Association of State Wetland Managers - Protecting the Nation's Wetlands.

The Complete Wetlander: A Climate Change Portal for Everyone

 “We basically have three choices: mitigation, adaptation,
and suffering. We’re going to do some of each. The
question is what the mix is going to be. The more
mitigation we do, the less adaptation will be required and
the less suffering there will be.”
— John Holdren, President of the American
Association for the Advancement of Science;
Harvard University

Still trying to convince friends and associates that climate change is real?  Trying to find information and predictive tools to develop adapative management strategies for wetlands and other aquatic resources?  Looking for some place to get started? The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) can help
.
NOAA has created a climate services portal at www.climate.gov to provide one-stop shopping for information about climate change science and technology.  The current webpage is in the prototype stage with more to come in the future.

NOAA has designed the website to be useful for specific audiences: decision-makers, science/data users, media professionals, educators and the public.

Climate Watch Magazine includes articles, images and videos about climate change http://www.climatewatch.noaa.gov/ such as the video “State of the Climate 2009” http://www.climatewatch.noaa.gov/2010/videos/soc2009

Predictive and interactive tools are provided under “Data & Services” http://www.climate.gov/#data
Services
including past, present and future climate information and predictive tools.

NOAA’s data library at http://www.climate.gov/#dataServices/
dataLibrary
includes lots of information that people can use in the Presentation Library. The Global  Climate Dashboard on the bottom half of the screen on the main page (and many other pages) includes sliders so the individual viewer can look at temperature, carbon dioxide, sea level rise and other trends for any timeframe from 1950 to 2010.

Want to know the weather in a given place on a given day?  Users can look up weather under the “Past Weather” search tool (lower right side of the main page) and type in the date and location. In the future, this tool will be expanded to distinguish between “weather” and “climate.”

Some things I learned on my visit to the portal:

• 11 of the last 12 years have been the warmest on record
• In most parts of the U.S. the weather feels like it used to feel 200 miles south 20
years ago
• Larger and more damaging wild fires are occurring in the West
• Extreme rainfall amounts are increasing particularly in the Northeast

Currently the website only touches on the many climate datasets, products, and services available across NOAA. NOAA is planning to transition its website from prototype to operational status over the next year. The Agency’s long-term plan is to actively gather user feedback to expand the portal’s scope and functionality and enhance the accessibility and usefulness of NOAA’s climate resources.

Other worthwhile coastal NOAA climate change websites are linked below:

Digital Coast
http://www.csc.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/
Coastal Inundation Toolkit:
http://www.csc.noaa.gov/digitalcoast/inundation/index.html
Coastal Climate Adaptation
http://collaborate.csc.noaa.gov/climateadaptation/default.aspx

Warning:  NOAA’s webpages can be slow or even fail to load.  Keep trying.  They may need to acquire more bandwidth.  Also pop-ups and active x controls need to be enabled to view some webpages.

Additional information about climate change and wetlands can also be found on ASWM’s website at: http://aswm.org/wetland-science/climate-change/wetlands-and-climate-change

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One Response to The Complete Wetlander: A Climate Change Portal for Everyone

  1. John C. Bender says:

    Evidently NOAA is a tendentious bunch.

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