WBN September 2018

                

IN THIS ISSUE:

EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

NATIONAL NEWS

STATE NEWS

WETLAND SCIENCE

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

POTPOURRI

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

INDEX

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Thank you for your continued interest.

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WBN September 2018

 

Editor's Note

Hello Wetlanders,

A lot has happened in the world of wetlands and
aquatic resources over the past month. In the
Editor’s Choice section, you’ll see a story about
the passage of the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) of 2018. This critical bill allows for greater investment in clean drinking water and reauthorized the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (WIFIA). The Association is particularly pleased with the inclusion of considerations for natural and nature-based infrastructure solutions to mitigate the impacts of floods and hurricanes – timely considering the recent wallop from Hurricane Florence.

Speaking of flooding…I had to include the article on Coastal Labs Studying Increased Flooding Consider Moving Because of Increased Flooding.” The irony is just too good to pass on…

The Waters of the U.S. (WOTUS) saga continues to make headlines. Whereas on August 16, U.S. District Judge David Norton for the District of South Carolina issued a nationwide injunction on the Trump administration’s delay of the Clean Water Rule, on Wednesday, September 12th, the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas in Galveston granted a request for a temporary injunction of the rule in Texas, Mississippi and Louisiana. So now the Clean Water Rule is in effect in 23 states and on hold for 27 states. Keep your seatbelts on as this will continue to be a wild ride.

I have also included a story on the late Senator John McCain’s climate change legacy because it supports the notion that science should always be non-partisan in order to maintain scientific integrity. President Trump’s nomination of Kelvin Droegemeier to lead the White House Office of Science and Technology is an encouraging move in this direction, as Mr. Doegemeier testified to the importance of science “unencumbered by political influence” during his confirmation hearing.

Until next month, I hope you enjoy this edition’s news stories. And thank you for all you do for wetlands!

Best regards,

Marla J. Stelk
Editor
Wetland Breaking News

 
   
              


Editor's Choice


WRDA Passes in the House

By Emily Castellanos – Infrastructure Report Card – September 14, 2018
Today, the House of Representatives passed the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) of 2018, S. 3021. The passage of this bill authorizes key programs and projects that are critical to improving our nation’s water-related infrastructure categories. The 2017 Infrastructure Report Card graded each of these categories; ports received a grade of “C+,” while dams, levees, and drinking water were graded at a “D,” and wastewater received a “D+.” Read full story here.

Three States Granted WOTUS Injunction

By Todd Neeley – Koenig Equipment, Inc. – September 14, 2018
A Texas court has issued an injunction against the 2015 waters of the United States, or WOTUS, rule after the Texas attorney general's office told the court it was ready to appeal to a higher court. As a result of a South Carolina court's recent ruling, the rule was in effect in 26 states and on hold in 24 states. The South Carolina court on Aug. 16 ruled that the EPA did not follow the Administrative Procedures Act in finalizing its rule to delay the 2015 WOTUS for two years. On Wednesday, the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas in Galveston granted a request for a temporary injunction of the rule in Texas, Mississippi and Louisiana. Read full story here.

Coastal Labs Studying Increased Flooding Consider Moving Because of Increased Flooding

By Tegan Wendland – NPR – September 6, 2018
Scores of coastal research labs around the U.S. are helping communities plan for sea level rise. But now many are starting to flood themselves, creating a dilemma: stay by the coast and endure expensive flooding, or move inland, to higher ground, but away from their subject of study. Read full article here.

John McCain’s Climate Change Legacy

By Marianne Lavelle – InsideClimate News – August 26, 2018
Among the many battles Sen. John McCain waged in his storied career, it is easy to overlook his fight for U.S. action on climate change. He wrote legislation that failed. He built a bipartisan coalition that crumbled. And when Congress came closest to passing a bill that embraced his central idea—a market-based cap-and-trade system—McCain turned his back. And yet, McCain's nearly decade-long drive on global warming had an impact that reverberates in today's efforts to revive the U.S. role in the climate fight. In the Senate chamber and on the campaign trail, the Arizona Republican did more than any other U.S. politician has done before or since to advance the conservative argument for climate action. Read full story here.

White House Pick for Top Science Spot Stresses Science Integrity

By Randy Showstack – EOS – August 24, 2018
The Trump administration’s nominee to be the next director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) pledged his support for scientific integrity and for maintaining the strength of the nation’s scientific enterprise during a friendly Senate confirmation hearing on Thursday. Read full story here.

  

 

 

National News 


Florence causes coal ash spill in North Carolina

By Timothy Cama – The Hill – September 17, 2018
Flooding from Hurricane Florence caused a pair of coal ash spills from a site near a power plant in North Carolina. Duke Energy Corp. announced the first spill at the L. V. Sutton Power Station near Wilmington Saturday night, saying about 2,000 cubic yards of coal ash had been released. It said rains caused a slope collapse, displacing the ash, which contains heavy metals like arsenic, cadmium and mercury, potentially into the nearby Cape Fear River. Coal ash is not considered hazardous but is harmful to ecosystems and humans. The volume is enough to fill about 180 dump trucks, or two thirds of an Olympic-sized swimming pool. Read full story here.

Democratic Senator Releases Document Showing ICE got $9.8 million from FEMA

By Kate Sullivan – CNN – September 12, 2018 – Video
Sen. Jeff Merkley released a document Tuesday showing a transfer of nearly $10 million from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to US Immigration and Customs Enforcement and accused President Donald Trump's administration of diverting funds from hurricane relief just as hurricane season was starting. However, the document from the Department of Homeland Security specifically mentions the money would come from the agency's budgets for travel, training, public engagement and information technology work. The department denies that the money came from disaster relief funding. Read full story and view video here.

Native American Tribes File Lawsuit Seeking to Invalidate Keystone XL Pipeline Permit

By Vanessa Romo – NPR – September 10, 2018
In a new bid to stop the Keystone XL pipeline, two Native American communities are suing the Trump administration, saying it failed to adhere to historical treaty boundaries and circumvented environmental impact analysis. As a result, they are asking a federal judge in Montana to rescind the 2017 permit and block any further construction or use of the controversial pipeline. The Fort Belknap Indian Community of Montana and the Rosebud Sioux Tribe of South Dakota contend there was no effort to study how the 1,200-mile pipeline project through their respective territories would affect their water systems and sacred lands. Read or listen to full story here.

This is How Much Water It Takes to Produce Energy in the US

By Prachi Patel – Anthropocene Magazine – September 6, 2018
How much water does the United States use to produce energy? It’s an amount that has not been estimated in decades, but a new study in the journal Environmental Science & Technology shows that the number is huge. The US energy sector withdrew a total of 58 trillion gallons from various sources such as lakes, rivers and underground aquifers, the analysis finds. That’s enough to fill 88 million Olympic-sized swimming pools. Read full article here. 

Even Without the Trump Administration, the U.S. is Upholding Its Commitment to the Paris Climate Agreement

By Jerry Brown and Michael Bloomberg – Los Angeles Times – September 12, 2018
Rampant wildfires in the West, record high temperatures in the Arctic Circle, severe hurricanes in the Atlantic and the Pacific: Unless we reduce greenhouse gases now, these kinds of destructive “natural” disasters will only get worse. It would be easy to be despondent about humanity’s chances for success. The Trump administration has announced its intention to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement, moved to weaken California's fuel-efficiency standards for automobiles, sought to repeal stricter limits on methane, and attempted to prop up coal-fired plants. But it's important to keep in mind: None of those attempts has yet succeeded. The United States cannot legally withdraw from the Paris agreement until November 2020. Read full story here.

Climate Action Could Add $26 Trillion to World Economy: Study

Phys.org – September 5, 2018
Ambitious action on climate change could contribute an extra $26 trillion to the world economy by 2030, international experts said on Wednesday, urging nations and businesses to step up their engagement. The economic benefits offered by a shift to a low-carbon economy have been "grossly" underestimated, according to the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate, a think tank grouping former heads of government and top economic and business leaders. Read full article here.

Farm Bill: House Proposal Could Wipe Out Communities’ Power to Prohibit Pesticides

Andy McGlashen – Environmental Health News – September 5, 2018
As lawmakers convene on Capitol Hill to finalize the latest federal Farm Bill, environmental advocates warn that a House proposal could put public health at risk by rolling back restrictions on pesticides in 155 communities nationwide. The Environmental Working Group (EWG) today released its analysis of data from the nonprofit group Beyond Pesticides, including an interactive map of local policies that it says could be scuttled if the House measure passes. Those regulations vary widely—some communities restrict neonicotinoid use to protect pollinators, while others map out pesticide-free buffer zones or require that public notice be posted when pesticides are applied on public or private property. Read full story here.

Trump’s Rollback of Pollution Rules to Hit Coal Country Hard

By Ellen Knickmeyer and John Raby – Associate Press – September 4, 2018
It’s coal people like miner Steve Knotts, 62, who make West Virginia Trump Country. So, it was no surprise that President Donald Trump picked the state to announce his plan rolling back Obama-era pollution controls on coal-fired power plants. Trump left one thing out of his remarks, though: northern West Virginia coal country will be ground zero for increased deaths and illnesses from the rollback on regulation of harmful emission from the nation’s coal power plants. An analysis done by his own Environmental Protection Agency concludes that the plan
would lead to a greater number of people here dying prematurely, and suffering health problems that they otherwise would not have, than elsewhere in the country, when compared to health impacts of the Obama plan.
Read full story here.

Engineered Sand Zaps Storm Water Pollutants

University of California – Berkeley Science Daily – August 30, 2018
Engineers have created a new way to remove contaminants from storm water, potentially addressing the needs of water-stressed communities that are searching for ways to tap the abundant and yet underused source of fresh drinking water. The mineral-coated sand reacts with and destroys organic pollutants, providing a way to help purify storm water percolating into underground aquifers, creating a safe and local reservoir of drinking water for parched communities. Read full article here.

NOAA and Partners Test Unmanned Vehicle to Detect Harmful Algal Blooms in Lake Erie

Environmental News Network – August 28, 2018
Scientists from NOAA, the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research, and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute will launch and test an unmanned underwater vehicle equipped with technology capable of collecting and processing water samples that can be used to track harmful algal blooms in Lake Erie. The torpedo-shaped underwater vehicle will travel through the waters of the western basin of Lake Erie to gather and analyze data on a harmful algal bloom currently occurring in the lake. The tool will also archive samples for later genetic analysis, with the goal of better understanding the growth, toxicity and persistence of harmful algal toxins and developing future mitigation strategies. Read full story here.

Tons of Plastic Trash Enter the Great Lakes Every Year—Where Does it Go?

By Matthew J. Hoffman and Christy Tyler – The Conversation – August 20, 2018 – Videos
Awareness is rising worldwide about the scourge of ocean plastic pollution, from Earth Day 2018 events to the cover of National Geographic magazine. But few people realize that similar concentrations of plastic pollution are accumulating in lakes and rivers. One recent study found microplastic particles – fragments measuring less than five millimeters – in globally sourced tap water and beer brewed with water from the Great Lakes. According to recent estimates, over 8 million tons of plastic enter the oceans every year. Using that study’s calculations of how much plastic pollution per person enters the water in coastal regions, one of us (Matthew Hoffman) has estimated that around 10,000 tons of plastic enter the Great Lakes annually. Now we are analyzing where it accumulates and how it may affect aquatic life. Read full story and view videos here.

Out of Sight, Out of Water: The U.S. and Mexico Have Only Just Begun to Grapple with the Aquifers They Share

By Zoë Schlanger – Texas Observer – August 20, 2018
All along the 1,250 miles of border between Texas and Mexico, hidden under hundreds of feet of soil and rock, lie more than a dozen underground aquifers—areas of permeable earth that hold water—that crisscross the national boundaries. They might be the only sources of water the region will have left when the Rio Grande, hit by a one-two punch of climate change and a booming population, inevitably dries up. And yet there is no binational agreement for all this shared groundwater. Read full article here.

Sea Level Rise is Eroding Home Value, and Owners Might Not Even Know It

By John Tibbetts and Chris Mooney – The Washington Post – August 20, 2018
Elizabeth Boineau’s 1939 Colonial sits a block and a half from the Ashley River in a sought-after neighborhood of ancient live oaks, charming gardens and historic homes. A year ago, she thought she could sell it for nearly $1 million. But after dropping the price 11 times, Boineau has decided to tear it down. In March, the city’s Board of Architectural Review approved the demolition — a decision not taken lightly in Charleston’s historic district. “Each time that I was just finishing up paying off the bills, another flood would hit,” Boineau said. Boineau is one of many homeowners on the front lines of society’s confrontation with climate change, living in houses where rising sea levels have worsened flooding not just in extreme events like hurricanes, but also heavy rains and even high tides. Now, three studies have found evidence that the threat of higher seas is also undermining coastal property values as home buyers — particularly investors — begin the retreat to higher ground. Read full article here.

 
 State News 


AZ: The Bullfrog is the “Great White Shark” of Arizona’s Wetlands

By Jason Bittel – NRDC – August 31, 2018
A century and a half ago, when Geronimo and his men walked through Arizona’s Chiricahua Mountains at night, a chorus of leopard frogs would have greeted them. Whether the Apaches enjoyed it, though, is unknown. Frankly, the song sounds a lot like snoring. In any event, over the course of the 20th century this froggy log-sawing became a rare sound. Housing developments paved over the species’ wetlands. Cattle ranches sullied their waterways. And in this century, the mysterious chytrid fungus devastating amphibian populations all over the globe has also struck this corner of the Southwest. In the past 15 years alone, the Chiricahua leopard frog population has declined more than 30 percent. But the greatest threat to these adorably spotted snorers might come from one of their own: the American bullfrog. Read full story here.

CA: California Works to Protect Its Shrinking Wetlands

By Matt Weiser – Pacific Standard – September 11, 2018
California officials are poised to seize control over a major arena of federal regulation in response to Trump administration rollbacks: the management and protection of wetlands. Wetlands are vital features on the landscape. Basically, low spots in a watershed, when they fill with water they provide important habitat for birds, fish, and other species. Wetlands also help control floods and recharge groundwater, and they filter the water we drink. On the other hand, being generally flat and maligned as "swamps," they are popular places to pave and build. As a result, wetlands have nearly disappeared across the western United States. That has given rise to the controversial policy known as the Waters of the U.S. rule, or WOTUS. The rule is an effort, first, to define wetlands, which turns out to be monumentally difficult. And second, to regulate development in and around wetlands. Read full story here.

CO: Denver Accelerates “Daylighting” of Lost Waterways, “Undoing History” with Decades-Long Re-Engineering Effort

By Bruce Finley – The Denver Post – September 2, 2018
Old Denver pulsed with H2O, water that snaked through the creeks and irrigation canals crisscrossing Colorado’s high prairie before 150 years of urban development buried most of them or forced them into pipes. New Denver wants those waterways back. City leaders are ramping up what they describe as a massive, restorative “daylighting” of buried water channels wherever possible — cutting through pavement and re-engineering old streams and canals to create up to 20 miles of naturalistic riparian corridors. Hundreds of millions of dollars have been committed. Eventual costs are expected to top $1 billion over several decades. This work reflects increased interest worldwide in harnessing water and natural processes to make cities more livable. Read full story here.

FL: Toxic Algae Seeps into Florida Congressional Races

By Greg Allen – NPR – September 7, 2018
On Florida's St. Lucie River, east of Lake Okeechobee, locks and a dam hold water before it races downstream to the estuary on what is known as Florida's Treasure Coast. But looking out over the river, Stephen Davis with the Everglades Foundation sees signs of trouble. "There's a pretty substantial mat of the blue-green algae we see floating on the surface," the wetland ecologist says. "As soon as these gates are open, the water will pass out into the estuary." Read or listen to full story here.

ME: Hundreds of Seals Have Died in Maine

By Dan Zukowski – Hakai Magazine – September 5, 2018
Since July 1, more than 460 dead seals have washed up on beaches and islands in Maine, New Hampshire, and northern Massachusetts. Another 137 coughing, sneezing, and sick seals have stranded themselves, overwhelming marine animal rescuers. In an announcement last week, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) declared the mass die-off an unusual mortality event (UME)—adding to the three other UMEs currently affecting right, humpback, and minke whales in the same waters. Read full article here.

ME: An Ocean ‘Heat Wave’ Just Drove Temperatures Off Maine to Near-Record Highs

By Steven Mufson – The Washington Post – August 31, 2018
Sea surface temperatures in the vast Gulf of Maine hit a near-record high of 68.93 degrees Fahrenheit on Aug. 8, part of what scientists called a month-long “marine heat wave” in the normally chilly waters that are home to everything from lobsters to whales. In some parts of the gulf, surface temperatures soared to nearly 11 degrees warmer than normal. Using satellite data, scientists at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute said that over the past 30 years, the waters there have warmed at a rate more than three times the global average. Over the past 15 years, it has warmed at seven times that average. Read full story here.

ME: South Portland’s Tar Sands Ban Upheld in a ‘David vs. Goliath’ Pipeline Battle

By Sabrina Shankman – InsideClimate News – August 28, 2018
A federal judge has ruled that the coastal city of South Portland, Maine, did not violate the U.S. Constitution when it passed an ordinance that blocked a local pipeline company from bringing tar sands oil through its port. For the city of 25,000, the ruling was a surprise victory after years of fighting what felt like an impossible battle against some of the world's biggest oil companies, which lined up to support the Portland Pipe Line Corporation (PPLC). Provided the ruling survives an appeal, it slams the door on a significant plan to ship Canadian tar sands oil, one of the most carbon-intensive fuels on the planet, to the East Coast for export to international markets, and it could offer a guide for other communities hoping to block energy projects. Read full story here.

MD: Washed Away? Torrential Rains Threaten Bay Restoration Gains

By Jeremy Cox – Bay Journal – September 4, 2018
Up to her chest in muddy water, Cassie Gurbisz had a clear realization. Cassie Gurbisz, a St. Mary’s College coastal ecosystem ecologist, prepares to take a sample of underwater grasses near the Susquehanna Flats during a research cruise in mid-August. (Jeremy Cox) “When I just went down, it was pitch-black at the bottom,” said Gurbisz, a coastal ecologist with Maryland’s St. Mary’s College, as she prepared for another dive into the Upper Bay. “I’ve never been in water this murky before.” The chocolate-colored water was caused by an unusual summertime deluge that dumped a foot or more of rain in parts of Maryland and Pennsylvania over a five-day span beginning July 21. Just as water levels began falling, a smaller sequel roared into northern Pennsylvania and southern New York, adding another 2–6 inches of rainfall. The health of the Chesapeake has shown signs of improvement in recent years, with underwater grass beds reaching levels not seen in decades, and dissolved oxygen levels ticking upward in deepwater areas. The persistent storms could be a setback, at least in the short term, for recovery efforts, though it will take weeks, if not months, of monitoring for scientists to fully assess the potential damage — or even know the amount of water-fouling nutrients and sediment that were flushed into the Bay. Read full article here.

MI: Fishing in Greener Waters: Understanding the Impact of Harmful Algal Blooms on Lake Erie Anglers

By Jim Erickson and Mary Ogdahl – University of Michigan News – September 12, 2018
A new study published by the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research at the University of Michigan provides insights into decisions that Lake Erie anglers make regarding harmful algal blooms, or HABs. Other studies have explored the impact these toxic blooms have on local economies, including the Lake Erie recreational fishing industry. But little is known about the decision-making that leads to bloom-related financial losses. In the new study, published online Sept. 7 in the Journal of Environmental Management, researchers took a social science approach to understand why people decide to fish—or not to fish—during an algal bloom. Read full story here.

MI: Flint Water Crisis: Michigan Health Director Ordered to Manslaughter Trial

By Beth Mole Ars – Technica – August 21, 2018
A judge on Monday ordered Michigan’s top health official, Nick Lyon, to stand trial for involuntary manslaughter charges in two deaths linked to the Flint water crisis. Genesee District Judge David Goggins determined that there was probable cause that Lyon committed involuntary manslaughter against Robert Skidmore and John Snyder in 2015. The two men died during an outbreak of Legionnaire’s disease, which researchers have connected to the devastating use of improperly treated water in Flint starting in 2014. As Ars has reported previously, prosecutors allege that Lyon specifically had “willfully disregarded the deadly nature of the Legionnaires’ disease outbreak” and failed to warn the public in time to spare lives. He allegedly knew about the outbreak in early 2015 but waited until early 2016 to release a public advisory. Read full story here.

MN: Wetlands Project Aims to Purify St. Paul Drinking Water

By Isabella Murry – Twin Cities – September 12, 2018
A project aimed at improving water resources could be effective in treating documented E.Coli in one of Ramsey County’s water sources. The Whitaker Treatment Wetlands project — which was presented to the public at an Aug. 30 open house — is a state-funded initiative attempting to engineer wetlands for water quality improvement. It’s the first of its kind in Minnesota. Read full story here.

NC: North Carolina, Warned of Rising Seas, Chose to Favor Development

By John Schwartz and Richard Fausset – The New York Times – September 12, 2018
As Hurricane Florence bears down on North Carolina, the state may face the consequences of policies minimizing the impact of climate change and allowing extensive development in vulnerable coastal areas. The approaching storm almost certainly gained destructive power from a warming climate, but a 2012 law, and subsequent actions by the state, effectively ordered state and local agencies that develop coastal policies to ignore scientific models showing an acceleration in the rise of sea levels. In the years since, development has continued with little regard to the long-term threat posed by rising sea levels. And the coastal region’s population and economy have boomed, growing by almost half in the last 20 years. Read full story here.

PR: Growing Grounds: Rebuilding with Native Trees

By David Thill – World Wildlife Fund Environment and Disaster Management – June 29, 2018
Seedlings like the ones at this San Juan-based tree nursery can help Puerto Rico rebuild after last year's hurricanes. In a garden on an unnamed road, off another unnamed road off Highway 1 in San Juan, icaco trees are beginning to bloom. The icaco -- Chrysobalanus icaco, which sprouts an edible plum that contains its seeds -- is one of the 120 species of trees native to Puerto Rico that are growing here in Para la Naturaleza's native tree nursery. PLN, a branch of the larger nonprofit Conservation Trust of Puerto Rico, manages 32,000 acres of protected land throughout the island. This tree nursery is one part of their programming. Trailer trucks on the outskirts of the grounds house staff offices, among them the office of Luisa Rosado, the PLN reforestation manager. The trees grow just beyond the trucks, in several enclosed and open-air garden-like plots that serve as a sort of step-by-step early-stage development site for the germinating seeds. PLN began the reforestation program in the early 1990s, says Rosado, in response to Hurricane Hugo, which hit eastern Puerto Rico in 1989 and caused severe crop damage. Read full story here.

VA: The Fastest Rate of Sea Level Rise on the East Coast is in Virginia Beach

By Christina Ianzito – Chicago Tribune – September 7, 2018
When several days of storms brought more than seven inches of rain to the seaside resort town of Virginia Beach, Virginia, in July, muddy water inundated Blue Pete's seafood restaurant, which was forced to close for 16 days to dry out and be cleaned up. It was the third time the hugely popular spot, on the aptly named Muddy Creek Road in the city's rural Pungo area, has flooded this year, says Aristotle Cleanthes, 31, who co-owns it with his twin brother, Nicholas. "It's a living nightmare. The water's just destroying us." In fact, a lot of the Virginia Beach residents who depend on tourists find themselves thinking about water these days. Read full story here. 

WA: Moving Mountains: Elwha River Still Changing Five Years World’s Largest Dam-Removal Project: More than 20 Million Tons of Sediment Flushed to the Sea

U.S. Geological Survey – September 5, 2018
Starting in 2011, the National Park Service removed two obsolete dams from the Elwha River in Olympic National Park, Washington. It was the world’s largest dam-removal project. Over the next five years, water carrying newly freed rocks, sand, silt and old tree trunks reshaped more than 13 miles of river and built a larger delta into the Pacific Ocean. Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and six research partners recently published a paper summarizing a half-decade of changes to the shape and sediment of the Elwha River after dam removal. Read full story and download the paper here.

WV: EPA Backs West Virginia Plan to Improve Water Quality

Water Online – September 5, 20118
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced today it has approved and helped fund a more than $50M plan by West Virginia to implement key water infrastructure projects, including new and upgraded wastewater treatment plants to better serve residents, increase efficiency and reduce pollution. West Virginia’s Plan includes an award of $25M from EPA’s FY 2018 Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF). The plan by the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) is also funded with a $5M state match, repayments from prior CWSRF loans, and interest earnings. Read full story here.

WI: When it Comes to Flooding, Can Milwaukee Cope?

By Susan Bence – WUWM 98.7 – Milwaukee Public Radio – August 24, 2018
Parts of Wisconsin recently experienced torrential rains. Roads flooded — or in some cases, washed out — in Dane and Iowa counties. Some state trails have closed until further notice. So, where does Milwaukee stand in its ability to cope with massive rain storms? WUWM Enviornmental Reporter Susan Bence met with Patrick Elliott of the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District (MMSD) near the Kinnickinnic River in Pulaski Park on the city’s south side to help find out. Read or listen to full story here.

WI: Wisconsin’s Catastrophic Flooding is a Glimpse of the Midwest’s Drenched Future

By Eric Holthaus – Grist – September 5, 2018
An entire summer’s worth of rain has fallen across a broad swath of the Midwest in recent days. The resulting record floods have wrecked homes and altered the paths of rivers, in one case destroying a waterfall in Minnesota. The worst-affected region, southwest Wisconsin, has received more than 20 inches of rain in 15 days– more than it usually gets in six months. Governor Scott Walker of Wisconsin declared a statewide emergency last week, mobilizing the Wisconsin National Guard to assist flood victims if necessary. The Kickapoo River in southwest Wisconsin rose to record levels — as high as six feet above the previous high water mark — producing damage that local emergency management officials described as “breathtaking.” Read full story here. 


 

Wetland Science News


In Droughts and Heavy Rains, Ecosystems Function Like Information Communication Networks

Environmental News Network – September 12, 2018
How is a telecommunications network like an ecosystem? Tree canopies and the running streams below, or coral reefs and the ocean waters that flow around them, are interconnected components of a larger whole: an ecosystem. These ecosystem parts are in communication with one another, scientists have learned, via signals transmitted among earth, air and water. Read full story here.

Climate Change Hits Nature’s Delicate Interdependencies

UN Environment – September 12, 2018
Changing weather patterns are disrupting hard-wired animal and plant reproduction systems with unpredictable consequences for biodiversity. In the northern hemisphere, climate change is causing spring to arrive earlier. We know this from reliable climate records dating back to 1880 and in some cases earlier than that. Herbarium records are turning out to be a huge source of important plant data. Plants and animals have adapted to relatively stable climate conditions over hundreds of years, even millennia. If average temperatures rise by half a degree Celsius in 100 years – the blink of an eye in evolutionary terms – many species may struggle to adapt in time. Read full story here.

Future of Tidal Wetlands Depends on Coastal Management

By Jonathan D. Woodruff – Nature – September 12, 2018
Coastal communities around the globe depend on tidal marshes and mangroves for the diverse ecological, economic and flood-mitigating services they provide. These relatively flat wetland systems commonly reside just above mean sea level, making them one of the ecosystems most at risk of being drowned by rising sea levels. But tidal wetlands will not disappear without a fight. Writing in Nature, Schuerch et al. present global-scale modelling that suggests that tidal wetlands are less vulnerable to sea-level rise than was thought. However, the scale of future wetland loss or gain depends greatly on the degree to which coastal communities accept or prevent the landward advances of these living coastal systems into newly inundated areas. Read full article here.

Wetlands are Key for Accurate Greenhouse Gas Measurement in the Arctic

Science Daily - University of Eastern Finland – September 11, 2018
The Arctic is rapidly warming, with stronger effects than observed elsewhere in the world. Determining whether the Arctic is continuing to take up carbon from the atmosphere or instead releasing it to the atmosphere is an urgent research priority, particularly as the climate warms. A new study now provides the first estimate of regional carbon budget for tundra in Western Russia for the 10-year period from 2006 to 2015. Read full article here.

Peatlands Will Store More Carbon as Planet Warms

University of Exeter – Phys.org – September 10, 2018
Global warming will cause peatlands to absorb more carbon—but the effect will weaken as warming increases, new research suggests. This effect—a so-called "negative feedback" where climate change causes effects which slow further climate change—will increase over the coming decades but will decline after 2100 if warming continues, according to an international team of 70 scientists, led by the University of Exeter. Peatlands are a vital "carbon sink", currently storing more carbon than all the world's vegetation, and the research showed they will store even more carbon in the future than was previously believed. Read full story here.

Budgeting Ozone-Depleting Emissions from Coastal
Tidal Marshes

By Aaron Sidder – EOS – September 6, 2018
Coastal wetlands have recently been lauded for their carbon sequestration capacity, but many also emit compounds with deleterious atmospheric effects. For example, brackish tidal marshes—where fresh and salt water mix—release significant amounts of methyl chloride and methyl bromide into the atmosphere. (Compounds derived from a methyl group and halogens, including methyl chloride and bromide, are collectively referred to as methyl halides.) Both compounds contribute to stratospheric ozone destruction because they carry substantial quantities of chlorine and bromine into the stratosphere, where they catalyze ozone loss reactions. Read full story here.

Massive Ocean Waves May Play a Role in Nuisance Flooding

By Jenessa Duncombe – EOS – September 4, 2018
In the early morning on 20 September 2009, the waters lapping the coast of Charleston, S.C., began to rise. High tide was on its way. But this time, the water did something unusual—it kept rising. By 10:00 a.m., the higher-than-normal tide had left its mark: 7 to 10 centimeters of water blocked streets near the shore. Beachfront parking lots filled with salt water up to the bumpers of cars. Lifeguards reported waves inundating the beaches, and salt water that splashed over sea walls doused city walkways. The flooding didn’t just affect Charleston either; it extended halfway down the Georgia coastline. What was special about this flood? According to a new study, the rising waters may have been partly due to a massive type of slow-moving ocean wave, called Rossby waves. Read full story here.

Most Land-Based Ecosystems Worldwide Risk ‘Major Transformation’ Due to Climate Change

By Jim Erickson – University of Michigan News – August 30, 2018
Without dramatic reductions in greenhouse-gas emissions, most of the planet’s land-based ecosystems—from its forests and grasslands to the deserts and tundra—are at high risk of “major transformation” due to climate change, according to a new study from an international research team. The researchers used fossil records of global vegetation change that occurred during a period of post-glacial warming to project the magnitude of ecosystem transformations likely in the future under various greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. They found that under a “business as usual” emissions scenario, in which little is done to rein in heat-trapping greenhouse-gas emissions, vegetation changes across the planet’s wild landscapes will likely be more far-reaching and disruptive than earlier studies suggested. Read full article here.

New Study by Villanova University Biologists Finds Mangrove Expansion May Help Coastal Ecosystems Keep Pace with Sea Level Rise in Warmer Future

Villanova University – August 29, 2018
Sea level rise and extreme weather events have become harsh realities for those living along the world’s coasts. The record-breaking hurricanes of the past decade in the United States have led to staggering tolls on coastal infrastructure and communities, leading many local governments to consider the benefits of natural coastal barriers. In a landmark study titled “Warming accelerates mangrove expansion and surface elevation gain in a subtropical wetland” a team of Villanova University biologists have documented that coastal wetlands in the southeastern United States are responding positively to rising temperatures both in their growth and in their ability to build soil to keep pace with sea level rise. Published August 29 in the British Ecological Society’s Journal of Ecology, the study’s results are a ray of sunshine in the climate change forecast. Read full story here.

Portable Freshwater Harvester Could Draw up to 10 Gallons Per Hour from the Air

American Chemical Society – Science Daily – August 21, 2018
For thousands of years, people in the Middle East and South America have extracted water from the air to help sustain their populations. Drawing inspiration from those examples, researchers are now developing a lightweight, battery-powered freshwater harvester that could someday take as much as 10 gallons per hour from the air, even in arid locations. They say their nanofiber-based method could help address modern water shortages due to climate change, industrial pollution, droughts and groundwater depletion. Read full article here.


 

Resources and Publications

Future Response of Global Coastal Wetlands to Sea-Level Rise

By Mark Schuerch, Tom Spencer, Stijn Temmerman et al. – Nature – September 12, 2018
The response of coastal wetlands to sea-level rise during the twenty-first century remains uncertain. Global-scale projections suggest that between 20 and 90 per cent (for low and high sea-level rise scenarios, respectively) of the present-day coastal wetland area will be lost, which will in turn result in the loss of biodiversity and highly valued ecosystem services. These projections do not necessarily take into account all essential geomorphological and socio-economic system feedbacks. Here we present an integrated global modelling approach that considers both the ability of coastal wetlands to build up vertically by sediment accretion, and the accommodation space, namely, the vertical and lateral space available for fine sediments to accumulate and be colonized by wetland vegetation. Read full article here.

Vulnerability and Comparability of Natural and Created Wetlands

By J.F. Bunnell, K.J. Laidig, P.M. Burritt, and M.C. Sobel – New Jersey Pinelands Commission – July 2018
We identified and mapped 5,850 natural ponds, excavated ponds, and stormwater basins in the Pinelands Area. We assessed the vulnerability of natural and excavated ponds to developed land by simulating a buildout scenario and assessing changes in surrounding developed land, the percentage of non‐native plant species, and pH for each pond. Natural ponds were less vulnerable than excavated ponds to future developed land because most natural ponds were located in protected areas of the Pinelands. Read full report here.

Aquatic Ecosystems in a Shifting Indiana Climate: A Report from the Indiana Climate Change Impacts Assessment

By Höök, Tomas; Foley, Carolyn; Collingsworth, Paris; et al. – Purdue University – September 12, 2018
Indiana is home to many types of aquatic ecosystems, including lakes, rivers, streams, wetlands, and temporary (ephemeral) pools, which provide habitats for a wide range of plants and animals. These ecosystems will experience changes in water quantity, water temperature, ice cover, water clarity, and oxygen content as the state’s temperature and rainfall patterns shift. The plants and animals living in these aquatic ecosystems will undergo changes that will vary based on the species and the specific places they inhabit. This report from the Indiana Climate Change Impacts Assessment (IN CCIA) uses climate projections for the state to explore the potential threats to Indiana’s aquatic ecosystems and describes potential management implications and opportunities. Read full report here.

The Wetland Book

C. Max Finlayson, Mark Everad, Kenneth Irvine, editors, et al. – Springer – 2018
I: Structure and Function, Management, and Methods. Book 1 contains 291 articles about wetland structure and function, management and methods.
II: Distribution, Description, and Conservation. Book 2 contains 170 articles about wetland distribution, description, and conservation. Individual articles can be accessed.

 

Potpourri

 
What the World Needs Now to Fight Climate Change: More Swamps

By William Moomaw, Gillian Davies, and Max Finlayson – The Conversation – September 13, 2018
“Drain the swamp” has long meant getting rid of something distasteful. Actually, the world needs more swamps – and bogs, fens, marshes and other types of wetlands. These are some of the most diverse and productive ecosystems on Earth. They also are underrated but irreplaceable tools for slowing the pace of climate change and protecting our communities from storms and flooding. Scientists widely recognize that wetlands are extremely efficient at pulling carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and converting it into living plants and carbon-rich soil. As part of a transdisciplinary team of nine wetland and climate scientists, we published a paper earlier this year that documents the multiple climate benefits provided by all types of wetlands, and their need for protection. Read full story here.

Climate Change is Everyone’s Problem. Women Are Ready to Solve It

By Anne Finucane and Anne Hidalgo – Fortune – September 12, 2018
Imagine a world with affordable, clean energy, sustainable cities and communities, and decent work and economic growth for all. That is the world the United Nations imagined when it defined the 17 Global Goals for Sustainable Development with “the desire to create a future where there is no poverty, the planet is protected, and all the people enjoy peace and prosperity.” But the reality is, that world can’t exist without the equal participation, and leadership, of women—as business and political leaders, investors, and contributors to the global economy. Read full story here.

Aquafarmers on the Frontlines

By Jenny Seifert – UC Santa Barbara – The Current – September 10, 2018
Many of the world’s future farmers will likely be farming oceans, as aquaculture – the cultivation of fish and other aquatic species – continues its expansion as the fastest growing food sector. New research shows that in order for this next generation of farmers to thrive, there is an urgent need to prepare them for climate change. Researchers from the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) at UC Santa Barbara have published the first comprehensive analysis of how climate change could affect marine aquaculture production, specifically of finfish and bivalves (e.g., oysters), around the world. Published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, their study, “Global change in marine aquaculture production potential under climate change,” reveals that climate change is not only a threat to global production in the future, but also is affecting producers today. Read full story here.

EPA Expands Clean Air Act Loopholes for Coal Plants

By Jack Lienke and Richard L. Revesz – The Hill – September 5, 2018
Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency unveiled a proposal to replace the Obama administration’s signature climate initiative, the Clean Power Plan, which aimed to cut planet-warming carbon dioxide emissions from the nation’s power sector. EPA calls its “Affordable Clean Energy” proposal — ACE, for short — “a new rule to reduce greenhouse gas emissions” from coal-fired power plants. There are just two problems with that characterization: First, ACE won’t do much of anything to reduce coal plants’ CO2 emissions — in fact, it might increase them. And second, the rule isn’t really new at all — at least, there’s nothing fresh about its most notable component. Instead, it’s a warmed-over policy from the George W. Bush years, served by one of the same attorneys, Bill Wehrum, who cooked it up the first time around. Read full opinion here.

Proposed Changes to the Endangered Species Act Threaten Wildlife

By Charise Johnson – Union of Concerned Scientists – September 4, 2018
The Trump Administration is threatening species, land conservation, and human health and wellbeing by rolling back our health, safety, and environmental protections. This time the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) are attempting to undercut the scientific basis of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) by proposing changes that will make it less effective, even increasing the chances that species will go extinct. Read full blog post here.

We Can Still Save Our Oceans and Fisheries. New Study Shows How.

By Merrick Burden – Environmental Defense Fund – August 29, 2018
For years, scientists have warned that climate change, along with overfishing, would devastate oceans and the fisheries that depend on them. Fishermen worldwide are already feeling the impact of warming oceans as fish move and stocks dwindle. But a new study shows that if we adopt sustainable fishing practices today and keep global warming to 2 degrees Celsius, we can change this trajectory. Not only would the decline be halted – we could actually boost sustainable production from our fisheries by $14 billion by 2030. Read full blog post here.

Trump’s EPA is Selling Out People of Color

By Denise Morrison – CNN – August 28, 2018 – Video
President Donald Trump's Environmental Protection Agency has abandoned environmental justice, which requires the fair treatment of all people, regardless of race or color, in the development and enforcement of environmental
laws and regulation. Its latest effort -- the so-called Affordable Clean Energy Rule, announced last Tuesday -- only exacerbates the issue by continuing to dismantle regulations designed to protect communities of color. It neglects the enforcement of the Clean Air Act (CAA), which standardizes air pollution to safe levels, and the Clean Water Act (CWA), which regulates the discharge of pollutants in American waters. And it does this despite the EPA's own research showing how communities of color bear the brunt of dirty air and contaminated water. Read full story and view video here.

The Farm Bill Should Better Protect America’s Drinking Water

By Colin O’Neil, Legislative Director – AgMag – August 28, 2018
America’s drinking water is under threat from a formidable foe: polluted farm runoff, which contaminates the tap water supplies for millions of people, especially in rural areas. About 1,700 public water systems across the country are contaminated with levels of nitrate – a chemical in commercial fertilizers and manure – that exceed what the National Cancer Institute says increases the risk of colon, kidney, ovarian and bladder cancers. Meanwhile, outbreaks of potentially toxic algae, fueled by runoff from farms, are rising sharply this summer in lakes, rivers and streams nationwide, according to EWG’s ongoing tracking of algae outbreaks. Read full article here.

Here are 10 Topics Senators Could Ask Trump’s Science Advisor Nominee to Address

By Jeffrey Mervis – Science Magazine – August 21, 2018
Is Kelvin Droegemeier in sync with the science policies of President Donald Trump? That’s what members of the Senate commerce committee will want to know when Droegemeier appears before them on Thursday to discuss his nomination to lead the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP).Is Kelvin Droegemeier in sync with the science policies of President Donald Trump? That’s what members of the Senate commerce committee will want to know when Droegemeier appears before them on Thursday to discuss his nomination to lead the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). Read full article here.

 



 Calendar of Events


WEBINARS
     
MEETINGS     
TRAINING     

 

 

 Special Events

The Avenue Viera:
Wild About Nature
September 22, 2018
Viera, FL

Wetlands Institute:
Fall Migration Festival
September 22, 2018
Cape May, NJ

Save the Bay: Bay Day
October 6, 2018

2018 Voice of the Wetlands Festival
October 12-14, 2018
Houma, LA

The Wetlands Conservancy
Wetlands & Wellies
October 14, 2018

Maine Maritime Museum:
Birding on the Bay

October 14 and 28, 2018
Bath, ME

Wings Over the Rockies Festival
May 6-12, 2019

               
WEBINARS  
               
September      
       

September 20, 2018
2:00 p.m. ET

September 20, 2018
3:00 p.m. ET

 

Wetland BMP Knowledge Exchange Webinar: Establishing vegetation on constructed fens in Alberta’s oil sands region

U.S. Geological Survey Webinar: Connectivity for Climate Change: Assessing Threats and Identifying Conservation Actions

 
   October 2018  
       
October 2, 2018
12:00 p.m. ET 
  Environmental Law Institute Webinar: The Dusky Gopher Frog’s Critical Habitat: Legal Implications for Public-Private Partnerships    
October 2, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  EBM Tools Network Webinar: Managing Global Acidification on a Regional Scale: How the US Mid-Atlantic and Northeast Coastal Acidification Networks (MACAN and NECAN) Are Working to Understand Impacts through Partnerships   
       
October 2, 2018
1:30 p.m. ET 
  Wetland BMP Knowledge Exchange Webinar: NAIT BRI Applied Research and Knowledge Exchange    

 

October 10, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  American Water Resources Association Webinar: Forecast Informed Reservoir Operations Improve Water Management  
     
October 10, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  Center for Watershed Protection Webcast: Innovations in Stream Restoration Design and Construction 
     
October 10, 2018
3:00 p.m. ET 
  Association of State Wetland Managers Members’ Wetland Webinar: Using Avoided Land Loss as a Proxy for Reduced Storm Damages: Feasibility Study Findings for an Environmental Impact Bond in Louisiana and the Gulf 
     
October 11, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET 
  EBM Tools Network Webinar:  Listening to our Sanctuaries: Understanding and Reducing the Impacts of Underwater Noise in Marine Protected Areas by Leila Hatch of Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary 
     
October 23, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  EBM Tools Network Webinar: Leverage a Global Volunteer Network and Access the Data Needed to Solve Environmental Challenges
     
October 24, 2018
3:00 p.m. ET 
  Association of State Wetland Managers Members’ Wetland Webinar: Utilizing EPA’s Water Quality “eXchange” (WQX) Data Tools and  Services to Support Wetland Water Quality Work 
     
NOVEMBER 2018
     
November 14, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  American Water Resources Association Webinar: Setting Up a Water Bank: From the Ground(water) Up 
     
November 14, 2018
1:00 p.m. ET
  Center for Watershed Protection Webcast: It Ain’t Easy Getting Green: Incentivizing Watershed Programs
     
November 28, 2018
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of State Wetland Managers: Members Wetland Webinar: Planning Wetland Restoration at the Watershed Level
     
DECEMBER 2018
     
December 19, 2018
3:00 p.m. ET
  Association of State Wetland Managers: Members Wetland Webinar: Using a Living Shorelines Prioritization Tool for Wetland Improvements
     
  

 

MEETINGS
 
SEPTEMBER 2018
     
September 20-23, 2018
Athens, GA
  University of Georgia, Center for Integrative Conservation Research: Integrative Conservation Conference
     
September 22, 2018
University of Pittsburgh
  Three Rivers Evolution Event
     
September 23-26, 2018
Eureka Springs, AR
  Arkansas Floodplain Management Association, Inc. Fall Conference: Keeping Your Head Above Water in 2018

     
September 24-28, 2018
Jena, Germany
  10th International Conference on Ecological Informatics  
     
September 24-30, 2018
New York, NY
  Climate Week NYC
     
September 25-26, 2018
Washington, DC
  Blue Print for Change: New Approaches and Needed Changes to Managing Natural Resource Risks, Liabilities and Opportunities (2018 Natural Resources Symposium) 
     
September 28-29, 2018
Kingston, RI
  Inclusive SciComm: A Symposium on Advancing Inclusive Public Engagement with Science
     
OCTOBER 2018 
     
October 2-3, 2018
Indianapolis, IN
  2018 Great Lakes Commission Annual Meeting
     
October 2-5, 2018
Pittsburgh, PA 
  2018 AASHE Conference & Expo: Global Goals: Rising to the Challenge 
     
October 4, 2018
University of Connecticut
Storrs, CT
  University of Connecticut: Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group 2018 Invasive Plant Symposium 
     
October 4, 2018
Ankeny, IA
  Iowa Floodplain & Stormwater Management Association Annual Fall Conference
     
October 4-5, 2018
Pittsburgh, PA
  Three Rivers Urban Soils Symposium
     
October 4-6, 2018
London, UK
  5th World Conference on Climate Change:  Climate Change and Sustainable Futures  
     
October 5-7, 2018
Miami, FL
  2018 Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference (SEEC) 
     
October 7-10, 2018
Washington, DC 
  Behavior, Energy & Climate Change Conference
     
October 7-11, 2018
Cleveland, OH
  The Wildlife Society's 25 Annual Conference
     
October 9-12, 2018
Houghton, MI
  2018 State of Lake Superior Conference  
     
October 10-12, 2018
Little Rock, AR
  2018 Society of Wetland Scientists South Central Chapter Fall Meeting
     
October 11-13, 2018
Pittsburgh, PA
  Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2018 National Land Conservation Conference 
     
October 15-18, 2018
Spokane, WA
 
  Society for Ecological Restoration Northwest Chapter and the Society of Wetland Scientists Pacific Northwest Chapter Joint Regional Conference: Restoring Resilient Communities in Changing Landscapes
     
October 15-18, 2018
Rome, Italy
  World Congress on Climate Change
     
October 16-17, 2018
St. Paul, MN
  University of Minnesota Water Resources Center: Minnesota Water Resources Conference
     
October 17, 2018
Oakland, CA 
  Alameda County Flood Control and Water Conservation District Conference: Alameda County Watershed Confluence  
     
October 17-18, 2018
Detroit, MI
  Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: Great Lakes Restoration Conference  
     
October 17-19, 2018
Crestview Hills, KY
  34th Annual Scientific Symposium of the Ohio River Basin Consortium for Research & Education (ORBCRE) and the Ohio River Basin Alliance (ORBA) Summit: Partnerships and Collaborations towards a Single Voice for the Ohio River Basin
     
October 18-19, 2018
Suisin City, CA
  California/Nevada Chapter Soil and Water Conservation Society Annual Meeting: Soil Health in Northern California 
     
October 18-21, 2018
Antalya, Turkey
  International Marine & Freshwater Sciences Symposium (MarFresh2018)
     
October 20, 2018
Leominster, MA
  MACC Fall Conference 
     
October 21-29, 2018
Dubai
  13th Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands
     
October 22-26, 2018
Stowe, VT
  American Meteorological Society: 29th Conference on Severe Local Storms
     
October 23, 2018
Washington, DC
  Corporate Governance in an Age of Increased Environmental Accountability, Liability and Risk (2018 Corporate Forum)
     
October 23-25, 2018
Bloominton, IN
  Natural Areas Conference: Building Resilience: The Future of Natural Areas 
     
October 23-25, 2018
Atlantic City, NJ 
  New Jersey Association for Floodplain Management: 14th Annual Conference   
     
October 24-25, 2018
Miami Beach, FL
  Southeast Florida Regional Compact: Southeast Florida Regional Climate Leadership Summit
     
October 24-26, 2018
New York, NY
  American Museum of Natural History Center for Biodiversity and Conservation: Student Conference on Conservation Science-New York

     
October 27-28, 2018
Knoxville, TN
  National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS): 10th Annual Undergraduate Research Conference
     
October 28-31, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  American Water Works Association: Water Infrastructure Conference
     
October 29-31, 2018
San Diego, CA
  6th International Conference on Sustainable Environment and Agriculture
October 30-November 2, 2018
Cincinnati, OH 
  38th International Symposium of the North American Lake Management Society: Now Trending: Innovations in Lake Management  
     
October 30-November 2, 2018
Galveston, TX
  American Shore & Beach Preservation Association: 2018 National Coastal Conference: Resilient Shorelines for Rising Tides
     
NOVEMBER 2018 
     
November 2-3, 2018
State College, PA
  4th Biennial Pennsylvania Botany Symposium
     
November 4-7, 2018
Baltimore, MD
 
  American Society of Agronomy, the Crop Science Society of America, and the Canadian Society of Agronomy: 2018 International Annual Meeting: Enhancing Productivity in a Changing Climate 
     
November 4-7, 2018
Indianapolis, IN
  Geological Society of America 2018 Annual Meeting
     
November 4-8, 2018
Baltimore, MD
  American Water Resources Association (AWRA) 53rd Annual Water Resources 
November 7-9, 2018
Pewaukee, WI
  Wisconsin Association for Floodplain, Stormwater, & Coastal Management 16th Annual Conference 
     
November 9, 2018
Boylston, MA
  Association of Massachusetts Wetland Scientists Annual Meeting 2018: What Could Go Wrong?
     
November 9-11, 2018
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI
  Sustainability and Development Conference
November 9-11, 2018
San Antonio, TX 
  Texas Society for Ecological Restoration Conference: Making Restoration Work in Texas  
     
November 13-15, 2018
Homer, AK
  Alaska Committee for Noxious and Invasive Pest Management: Invasive Species Workshop 
     
November 13-16, 2018
Chicago, IL
  Lincoln Park Zoo 2nd International Wildlife Reintroduction Conference
November 14-16, 2018
Mankato, MN
  2018 Minnesota Association of Floodplain Managers Conference
 
November 17, 2018
Cromwell, CT
  CACIWC Annual Meeting and Environmental Conference
     
November 19-20, 2018
Paris, France
  6th Global Summit on Climate Change: Paleoclimatology: The Earth’s Climate in Long View
     
November 25-29, 2018
Champions Gate, FL
  American Water Works Association, Florida Section: 2018 Fall Conference: Planning the Future of Water
     
November 26-27, 2018
Tokyo, Japan
  World Summit on Climate Change & Global Warming
 
DECEMBER 2018 
     
December 3-6, 2018 
Washington, DC
  2018 ACES Conference: A Community on Ecosystem Services 
     
December 8-13, 2018
Long Beach, CA
  Restore America’s Estuaries Conference: 9th National Summit on Coastal and Estuarine Restoration and Management
     
December 10-11, 2018
Carmel, IN 
  Midwestern States Environmental Consultants Association Conference: Environmental Liabilities, Risk Assessment, and Remediation  
     
December 10-14, 2018
Washington, DC 
  AGU Fall Meeting

     
December 11-13, 2018
Indianapolis, IN
  North Central Region Water Network: North Central Region One Water Action Forum
     
JANUARY 2019 
     
January 6-9, 2019
San Diego, CA
  International Soils Meeting: Soils Across Latitudes

     
January 27-30, 2019 
Cape May, NJ
  2019 Delaware Estuary Science & Environmental Summit: Estuary 2029: Saving our System Through Collaboration
Abstracts due by August 30, 2018
     
FEBRUARY 2019 
     
February 5-7, 2019
Phoenix, AZ
  Tamarisk Coalition and the Desert Botanical Garden: Riparian Restoration Conference
Abstract deadline: October 1, 2018
     
February 5-7, 2019
Osage Beach, MO
  Missouri Natural Resources Conference

     
February 5-7, 2019
Stevenson, WA
  River Restoration Northwest: Stream Restoration Symposium

     
February 11-15, 2019
Anchorage, AK
  Alaska Forum on the Environment

     
February 19-21, 2018
Madison, WI
  Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Wetland Science Conference
Proposals due by November 1, 2018
     
February 23-
March 2, 2019 
  San Juan, Puerto Rico Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography: Planet Water: Challenges and Successes 
     
February 27-28, 2018
Toronto, Canada
  International Conference on Water Management Modeling
     
MARCH 2019
     
March 13-15, 2019
Ann Arbor, MI
  Michigan Stormwater Floodplain Association Conference
     
March 13-17, 2019
Raleigh, NC 
  CitSci 2019: Growing Our Family Tree 
     
March 20-22, 2019
Baltimore, MD 
  Climate Leadership Conference
     
March 25-29, 2019
Denver, CO
  5th Life Discovery – Doing Science Biology Education Conference: : Microbiomes to Ecosystems: Evolution and Biodiversity across Scale, Space, and Time
     
March 25-29, 2019
Denver, CO
  National Water Quality Monitoring Council: 11th Annual National Monitoring Conference
   APRIL 2019
     
April 22-25, 2019
Coral Springs, FL
  Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration: Science Advancing Everglades Resilience and Sustainability
     
MAY 2019   
     
May 2, 2019
Washington, DC
  Environmental Law Institute Conference: Clean Water Act: Law and Regulation 2019 
     
May 6-10, 2019
Minneapolis, MN
  National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Connecting Policy, Practice, Business, Science & People.
Presentations due by October 1, 2018
     
May 7, 2019
Washington, DC
  Environmental Law Institute 30th Annual National Wetlands Awards 2019 
     
May 19-23, 2019
Baltimore, MD
  2018 NAEP Conference: The Environmental Landscape in an Age of Infrastructure Modernization
     
May 19-24, 2019
Cleveland, OH
  Association of State Floodplain Managers 42nd Annual Meeting: Managing Floods Where the Mountains Meet the Desert 
     
May 29-June 2, 2019
Waikoloa, HI
  Ducks Unlimited National Convention
   JUNE 2019
June 4-6, 20, 2019
Bologna, Italy
  2nd International Conference on Community Ecology 
     
June 16-19, 2018
Sparks, NV
  2019 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: Improving Water Infrastructure Through Resilient Adaptation
     
AUGUST 2019   
     
August 11-16, 2019
Louisville, KY
  Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting
Abstracts due by September 24, 2018
     

   

TRAINING
 
 SEPTEMBER 2018
     
September 20-22, 2018
Laramie, WY
  CUAHSI: Near Surface Geophysics for Hydrology Workshop 
     
September 21, 2018
Portage, WI
  Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Plant ID – Familiarization for New Wetland Delineators 
     
September 21-23, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review Process 
     
September 24-25, 201
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Evaluating Hydric Soils in the Field 
     
September 24-28, 2018
Covington, LA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
     
September 24-27, 2018
Aliquippa, PA 

September 24-28, 2018
Portage, WI 

September 26-27, 2018
Baton Rouge, LA 
 


September 27-28, 2018
Gainesville, FL 
 

September 28-29, 2018
Baton Rouge, LA 

September 28-30, 2018
Steuben, ME
  The Swamp School: Classroom and Field
Wetland Delineation Training
 

Wetland Training Institute Course:
Basic Wetland Delineation
 

Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.
Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training

Southeastern Botany, LLC Workshop: Grass & Sedge Workshop  

Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training

Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Fall Maine Mushroom
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     
OCTOBER 2018
     
October 1-December 24, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018
     
October 2, 2018
New Brunswick NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Flood Hazard Area Control Act Rules: Technical Standards Part 1 
     
October 4-5, 2018
Tuckerton, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants
     
October 5-7, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Columbus Day Weekend Retreat
     
October 8- November 5, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets  
     
October 8-December 31, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator
     
October 9-12, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  D&D West Course: Basic Wetland Delineation - 40 hours (½ lecture, ½ field)
     
October 9-12, 2018
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Methodology for Delineating Wetlands
     
October 10-11, 2018
Marquette, MI
  Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Hydric Soils Identification  
     
October 10-11, 2018
Richmond, VA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
     
October 10-11, 2018
Richmond, VA
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
     
October 12-14, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Bryophytes: Mosses and Liverworts 
     
October 17-18, 2018
San Diego, CA
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
     
October 19-21, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Northeastern Freshwater Fish Assemblages 
     
October 22-25, 2018
Pittsburgh, PA
  The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design
     
October 22-November 5, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Habitat Conservation Plans
     
October 23-24, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  D & D West Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species - 16 hours (lecture)
     
October 23-28, 2018
Boulder, CO
  CUAHSI – NCAR Training Workshop: The Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System

     
October 25-26, 2018
Gainesville, FL
  Southeastern Botany, LLC Workshop: Grass & Sedge Workshop 
     
October 26-28, 2018
Steuben, ME
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Crustose and Foliose Lichens  
     
October 30, 2018
New Brunswick NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Education Course: Flood Hazard Area Control Act Rules: Technical Standards Part II 
     
October 31-November 1, 2018
Tampa, FL
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
     
NOVEMBER 2018
     
November 5-9, 2018
John Bunker Sands Wetland Center
Seagoville, TX
  The Swamp School CourseWetland Delineation Training
     
November 5, 2018-
January 28, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018
     
November 5, 2018-January 28, 2019
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist  
     
November 7-8, 2018
Columbus, OH
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training 
     
November 7-8, 2018
Charleston, SC
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
     
November 7-8, 2018
Charleston, SC
  Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
     
November 8, 2018
Lacey, WA
  Washington Department of Ecology Workshop: Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
     
November 8-9, 2018
Hillsborough, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Education Course: Lake Management
     
November 8-11, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Tree and Shrub Identification Using Twigs and Other Winter Characteristics  
     
November 12-13, 2018
Atlanta, GA
  D & D West Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology – Piedmont - 16 hours (field)
     
November 12, 2018-
February 4, 2019

Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design  
     
November 13-15, 2018
St. Michaels, MD
  Environmental Concern Course: Winter Woody Plant ID 
     
November 26-December 24, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment 
     
DECEMBER 2018
     
December 3-31, 2018
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets
     
December 3, 2018-
February 25, 2019

Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018  
     
December 5-6, 2018
Tampa, FL
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training 
     
December 7-8, 2018
Tampa, FL
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training
     
December 10-11, 2018
Charleston, SC
  D & D West Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement – Eastern Mountains/Piedmont) - 16 hours (½ lecture, ½ field)
     
December 10, 2018-April 2019
Pittsburgh, PA
  The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
     
December 12-13, 2018
Houston, TX 
  Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
     
December 13-14, 2018
Basking Ridge, NJ
  Rutgers Office of Continuing Education Course: Identification of Wetland Plants in Winter
     
December 17-31, 2018 
Online
  The Swamp School Online Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
     
December 28, 2018-January 16, 2019 
Costa Rica
  Organization for Tropical Studies and the University of Costa Course:  Field Ecology: Skills for Science and Beyond
     
JANUARY 2019
     

January 13-18, 2019
Oracle, AZ 

January 10-21, 2019
Kananaskis Valley
Alberta, Canada

 

CUAHSI Master Class: Advanced Techniques in Watershed Science  

University of Saskatchewan Centre for Hydrology / CWRA / Canadian Society for Hydrological Sciences Kananaskis Short Course: Principles of Hydrology 

 

 
 
   
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


INDEX


EDITOR'S NOTE

EDITOR'S CHOICE

  • WRDA Passes in the House
  • Three States Granted WOTUS Injuction
  • Coastal Labs Studying Increased Flooding Consider Moving Because of Increased Flooding
  • John McCain’s Climate Change Legacy
  • White House Pick for Top Science Spot Stresses Science Integrity 

NATIONAL NEWS

  • Florence causes coal ash spill in North Carolina
  • Democratic Senator Releases Document Showing ICE got $9.8 million from FEMA
  • Native American Tribes File Lawsuit Seeking to Invalidate Keystone XL Pipeline Permit
  • This is How Much Water It Takes to Produce Energy in the US
  • Even Without the Trump Administration, the U.S. is Upholding Its Commitment to the Paris Climate Agreement
  • Climate Action Could Add $26 Trillion to World Economy: Study
  • Farm Bill: House Proposal Could Wipe Out Communities’ Power to Prohibit Pesticides
  • Trump’s Rollback of Pollution Rules to Hit Coal Country Hard 
  • Engineered Sand Zaps Storm Water Pollutants
  • NOAA and Partners Test Unmanned Vehicle to Detect Harmful Algal Blooms in Lake Erie
  • Tons of Plastic Trash Enter the Great Lakes Every Year—Where Does it Go?
  • Out of Sight, Out of Water: The U.S. and Mexico Have Only Just Begun to Grapple with the Aquifers They Share
  • Sea Level Rise is Eroding Home Value, and Owners Might Not Even Know It

STATE NEWS

  • AZ: The Bullfrog is the “Great White Shark” of Arizona’s Wetlands
  • CA: California Works to Protect Its Shrinking Wetlands
  • CO: Denver Accelerates “Daylighting” of Lost Waterways, “Undoing History” with Decades-Long Re-Engineering Effort
  • FL: Toxic Algae Seeps into Florida Congressional Races
  • ME: Hundreds of Seals Have Died in Maine
  • ME: An Ocean ‘Heat Wave’ Just Drove Temperatures Off Maine to Near-Record Highs
  • ME: South Portland’s Tar Sands Ban Upheld in a ‘David vs. Goliath’ Pipeline Battle
  • MD: Washed Away? Torrential Rains Threaten Bay Restoration Gains
  • MI: Fishing in Greener Waters: Understanding the Impact of Harmful Algal Blooms on Lake Erie Anglers
  • MI: Flint Water Crisis: Michigan Health Director Ordered to Manslaughter Trial
  • MN: Wetlands Project Aims to Purify St. Paul Drinking Water
  • NC: North Carolina, Warned of Rising Seas, Chose to Favor Development
  • PR: Growing Grounds: Rebuilding with Native Trees
  • VA: The Fastest Rate of Sea Level Rise on the East Coast is in Virginia Beach
  • WA: Moving Mountains: Elwha River Still Changing Five Years World’s Largest Dam-Removal Project: More than 20 Million Tons of Sediment Flushed to the Sea
  • WV: EPA Backs West Virginia Plan to Improve Water Quality
  • WI: When it Comes to Flooding, Can Milwaukee Cope?
  • WI: Wisconsin’s Catastrophic Flooding is a Glimpse of the Midwest’s Drenched Future

WETLAND SCIENCE

  • In Droughts and Heavy Rains, Ecosystems Function Like Information Communication Networks
  • Climate Change Hits Nature’s Delicate Interdependencies
  • Future of Tidal Wetlands Depends on Coastal Management
  • Wetlands are Key for Accurate Greenhouse Gas Measurement in the Arctic
  • Peatlands Will Store More Carbon as Planet Warms
  • Budgeting Ozone-Depleting Emissions from Coastal Tidal Marshes
  • Massive Ocean Waves May Play a Role in Nuisance Flooding
  • Most Land-Based Ecosystems Worldwide Risk ‘Major Transformation’ Due to Climate Change
  • New Study by Villanova University Biologists Finds Mangrove Expansion May Help Coastal Ecosystems Keep Pace with Sea Level Rise in Warmer Future
  • Portable Freshwater Harvester Could Draw up to 10 Gallons Per Hour from the Air

RESOURCES & PUBLICATIONS

  • Future Response of Global Coastal Wetlands to Sea-Level Rise
  • Vulnerability and Comparability of Natural and Created Wetlands
  • Aquatic Ecosystems in a Shifting Indiana Climate: A Report from the Indiana Climate Change Impacts Assessment
  • The Wetland Book
  • Wetland & Stream Rapid Assessments 1st Edition Development, Validation, and Application

POTPOURRI

  • What the World Needs Now to Fight Climate Change: More Swamps
  • Climate Change is Everyone’s Problem. Women Are Ready to Solve It
  • Aquafarmers on the Frontlines
  • EPA Expands Clean Air Act Loopholes for Coal Plants
  • Proposed Changes to the Endangered Species Act Threaten Wildlife
  • We Can Still Save Our Oceans and Fisheries. New Study Shows How.
  • Trump’s EPA is Selling Out People of Color
  • The Farm Bill Should Better Protect America’s Drinking Water
  • Here are 10 Topics Senators Could Ask Trump’s Science Advisor Nominee to Address

 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Webinars

September

  • Wetland BMP Knowledge Exchange Webinar: Establishing vegetation on constructed fens in Alberta’s oil sands region
  • U.S. Geological Survey Webinar: Connectivity for Climate Change: Assessing Threats and Identifying Conservation Actions

October

  • Environmental Law Institute Webinar: The Dusky Gopher Frog’s Critical Habitat: Legal Implications for Public-Private Partnerships
  • EBM Tools Network Webinar: Managing Global Acidification on a Regional Scale: How the US Mid-Atlantic and Northeast Coastal Acidification Networks (MACAN and NECAN) Are Working to Understand Impacts through Partnerships
  • Wetland BMP Knowledge Exchange Webinar: NAIT BRI Applied Research and Knowledge Exchange
  • American Water Resources Association Webinar: Forecast Informed Reservoir Operations Improve Water Management
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webcast: Innovations in Stream Restoration Design and Construction
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Members’ Wetland Webinar: Using Avoided Land Loss as a Proxy for Reduced Storm Damages: Feasibility Study Findings for an Environmental Impact Bond in Louisiana and the Gulf
  • EBM Tools Network Webinar: Leverage a Global Volunteer Network and Access the Data Needed to Solve Environmental Challenges
  • Association of State Wetland Managers Members’ Wetland Webinar: Utilizing EPA’s Water Quality “eXchange” (WQX) Data Tools and Services to Support Wetland Water Quality Work

November

  • American Water Resources Association Webinar: Setting Up a Water Bank: From the Ground(water) Up
  • Center for Watershed Protection Webcast: It Ain’t Easy Getting Green: Incentivizing Watershed Programs
  • Association of State Wetland Managers: Members Wetland Webinar: Planning Wetland Restoration at the Watershed Level

December

  • Association of State Wetland Managers: Members Wetland Webinar: Using a Living Shorelines Prioritization Tool for Wetland Improvements

Meetings

September

  • University of Georgia, Center for Integrative Conservation Research: Integrative Conservation Conference
  • Three Rivers Evolution Event
  • Arkansas Floodplain Management Association, Inc. Fall Conference: Keeping Your Head Above Water in 2018
  • 10th International Conference on Ecological Informatics
  • Climate Week NYC
  • Blue Print for Change: New Approaches and Needed Changes to Managing Natural Resource Risks, Liabilities and Opportunities (2018 Natural Resources Symposium)
  • Inclusive SciComm: A Symposium on Advancing Inclusive Public Engagement with Science

October

  • 2018 Great Lakes Commission Annual Meeting
  • 2018 AASHE Conference & Expo: Global Goals: Rising to the Challenge
  • University of Connecticut: Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group 2018 Invasive Plant Symposium
  • Iowa Floodplain & Stormwater Management Association Annual Fall Conference
  • Three Rivers Urban Soil Symposium
  • 5th World Conference on Climate Change: Climate Change and Sustainable Futures
  • 2018 Southeastern Ecology and Evolution Conference (SEEC)
  • Behavior, Energy & Climate Change Conference
  • The Wildlife Society 25th Annual Conference
  • 2018 State of Lake Superior Conference
  • 2018 Society of Wetland Scientists South Central Chapter Fall Meeting
  • Land Trust Alliance: Rally 2018 National Land Conservation Conference
  • Society for Ecological Restoration Northwest Chapter and the Society of Wetland Scientists Pacific Northwest Chapter Joint Regional Conference: Restoring Resilient Communities in Changing Landscapes
  • World Congress on Climate Change
  • University of Minnesota Water Resources Center: Minnesota Water Resources Conference
  • Alameda County Flood Control and Water Conservation District Conference: Alameda County Watershed Confluence
  • Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition: Great Lakes Restoration Conference
  • Partnerships and Collaborations towards a Single Voice for the Ohio River Basin
  • California/Nevada Chapter Soil and Water Conservation Society Annual Meeting: Soil Health in Northern California
  • International Marine & Freshwater Sciences Symposium (MarFresh2018)
  • MACC Fall Conference
  • 13TH Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands
  • American Meteorological Society: 29th Conference on Severe Local Storms
  • Corporate Governance in an Age of Increased Environmental Accountability, Liability and Risk (2018 Corporate Forum)
  • Natural Areas Conference: Building Resilience: The Future of Natural Areas
  • New Jersey Association for Floodplain Management: 14th Annual Conference
  • Southeast Florida Regional Compact: Southeast Florida Regional Climate Leadership Summit
  • American Museum of Natural History Center for Biodiversity and Conservation: Student Conference on Conservation Science-New York
  • National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS): 10th Annual Undergraduate Research Conference
  • American Water Works Association: Water Infrastructure Conference
  • 6th International Conference on Sustainable Environment and Agriculture
  • 38th International Symposium of the North American Lake Management Society: Now Trending: Innovations in Lake Management
  • American Shore & Beach Preservation Association: 2018 National Coastal Conference: Resilient Shorelines for Rising Tides

November

  • 4th Biennial Pennsylvania Botany Symposium
  • American Society of Agronomy, the Crop Science Society of America, and the Canadian Society of Agronomy: 2018 International Annual Meeting: Enhancing Productivity in a Changing Climate
  • Geological Society of America 2018 Annual Meeting
  • American Water Resources Association (AWRA) 53rd Annual Water Resources Conference
  • Wisconsin Association for Floodplain, Stormwater, & Coastal Management 16th Annual Conference
  • Association of Massachusetts Wetland Scientists Annual Meeting 2018: What Could Go Wrong?
  • Sustainability and Development Conference
  • Texas Society for Ecological Restoration Conference: Making Restoration Work in Texas
  • Alaska Committee for Noxious and Invasive Pest Management: Invasive Species Workshop
  • Lincoln Park Zoo 2nd International Wildlife Reintroduction Conference
  • 2018 Minnesota Association of Floodplain Managers Conference
  • CACIWC Annual Meeting and Environmental Conference
  • 6th Global Summit on Climate Change: Paleoclimatology: The Earth’s Climate in Long View
  • American Water Works Association, Florida Section: 2018 Fall Conference: Planning the Future of Water
  • World Summit on Climate Change & Global Warming

December

  • 2018 ACES Conference: A Community on Ecosystem Services
  • Restore America’s Estuaries Conference: 9th National Summit on Coastal and Estuarine Restoration and Management
  • Midwestern States Environmental Consultants Association Conference: Environmental Liabilities, Risk Assessment, and Remediation
  • AGU Fall Meeting
  • North Central Region Water Network: North Central Region One Water Action Forum

January 2019

  • International Soils Meeting: Soils Across Latitudes
  • 2019 Delaware Estuary Science & Environmental Summit: Estuary 2029: Saving our System Through Collaboration

February 2019

  • Tamarisk Coalition and the Desert Botanical Garden: Riparian Restoration Conference
  • Missouri Natural Resources Conference
  • River Restoration Northwest: Stream Restoration Symposium
  • Alaska Forum on the Environment
  • Wisconsin Wetlands Association: Wetland Science Conference
  • Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography: Planet Water: Challenges and Successes
  • International Conference on Water Management Modeling

March 2019

  • CMichigan Stormwater Floodplain Association Conference
  • CitSci 2019: Growing Our Family Tree
  • Climate Leadership Conference
  • 5th Life Discovery – Doing Science Biology Education Conference: Microbiomes to Ecosystems: Evolution and Biodiversity across Scale, Space, and Time
  • National Water Quality Monitoring Council: 11th Annual National Monitoring Conference

April 2019

  • Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration: Science Advancing Everglades Resilience and Sustainability

May 2019

  • Environmental Law Institute Conference: Clean Water Act: Law and Regulation 2019
  • National Mitigation & Ecosystem Banking Conference: Connecting Policy, Practice, Business, Science & People
  • Environmental Law Institute 30th Annual National Wetlands Awards 2019
  • 2018 NAEP Conference: The Environmental Landscape in an Age of Infrastructure Modernization
  • Association of State Floodplain Managers 42nd Annual Meeting: Managing Floods Where the Mountains Meet the Desert
  • Ducks Unlimited National Convention

June 2019

  • 2nd International Conference on Community Ecology
  • 2019 AWRA Summer Specialty Conference: Improving Water Infrastructure Through Resilient Adaptation

August 2019

  • Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting 

Training

September

  • CUAHSI: Near Surface Geophysics for Hydrology Workshop
  • Wetland Training Institute, Inc. Course: Basic Plant ID – Familiarization for New Wetland Delineators
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review Process
  • Environmental Concern Course: Evaluating Hydric Soils in the Field
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • The Swamp School: Classroom and Field Wetland Delineation Training
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Southeastern Botany, LLC Workshop: Grass & Sedge Workshop
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Fall Maine Mushroom

October

  • The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Flood Hazard Area Control Act Rules: Technical Standards Part 1
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Identification of Tidal Wetland Plants
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Columbus Day Weekend Retreat
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Hydric Soils Investigator
  • D&D West Course: Basic Wetland Delineation 
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Professional Education Course: Methodology for Delineating Wetlands
  • Michigan Wetlands Association Course: Hydric Soils Identification
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Bryophytes: Mosses and Liverworts
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Northeastern Freshwater Fish Assemblages
  • The Swamp School Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Habitat Conservation Plans
  • D & D West Course: Interagency Consultation for Endangered Species - 16 hours (lecture)
  • CUAHSI – NCAR Training Workshop: The Community WRF-Hydro Modeling System
  • Southeastern Botany, LLC Workshop: Grass & Sedge Workshop
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Crustose and Foliose Lichens
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Education Course: Flood Hazard Area Control Act Rules: Technical Standards Part II
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training

November

  • The Swamp School Course: Wetland Delineation Training
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Online Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Certified Wetland Hydrologist
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Basic Wetland Delineation eSession with Field Practicum
  • Wetland Training Institute Course: Wetland Delineation Refresher – 2018
  • Washington Department of Ecology Workshop: Selecting Wetland Mitigation Sites Using a Watershed Approach
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Education Course: Lake Management
  • Eagle Hill Institute Workshop: Tree and Shrub Identification Using Twigs and Other Winter Characteristics
  • D & D West Course: Advanced Hydric Soils, Atypical Wetlands & Hydrology – Piedmont - 16 hours (field)
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Principles of Wetland Design
  • Environmental Concern Course: Winter Woody Plant ID
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Phase I Environmental Site Assessment

December

  • The Swamp School Online Course: Developing Wetland Water Budgets 
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Wetland Basic Delineation Training 2018
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Wetland Permitting Training
  • D & D West Course: Wetland Delineation Regional Supplement – Eastern Mountains/Piedmont)
  • The Swamp School Course: Certified Wetland Delineator
  • Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc. Course: Regional Supplement Wetland Delineation Training
  • Rutgers Office of Continuing Education Course: Identification of Wetland Plants in Winter
  • The Swamp School Online Course: Data Collection for Environmental Professionals
  • Organization for Tropical Studies and the University of Costa Course: Field Ecology: Skills for Science and Beyond

January 2019

  • CUAHSI Master Class: Advanced Techniques in Watershed Science
  • University of Saskatchewan Centre for Hydrology / CWRA / Canadian Society for Hydrological Sciences Kananaskis Short Course: Principles of Hydrology