emerge from the water. The animals can destroy the wetland habitats of rare and endangered species, degrading soil, ruining crops and carrying pathogens that may threaten livestock. Most of all, they pose a public safety risk: Left unchecked, nutria could jeopardize California's water supply, especially if they get into the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. Read full story and view video here.

CA: Calif. sues EPA for nixing protection of S.F. Bay salt ponds

By Ariel Wittenberg – E&E News – September 24, 2019
California sued the Trump administration today over EPA's refusal to extend Clean Water Act protections to salt ponds in San Francisco Bay. At issue are development plans for 1,365 acres owned by Cargill Inc. and DMB Pacific Ventures LLC in the southern bay. Those tidal wetlands were converted to industrial salt production in the mid-1800s, but conservationists have been buying tracts in that area since the 1970s, arguing that restoring marshes will improve water quality and combat rising sea levels. EPA declared in March that none of the property qualified as "waters of the United States" and therefore is not protected by the Clean Water Act. Read full story here.

CO: Wetland Expansion Approved in Colorado

By Kate Johns – Storm Water Solutions – October 1, 2019
An original plan to restore 50 acres into wetlands has now been expanded by 15 acres. An expansion to the wetlands in Animas Valley, north of Durango, Colo., has been approved. The Zink family, who owns the property that will be expanded, has been working to restore a portion of their 150-acre ranch back to wetlands for years, according to The Durango Herald. At first, the family told the Durango Herald that the plan was to restore just 50 acres, but while those acres were being worked on, the family began looking at other areas of their property that could be converted. Now, the family has gained approval from various government agencies, including the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Environmental Protection Agency and La Plata County Government, to expand the original wetlands project by 15 acres, the Durango Herald reported. Read full story here.

FL: Project aims to turn pit into an artificial wetland in Volusia County

By Irene Sans – WFTV – October 2, 2019 – Video
There is a big hole in Orange City in Volusia County, to be specific, a 60-acre 40-feet deep hole. This giant pit was left after sand mining for local construction and now a project aims to turn this pit into a wetland that can replenish the aquifer below, recharging Blue Spring, and ultimately could be used by local residents. Wetlands are often referred to as “nature’s kidneys.” They are a crucial part in our ecosystems and many wetlands are shrinking or being drained across Florida. Read full story and view video here.

FL: $2.8M Conservation Easement Approved for Putnam County Wetland Preserve

By Brendan Rivers – WJCT News – September 24, 2019
The Florida Cabinet voted Tuesday to approve a $2.8 million conservation easement on Wetland Preserve in Putnam County. The 3,562 acres of land is owned by Ben and Louann Williams. The easement is funded through Florida Forever, the state’s conservation and recreation land-acquisition program. The North Florida Land Trust, a nonprofit that aims to protect land of ecological, agricultural, and historic significance to North Florida, sees the property as a critical link in the Ocala to Osceola Wildlife Corridor, a 1.6 million acre stretch of public and private lands that connect the Ocala National Forest in Central Florida and Osceola National Forest in North Florida. Read full story here.

HI: Maui Council Committee Votes to Settle Clean Water Act Case

By Nathan Eagle – Civil Beat – September 9, 2019
Maui County Council members took a critical first step Friday in diverting a Clean Water Act case bound for the U.S. Supreme Court. After a long hearing, the council’s Governance, Ethics and Transparency Committee, chaired by Michael Molina, voted 5-3 to recommend that the full council settle the case. Read full story here.

ID: Students get Hands-On Wetland Education

By Mary Malone – Bonner County Daily Bee – September 24, 2019
The number of monarch butterflies has significantly decreased in recent years. “Three years ago, the population estimate in California was 200,000,” Bill Ament, retired Idaho Fish and Game fisheries biologist, told Southside Elementary fifth graders on Thursday. “This last winter, they estimated there was only 30,000. Since the 1980s, the numbers have dropped 99 percent.” Ament has been introducing milkweed to the wetland restoration site at the south end of Cocolalla Lake in an effort to attract monarch butterflies migrating to and from California. He also tags the butterflies for tracking and identification. The butterflies migrating to California, however, will never see this area again, Ament told the kids. “They are going to take three to four generations to make it all the way back up here,” he said. Read full story here.

MN: Minnesota Pollution Control Agency denies key permit for Enbridge Line 3

By Jimmy Lovrien – Twin Cities Pioneer Press – September 27, 2019
The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency on Friday denied a key water permit to Enbridge’s proposed Line 3 oil pipeline, requiring the Canadian oil company to satisfy several additional requirements before it can reapply for the permit. The agency issued a “denial without prejudice” for the proposed 340-mile long pipeline’s 401 certification, a permit awarded by a state’s regulators if the project’s impact on water falls within the state’s standards. Federal agencies cannot issue a federal permit or license without a state approving the 401 certification. Read full story here.

MN: Crow Wing County to administer Wetland Conservation Act

By Frank Lee – Brainerd Dispatch – September 18, 2019
Crow Wing County commissioners support a proposal to administer the Minnesota Wetland Conservation Act after the Crow Wing Soil and Water Conservation District decided to stop. In the spring, the district informed cities and townships under its Wetland Conservation Act jurisdiction that it would no longer handle the administration, causing some consternation. Read full story here.

MT: Officials plan to restore Butte wetland

By Jayda McClendon – NBC Montana – September 26, 2019
Atlantic Richfield is planning to restore an under-utilized wetland near the Lexington Avenue bridge. Gary Swant, founder of a bird guide service called GoBirdMontana, says he is in support of the project. “A lot of these wetlands have emerging vegetation, cattails and reeds, and that’s very important for birds, not only to feed on, but to hide in for protection,” Swant said. That’s why Swant is advocating for the restoration of the Lexington Wetland Conservation Area. Read full story here.

NH: New Hampshire Citizens and Organizations Recognized by EPA for Environmental Achievements

Contact: David Deegan – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – September 10, 2019
Four individuals and three organizations in New Hampshire were each recognized today by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for their work to protect New England's environment. These environmental leaders were among 25 recipients across New England honored by EPA's New England office at the 2019 Environmental Merit Awards ceremony. Michael W. Durfor of Epsom and Collis G. Adams of Concord were each given awards for lifetime achievement. Other awards were given to Mary Ann Tilton of Concord; Boyd Smith of Newfound; the Town of Wolfboro; the NH Coastal Program in the NH Department of Environmental Services, and the Baboosic Lake Association in Amherst and Merrimack. Read full news release here.

NJ: Federal appeals court rules against PennEast in fight over pipeline land

By Zachary Lanning – NJTV News – September 10, 2019
In a blow to PennEast and their hopes of building a 120-mile natural gas pipeline across New Jersey, the US Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit ruled today that the company cannot use eminent domain to take state-owned land along the route of the pipeline. The decision reverses an earlier district court ruling that had allowed PennEast to condemn approximately 40 parcels of land that were preserved for various uses through state tax dollars. Read full story here.

OH: Girls in STEM | Learn how a floating wetland helps purify water

WKYC Studios – September 10, 2019 – Video
The Cuyahoga Soil and Water Conservation District anchored a floating wetland in a pond to help clean the water. Betsy Kling reports. Watch video here.

TX: How BP oil spill fines could help protect the Texas Coast

By Amal Ahmed – Mail & Guardian – September 26, 2019
Nine years after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill — one of the largest environmental disasters in US history — recovery funds are still trickling in to rebuild and restore the Texas Gulf Coast. Last week, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) held a series of public meetings on how to spend the latest chunk of available money: $360-million split between the five Gulf Coast states affected by the leak. Read full article here.

VA: Community, Wildlife, and Clean Water at Mulberry Run Wetlands

Chesapeake Bay Foundation – September 27, 2019
A corner of Waynesboro's Jefferson Park Neighborhood has undergone an amazing transformation since 2016. What at first glance was a boggy, grassy field has become a 10-acre manmade wetland that's both a haven for wildlife and the community. The city undertook the project three years ago to reduce pollution going into the South River and the Chesapeake Bay. Read full blog post here.

WV: Urban wetland used as a classroom

By Dr. Heather Biola – The Inter-Mountain – September 21, 2019
Elizabeth Byers used the Kump Education Center wetland as a classroom to train her vegetation ecology students to recognize the plant life and soil conditions present in a healthy urban wetland. On Sept. 12 the old Kump pasture became a certified West Virginia wetland after Elizabeth and her students did their assessment. Read full story here.

Washington, D.C.: D.C. Wants to Be Resilient to Climate Change. Critics Argue Efforts Could Worsen Inequalities.

By Jacob Fenston – WAMU – September 19, 2019
More extreme thunderstorms and hurricanes. Entire summers of “heat emergency” days. Regular flooding along the Potomac River and Anacostia River, as well as inland neighborhoods, where storm drains are overwhelmed by rain. This is the future climate scientists tell us is rapidly approaching for the D.C. region as the global temperature warms. One way the District is responding is with a lengthy plan, released in April, to make the city more resilient. Among the recommendations: revamp building codes to make sure new buildings are “climate ready” — able to resist things like flooding, power outages and extreme heat. By 2050, the plan recommends retrofitting all at-risk buildings (not just new construction) or removing them from the riskiest areas. Read full story here.

Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

 

Wetland Breaking News: October 2019Wetland Science News


Stewardship of Wetlands and Soils Has Climate Benefits

By Melanie Sturm – NRDC – September 30, 2019
When you look at a farm, do you think about nutrient rich soils or cover crops growing between rows? When you look at a marsh, do you see the submerged layers of sediment created by years of plant litter piling up? Probably not. But those parts of well-managed agricultural lands and wetlands store a lot of carbon, and that’s increasingly important as climate change is forcing society to consider ways to lower carbon emissions and draw down existing carbon levels in the atmosphere. Managing landscapes and its components, like plants and soils, to sequester carbon long-term is called natural climate solutions. Several of NRDC’s water-related initiatives, including our work on wetlands and healthy soils, support this type of climate mitigation. Read full story here.

SERC experiments show CO2 stunts wetlands

Laboratory News – September 27, 2019
Scientists at SERC are running experiments to simulate projected environmental conditions in the year 2100 by steadily raising CO2 levels in controlled plant chambers. They found that instead of producing bigger stems, marsh plants that were exposed to elevated levels of CO2 produced more stems, but ones that were noticeably smaller. Meng Lu, lead author of the study, published in Nature Climate Change, said: “I don't think anybody expected this. Everyone thought [plants] increased, biomass increased, so the height, width, all should increase. But that’s not the case in a marsh.” Read full story here.

Study examines effects of climate change, land loss on Louisiana’s Houma tribe

By Sharita Forrest – Illinois News Bureau – September 27, 2019
Repeated disasters and environmental changes on Louisiana’s Gulf Coast are rapidly eroding the land, and along with it, an Indigenous tribe’s ability to sustain its culture, health and livelihoods, new research suggests. Shanondora Billiot, a professor of social work at the University of Illinois, interviewed 160 members of the United Houma Nation living in Terrebonne Parish – one of six districts in the tribal service area bordering the Gulf of Mexico – about the effects of climate change and land loss on their families. Read full story here.

New U.N. climate report: Monumental change already here for world’s oceans and frozen regions

By Chris Mooney and Brady Dennis – The Washington Post – September 25, 2019 – Videos
Climate change is already having staggering effects on oceans and ice-filled regions that encompass 80 percent of the Earth, and future damage from rising seas and melting glaciers is now all but certain, according to a sobering new report from the United Nations. The warming climate is killing coral reefs, supercharging monster storms, and fueling deadly marine heat waves and record losses of sea ice. And Wednesday’s report on the world’s oceans, glaciers, polar regions and ice sheets finds that such effects foreshadow a more catastrophic future as long as greenhouse gas emissions remain unchecked. Read full story here.

Could Massive Storm Surge Barriers End the Hudson River’s Revival?

By Elizbeth Royte – YaleEnvironment 360 – September 24, 2019
On a sunny afternoon, John Lipscomb steered the 22-foot vessel Ian Fletcher past the rip-rapped, industrialized shoreline of South Brooklyn and into the vastness of New York Harbor, where the Hudson River meets the sea. The towers of Lower Manhattan glittered to the north, and the Statue of Liberty rose off our bow. Lipscomb — vice president for advocacy for Riverkeeper, a non-profit — let off the throttle, and we paused to take in both the incongruities and the splendors of the scene. Then our thoughts turned to the river. Not two months earlier, Lipscomb told me, American Rivers had named the Hudson the second most endangered waterway in the nation. It wasn’t pollution that put the river on the conservation group’s 2019 watchlist, though parts of it are, in fact, polluted. Nor was the river particularly imperiled by diversions or urban sprawl, like others on the list. For the first time in its history, American Rivers had singled out a waterway solely on the possibility that massive in-river storm surge barriers could rise in its lower reaches, representing an existential threat to a river in the midst of much-heralded ecological recovery. Read full story here.
 

 

National Wetlands Inventory Wetlands Mapper Updates

New wetlands data have been added to the Wetlands Mapper as part of their biannual data update process. The new data additions cover over 35 million acres of the U.S. comprising 8 projects in portions of California, Montana, Minnesota, New Mexico and Vermont. Additionally, over 100 million acres of data improvements were made to Colorado, Minnesota and Wisconsin.

To view these updates, please visit Wetlands Mapper. The Wetland Mapper provides users access to this new wetlands data as part of the over 34 million wetland polygons that can be viewed, downloaded and printed. The Projects Mapper provides users with the geographical locations of new and recent wetlands mapping projects posted as well as locations of active wetland mapping projects.

A new Code Definition Table download has been added to the website. This table provides a crosswalk from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) wetlands data, as defined by the Federal Wetland Mapping Standard, to the complete wetland definitions, as defined by the Federal Wetlands Classification Standard. The table can be joined with NWI wetlands data using the 'Attribute' field. This provides users with a full wetland or deepwater habitat description for each polygon within their own mapping environment. For the new Code Definition Table download please go here.

A new Riparian Arc version 10.6 and ArcPro 2.3 compatible QAQC toolset has been released. The Riparian Data Verification Toolset is a user-friendly tool designed to automate the quality control functions necessary to ensure your riparian data meets the Service’s riparian definition and mapping conventions and addresses specific geospatial errors, digital anomalies and logic checks. This toolset has the same functionality as the Wetlands Verification Toolset. Download the Riparian QAQC toolset here.

 

Scientists track frog-killing fungus to help curb its spread

University of California – Berkeley – Science Daily – September 23, 2019
With the help of advanced genetic testing and hundreds of frog skin swabs, an international team of researchers has created the most complete map to date of when and where different genetic variants of the frog-killing Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis have infected frog populations around the world. The investigation also uncovered a whole new genetic lineage of the fungus, one that appears to have originated in Asia and may be the oldest variant yet discovered. Read full story here.

Coastal Birds Can Weather the Storm, But Not the Sea

UConn Today – September 18, 2019
How can birds that weigh less than a AA battery survive the immense power of Atlantic hurricanes? A new study in Ecology Letters finds that coastal birds populations can absorb impacts and recover quickly from hurricanes—even storms many times larger than anything previously observed. Researchers developed computational simulations that allowed them to explore how disturbances like hurricanes would affect the populations of four coastal species over time. All of the species were able to absorb the impacts of storms across a wide range in severity. Read full story here.

Wetland Breaking News: October 2019Can We Turn Down the Temperature on Urban Heat Islands?

By Jim Morrison – YaleEnvironment360 – September 12, 2019
The volunteers fanned out across cities from Boston to Honolulu this summer, with inexpensive thermal monitors resembling tiny periscopes attached to their vehicles to collect data on street-level temperatures. Signs on their cars announcing “Science Project in Progress” explained their plodding pace — no more than 30 miles-per-hour to capture the dramatic temperature differences from tree-shaded parks to sun-baked parking lots to skyscraper-dominated downtowns. The work of these citizen scientists is part of a new way of studying the urban heat island effect, with volunteers mapping two dozen cities worldwide in recent years. The work of these citizen scientists is part of a new way of studying the urban heat island effect, with volunteers mapping two dozen cities worldwide in recent years. Read full story here.

Climate change water variability hurts salamander populations

By University of Montana – PHYS.org – September 7, 2019
New research from the University of Montana suggests that streamflow variability brought on by climate change will negatively affect the survival of salamanders. UM biology Professor Winsor Lowe and his partners studied spring salamanders living in five New Hampshire streams. Like many streams around the globe, these waterways are experiencing greater fluctuations between low and high flows brought about by climate change. Read full story here.

 

Two Important Events with Exclusives for ASWM Local, State and Tribal Government Members!

Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

Exclusive Rate for ASWM Local, State & Tribal Government Members to the Environmental Markets and Finance Summit, October 29-31, Washington, D.C.

The Association of State Wetland Managers (ASWM) is pleased to co-sponsor the Environmental Markets and Finance Summit, a high-level gathering of public, private and philanthropic communities in forestry, carbon, ecological restoration, water resources management and corporate sustainability, hosted by Forest Trends and the Alliance for Environmental Markets and Investments.

Connect and network with leaders from corporations, local, state and federal agencies, regulators, consultants, providers, and users of offsets, policymakers, nonprofits and universities.

Held at the Mandarin Oriental, Washington, D.C., the Summit has secured a limited number of government rate rooms for government attendees at the premiere five-star Mandarin Oriental located in the popular Southwest Waterfront and within walking distances to monuments and more.

More on the Summit can be found here.

Register w/Exclusive Rate:
Email to get your code for your exclusive rate of $500, only available for ASWM local, state and tribal government members.

Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

ASWM is pleased to be a co-sponsor of the 2020 National Mitigation and Ecosystem Banking Conference to be held May 4-8, 2020 in Boise, Idaho.

Well-known as the “must attend event” environmental markets conference for those involved in mitigating for wetlands, streams, species and related markets, NMEBC draws key decisionmakers and leaders from business, government (local, state, federal, tribal), nonprofits and universities.

Look for more to come on exclusive rates for ASWM local, state and tribal government members.

Visit here

 

 

Wetland Breaking News: October2019Resources and Publications


Tools for ecosystem-based adaptation: new navigator now available

International Institute for Environment and development – September 18, 2019
IIED and partners have released a navigator that catalogues ecosystem-based adaptation tools for planning and decision-making. Ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) can help governments, civil society and communities manage climate change impacts. EbA is a nature-based approach that uses biodiversity and ecosystem services to help people adapt to the adverse effects of climate change. Although there are hundreds of tools and methodologies available to support the integration of EbA into adaptation strategies, information about these tools and how to use them is not always easily accessible to those who need it. For more information and to download the navigator, go here.

Impacts to Wildlife of Wind Energy Siting and Operation in the United States

Ecological Society of America – 2019
Electricity from wind energy is a major contributor to the strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel use and thus reduce the negative impacts of climate change. Wind energy, like all power sources, can have adverse impacts on wildlife. After nearly 25 years of focused research, these impacts are much better understood, although uncertainty remains. In this report, we summarize positive impacts of replacing fossil fuels with wind energy, while describing what we have learned and what remains uncertain about negative ecological impacts of the construction and operation of land-based and offshore wind energy on wildlife and wildlife habitat in the U.S. Finally, we propose research on ways to minimize these impacts. Download report here.

WELLSPRING Source Water Resilience and Climate Adaptation

John H. Mathews, Nathanial Matthews, Emily Simmons, and Kari Vigerstol – The Nature Conservancy – August 2019
A new paper, Wellspring: Source Water Resilience and Climate Adaptation, explores some of the ways in which practitioners can implement a new approach to SWP, which integrates enhanced resilience to sustain communities and ecosystems in a shifting climate. Authored by experts from the Global Resilience Partnership, the Alliance for Global Water Adaptation and The Nature Conservancy, this paper distils lessons from our collective years of experience with SWP. Download the report here.

 


PotpourriWetland Breaking News: October 2019


Seven recipes using invasive species

By Dylan Reynolds – Chesapeake Bay Program – September 25, 2019
Invasive species are animals and plants that have been introduced, whether accidentally or on purpose, into their current habitat and at the expense of the native species that were already there. With few predators, diseases and other natural controls to keep them in check, invasive species establish themselves in their new environment and encroach on the food or habitat of native species. Read full blog post here.

Repealing the Clean Water Rule will swamp the Trump administration in wetland litigation

The Conversation – September 24, 2019 – Video
The question of which streams, lakes, wetlands and other water bodies across the U.S. should receive federal protection under the Clean Water Act has been a major controversy in environmental law over the past 20 years. The latest twist came on Sept. 9, 2019, when U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler and Army Assistant Secretary R.D. James signed a final rule repealing the Obama administration’s “Clean Water Rule.” Read full story and view video here.

Repealing the Clean Water Rule is not about protecting farmers

By Mark Ryan and Betsy Southerland – The Hill – September 20, 2019
Last week, EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler signed a rule repealing the 2015 Clean Water Rule. That Obama-era rule defined the rivers, streams and wetlands considered “waters of the United States” - in other words, waters requiring protection under the federal Clean Water Act. The repeal was justified, in large part, because of the Clean Water Rule’s impact on farmers. Calling it “one of the worst examples of federal regulation,” President Trump said the Rule is “prohibiting [farmers] from being allowed to do what they’re supposed to be doing.” In fact, the Clean Water Rule had very little effect on farmers. The real beneficiaries of the repeal include deep-pocketed developers, the fossil fuel industry, and mining companies. Read full opinion here.

Healthy lands means healthy water

By Rachel Felver – Chesapeake Bay Program – September 19, 2019
Protecting our lands is critical to keeping our waters clean and healthy. Actions taken on land, for instance, paving a parking lot, spraying pesticides on crops or cutting down trees, impacts our water quality. This happens because no matter where we reside, everyone lives in a watershed—an area of land that drains into a particular body of water. The Chesapeake Bay watershed spans over 64,000 square miles from New York down to Virginia and has one of the largest land-to-water ratios in the world at 14:1. This means that there is 14 times the amount of land than there is water. That’s a pretty big area to impact the Chesapeake Bay, so it’s important that the Chesapeake Bay Program partners continue to take steps to help conserve lands throughout our watershed. Read full blog post here.

America's Wetland Foundation Launches New Initiative

Investorideas– September 18, 2019
The America's WETLAND Foundation (AWF) is launching its Sea Safe Communities Certification (SSCC) program, responding to a growing need for coastal communities to counter the perceived stigma of risk that can impact economies and real estate values, financing, and public services. The new certification can instead strengthen communities through adaptation actions that can stabilize strong investment. Read full story here.

New Giant Salamander Species Is the World’s Largest Amphibian

By Brigit Katz – Smithsonian.com – September 17, 2019
The giant salamanders of China—hulking amphibians that were once widespread across the country—are facing a dire conservation crisis. Prized for their meat and purported medicinal properties, the animals have been transported in droves to farms and virtually depleted in the wild. But conservationists may have to rethink their efforts to save China’s giant salamanders, which do not consist of a single species as experts have long believed. According to a new study published in Ecology and Evolution, there are in fact three species of Chinese giant salamanders, one of which may be the biggest amphibian in the world. Read full story here.

Urban wetlands: Now coming to a city near you

By Augusta Dwyer – Landscape News – September 17, 2019
For centuries, town and city dwellers have been at odds with their wetlands. Draining them was considered a sign of progress, with marshy areas converted into land for growing food and building houses and estuaries channeled for more efficient transportation. But that view has come to be seen as short-sighted. Read full story here.

What was once lush and thriving

By Sarina Katz – Restore America’s Estuaries – September 10, 2019
A groundbreaking report recently published by NOAA and its partners uses new technology and data to determine that West Coast estuaries have lost nearly 85% of their historical acreage. According to the study, estuaries in California, Oregon, and Washington once covered nearly 2 million acres, an area three times the size of Rhode Island. As humans began altering and developing the land in the early 1800s to support the Industrial Revolution, the size of these tidelands drastically decreased. This lush tidal vegetation supports an array of birds and wildlife and serves as critical nursery habitat for juvenile salmon and steelhead making their way from freshwater to the sea. Read full blog post here.

Sometimes we don’t even know what we’ve lost

By Brandon Keim – Anthropocene Magazine – September 4, 2019
Such is the curse of salmon’s shifting baseline: coming to accept as normal what is in fact a diminished state of affairs. Usually baselines are set according to present circumstances. Sometimes, though, it’s the historical record against which the present moment is measured—and when that history is revised, our understanding of the present, of where the baseline ought to be, undergoes a radical shift. That’s the case with Canada’s Skeena River, the nation’s second-largest salmon watershed, which until recently teemed with wild sockeye salmon. The salmon—who are vital to the food security of Indigenous peoples and wild animals, the prosperity of commercial fishers, and the transport of ecosystem-sustaining nutrients throughout the watershed—are generally thought to have declined moderately since the mid-20th century. Read full article here.
Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

Awards & Grants

Second Century Stewardship: Science for America’s National Parks
2019 Research Fellowship – Request for Proposals
Application Deadline: October 30, 2019.

Society of Wetland Scientists Multicultural Mentoring Program
The Society of Wetland Scientists (SWS) Multicultural Mentoring Program (SWaMMP) announces the availability of student awards for travel to attend the SWS Annual Meeting in Quebec City, Canada from June 7-11, 2020. Apply by November 1, 2019.

2020 Wetland Foundation Travel Grants
The Wetland Foundation is soliciting applications for 2020 travel grants. Applications are being accepted from any student who is currently enrolled at an academic institution in the United States and who meets the specific criteria for one of the types of grants listed below. For more information, visit The Wetland Foundation website. Application deadline is December 18, 2019.

Conference Travel Grant Type 1 ($800): For advanced undergraduate and graduate students who have never attended a wetland scientific conference and who have limited funds for travel.

Conference Travel Grant Type 2 ($1400): For advanced undergraduate and graduate students with limited funding to present their wetland research findings at a conference.

Field Travel Grant Type 1 ($800): For outstanding graduate students with limited funding to defray field expenses associated with thesis or dissertation research on wetlands.

Field Travel Grant Type 2 ($600): For promising undergraduate students to defray costs of a field course focused on wetlands.

Seneca Award ($1600): For a student whose research focuses on wetland plant ecology or restoration.

See website for details here.

Ecological Society of America (ESA) Awards
The American Society of Naturalists, the Society for the Study of Evolution, and the Society of Systematic Biologists announce the call for nominations for the 1st annual ASN/SSE/SSB Inclusiveness, Diversity, Equity, and Access (IDEA) Award. The IDEA Award will be given to a person at any career stage who has strengthened the ecology and evolutionary biology community by promoting inclusiveness and diversity in our fields. The award can also be presented to a group. The recipient will receive a plaque at the annual meeting of ASN/SSB/SSE and a $1000 honorarium. Nominations should be submitted by January 15, 2020.

 

 

Wetland Breaking News: October 2019
Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

 

Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

 

 

 Calendar of Events


WEBINARS
     
MEETINGS     
TRAINING  

 

Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

Special Events


So. Many. Birds.

Cape May, NJ
October 17-20, 2019


Sand HIll Crane Festival
Lodi, CA
November 1-3, 2019


80th Anniversary Research Celebration
Huyck Preserve
November 2, 2019
Rensselaerville, NY

WEBINARS  
       
OCTOBER 2019  
       
October 16, 2019
1:00 p.m. ET 
 
  American Water Resources Association Webinar: Wicked Water Problems: Can Network Governance Deliver? Integrated Water Management Case Studies from New Zealand and Oregon, USA  
       
October 23, 2019
1:00 p.m. ET 
 
  Center for Watershed Protection Webcast 5: Monitoring for Stream Restoration and Green Infrastructure Practices  
       
October 23, 2019
3:00 p.m. ET 
 
 
  Association of State Wetland Managers Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: National Land Cover Database 2106, General Overview and Applications to Wetland Assessments   
       
October 24, 2019
3:00 p.m. ET 
 
 
  Association of State Wetland Managers Compensatory Mitigation Webinar #8: An Ecological Framework for Reviewing Compensatory Mitigation: Oversight and Compliance
 
October 24, 2019
3:00 p.m. ET 
 
  
  National Climate Adaptation Science Center Webinar: Climate Adaptation Planning with Alaska-Based Adaptation Tools  
       
October 30, 2019
3:00 p.m. ET 
 
  Association of State Wetland Managers Members’ Webinar: Understanding California’s New Wetland Rules and Implications for Wetlands Management  

 

 
NOVEMBER 2019  
       
November 7, 2019
2:00 p.m. ET 
 
 
  EBM Tools Network Webinar: Making Marine and Coastal Protected Areas Climate Savvy.  
       
November 13, 2019
3:00 p.m. ET 
 
 
  Association of State Wetland Managers Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Wetland Inventory of Canada Using Optical and RADAR EO Data and Good Earth Cloud Computing  
       
December 2019  
       

December 3, 2019
1:00 p.m. ET 
 

  EBM Tools Network Webinar: Improving your impact: Guidelines for doing science that influences policy and management  
       
December 3, 2019
3:00 p.m. ET 
 
  Association of State Wetland Managers Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Application of NWI Data in Conservation of Eastern Black Rail
 

 

MEETINGS
 
OCTOBER 2019  
     
October 21-22, 2019
Oakland, CA
  San Francisco Estuary Partnership: State of teh Estuary Conference
     
October 23-25, 2019
Galveston, TX
  Society of Wetland Scientist South Central Chapter Fall Meeting
     
October 23-25, 2019
Wausau, WI
  Wisconsin Association for Floodplain, Stormwater, & Coastal Management 17th Annual Conference
     
October 27-30, 2019
Ocean Beach, AL
  Alabama Association of Floodplain Managers Annual Conference

October 27-30, 2019
Spokane, WA

AASHE Conference: Co-Creating a Sustainable Economy

     
October 29-31, 2019
Washington, DC
  Alliance for Environmental Markets and Investments and Forest Trends: Environmental Markets and Finance Summit: Accelerating Investment in Natural Infrastructure
     
NOVEMBER 2019
     
November 1-3, 2019
Taizhou, China
  Invasion Ecology Lab, Taizhou University Conference: Current and Emerging Topics in Global Change Ecology of Plants
   
November 3-7, 2019
Mobile, AL
  CERF 2019 25th Biennial Conference: Responsive-Relevant-Ready
   
November 3-7, 2019
Salt Lake City, UT
  American Water Resources Association: Annual Water Resources Conference
     
November 4-5, 2019
Sacramento, CA
  The Nature Conservancy and UC Davis: 2019 Natural Climate Solutions Symposium
     
November 6, 2019
Cameron, LA
  America’s Wetland Foundation: Coastal Wetlands Communities Adaptation Roundtable
   
November 8-10, 2019
University of Arizona
Tucson, AZ
  Society for Ecological Restoration Annual Conference

     
November 14, 2019
Portland, OR
  The Wetlands Conservancy: Wetlands & Wellies
   
November 15-17, 2019
Shepherdstown, WV
 

Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Forum: Better Together: Diverse and Innovative Collaborations for the Chesapeake Watershed

     
November 19, 2019
Davis, CA
  UC Davis Symposium: Thresholds and Ecosystem Restoration

     
November 20-21, 2019
Lansing, MI
  Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy: Michigan Sustainability Conference
     
DECEMBER 2019
     
December 4, 2019
Washington, DC
  Montgomery Parks and Casey Trees Eight Annual Conference: Trees Matter: Green Cities Summit
     
December 10-14, 2019
Washington, DC
  AGU Fall Meeting: Science Communication: A Sharing Science Room
     
December 12-13, 2019
Indianapolis, IN
  Midwestern States Environmental Consultants Association: Conference on Environmental Liabilities, Risk Assessment, and Remediation

     
JANUARY 2020
     
January 3-7, 2020
Pacific Grove, CA
  American Society of Naturalists Stand Alone Meeting
     
January 29-30, 2020
Wlminton, DE
  Delaware Wetlands Conference 2020

     
FEBRUARY 2020
     
February 16-21, 2020
San Diego, CA
  Ocean Sciences Meeting 

     
February 18-20, 2020
Elkhart Lake, WI
  Wisconsin Wetlands Association: 25th Annual Wetland Science Conference: A Clear Vision for Wetlands
Abstracts due by November 15, 2019
     
MARCH 2020
     
March 4-5, 2020
Washington, DC
  Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: Great Lakes Day 2020

     
March 23-26, 2020
Austin, TX
  American Water Resources Association Conference: Geospatial Water Technology Conference Complex Systems
     
APRIL 2020
     
April 27-29, 2020
Baton Rouge, LA
  University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences: 13th International Symposium on Biogeochemistry of Wetlands
     
April 28-29, 2020
Clayton, NY
  2020 New York State Wetlands Forum Conference
     
April 28-30, 2020
Novi Michigan
  Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy: Great Lakes Water Infrastructure Conference 
 
MAY 20202
     
May 4-8, 2020
Boise, ID
  National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Investing in the Environment
   
May 12-15, 2020
Richmond, VA
  River Management Training Symposium: Mountain Creeks to Metro Canals
   
May 27-30, 2020
Orlando, FL

  Ducks Unlimited 83rd annual National Convention
 
JUNE 2020
     
June 7-11, 2020
Fort Worth, TX
  Association of State Floodplain Managers: 2020 Annual Conference: Resiliency Where the West Begins
Abstract due by October 31, 2019
     
June 7-11, 2020
Quebec City, Canada
  Canadian Land Reclamation Association (CLRA), the Society for Ecological Restoration (SER) and the Society of Wetland Scientists (SWS) joint Conference: From Reclaiming to Restoring and Rewilding
Call for Proposals due by October 1, 2019
     
June 31-26, 2020
Waterville Valley, NH
  Gordon Research Conference: Biological Responses to Winter Climate Change

     
JULY 2020
     
July 5-10, 2020
Bremen, Germany
  14th International Coral Reef Symposium

     
July 13-14, 2020
Manchester, NH
  Gordon Research Seminar: Genomic Changes Behind Adaptation and Ecosystem Functions

     
July 26-31, 2020
Denver, CO
  North American Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB 2020): Crossing Boundaries: Innovative Approaches to Conservation
     
AUGUST 2020
     
August 2-7, 2020
Salt Lake City, UT
 

ESA Annual Meeting: Harnessing the ecological data revolution
Abstracts due by September 19, 2019 at 5:00 p.m. Eastern

     

 

TRAINING/WORKSHOPS
 
October 2019
     
October 21-24, 2019
Pittsburgh, PA
  The Swamp School Workshop: Principles of Wetland Design
     
October 21-November 1, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Online Class: Habitat Conservation Plans 2019
     
October 22-25, 2019
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Methodology for Delineating Wetlands
   
October 23, 2019
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Introduction to Wetland Identification
   
October 25-27, 2019
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Natural History Science Fall Workshop: Crustose and Foliose Lichens
     
NOVEMBER 2019   
     
November 4-7, 2019
Crystal Springs, FL
  The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Delineation Training
     
November 4, 2019-
January 27, 2020
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
     
November 6, 2019
Shoreline, WA
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Demystifying Wetland and IN-Water Permitting in Washington State
     
November 7-8 2019
Somerset, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Lake Management
   
November 11-13, 2019
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Winter Woody Plant ID
   
November 11, 2019-January 31, 2020 
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design
   
November 14-15, 2019
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
   
November 18-19, 2019
Atlanta, GA
  Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands, and Hydrology (Piedmont)
   
November 25-
December 23, 2019

Online
  The Swamp School Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment
     
   DECEMBER 2019
     
December 2-5, 2019
Atlanta, GA 
  The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
     
December 2-13, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Botanist/Winter Edition 2019
     
December 2-13, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Stream Restoration Part 2 – Stream Site Assessment Techniques
   
December 2-27, 2019 Online 
  The Swamp School Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2019
     
December 4-5, 2019 Vernon, WA   Padilla Bay Adaptation Planning for Coastal Communities
     
December 9, 2019-
March 2, 2020
Online
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
     
December 11-12, 2019 Portage, WI   Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Problematic Delineation Seminar
     
December 16-17, 2019 
Baskin Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Identification of Wetland Plans in Winter
   
December 16-27, 2019
Online 
  The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
 
     
January 2020 
     
January 15-17, 2019
Annapolis, MD
  National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC): Graduate Leaders in Socio-Environmental (S-E) Synthesis workshop.
     
February 2020
     
February 10-21, 2020
Onlinle
 
  The Swamp School Course: Stream Restoration Part 3 – Stream Ecology
     
March 2020
     
March 9-20, 2020
Front Royal, VA
  Smithsonian-Mason School of Consrvation Course: Statistics for Ecology and Conservation Biology
     
     

 

 Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

 

INDEX

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • Microbe from New Jersey wetlands chomps PFAS
  • Nearly 30% of birds in U.S., Canada have vanished since 1970
  • Trump administration drops Obama-era water protection rule

NATIONAL NEWS

  • Americans Love Public Lands and Species Conservation but How Do We Pay for Them?
  • The Trump administration weakened Endangered Species Act rules — 17 state attorneys general have sued over it
  • Committee Approves Slate of Legislation to Maintain Labor Standards, Fund Water Projects Across the Country, Improve Disaster Preparedness, and More
  • Secretary Bernhardt Announces Over $100 Million in Public-Private Funding for Wetland Conservation Projects
  • Feds finalize plan to open Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling

STATE NEWS

  • AR: Natural growth back in wetland
  • CA: California farm region faces furry new threat: swamp rodents
  • CA: Calif. sues EPA for nixing protection of S.F. Bay salt ponds
  • CO: Wetland Expansion Approved in Colorado
  • FL: Project aims to turn pit into an artificial wetland in Volusia County
  • FL: $2.8M Conservation Easement Approved for Putnam County Wetland Preserve
  • HI: Maui Council Committee Votes to Settle Clean Water Act Case
  • ID: Students get Hands-On Wetland Education
  • MN: Minnesota Pollution Control Agency denies key permit for Enbridge Line 3
  • MN: Crow Wing County to administer Wetland Conservation Act
  • MT: Officials plan to restore Butte wetland
  • NH: New Hampshire Citizens and Organizations Recognized by EPA for Environmental 
  • NJ: Federal appeals court rules against PennEast in fight over pipeline land 
  • OH: Girls in STEM | Learn how a floating wetland helps purify water 
  • TX: How BP oil spill fines could help protect the Texas Coast
  • VA: Community, Wildlife, and Clean Water at Mulberry Run Wetlands 
  • WV: Urban wetland used as a classroom 
  • Washington, D.C.: D.C. Wants to Be Resilient to Climate Change. Critics Argue Efforts Could Worsen Inequalities.
 

Wetland Breaking News: October 2019


INDEX


Editor's Choice

National News

State News

Wetland Science News

Resources & Publications

Potpouri

Calendar of Events

WETLAND SCIENCE NEWS

  • Stewardship of Wetlands and Soils Has Climate Benefits
  • SERC experiments show CO2 stunts wetlands
  • Study examines effects of climate change, land loss on Louisiana’s Houma tribe
  • New U.N. climate report: Monumental change already here for world’s oceans and frozen regions
  • Could Massive Storm Surge Barriers End the Hudson River’s Revival?
  • Scientists track frog-killing fungus to help curb its spread
  • Coastal Birds Can Weather the Storm, But Not the Sea
  • Can We Turn Down the Temperature on Urban Heat Islands?
  • Climate change water variability hurts salamander populations

RESOURCES AND PUBLICATIONS

  • Tools for ecosystem-based adaptation: new navigator now available
  • Impacts to Wildlife of Wind Energy Siting and Operation in the United States
  • WELLSPRING Source Water Resilience and Climate Adaptation

POTOURRI 

  • Seven recipes using invasive species
  • Repealing the Clean Water Rule will swamp the Trump administration in wetland litigation
  • Repealing the Clean Water Rule is not about protecting farmers
  • Healthy lands means healthy water
  • America's Wetland Foundation Launches New Initiative
  • New Giant Salamander Species Is the World’s Largest Amphibian
  • Urban wetlands: Now coming to a city near you
  • What was once lush and thriving
  • Sometimes we don’t even know what we’ve lost 

Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Webinars

October 2019

  • American Water Resources Association Webinar: Wicked Water Problems: Can Network Governance Deliver? Integrated Water Management Case Studies from New Zealand and Oregon, USA
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webcast 5: Monitoring for Stream Restoration and Green Infrastructure Practices
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: National Land Cover Database 2016, General Overview and Applications to Wetland Assessments
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Compensatory Mitigation Webinar #8: An Ecological Framework for Reviewing Compensatory Mitigation: Oversight and Compliance
  • National Climate Adaptation Science Center Webinar: Climate Adaptation Planning with Alaska-Based Adaptation Tools
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Members’ Webinar: Understanding California’s New Wetland Rules and Implications for Wetlands Management

November 2019

  • EBM Tools Network Webinar: Making Marine and Coastal Protected Areas Climate Savvy
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Wetland Inventory of Canada Using Optical and RADAR EO Data and Good Earth Cloud Computing

December 2019Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

  • EBM Tools Network Webinar: Improving your impact: Guidelines for doing science that influences policy and management
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Wetland Mapping Consortium Webinar: Application of NWI Data in Conservation of Eastern Black Rail

 

MEETINGS

October 2019

  • San Francisco Estuary Partnership: State of the Estuary Conference
  • Society of Wetland Scientist South Central Chapter Fall Meeting
  • Wisconsin Association for Floodplain, Stormwater, & Coastal Management 17th Annual Conference
  • Alabama Association of Floodplain Managers Annual Conference
  • AASHE Conference: Co-Creating a Sustainable Economy
  • Alliance for Environmental Markets and Investments and Forest Trends: Environmental Markets and Finance Summit: Accelerating Investment in Natural Infrastructure

November 2019

  • Invasion Ecology Lab, Taizhou University Conference: Current and Emerging Topics in Global Change Ecology of Plants
  • CERF 2019 25th Biennial Conference: Responsive-Relevant-Ready
  • American Water Resources Association: Annual Water Resources Conference
  • The Nature Conservancy and UC Davis: 2019 Natural Climate Solutions Symposium
  • America’s Wetland Foundation: Coastal Wetlands Communities Adaptation Roundtable
  • Society for Ecological Restoration Annual Conference
  • The Wetlands Conservancy: Wetlands & Wellies
  • Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Forum: Better Together: Diverse and Innovative Collaborations for the Chesapeake Watershed
  • UC Davis Symposium: Thresholds and Ecosystem Restoration
  • Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy: Michigan Sustainability Conference

December 2019

  • Montgomery Parks and Casey Trees Eight Annual Conference: Trees Matter: Green Cities Summit
  • AGU Fall Meeting: Science Communication: A Sharing Science Room
  • Midwestern States Environmental Consultants Association: Conference on Environmental Liabilities, Risk Assessment, and Remediation

January 2020

  • American Society of Naturalists Stand Alone Meeting
  • Delaware Wetlands Conference 2020

February 2020

  • Ocean Sciences Meeting
  • Wisconsin Wetlands Association: 25th Annual Wetland Science Conference

March 2020

  • Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: Great Lakes Day 2020
  • American Water Resources Association Conference: Geospatial Water Technology Conference: Complex Systems

April 2020

  • University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences: 13th International Symposium on Biogeochemistry of Wetlands
  • 2020 New York State Wetlands Forum Conference
  • Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy: Great Lakes Water Infrastructure Conference

May 2020

  • National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Investing in the Environment
  • River Management Society Symposium: Mountain Creeks to Metro Canals
  • Ducks Unlimited 83rd Annual National Convention

June 2020

  • Association of State Floodplain Managers: 2020 Annual Conference: Resiliency Where the West Begins
  • Canadian Land Reclamation Association (CLRA), the Society for Ecological Restoration (SER) and the Society of Wetland Scientists (SWS) joint Conference: From Reclaiming to Restoring and Rewilding
  • Gordon Research Conference: Biological Responses to Winter Climate Change

July 2020

  • 14th International Coral Reef Symposium
  • Gordon Research Seminar: Genomic Changes Behind Adaptation and Ecosystem Functions
  • North American Congress for Conservation Biology (NACCB 2020): Crossing Boundaries: Innovative Approaches to Conservation

August 2020

  • ESA Annual Meeting: Harnessing the ecological data revolution

 

Training/Workshops

October 2019 

  • The Swamp School Workshop: Principles of Wetland Design
  • The Swamp School Online Class: Habitat Conservation Plans 2019
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Methodology for Delineating Wetlands
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Introduction to Wetland Identification
  • Eagle Hill Natural History Science Fall Workshop: Crustose and Foliose Lichens

November 2019

  • The Swamp School Online Workshop: Wetland Delineatiaon Training
  • The Swamp School Online Workshop: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Demystifying Wetland and IN-Water Permitting in Washington State
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Lake Management
  • Environmental Concern Course: Winter Woody Plant ID
  • The Swamp School Online Workshop: Principles of Wetland Design
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species
  • Duncan & Duncan Wetland & Endangered Species Training Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands, and Hydrology (Piedmont)
  • The Swamp School Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment

December 2019

  • The Swamp School Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Botanist/Winter Edition 2019
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Stream Restoration Part 2 – Stream Site Assessment Techniques
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 2019
  • Padilla Bay Adaptation Planning for Coastal Communities
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Problematic Delineation Seminar
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Eduation Course: Identification of Wetland Plants in Winter
  • The Swamp School Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals

January 2020

  • National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC): Graduate Leaders in Socio-Environmental (S-E) Synthesis workshop

February 2020

  • The Swamp School Online Course: Stream Restoration Part 3 – Stream Ecology

Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

 

  
Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

 

Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

Wetland Breaking News: October 2019

 

Wetland Breaking News:May 2019