Association of State Wetland Managers - Protecting the Nation's Wetlands.

bos2Most Underestimate Minorities’ Environmental Concerns—Even Minorities

By Susan Kelley – Cornell Chronicle – October 29, 2018
In a new study with implications for environmental organizations – and an indication that stereotypes are alive and well – most Americans underestimate just how concerned minorities and lower-income people are about environmental threats. This extends even to members of those groups: They themselves underestimate their peers’ concerns about environmental problems. Read full story here.

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Stopping Superstorms—The World is Our Oyster

The Observer – October 24, 2018
Hurricane Michael’s death toll is at least 39 and its economic damages are expected to surpass $30 billion. This most recent superstorm pales in comparison to previous storms, including Maria, Harvey, Irma and Sandy, which have directly and indirectly resulted in almost 4,000 deaths and hundreds of billions of dollars in damages. Politicians are discussing solutions as extreme as building physical sea walls, but what if the answer is much simpler, more economical and better for the environment? What if we could be protected by … oysters? Read full story here.

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bos2Let’s Not Go Back to the Bad Ol’ Days for Our Waterways

By Jon Devine – The Hill – October 19, 2018
While President Trump has promised to Make America Great Again, he certainly couldn’t have meant a return to the way our nation treated its waterways and wetlands five decades ago. And yet, it appears that’s just what the administration aims to do. Read full story here.

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Recent Hurricanes Underscore Critical Need for Better Flood-Ready Infrastructure Standards

By Forbes Tompkins & Evan Chapman – PEW – October 19, 2018
While the full extent of damage caused in the past two months by hurricanes Florence and Michael is still being calculated, initial estimates suggest Florence is one of the 10 costliest hurricanes on record and marked the 12th 1,000-year rainfall event the country has suffered since the beginning of 2016. Meanwhile, Michael became one of the four most intense hurricanes on record to strike the United States. Read full story here.

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bos2A Remote Corner of Staten Island Braces for Major Changes: Wetlands Remediation and the Presence of a New Amazon Warehouse are Transforming Staten Island’s West Shore

By Nathan Kensinger – Curbed – October 11, 2018
For many years, Bloomfield has been one of the most isolated and neglected neighborhoods in Staten Island. Located in a marshland on the island’s northwest coast, the roads here are permanently flooded, the wetlands are a dumping grounds, and much of the street grid has been fenced off for decades, hidden inside a vast post-industrial wasteland. Today, three new projects are transforming this desolate landscape, bringing in new life, new roads, and new visitors. Read full story here.

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How Can We Reduce Losses from Coastal Storms? Monitor the Health of Our Coasts.

By Natalie Peyronnin Snider– Environmental Defense Fund – October 17, 2018
With a rapidly changing climate and more frequent extreme events like floods and droughts, comprehensive environmental monitoring will be increasingly important for coastal planners, farmers and others invested in natural resource management. Read full blog post here.

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bos2Science Teacher Transforms Detention Pond Into ‘Wetlands Laboratory’ for Environmental Education

By Andrew Moore – Greenville Journal – October 3, 2018
Wetlands are an important, yet often overlooked, resource. They not only provide critical habitat for a variety of plants and animals but also protect against flooding and storms. Unfortunately, in the last few hundred years, the United States has lost more than half of its wetlands to land conversion, according to a recent report by the U.S. Geological Survey. Now an Upstate middle school teacher is working to change that statistic — at least locally. Gina Varat, a fifth-grade science teacher at Christ Church Episcopal School, has launched a project that aims to connect students with Mother Nature and introduce them to the various environmental threats impacting natural resources throughout Greenville County. Read full story here.

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3 Actions the Government Can Take Today to Lessen the Damage of Future Floods

By Shannon Cunniff – Environmental Defense Fund – October 8, 2018
Another devastating hurricane, another bill for American taxpayers: The tally from Hurricane Florence may go as high as $22 billion, according to Moody’s, placing it in the top 10 category for damages. We can either continue down this path or make a collective reevaluation of how we manage risk. It means we must revisit the myriad of local, state and federal laws and policies that guide how we cope with storms in our changing climate. And it means we must challenge long-held assumptions. Read full blog post here.

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bos2Coastal Communities Must Plan for the Future Instead of Planning from the Past

By Devyani Kar – Environmental Defense Fund – September 28, 2018
Ecosystem restoration planning has traditionally been based on a desire to restore a system to some historic condition – even as conditions are constantly evolving because of climate change. Rather than planning for the future, we often look back at what the system once was and try to replicate it. But in a rapidly changing world, this model is not sustainable. Ecosystem restoration planning has traditionally been based on a desire to restore a system to some historic condition – even as conditions are constantly evolving because of climate change. Rather than planning for the future, we often look back at what the system once was and try to replicate it. But in a rapidly changing world, this model is not sustainable. Read full blog post here.

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The Answer to Coastal Flooding is Not More Cement

By David Yarnold, opinion contributor – The Hill – October 2018
For decades, governments have built higher levees and concrete barriers as the answer to protecting life and property from damaging coastal storms and flooding. Surrounding ourselves with concrete isn’t a solution — water always finds a way. Part of the solution is far more fundamental. It’s called natural infrastructure. That simply means incorporating natural landscapes such as marshes, barrier islands and oyster reefs to minimize flood and storm damage. And while nothing will stop a nine-foot storm surge, it’s worth noting that coastal wetlands prevented $625 million in direct property damages during Hurricane Sandy. Read full opinion here.

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